MOT spot welder?

I want to build an MOT spot welder and ive already cut the wiring out of the transformer but i noticed while doing so i scraped off what seems to be the coloring off the primary.  Will this affect it in any way? Also, i can really tell the power of this transformer? can anyone help?

Question by dask13   |  last reply


arc welder/spot welder? Answered

Can an old small arc welder be used to make a spot welder? It's a 60 yr. old Grindl. A stamping on it says input amps 20, sec. amps rated .80- 80, welding volts 20, max open cir volts 80.

Question by hjones47222222   |  last reply


Can a ARC WELDER be converted to a SPOT WELDER?

I have this ARC welder which puts out 50 AMPS, flip the switch gives you 80 AMPS. I would like to spot weld thin metals for a project i am working on, and by all accounts on what iI have seen on the INSTRUCTABLES all I would need is the copper tips attached to the clamp device

Question by yeagerxp   |  last reply


Is it possible to 'weld' polymorph? Answered

I've ordered some polymorph (shape lock, friendly plastic) so I'll be able to try it myself in a few days, but I was wondering if it's possible to attach (for example) a polymorph rod to a block by heating a spot with a pen-torch and hot air attachment then pushing the rod against it?

Question by AndyGadget   |  last reply


Making a better spot welder....

I am in the process of building a proper spot welder from scratch. Proper more in terms of the electrical and electronics part but not so much in looks ;) My problem now is to find useful info on what power levels are required for certain tasks. I realise that welding thin sheet metal won't need as much time and amps as welding a 3mm stainless steel rod - but what is a "good" power level? I watched a bunch of Youtube videos showing various approaches but for many it seems the producer had no clue about the difference between creating a short with burn marks and a weld... Especially when it comes to creating battery packs with a capacitor bank as the main power provider you can clearly see the device burns holes but does not really create a welded spot. On the other hand there are a few videos showing spot welder made from a MOT that seem to produce a proper melted and welded connection. When I used a proper spot welder at work it had timing settings, power levels and even a feature to adjust how the current rises.... Not to mention a gauge that checks the pressure and only activates the welder once the set point is reached... There is a ton of info out there that after a thausand words still tells you nothing you need to know :( So is there anyone here who can shed some light on the actual process of spot welding in easy words for everyone to follow? I am aiming for a max output of around 400A @ 1.5 -2.5V with an adjustable shunt in the transformer core to avoid oversaturating the core. In a later stage I will add power control over the primary side but until then it is only time control, from a few ms to a max of 5sec if the damn controller arrives one day. Big questions: 1. Is a power control really required or is it possible to cater from thin to thick just by using different timing settings? 2. Since a MOT is used for the power supply: Is it better to leave the shunts out to fully avoid saturation by adding an inductor in line with the primary or is it still better to adjust the shunts under load to get the maximum power possible? 3. Aluminium and other materials benefit from using AC but would be good to have a DC output too, if so then what materials really need DC? 4. All I could find is that copper is used for the electrodes, due to resistance and heat transfer - are there other options apart from using copper? 5. Tricky one: I would prefer to use the secondary winding as the new primary to avoid core saturation and to lower the load on the power outlet. Where can I find very thin copper bar material that I can coil up and insulate as I would quite a few more turns to get at least 1.5V out of it? Just don't like the idea of spending days rolling a copper bar thin enough.... For the advanced model at a much later stage: Of course I would like to be able to use a proper power control instead of a motor dimmer or similar. For obvious reasons an inverter microwave jumps to mind. But after checking one I noticed one big problem: there are not really that many windings on the primary of the transformer at all! Same way our modern switchmode power supplies only use a few turns these things do exactly the same. After some quick and dirty initial tests I realised that even a single turn of thick wire already results in over 20V on the secondary. Wasted a lot of wire and time making one coil with 5 turns less and one with 10 turns less but the system would not even start with it. Seems these things need a fixed inductivity on the primary that matches the frequency used, in my case 36kHz. Would love to overcome this problem so I can at least go down to a single turn to get under 5V on the output side as space is non existing on these inverters. Can I cheat? Do I need to change the circuit to match the new primary coil? Am I thinking in the wrong direction altogether here? And added bonus would be to be able to adjust the power from around 15% to 100%, so far the electronics don't allow anything below 45%. Is it possible to drive these inverters in resonance? (Ok, off topic as I would like to use this for a beefy HV supply) Last thoughts: I know people already used Arduinos and Raspberries with displays and all but so far I have not found anything that shows how to do it properly. Seems all that counts is to create connection one way or the other and to call it a spot weld even if it is just a burn hole from discharging a capacitor bank through a needle like electrode.... For obvious reasons I don't want to create just another spot welder that makes a professional pee himself laughing about it. IMHO nothing beats personal experience with something but I don't really like wasting my time by trying what other people alread did a long time ago. So if YOU already built a MOT based spot welder and used for more than a few spots I would love to hear from you! Let me know what type you used, what problems or shortcomings you noticed or where you feel it just does not work out the way you expected it. From simple things like always getting bad sparks or arcing, over how easy or hard it is to get consistand results to whatever really annoys you while using your homemade spot welder. I hope that your feedback here will help me to write an Instructable on building a spot welder that does what you expect it to do, not once or twice, but everytime you use it. Mechanics might vary the same way the electrode style does but the weld should always be a proper weld that won't tear apart ;)

