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a couple of questions Answered

i have a greenlee multimeter and i cant get it to give a read out it just stays at 0 it was working fine then all of the sudden it will not do anything any ideas as could be wrong? resistors? does it matter which way they are connected and when i hook one to a power lead and stick a multimeter on the other side the voltage should be different right?

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LoveforBlueFarms

10 years ago

i dunno so i hooked up an led with a 12 volt power supply and it requires a 330 ohm resistor and it did not burn out the led as if i put all 12 volts to it but i still cant figure out why it will not show me a voltage drop anywhere on the circuit

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caitlinsdadLoveforBlueFarms

Reply 10 years ago

+ terminal ---resistor--- -(+)LED(-) +red probe---meter---black probe--- (-)ground power supply Have you tried flipping which probe is on what side and the meter is "inserted" in the circuit path and not just touching on both ends of the resistor?

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LoveforBlueFarmscaitlinsdad

Reply 10 years ago

ah that worked sorry it has been awhile since ive messed with this stuff and ive never been a pro anyway but you have been a big help

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LoveforBlueFarms

10 years ago

ok i got the multimeter fixed it was a blown fuse now here is my resistor problem i got a 330 ohm resistor and a 5v power supply when i put a resistor in the line i still get the same 5.04 volts as i would if it was not in line (also when i test the ohms of the resistor it is in the correct 330 ohm range) but shouldnt the voltage be dropped? even if i complete the circuit

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caitlinsdadLoveforBlueFarms

Reply 10 years ago

That's odd. Maybe do a test with a regular battery to see what happens. I dunno if 330 ohms is enough to drop the voltage.

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caitlinsdad

10 years ago

1. change the battery or reseat the battery to make sure it is good. The display should show something or the meter needle will bounce once the unit is turned on. 2. Do you need to try the meter at different resistance multipliers to get the right range for ohms? 3. If you are checking voltage, are the testprobe leads in the right sockets for measuring DC and not AC? and again check the range multiplier. 4. If set correctly to measure ohms, you should see zero resistance when the two probes are touched together and infinite or high resistance when they are apart. Again check that the probes are plugged into the right terminals. 5. If you power up a resistor, one end to the + end of a battery, you should be able to measure the voltage drop it provides by touching the free lead of the resistor and the free end or ground of the battery to complete the circuit. Good luck. Hope that helps.

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NachoMahma

10 years ago

. Possibly a blown fuse . Resistors do not have polarity when measuring resistance. . There will be a voltage drop if there is current flow.