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Convert an earthquake graph into datas Answered

I'm currently working on a project which studies the earthquakes and aims to reproduce seismic datas on paper rolls. I'm using home-made electronics (servomotors) and would like to redraw the earthquakes with the most accuracy.

For that, I use the heliplots we can find like here:
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/monitoring/operations/heliplots_gsn.php

However, each time I find a heliplot, it is an image. But in my project, I'm trying to get the datas as inputs as sort to be drawn directly with servomotors and mechanisms.

My question is how could I translate the pictures as datas (CSV for examples) or where could I find an earthquake decomposed under a CSV file?

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Downunder35m

Best Answer 3 years ago

Earthquakes, if still recorded on paper usually use galvanometers instead of servos as a servos is unable to move fast enough - there is your first flaw.
Sure you can compensate with much slower paper movement but it won't give the sharp rise and fall of a real recording.
The second flaw is the data itself - it is on paper as an image than there is a good chance there is not digital data.
A digitial source like in your image should also have a reference file for that data somewhere - as Bwrussel said, check the web and universities.
If you want all this for some sort of simulation it might be better to generate your own data based on the hardware you plan to use.

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steveastroukDownunder35m

Answer 3 years ago

On the basis that the graphs shown are an HOUR from side to side, I don't think there is any problem recording data using a servo pen. I did this with a scientific plotter fairly recently, and got good results. If you were worried, then there are fast response model servos too.

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bwrussell

3 years ago

First off, "data" is already a plural.
In some communities this has changed but the plural is "datums". Sorry,
not consequential, just bugging me. ;)

As far as acquiring said raw data your best bet is the National Centers for Environmental Information
(NCEI). If they don't have what you want , try
contacting a local university. Almost every campus has seismographs
running around the clock and I'm sure a lot of them would happily supply
you with raw data if you tell them why you want it and give them credit
for providing it.