Topic by Downunder35m 


120V MOT transformer on 220V for spot welding machine? Answered

Hello i'm making a Spot welding Machine using a microwave transformer i'm removing the secondery coil to replace with 2 rounds of very thick wire for the output . the only problem is the transformer rated for 120V input Will it matter if i connect the primary to 220v ? i'm replacing the secondery anyway ?

Question by pixema   |  last reply


small hobby resistance/spot welder?

I want to weld small steel wires (the size of guitar strings - +/_ .035) to make small sculptures. Solder works, but is not fast or strong enough. Can I make a welder to run on 115VAC?

Question by Dweevil 


robotic arm arc welder

Is it a robotic arm capable of arc welding feasible for a diyselfer ? I spotted some robot arms for cheaper than 200 $ over the web . Vantages for the operator would be no weld fumes breathing , no uv rays and such ..

Topic by gabdab   |  last reply


welding cast iron to mild steel

Welding cast iron to mild steel is for the most part done with ornamental iron such as gates and fences. the ornaments are typicaly cast iron such as spearpoints and fit over the top of what ever square tubing size ect you are working with. If you weld say with a mig welder in the normal mannor you rweld will cold roll and ball on you leaving a poor appearance that you will have to spend time grinding to make look good. Fortunatly it is not a matter of strenght or how much penetration ect. It is just ornamentation but must look good. Now take your mig welder with say 035 wire and use pure argon..(less spatter). Turn your welders heat up somewhat past what your normanl setting would be for what ever thickness you are using. Use breif spot welding like techniques overlapping as needed. You will find that this makes a good wash bead with no undercut or cold roll. The argon gas helps to keep down all the extra spatter welding cast iron to mild steel seems to cause. Larger peices such as caps for say 4by4 gate posts or fence posts, i preheat as uniformely as possibly to just under cherry red then weld as described. It welds badly because cast iron is actualy dirty, literaly with particles of dirt in the cheap castings, wich the ornaments are. Not haviong the need to be anealed or nodular for instance. If the welds are not going to show then you dont have to do this. It will still weld, just do not expect the clean perfect welds you are used to.  And NO I do not have PICS AND I dont own a digital camera nor do i know how to use one let alone put them on a computer.

Topic by beserker   |  last reply


bare bronze welding cast iron

If you happen to have a some what rare car, or one that is simply thirty or more years old, you may find that if you ever crack your manifold exauhst that you can not get another by simply going to a (pick and pull) So, the first thought is..most of the time, "I will simply zap it with NIRod". WRONG! an old manifold that has repeatedly heated and cooled is very brittle and the sudden change in temp and too rapid cooling may crack it even more. Now what i do is use bare bronze rod and braze the crack. Here is how i do it. First I find the ends of the cracks and drill a 1/4 hole half way through the material at each end of the cracks. Next I use a rose bud torch and heat up the cast iron as evenly as possible peening with a hammer lightly to releive stress in the casting. After about five minutes of this I quickly switch to a oxy-actl. brazing tip and start my pass. The first thing i do is heat up as much of the crack as i can to cherry red and sear one coat of bronze using plenty of flux. Then I start at one end of the crack and fill in the crack that i had previously veed out with a grinder to half way of the depth of the material and no more than 1/4 inch wide. I use an overlapping spot weld like technique. i lay a small amount of bronze, remove heat for a second and overlapp where i left out. When done I have a bronze brazing weld with no undercut or cold roll. Then i use the rose bud again for some post heating gradulay reducing the heat and peening with hammer again. Then I quickly take the whole peice and cover it in powdered lime so that it cools very slowly. This will stop it from cracking due to rapid cooling. Also it may put some ductility in the cast iron. It takes about four hours to be cool enough to touch with the bare hand. Then I grind the bronze weld flush and inspect the weld to see if i got proper bonding, all you should see is a ribbon of nbronze that has no porosity or cavities. I have also done rare boat manifolds like this when repeative NIRod was used at other shops and they broke every time. Still no 100 percent with cast iron like this. Sometimes it just cracks more, after all it is a dirty porous metal that is very brittel. Anyway, i have had very good luck doing it this way

Topic by beserker   |  last reply


lithium 18650 series first or parallel?

Hey all Looking at doing a lithium battery build but trying to cut down on soldering or spot welding. My idea is to use a stack of 3 18650 batteries in series pushed inside a piece of PVC pipe, thus making a 12V tube and then having multiples joined together to make the final battery Is there any reason why people mostly use a set of batteries is paralel then series?

Question by pickstock   |  last reply


20amps at 12volts, What to do with it?

From taking down the halogen lights in the kitchen I'm left with a 250W transformer that outputs 12V, which I somehow took around 20amps to be, that's just using the first calculator I found... I was wondering what to do with it, it's got a couple of projects to be attacked with, kind of scary evil ones involving high amperages through unsuspecting materials... However, could I spot weld with it, I mean really thin pieces of metal, not to mention what else could I do with it. It's a well made transformer that doesn't overheat easily, has a nice tough casing and handy mounting points...  So I kept it in the, I'll do something with that spot... 

Question by killerjackalope   |  last reply


G.E. dielektrol capacitor making popping sounds internally Answered

I recently acquired a G.E. 40,000 volt capacitor and initially it was fine but it has started making loud popping sounds inside while charging and discharging. It sounds like there might be arcing inside but it still holds a charge just fine which is quite strange. The sound always comes from the same exact spot and the capacitance has decreased from 1.88 uf to 1.5 uf. I'm wondering if inside the cap there is several smaller ones and maybe a connection came loose during shipping but I really don't want to pull it apart because it's welded shut. Any advice on what I should do would be helpful :) Thank in advance!

Question by workinprogress37   |  last reply


Will i damage small solar panels on a car battery? Answered

I've got a couple tiny solar panels and i wanted to have them charge a car battery, The panels in series put out 18v at 50ma but the leads are just those tabs they spot weld to batteries. Is it possible to fry the solar panel or leads?  I am not sure about amperage of the battery. It's similar to one i bought a long time ago with 650 Cold cranking amps(not sure how that translates to total amperage but i'm guessing that is how much you can safely draw from it at one time)  i understand that it wouldn't be proper to attach 18 volts to a 12 volt car battery, it charges at around 15 volts like most car batteries.  I understand that 50ma will take an extremely long time to charge something like a car battery. But in a hypothetical emergency situation, would this work temporarily without destroying the solar panels.

Question by Tomahawk92   |  last reply


Space Heater Repair, is there a glue for broken heating element coil spacer that is inflammable? Answered

Usually a space heater consists of a fan mounted to a motor which is then mounted to a back plate. Connected to the back plate are reflective spacers that hold the heating element coils seperate from eachother so they don't spark. Recently, I figured I'd repair my space heater after it started sparking instead of going and buying a new one. I opened it up to find the spacer plate which has several arms for holding 1-5 coiled wires. One of the arms was broken and the coils touched which is why it was sparking. Seeing as this is a heater, i'm fairly certain I can't use a super glue or epoxy to fix the plate due to its flammable nature. The plates are not easily replaceable themselves as they've been spot welded into place. So the question, is there a type of glue which will hold up under high temperatures which is not flammable that will bond metal / plastic / ceramic. I'd estimate the heating element probably reaches no higher then 700 degrees. If you have any suggestions on how I would go about repairing this I'd love to hear your ideas. Thanks in advance.

Question by Lorek   |  last reply


Re-Use, Individual Cells from 18V NiCad

Seems that with a bit of randomnity in mfging, some cells in an 18V battery might fail before others. With that in mind, I'm trying to re-use individual cells after a pack craps out.  Test 1  Battery pack from a "drill master" which I got for  ~$2 at a thrift store. Google informs that this is a harborfreight tool, so expectations are low.  Upon disassembly of the pack, 1 of the spot-weld connections between cells had broken.  Since I don't currently have a 1.5v source, I'm using a 3v  source to charge 2 cells in series. Only charging for a few minutes at a time. Currently, this 2 cell set will light a couple xmas lites for a few minutes after charging for a few min. I'm uncertain of the calibration of my v-meter, but it currently indicates 2.65v for these 2 cells. Depending upon the source, NiCads should max out at 1.45 to 1.65 v per cell. Test 2: Pending- Ryobi drill batteries I'm uncertain how to get a good read on the accuracy of my meter without a high-end meter to compare against. Suggestions? Hopefully, I can find a proper 1 cell nicad charging device.  Thoughts? concerns? insights?

Topic by Toga_Dan   |  last reply


Suggestions for a cheap, simple robot unicorn build

My 5yo daughter has figured out that her mad-Scientist daddy can make crazy things come true.  For her birthday, she got a real unicorn and a princess crown (see picture attached).  Now for Christmas, she has her heart set on a ROBOT unicorn, and I think I'm going to try to tackle this, but I need to keep the scope tight so that when Christmas arrives, I'll have a deliverable for her. (My instinct always leap to grandiose ideas like actual quadrupedalism that would balloon the time/effort/money inputs into the stratosphere.   My biggest obstacle to make this work for Christmas is to stick with K.I.S.S. principles.  I can do basic welding, woodworking, fabricating, stitching, etc.  I'm reasonably good at electronics, and am a professional programmer with a degree in Aerospace Engineering.) Here is my rough  build plan:  (Completely open to improvement suggestions) 1)  Build frame out of 1/2" square steel tubing and weld together.  Leave large torso cavity for electronics and batteries.  Feet will have wheels concealed by a hoof shroud.  Feet will be upgradable (see tech features below) 2)  Use blue foam to rough out body shape.  3)  Cover with about 1/2" of soft foam covered with felt.  Use yarn for mane and tail.  Cover should be removable and washable. I'm trying to figure out tiers of work so that as long as I get the basic frame and covering down, I'll be able to increase/decrease the scope to ensure I'll have a deliverable for Christmas.  Here are the tiered robotic features I am envisioning: Tier 1: Make the saddle bounce at about .5Hz with an amplitude of roughly 1/2".  Possibly make head/neck bob up/down in sync. Tier 2:  Add horse sound effects Tier 3:  Build sensors for the reigns and stirrups.  Monitor if stirrups get pushed inward in a basic kick the horse motion.  Monitor if one reign or both are being pulled.  Make sounds effects based on inputs.  (E.G.  Clop, clop of hooves begins when stirrups are pushed in, and stop when reigns are pulled.)  NOTE:  Since they have access to real horses, keeping the controls reasonably close to riding a real horse will make this double as a trainer/simulator for her and her friends. Tier 4:  Upgrade wheels to powered.  Move based on reign and stirrup inputs.   Max speed will be very slow (40fps or so), so that it can be used inside safely.  Movement is mostly just to augment her imagination, not to move like a real horse. Tier 5:  (Not much chance I'll get this far prior to Christmas)  Upgrade software, sound effects, etc. Current back of napkin ideas: Frame will probably have 3 pieces: legs/torso, neck/head, Saddle/back  Saddle/back removable for electronics access. Neck/head will be joined to torso in 3 spots:  the top point will be anchored with a chain link between two eye-bolts, the other two points would be on the sides of the bottom, with compression springs pushing the neck and torso away from each other, limited by a mechanical linkage.  This should give reasonable motion ability, and allow the two base points to become the sensors for the reigns being pulled. I'm thinking a small 12V deep cycle battery, and 12v salvage DC motors powering the wheels.  Depending on the motor torque, I'll either power the back two feet and keep the front feet as swivel casters, or power all four and turn tank-style. The budget needs to stay reasonable, say $100ish.  This is a kids toy, and I've got lots of other mad-scientist projects to pump money towards. Outstanding questions: Motor selection, cheapest with high enough torque Good, cheap way to make seat and possibly head oscillate.  Mechanism needs to not break even if a 200lbs rider sits on it.  (Doesn't need to work when overloaded, just can't be permanently damaged when overloaded.) Locate inexpensive 12v charger that won't overcharge if left connected, but will charge a 3ah battery reasonably quickly.  (Or schematics to build one)  Essentially, looking for a best bang-for-buck charger. Least expensive way to play audio clips?  I've got plenty of horse-sound clips located, but I need a way to play them economically. Not sure how much force will be needed for movement.  I'm assuming a 70lbs rider/robot max and that it will primarily operate on flat surfaces, potentially on carpet.  Can't burn out if overloaded.  Suggestions on simplifying this?  Suggestions on simple improvements?  Ways to keep the costs down?  Sources for economical parts?

Topic by SvdSinner   |  last reply


Ultrasonic soldering bath

Making a working ultrasonic soldering iron is not as easy as I though it would be.Finding tanrsducer of suitable design and size is even harder.So I thought I start with something easier and share the thoughts here.If you need to solder impossible to solder things then quite often you could get away by wetting the entire area.For example the end of a wire or a lug where it won't matter that you can solder on the bottom as well as the top.Back in my days flux core solder was a rare and very expensive thing to find.So we had a little soldering pot and flux pot instead for working with lots of wires.Dip, dip, done....The pre-soldered wires where then easy to work with and the ramaining flux on then was enough.Doing this for metals like aluminium, stainless steel or even ceramics seems impossible at first sight.China offers cheap ultrasonic transducers including the required driver electronics for very littel money these days, despite the trade wars.The most obvious solution would then be to get a cheap and big enough soldering bath and to attach the transducer to it....Won't work though and if it does then not for long.Problem is firstly the heat transfered to the ceramic parts of the trandsucer and secondly the fact that most of these soldering baths use quite thick steel for the container.Add the that you deal with quite some grams of molten metal and you know where I am going.Building your own ultrasonic soldering bath to solder the impossible with ease!Project costs:40kHz transducer with driver board : about 50 bucks.Thin walled stainless steel bowl ( about 50 to 100ml but go bigger if you like) : about 2 bucks.Leftovers for an enclosure can be wood, plasic or your favourite 3D printer.Ultrasonic horn: About 500 bucks from your favourite engennering company or you need to make it yourself - I prefer the later.Main design considerations for the horn:We need something to keep the heat away from the transducer that also amplifies the power coming from it.That is why we can use a bowl or container that has a small bottom daimeter as the transducer if need be ;)There is a good reason a commercial horn costs a lot of money.They are preferably made from titanium and they need to perform as advertised right from the start.We substitude by using some aluminium round stock and a lathe.It is advisable to leave the transducer as it is!Do not take it apart to mount your horn directly onto the ceramics!Use a long enough set screw or include the required thread on your horn to mount it onto the transducer.If you prefer to use stainless steel doe to the lower heat conductivity then be my guest.The horn should have the same diameter as the mating part of the transducer for a quarter of the wavelength of the transducers frequency in the given material.Please look up how fast sound travels in your choosen material and calculate it properly.Having the lenght of the thick part right is quite cruicial.The thinner part that amplifies our movements should be about a quarter of the diameter of the transducer.For example: if the mating face of the tansducer is 40mm in diameter then the thin part of the horn should be 10mm.The length again is a quarter of the wavelength or the same as the thick part.Where thick meets thin please allow for a 3 to 5mm radius and make sure this area is nice and smothly finnished.Now, length is quite critical here....As we will mount our finnsihed actuator free hanging under the bath we need a feasable way to comapensate for our tolerances by creating our horn without a simulating software. I found that welding a short stub onto the container works best but with aluminum it is harder.I assume most will opt for welding a 6mm soft steel threaded rod onto the container.Either way the container surface must be kept flat for the mating surface of our actuator rod.So it is best to make the stud yourself or to use a suitable replacement - like using some flux and your stick welder for create a makeshift spot welder ;)If you decided on using steel for the horn then of course you can just mill a 10mm piece with a suitable thread and flat mating surface...What you want to end up with is a screw connection that has a flat mating surface and no empty spaces, fine thread prefered.Tuning the horn....The ensclosure is easy to make as a box, so the only thing to worry about is insulation but nothing to affect performance.So I just assume you have it all ready ;)With the horn at one quarter wavelength either end our thin end will be too long unless a short stud is used for a direct fit.So whatever you had to add for the part on your container or bowl need to be removed from he horns thin end.Try to keep the gad for the threaded part as small as possible as it affects the resonace.As things never turn out perfect the first try I prepare some thin steel washers - 100mm outer diameter in case you wonder and stick with the above example.I use a strong neodymium magnet and belt sander to create washers from very thin to slightly thinner ;)Taking off slightly more from the horns end will then allow toadd these washers if required - but please do a try as it is first when you think you got the measurements all right!For an aluminium horn you will of course use aluminium washers here.To do so fill the container with some water and place a sheet of thin alumiium foil on top of the water.Turn it on and within a few seconds you should see holes appearing in the fiol or even small fractures.If nothing but noise happens it is quite certain your rod will be a bit too long.Unscrew and take about one tenth of a mm off the thin end of the horns mating surface to shorten it.Try again with the foil and if no better remove some more material.Once you see some action try adding a layer of aluminium foil between the mating surfaces - screw it tight!The foil won't last long but if the action on the water is far better until it fails you know you took off too much.The washers come into place if the tuning won't work at all.Sometimes you can cut off a little bit again and again but the piece will remain too short ;)Especially if you have an aluminium horn and needed to use a steel screw on the bowl...So once the shortening of the horn fials you add a washer to get slightly above the original length and start replacing the differently thick washer until you find a sweet spot.The tricky part is over, now to solve the heating poblem...Using some glass seal as used on wood fire ovens not olnyl provides good insulation to our enclosure but also prevents the vibrations from spreading too far.As our hardware store won't just give use the little bit we need the rest can be used to insulate our container.Dending on the size and shape of your container I hope you decided to buy a container tha fits your heating element...I found that replacement coils for lab heaters work fine but some small fan heaters also use round heating elements instead if wire spirals.For a custom shape it is quite easy to use a coil of heatin wire rated for your mains voltage and a glass fibre sleeve for insulation.To keep it all in shape just wrap some steel wire over it - over the insulated coils of course.The temperature control can be as fancy as with a microcontroller or as simple as using a dimmer like I did.Most heating elements will go glowing red hot if the mains voltage is not reduced.It makes sense to limit the dimmer's movements accordingly by testing it.Just do it in the dark afeter exposing a small bit of the heating wire from the insulating sleeve.Once you see a faint glow coming dial it back a bit until you can see any glow - that should be the max setting.For a big bath or to save time you can of course crank it up to what the glass insulation can tolerate but be aware that solder can boil over!I do a temperature check either with a touch free IR thermometer of by checking how quickly some rosin boils off.If you need to dip bigger parts you need a higher temperature, so I think a digital or sensor temp control is not really required.Once you found a sweet spot to hold the solder temp long enough without getting too hot or cold just mark it for reference ;)Using the ultrasonic soldering bath correctly.Cavitation is what the work for us, so we only need to activate the ultrasonic part when we need it with a push button or food pedal switch.We do not use any flux or resin!That means if you used the bath for normal soldering and or resin then clean the remains off the surface first.A shiny and clean surface is best but the oxidisation will happen quickly so don't be too disappointed ;)Start by dipping in a clean copper wire.Some solder might stick but it won't look proper.Now dip it in again and while it is in push the button for about 3 seconds.Like magic, if tuned properly your wire is soldered and properly covered to where it was dripped in.Try the same with some slightly sanded or at least clean aluminium wire, but use the button right away for about 5 seconds.The wire should be coated with solder once more.You can try a glass rod or some stainless wire next but I guess the working principle is clear now ;)Not everything will bond with solder, especially not if it is not clean.A piece of glass with your fingerprint on it might just fail and some ceramics will only let the solder stick without actually bonding.You should always check the mechanical strength of your soldered connection before having to rely on it ;)And why would you need such a machine?Well, most people won't have any use for it.Those who do might not be able to afford a commercial model.And there is always those who just want it all...If you know why you need such a thing than you have an alternative now at a fraction of the cost.You only need a lathe or someone who can machine the horn for you.Another benefit is that for smaller containers it is possible to weld a small "bridge" over the top.Should be placed so the bottom is in the solder while top is above it.In many cases you will then be able to use this plate to heat up whatever you need to solder on.Like a glass plate where you would like to solder a wire to.Once up to temp turn the ultrasonic part on and use a normal soldering iron and flux flree solder.Works quite well for these small solar panel kits...Ok, and how far away is our cheap ultrasonic soldering iron?Not that far :)I already have a topic for this though....

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply