Why Vegan Is Good?

Here are four reasons that make me cook and eat vegan, and most important – enjoy it: Vegan is Healthy - Eating vegan and fresh food several times per week will make you lose weight, look better, be full of energy and feel better. Go back to the roots. Vegan is more Sustainable - Conventional livestock farming is the most polluting, water using, greenhouse gases emitting and cruel industry humans have ever managed to create. And don’t give me that crap about pesticides and migrant workers picking the vegetables – buy seasonal (see recipes for autumn-winter, spring-summer or all season meals) and local products. It’s your choice who you’re giving your money to after all! Vegan brings Cultures together - Vegan meals are dominant menu in all ancient cultures – from India and the Middle East, through South East Asia, the Americas, Europe and Africa. Vegan is a Challenge - My first rule – never follow a recipe to the letter. Use your imagination and creativity, change it according to your personal taste, improvise and share your experience. And here I am putting together a cookbook with easy vegan recipes and willing to share experience! 

Topic by DiaPia   |  last reply


Knex underbarrel chainsaw

So i was bored one day and i made a knex underbarrel chainsaw attachment, it works tho, but the chain doesnt have little hooks so its safe to use in and out of knex combat it was really really bulky and rather heavy, it uses a modified knex motor and a micro chain you should be able to build it from the pictures oh by the way the gear closest to the handle is a bit to the side so the chain is a bit crooked

Topic by Kona-chan   |  last reply


Objective-oriented Contests

On Instructables, contests have tended to had very limited specifications beyond a general theme they work to. I propose this trend be broken in favor of something a bit more actively competitive: hold contests where the objective is set and have people compete to meet that stated goal as set by the contest host. The parameters that entries would be judged upon would be laid out in the briefing, as would any material or cost limitations. Holding competitions in this manner would entice people to competitively build something to meet the requirement the host sets and to do their best to hone their project to succeed in the relevant parameters. I think this would be a nice change from the chaotic randomness of current contests where there isn't much competition among entries, besides wooing people for votes to win finalist positions.

Topic by OrigamiAirEnforcer   |  last reply


PLEASE help....smelly basement storage space between units

I have been trying to get RID of a smell with no success. The smell is in a shared closet space between my unit and another unit in a basement (duplexed down units with first floor above grade).  The smell is so damp and musty and just terrible.  This is true especially in the summer.  I want to sell this place, but people have been opening this shared closet and are immediately like what the heck!  I have noticed it all along, but in the winter it is faint.  My spouse says he did not notice it, but at least 30 potential buyers were not okay with it and noticed it in the Summer...no one really commented in the winter, but I always smelled something. We put in a dehumidifier which we empty every single day because it is full (see in picture the type of dehumidifier), but we cannot for the life of figure out where the moisture is coming from.  One person told us it was likely coming out of the floor....I have no idea if this is the case...it almost looks like plywood is on the floor.  I guess this would be a subfloor?  In one of the pictures, it shows where the door opens to this shared space right out of our den.  I am at my wits end trying to figure this out.  I have tried essential oils, carbon, baking soda, the dehumidifier (which feels completely up in one day).  It is closed off in the closet and there is no window or any way for the smell to get out unless we open the doors to our unit and then the units smell!  We cannot smell it at all in either unit with the door closed.  It is sooooo bizarre.  These units are duplexed down to the basement.  It is absolutely puzzling me and has kept us from selling our unit after a winter deal fell through.  When we started showing in the summer, the smell was so strong as it usually is in the summer.  I guess we never paid attention because we never go in there unless getting something from storage.  Can someone tell me what I can do and what type of floor this is?  It kind of looks like it has gray paint on it, but it is certainly some type of wood or a material like it. Should we get someone to rip the floor up? Why is the smell not in either unit?  Please help!

Topic by CareBearie   |  last reply


Is it true that Google makes employees learn all languages?

I don't know if I heard this right but I believe I heard this in the movie the movie The Internship. Does Google make their employees learn all different languages because Google is in all different countries?

Topic by stankygoodeluck   |  last reply


i have to be 18 to buy heet?!?

UGH, so i went into walmart today hoping to buy some heet for my alcohol stove, well it all went well until i got to the register ( self checkout) i scaned and and it said "waiting for aproval". then this big hairy dude came over and told me i had to be 18. my thought is WHY? Tell me what you think, or what else works as a fuel (other than denatured alcohol)

Topic by junits15   |  last reply


Spare parts overpricing - anyone familiar with the concept?

I recently had the joy of getting one of the machines I use at work fixed. We already knew a valve was no longer working but I did not expect the source to be a motor with a gearbox on it. I kept the faulty part to check the internals - just out of curiosity. Now mind you that after little online I sear I found all the components of this drive: 1. A Mabuchi RS-555 motor - priced at under $10 2. A 3 stage planetary gearbox with a sproket for a chain drive - all up and in top quality around $250 with much cheaper options available... 3. A mounting plate - just an aluminium square with 4 holes in it. 4. A standard connector plug with 6cm of cable. Even if I consider that there are only 2 manufacturers for this sort of machinery wordwide I fail to see how a price of very close to $1000 is justified for this part. But let's not brag about politics but design instead: The gearbox is totally over-engeneered for the task and could deliver about 15 times the torque required to moved the valve even if it would be blocked. And against the technicians assurance the drive failed because of us forcing it to be used to often (ROFL) I had to realise the culprit is the design and way it is put together. Despite being all hardened steel there was basically no grease left inside the gearbox, I was not even able to turn it from the motor side by hand! As it is a fully sealed unit I highly doubt the grease just disappeared because most of the metal parts were bone dry, the rest only had a smidge of grease hard like wax left on it. And although the motor has a similar laser engraving than a real Mabuchi motor of the same type it has no ball bearings and judging by the free space bushes of only 4mm lenght, maybe less. One broke off, the other still had about 2.5mm left. I could argue the dry gearbox caused a constant overload of the motor, which is evident by the thermal marks on the rotor but I never had a motor with te brushes broken off the metal clip holding them. The next day I reported my findings to the boss and he said he might have another one somewhere from a previous repair and wanted me to check it as well. Needless to say the faul was identical. This system is being replaced on average every 18 months at a total cost of close to $1500. One third of this is for labour, other spares and general service but the amount for the motor drive is always a sting. Now to really funny part: After my boss had a long and frustrating phone call with our service company it turns out we not allowed to use any parts other then what the manufacturer supplies. Ok, truth told, we are of course allowed to do so but if the service company notices non-genuine parts they have to report it and this automatically cancels our service agreement with the manufacturer. Only one company produces the stuff, only one company in the country has the service contract with them - you see the circle? LOL I found a supplier that could offer a similar motor drive that would only require the original mounting plate and sproket. Priced at just $300 and with a 2 year warranty it sounds tempting especially if you consider that is only for the gearbox and the motor has 3 years. Of cours we won't do it and have to suck it up, so just for laughs a few other spares for this machine that I found in old bills and their price on Ebay for the same part or one of better quality on the right: Various microswitches:                                  25 - 88                       0.20 - 4 Temperatur sensor:                                              129                       1.20 Temp sensor with 30cm heat proof cable:       149                       3.50 Stainless steel sheet metal screw:                        6.50                 0.40 if ordered more than 10 Main switch (simple flip):                                        99                      1.20 Stainless steel screening fliter:                             114                      8.30 And that is just for the mechanical and electrical stuff, if I would go into the plumbing with little stainless steel parts and ruber seals some here might end up with sore muskles from all the laughing... Do have similar equippment that could be serviced better for a fraction of the cost but can't because of similar restrictions? Mind you that I am not talking about warranty stuff here as the machine is far over this already... If someone wants to see how much damage a broken off peice of carbon will cause in the long run let me know. But be aware that I already cleaned away most of the black dust before you complain it looks too clean - I did not want that stuff everwhere ;)

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply


Looking for a cheap compressor with a high pressure rating or for airbrush use?

Today a friend of mine asked me if I know a way to reduce the noise level of his compressor in the work shed. With the current heat he prefers to work in the evening and nights, which does not make his neighbours too happy. His main use for several airbrush guns and sometimes for mormal airtools or the big spray gun for an undercoat or similar. So his main concern is oil in the airline and the actual flow rate is of second concern as he has an old 25kg propane cyclinder as an additional air tank. For relative low air volumes I would suggest an old fridge compressor. With a thicker pipe at the outlet that is filled with stainless steel wool most of the oil stays in the compressor. That is if this pipe is a) long enough b) upright c) of sufficient diameter so there is enough for the oil to avoid it being pushed up A second, standard oil seperator will be enough for the oil level required for airbrush stuff - and most other things too. If there is no pressure regulator on the airbrush system it is best to add a small air tank and shut off valve for it. In our case however a fridge compressor would be just enough to keep the bigger airbrush gun running but not to fill the tank at the same time. Not to mention the problem of fluctuating pressure levels. Since we already had a tank and pressure shut off connected to the loud compressor it was only a matter of finding something that keeps the neighbours happy. The first thing we did was to check how often the compressor comes on and how long it runs till the tank is back to pressure. With that and the stated air volume on the compressor we guesstimated that something a bit bigger than the compressor of a window airconditioner should be sufficient. The search begins.... If you don't know what to look for I give you a few hints: Older airconditioners often run on R22 or R12 - both use quite high system pressures which is a bonus, but more on that later. As a rule of thumb for these compressors you cans say: the bigger the higher the flow rate. At the local wreckers and scrap yards we found a few units but noticed the bigger ones often used three phases and not just one :( So we opted for the R22 compressor of a 4.5kW unit. Keep in mind the 4.5kW is for the entire system, so the quite massive fans can be removed from the sum. Usually the compressor alone is the 2.5 - 3kW range. Ok, we found the big thing but how does this help us? First things first ;) The oil was removed as the housing stating the original oil amount. This allowed us to use an oil rated for air use that has little to no water absorption qualities - you don't want water in your compressor. With the usual heat the water should be no problem anyway. Next was a pressure test to make sure the thing actually still works, so we added some plumping in the form of standard connectors to the inlet and outlet. We got well above 200PSI and abondoned the test at this stage as it was more than enough already. The air volume seemd to be well more than expected too so let'S move to the next stage. A fridge or aircon compressor always needs to have a certain amount of oil in it as it will otherwise seize and overheat quickly. But they are also designed so that the oil mixes with the refrigerant to cool all moving parts. So the biggest hurdle is to make sure the oil stays where it should stay and won't enter or get lost in the tank. Only real option for this to use something to catch the oil that is capable of releasing it into the compressor once it shuts off. Now there are several options for this so I start with the most basic: A "catch can" will get most of the oil, especially if filled with stainless steel wool or similar. Downside is that you have to find a way to get it back into the compressor. A step better is a thicker pipe filled with stainless steel wool to catch the oil. If placed upright and the outgoing pipe can be bend a bit upwards you have a good chance that most of the oil will sweep through the valves and get back down into the compressor housing. But only too often the cheap or even free compressor is better than expected and the oil won't get back into the housing as the vlaves are just too good. The last and IMHO best option is a pressurised return system. Most compressors for bigger aircons have a seperate filling port or sealed off piece of pipe. In this case you can do a simple check to see if they are usable for our purposes. Open the port of pipe and use a simple bike bump or similar to get some pressure in it. With a dedicated oil filling port you are best off but they are hard to find. The air you pump in should come out of the high pressure side - you might need a little pressure to overcome the valves. If you hear any bubbling in the housing (use a pipe on your ear or a sensitive microphone) it means you are going through the oil inside the compressor - perfect! You might not hear any bubbling but the port or pipe is still usable. Get ready with your fingers and start the compressor. The fill pipe should be sucking air in, same for the service port if there is one. A dedicated oil port should not suck but instead force some oil up if you cover the high pressure outlet. I assume all is good and no oil is splashing out of the open pipe or port. Add a small amount of oil with a syringe or similar into the port/pipe. If you see an oil mist coming out of the high side it is bad news. Clean outlet air is good. To get the oil back from the catch pipe or can we have to add a hose or pipe with a needle valve. It needs to be adjusted so that there is only a very little airflow (or oil mist) coming out. This regulated outlet is now being connect to the port/pipe with a bit of suction that we found earlier. Now every time the compressor runs the collected oil is forced back into the compressor :) Please double check the port/pipe used is not directly connected to the intake port! The last thing you want is a puddle of oil going into the cylinder and damaging it! They are designed to move gas but not liquid! If in doubt use a hardened sttel nail or similar to create a small puncture in the top of the compressor housing if there is nothing else to use. Check first if the material sound very thick, if so it might help to drill with a 5 or 6mm drill first - only about 1mm to make sure you won't enter the housing and conimate it with metal shavings! Once you have a small puncture hole of about 2mm in diameter get some 2 component metal repair glue mix and add a suitable connection for the collecting pipe/can. If you feel up to it you can of course use a blow torch and solder the connection on. Now we have the compressor working with a oil return system that also gives up very little to no oil at all in our system. You might now think you are good to go but you should at least add a decent and fine filter to the air inlet ;) The compressor noise of a bigger system can still be an issue if thicker pipes are used that allow the noise to travel out. Keep in mind they usually run in a fully closed system.... As we only need to match the noise level of the compressor itself a solid steel can like an old fire extinguisher in the 1kg rage is a good way out. Fill it with filter wool and a fine filter pad after adding some hose connectors either end. You can misuse the trigger nozzle and keep it to seal the top if you braze a connector on it. If the intake here is about 5 times larger than the pipe connection to the compressor itself the air flow going into the thing is low enough for a cheap paper air filter can or box if you have a quite dusty enviroment to work with. The real trick is to have a hose or pipe on the inside of the fire extinguisher connected to the compressor pipe connection. A garden hose is great here as is reduces the noise quite good and is dirt cheap. Make a lot of about 2mm sized holes in this pipe and close the other end of it off. Now the compressor will suck it through the small holes and the soft garden hose reduces the noise, the surrounding padding brings it down to basically nothing. The special case of clean air for airbrush.... If you read this for the sole purpose of airbrush use then this chapter is just for you, all other might want to skip it. The two things you don't want to enter your gun is oil or water. Both are a common thing in normal compressors due to lubrication and pressure difference resulting in condensation of the humidity in the intake air. Oil free compressors of good quality can cost quite a few bucks and often require ongoing replacement of membranes or piston seals. A refrigeration compressor with the above modifications already provides clean enough air for most airbrush users if a proper tank is used to store enough of the compressed air. So you might just want to add a basic oil filter or very fine paper filter close to the regulator. For very detailed work with very sensitive paints you might want to build a filter box containing of several layers of oil absorbent paper. This stuff is often used in the industry to clean up minor oil spills and bind oil very well. A PVC pipe (pressure rated please) with 5-8 layers of filter screens should last about a lifetime before the filters need changing if the diameter is in the 10-15cm range. That leaves us with the dreaded problem of condensation and water contamination. Depending on the type of paint and gun used a small amount of water vapour is usually no problem. Solvent based paints usally show their disliking by unwanted drops or run offs caused by water droplets. Of course you just go and buy a professional dehumidifier and accept the ongoing replacement costs for the cartridges... But if you are in a climated that has above 30% humidity for most of the year than you will have to remove the water one way or the other. A big enough storage tank for the air that is upright usually helps to release any condensated water prior to usage. But if you use a homemade tank you might want to avoid this problem completely and forget about water in the system altogehter. Silaca gel is the answer here, specifically the indicating variety that changes color once "full". A spaghetti glas or similar should be big enough unless you are in a very humid climate - is so just use multiple in a row. The air intake side for the compressor has to go through the silica gel to be effictive. This mean we need two holes in the lid. One with a pipe or hose going all the way to the botom - that is the air intake side. The other right on the lid - this is the air outlet side which continues to the compressor intake. With the color change in the silica gel we can estimate how much usage we have left until we have to heat it up to remove the water. If this color change happens quite fast from the bottom to the top, let's say within three days or less than you really need to use more jars with silica gel in a row or a longer one - like using a long and clear acrylic pipe instead. Of course you can always just cut holes and "viewing glasses" along the length to a PVC pipe.... No matter how wet your climate is you want to get at least 100 hours of compressor run time before you need to recharge the silica gel. This brings us to the recharging.... Once the color changes and you only have about one quarter left to the top you want to get the water out of the gel and re-use it. To do this you simply heat it up in your oven to around 120-150°C - the supplier should state the max temp for this. If you use a gas oven or one with limited accuracy here it is best to stay within the 120° range. You need to stir and mix the gel or use something big enough like an oven tray. But be aware that these little balls are like glass! The roll and bounce like no tomorrow! IMHO it best to use an old cooking pot that has no plastic handles for this and not to overfill it. This allows for easy mixing without making a mess that might cause a bad trpping hazard on your kitchen floor tiles! Once the gel is back to original colr it is time to let it cool of to a safe temperature and to fill it back into our canister or pipe. Tanks and shut off systems.... We have a refrigeration compressor working for us, and since it was for R22 we can use much higher pressures as a simple compressor from the hardware store. The low pressure side is used to 70PSI or around 5Bar of pressure in normal working conditions. The high side often works at pressure in the range of 200-300PSI or 14-20Bar! The tank we used is a big propane tank that was restamped at some stage in his life for the use of LPG - so it was tested to quite high pressures. The lower pressure limit is what keeps the stored gas liquid at the given temperature. For Propane at an imaginary 30°C this would around 155PSI or 10Bar. The stamped test pressure, although outdated, showed 600PSI or around 40Bar of pressure with no problems - and the thing was thick in the walls... The old shut off switch from an old air compressor was adjustable after removing the safety cap with a bit of force and the help of few cold beer. With a little tank attached we adjusted it to turn the compressor off at 250PSI or around 17Bar of pressure. If your tank is old or has no test pressure stamped on do your own test in a safe location. Make sure the area is secured so there is no chance of debris from a brusting tank can go anywhere - this includes to chain down the tank itself ;) Use the aircon compressor to fill it up to 300PSI or 20Bar of pressure - this should be tolerated with ease by any propane or LPG tank. Shut the valves and let it rest for a day or so. It is best to do this in the early morning so the heat from the day will slightly increase the pressure. At the end you still want to have a working tank and no major pressure losses. All of our mods on this tank were done without actually harming the tank. This was possible as the original valve had a release port for filling purposes - as it standard on most refillable ones. Here we removed the valve and added a pressure guage instead - better to know what is happening than to assume things. As this "port" had a seperate connection to the bottom of the brass valve we added as T-connection to allow for the connection to the compressor. Just be be really sure a thin piece of copper tubing was brazed to the exit hole of this port so all incoming air will be going down and away from the outlet connection with the big shut off valve on top - which we use to actually isolate and close the tank when not it use. Last thing required was something to connect the pressure shut off switch and regulator to. That was the only major expense on this project as we had no old BBQ hose or similar to get a suitable connector to the tank. We bought a simple adapter for the use of smaller hoses and cut the unwanted bits off we there was only the bottle conntector with the nut left. After removing the rubber ring we brazed piece of copper pipe onto it. Here we drilled holes and fitted severy connectors. First for the pressure switch, then for the connection to the pressure regulator and two standard ones with a ball valve for air hose connections. One air hose connection female, the other male so a standard compressor can be connected as well or "backfilled" for additional and mobile storage use. As we wanted to avoid any reduction in the safety and burst pressure no release valve was added at the bottom on the tank. The added silica gel filter stage was used instead so no water will get into the system to begin with. Additionally, and painfully for me and me friend, the inside of the tank was coated with a layer of acrylic paint to prevent and rust as it was free from it when we checked it at the beginning. This involved filling a suitable amount of paint into it, closing the top while keeping the thread clean and then to move the tank around to cover the inside evenly. If you do this be prepared for some weird movements with your friends LOL Once we were sure all ust be covered by paint at least three times we released the exxess paint and allowed the inside to dry with the assistance of some air forced to go in with a length of pipe. This was repeated 3 times... Then another two just for the bottom third of it where there might be some moisture after all... Now you don't want to remove the brass valve with everything connected to it just to turn the tank over to releae the collected water. Instead we made sure the added pipe on the former relese port would go all the way to the bottom of the tank. If any water collection is suspected only the connection to the compressor needs an additional valve for the disconnection so the water will be force back out here. To make this easy and fast we used standard quick connectors and a piece of flexible airhose rated to 20bar of pressure for the connection to the compressor. We checked the performance of the moisture removal and oil removal only for a few hours of running time while priming some surface for later use. The compressor oil used was very smelly to say it nice but nothing coul be smelled in the first paper filter after the pressure regulator. To check for remaining moisture levels (65% humidity in the house) we used a 10m length of clear PVC tubing going through an ice bath. After 30 minutes of moderate air release there was no condensation on the inside of the tubing visible. Of course if you only need it for air supply and don't care about a bit of moisture and oil you can keep it simple ;) Benefits of doing such a stupid thing: For starters noise and the peace of mind that you can do a lot of airbrushing until the compressor needs to kick in again. Then of course the benefit of an almost silent system compared to a standard compressor - something you can actually tolerate while doing art. But the real deal is knowing YOU did it and you did it for cheap. Warnings and some advise... I know, it should be at the very beginning but I just hope you read till the end ;) If the compressor fails from overheating you are up for a new one. This means the tan size should be within the limits of what the compressor can handle - same for what you actually use on air. You want an empty tank to be filled before the compressor feels hot to touch - quite warm is fine but if you can't leave your hand on it then it is too hot. Same story for the usage. There is no point in using a tiny 10 liter storage tank if you need that capacity every few minutes. The compressor would only have little pauses and overheat quickly. You want a good balance of usage time before the tank goes below supply pressure and running time of the compressor to get it to full pressure again. This brings us to the safety of high pressures. Where possible only copper tubing or sufficiently rate hoses should be used, the later as short as possible to avoid them acting like a whip if something goes wrong. When it comes to the safety of the tank you want to make sure to stay withing it's rated limits. All benefits of a compressor capable of producing over 500PSI otr close to 35Bar is wasted if your tank and pressure regulator can't handle it. This must not mean that you try to use a gas cylinder of unknow age and pressure rating and assume it will work! If in doubt use a lower shut off pressure and stay within the limits of normal air compressors - which is around 120PSI or 8Bar. Never, ever use a tank that is compromised by inside rust or bad corrosion on the outside! If you don't know how to braze copper tubing, pipes and connectors then check out some of the great Instructables about it! Whenever you know you won't use any compressed air for more than a few hours close all valves especially the ones going back to the compressor on the high pressure side! Some compressors really don't like a huge pressure difference constantly pushing on the reed valves. If your tank is big enough to allow for more than one hour of operation before the compressor has to top it up you might want to consider a one way valve right on the compressor outlet. This will prevent any massive pressures going onto the valves - especially helpful for modern compressors that only rely on the sealing capabilities of the clyinders or rotary system used. One thing you should always consider is a pressure relief valve rated for about 50PSI more than your tank pressure - it can be added to the pipe ;) If the shut off valve ever fails the relief valve gives you the ease of mind that it will blow before your tank does. Maintenance... If modded correctly the compressor should stay in the compressor and the compressor itself should not overheat from use. Having said that your compressor might force out a little more than your best catch system can handle. If that becomes a problem it might help to use an oil with a lower viscosity. If all fails it just means you need to top up oil once the last last paper filter is filthy or use slightly more to begin with so the intervals are longer. The silica gel, if used should be recharged before all of it is wasted - no point in adding it if you use it once full of water. If no gel is used there will be water in the storage tank. Even with the added paint and a good air filter it is possible that nasty things grow in there. Making sure the tank is emptied of any water after long uses and again before the next use is good practise. If no pressure gauge is used on the tank you must make sure the shut off valve is always working fine and within set parameters. I strongly recommend using a gauge and if not to perform a pressure check of the system every now and then to confirm all is within parameters of normal operation. A compressor constantly running means you either use far too much air or you have a leak - same story if the compressos kicks in after some of forgetting to shut it off and close the valves. If you keep the above in mind the salvaged compressor should work just fine for many years to come. Troubleshooting and alternatives.... You put everything together the right way, double checked and something is till not right? Maybe my crystal ball helps me to find something... 1. Always oil coming through the catch system. It usually means you use too much of it. A salvaged compressor, if the refrigent was removed legally from the system should still have a "correct" level of oil inside. Too much oil would mean is being pumped through the system at an excessive rate. Very thin compressor oils tend to do that in the compressor is misude like we do. Changing to standard mineral oil can help here. As a last resort you can use a pressure gauge or good judgement to allow more flow through the needle valve from the catch system back to the compressor. Too much backflow here would mean we loose system pressure to the set level of this needle valve! 2. The R22 rated compressor seems to be unable to produce enough pressure. First do a leak test using soapy water to rule out any leaks. Do a back pressure test on the ports. If you can push air through them in the reverse way with ease it means the valves are damaged making the compressor useless. You need to replace it. A regular cause with our type of usage is a constand back pressure from the storage tank to the compressor. To prevent this it might help to mount an electric solenoid between the compressor and storage tank. Such valve should be off when the pressure switch is engaged and on when the pressure switch is disengaged. This prevents the coil from overheating but requires a "normally off" type of valve. A good source at the wreckers are cars with LPG systems installed, they usually have suitable 12V valves somewhere on or near the tank and filler cap. 3. I am using several kg of silica gel but still get a lot of water in my storage tank. Going overboard in a humid climate can be a good thing here but if moisture makes it into the tank even with great amounts of silica gel there are only two causes: a) the tube or cylinder used is not long enough or not wide enough to allow the absorption of all the moisture going through. b) the flow rate is too high and the temperatures are too. For the first the solution is obvious enough. The second is related to the first for the diameter and lenght but temperatures constantly above the 30°C while operating somehow limits what the gel can do. Using a cooling coil on the intake side or simply putting the gel containers in icy water will help to a great deal here. If that is not an option than I suggest to layer the gel and to seperate it with fine paper filter screens. This will slow and even out the airflow allowing for more contact time with the gel. 4. The compressor gets very noisy after some time. If "some time" means more than 30-45 minutes you simply have it running too much and it overheats. If the noise increases too much when reaching the shut off pressure it can mean the pressure is too high for it. 5. Can I use multiple compressors from smaller units or refrigerators to get enough air volume? Of course you can but it might mean you have to lower your pressure expectations. Consider that each individual compressor would get the back pressure from all other compressors running while it's outlet valve is closed. To avoid premature failure you want to make sure the compressors are shut off at a lowver pressure. 6. I don't want to use a big tank but require a good airflow for airbrush. Two or three fridge compressors working one after the other with a small tank to keep the output pressure even can allow for about 30 minutes runtime per compressor. With three it gives one hour for the the first to cool off and should be enough for ongoing work. Downside is you need to make some sort of automatic switch to "rotate" to compressor working. Last words.... Is you find any spelling mistakes you can keep them. However, if you use them in any way to make a profit with them I kindly ask for 10% of your earning from it ;) Why did I not make an Instructable out of all this? Well the day was very hot, the beer very cold and my mobile phone at home, so I did not take any pics. To top it up the whole thing is now in a seperate box for additional noise reduction so it can be used in the same room where the guy is working. Of course he just used a nailgun for the job without any regard of access or at least easy view of the two pressure gauges. Typical if you have a great idea and the cold beer tells you to forget all about screws or hinges ROFL Only comment was: You created it and it works fine, why would need more than the pipe connections for the gel and regulator? Maybe he will reconsider when the service is due....

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply


CyberK'NEX Personality Programmer software

Hi, I'm looking for the software to program the Cyber K'NEX utra sets. They are no longer available from the K'nex website. Does anyone know a place where I can download this? or does anyone still has this on his PC ? thanks in advance, K'nex fan from Belgium (Europe)

Topic by Jorian   |  last reply


Miniature oven

Please don't laugh but I am building a small working oven for my daughter and need a heating element that can heat it from 70 to 220 degrees celsius via a thermostat. I've found this heating element http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/ceramic-heating-elements/3762795/ or http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/ceramic-heating-elements/1988529/ and this thermostat http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/7334726/ but am not sure these are suitable and would work together. The oven will measure about 15cm wide x 8cm hit x 10cm deep but I don't have to stick to this.Any help or advice would be amazing. You're laughing aren't you? :)

Topic by gooseisloose   |  last reply


loud sound shut off internet

Hi all. im looking for something what could shut down electricity for 1 second when there is too much noise. lets say with 90 decibel. why? my kids are screaming when they are loosing an computergame online. i want to build something what disconect the power to their router for 1 second. talking to them doesnt help. so who knows how to start this project

Topic by HerbertH6   |  last reply


RGB POV

Hello  friends! Im  make RGB pov using Arduino,    How to control 6 RGB Led  using  3 transistors?  please helpme  arduino code

Topic by AzamA9 


Arduino time base servo sweep code help

Hi,     I need help on creating arduino code for a time base sweeping servo. Specifically i would like to have my servo sweep 180 degrees and back to center every 20 minutes and repeat indefinably. Im sure its a fairly simple code but just new at coding in general I have looked at servo sweep code sample in the arduino library but I dont know how to implement it with a timer. Hope someone can help me out. thanks for your time uno r3, micro servo 99

Topic by jaysond04 


Does your partner / spouse get annoyed by your constant making and tinkering?

I find that whenever I start working on a new project I can get rather passionate and excited about it. This usually results in me getting a little carried away with the making process (typically spending every spare minute I have working on the "next big thing"). It sometimes gets on my girlfriends nerves and you could say she becomes a bit of a "workshop widow". I'm just wondering how everyone else manages with their work / making / life balance. Looking for your stories and experiences (any tips would also be appreciated!). I've tried getting her involved in some of my projects, but that's easier said than done!

Topic by ThirdEarthDesign   |  last reply


Wood trailer

Hi Joined this interesting website today When the spring comes, a trailer made off wood will be built. So far, a cheap small trailer from 1977 is bought and will be modified The Sketchy drawing program is used to plan how it will look A picture of the original trailer and two screenshots from the program are attached Pictures will be taken during building and will be included in a new instructable later

Topic by 1976kjell   |  last reply


arabic is my original language i can help you with it

I can help with formal arabic even commun language

Topic by zainabe   |  last reply


Translate your instructables to Spanish!

Hi I am new to instructables, and while I currently do not have a instructable posted (maybe soon) I noticed there are not many instructables in Spanish. I think i saw maybe one at best. There are many Spanish speaking people who do not speak English in the United States (and indeed the world over) who could benefit greatly from the wealth of information provided by this wonderful website. I speak and write fluent English and Spanish. (I also speak Swedish but I am not very good at writing it.) To get the ball rolling I am offering  translation of any instructable on this site. Just send me a message and I will start doing what I do. By translating your post you will be appealing to a much wider audience, and probably get more votes! Who doesn't want that?

Topic by Raziel7   |  last reply


Any Ideas On What I Should Post?

Hello, K'NEX community! I am the Knex Inventor, and I am looking for ideas of what I should post. If you have an idea of what I should post, please comment below with your suggestion, and I will consider making it. If I do make and post one of your ideas, I will give you partial credit for helping to come up with it. Thanks!, -The Knex Inventor

Topic by The Knex Inventor   |  last reply


LED dimming and color temperature control (variable white LEDs)

I'm trying to find an inexpensive way to control a variable-white LED strip with knobs. There are tons of remote dimmers and wall-touch-controls available. These are way too complicated or too big for my application. All I want is two knobs. One that controls the brightness of the LED strips and one that controls the color temperature between the cold and the warm white LEDs I did some research and see two possible solutions: a) 100% analog using potentiometers and LED drivers or b) using potentiometers, Arduino, and LED drivers. Here are the details: a) Analog: - Use two LED drivers to drive the actual LEDs, like these ones: http://www.ledsupply.com/led-drivers/buckpuck-dc-led-drivers - Use two dual-channel potentiometers to control the brightness of the two different LEDs in the strips:   - One controls the brightness for both channels (connected to the same pins)   - One controls the relative brightness between the channels (connected to opposite side pins) b) Using Arduino: - Any Arduino with analog inputs - Two single-channel potentiometers connected to two analog inputs - Some software that generates the correct PWM outputs for the two LED channels - LED drivers that can dim using PWM signal input. According to this post, the same BuckPucks can do that, too: http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=14603.msg107089#msg107089 Do you have any advice on these options? Is there a third one or even an off the shelf solution? What about compliance and certification? If I use BuckPucks and other components that are certified, do I still need a certification for the whole system? (assuming I want to use the design not just for my personal pleasure)

Topic by smensch07   |  last reply


Power genration by Foot steps

The main purpose of this Project is that to design a system that convert the mechanical energy harvested from human motion into electrical energy.This project report contains the complete literature review and implementation of an alternative to electrical power supplied by batteries for portable electronic devices and for computerized and motorized prosthetics. The report presents the idea to generate power harvesting from human motion. Electrical devices have been liberated from the wall socket. Battery powered computers, phones and music devices come along everywhere we go. The limiting factor is electricity. In the end the battery always goes dead. Ironically, when we move around with our portable devices we produce a lot of energy. But a lot of this energy is lost as heat. If that mechanical energy could be converted into electricity, our very mobility could charge our mobile devices. Using the working principal of dynamo, we intend to generate a small power which then can be used to charge the portable devices. We are charging mobile battery for testing purpose.

Topic by engr.zainshah   |  last reply


Half Inch CRT Monitror

I was tearing apart an old VHS camera and decided to rip the LCD out of the viewfinder. Much to my suprise I find a CRT monitor not a LCD! This screen is about 1/2 inch. It has a 5 pin connector that leads to the motherboard and a chip on the bottom that says A118121. Obviously two of the conections would be V+ and ground, but what about the other three? I would like to turn this into a composite or VGA compatible screen (maybe even a crazy tiny oscilloscope) but I need some help. Any suggestions or leads would be greatly appreciated.

Topic by gimmelotsarobots   |  last reply


Buzzer Game With Reset

I would like some help with this circuit. Description: It's like a regular electric circuit Buzzer game but with a no cheating reset option. 1. One must go from A to B to light L. 2. When you start (A) a green led turns on (G) 3. If you touch X, the buzzer sounds (S) an a red led (R) turns on, at this time (G) turns off. This means you have to restart from A 4. this must be powered by a 9V or 12V battery

Topic by RicardoA53   |  last reply


NEED HELP Looking for people to make a video game with me ^_^

Hi everyone! I'm posting here to see if anyone would like to help me create a real steam game! Its something Ive been working on for a long time. Basically its a team based FPS and I was wondering if anyone on here has or is interested in helping me code the game / programmers!  All the artwork and designs and concepts / storyline is completed just looking to make some buddies and create a real team! Let me know if youre interested! Cant wait to start! :D

Topic by Littlepuff   |  last reply


Mobile video game idea and mechanics needed

I've been wanting to create a game for a while and have learned mot off all the aspects needed...modelling,texturing,scripting(my specialty)....what i need is a good plot and possibly mechanics i can do the scripting...i am looking to focus on a survival horror genre...so if the plots could be generated around that area it would be nice and appreciated

Topic by kofo_14   |  last reply


Metal hallide ballasts - projects using?

I had to buy 2 salt water aquarium ballasts because they where dirt cheap, solid and shiny. I have no use for 2 shiny MH ballasts. Any suggestions for projects? Practical, informative or destructive? Not necessarily in that order ....

Topic by bmiller91   |  last reply


motorized flip up license plate

    I have started to try and create a motorized flip up license plate. It's mainly for my motorcycle.  In the "off" position the license plate is down and readable. Turn the switch to "on" and it flips up, making the plate unreadable. I thought about using a servo or a motor with limit switches. I do not really know how to wire something up to control the servo or motor.  Any help would be great. I know they sell these as kits, but they start off at teh $150 dollar range. Thanks in advance!

Topic by thirdGEARchirp   |  last reply


Which arduino borad to buy?

Http://arduinoteacher.appspot.com/matrix_8.html Hello! And i am interested in starting arduino! But i am not familiar with the hardware spec of arduino boards. I have some electronics and programming bg as an physics student. I read the above tutorial, the led matrix looks like a easy/cool starter project. However, i have a question, For 4 by 4 matrix, it need 4 outputs and 4 grounds. With 14 i/o pins on an arduino uno (0to13), is 7 by 7 the maximum for upscaling this design without multiplexing? Or if i can get a "shield" that add more pins to the uno? Should i just get a arduino mega with 54 I/O pins? Since it is not that expensive, Is the tutorial compatible with a mega? Actually my target build is two 15 by 15 matrix displaying identical image. Can i rig up two identical led matrix, connect both in parallel to the same board? Thank you in advance! for your replies!!

Topic by mchau2   |  last reply


Announcing Finalists for the IOT Builders Contest.

Does anyone know when the finalists for the Current IOT Builders Contest are going to be announced. The contest ended on January Second 2017, and today is the fifteenth. This contest seems to be taking an especially long time to judge. Hey "Danger is my middle name" , if you're out there, could you let me know an estimate for when the Finalists will be released? Thank  you so much!!

Topic by willydegroot 


15 litre/4 gallon water bottles

I have a lot of 15 litre/4 gallon empty, non-refillable water jugs. I keep searching, but, cannot find ways to use them. There are so many ways to use 2 litre pop bottles:  making nifty stuff, building green houses etc. Surely there are creative ways to use these. Can anybody help with ideas or maybe point me in the right direction? Thanks!

Topic by MaijaLiisa   |  last reply


How can I modify my vacuum to turn the brush roll off?

I have https://smile.amazon.com/Hoover-Cleaner-WindTunnel-Lightweight-UH70120/dp/B002HFDLCK/ref=pd_ybh_a_14?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=GR3CWSF52RR4YEMDSQWV this vacuum. I love it, the Hoover Vacuum Cleaner WindTunnel T-Series Rewind Plus Bagless Lightweight Corded Upright UH70120. I was wondering if anyone had a hack to make the brushroll turn off for hard floors. it currently doesnt have that option. Thank you!

Topic by JuliaM115   |  last reply


Mono Bass in Stereo System

Hello Everyone I'm building a portable amp system running in stereo, but I only have one Bass speaker. Each Speaker (5, left/right tops, left/right mids and the bass) has its own amp. How can I connect the input on the bass speaker to the (stereo) input while keeping the channels separate? Thanks. 

Topic by IronCake 


Options to improve cooling and reduce consumption for portable coolers

I recently had to start learning how to service airconditioners on the fast and that learning got me thinking about my portable coolers.... Some of us like to go camping or on longer fishing trips, so there might be one of those 3-way fridges in use or a better cmpressor model. The one thing they all have in common is that they can only cool down to a difference in ambient temperatures. No matter which way we turn it the cooling produces heat and that needs to get away somehow. The other big thing is the cooling cycling - or the lack of it on a warm day. After some reading and thinking I came up with some ideas that might be applicable to your existing cooler if you are willing to mess around a bit. Let's start with the produced heat, shall we? Down here in Australia most people either have the fridge in their4WD or camper. In a car or small camper trailer there is often the problem of airflow, so the cooler might be doing overtime for no other reason than a lack of airflow. If you check online sites like Amozon and Ebay you quickly find fan systems meant to be installed inside the cooler to get lower temperatures and a quicker cooling of fresh goods. The thing is that the box is quite well insulated and the benefit of the airflow goes only as far as it can reach. And even if the box is quite empty and you would have a benefit of the cold air moving around it won't change the fact that "improved" cooling always comes with more heat in this case. But if we use one of these fan systems to actually improve the airflow on the hot side we not only get better cooling but also a reduce power consumption - something worth considering if you have no backup power generator.... This of course brings us to placement. As I have done the mistake myself you might be tempted to put a 3way cooler onto your seat. Opening it with the back free means the lid always gets stuck on the seat, do it the other way around and you block the airflow. If you do put it on the seat then make sure two things match: 1. The thing is secured properly. 2. The airflow from your aircon is able to reach the hot side of the cooler. Even permanent installations in a camper benefit from a good airflow. Often the fridge or freezer is built into some sort of bench and the airflow behind might be very limited. A simple solution here is to add a vent on top of the bench to allow the hot air to escape. A better one is to use a fan that is powered together with the heating element or compressor and drives the hot air to the outside. How to improve the cold side of the box or fridge? Well, to be honest there is not much that can be done unless you are prepared for some serious work. Depending on compartment size, contents and how full it is a little fan can help to keep the temperatures even but it won't help to get it cooler or reduce the cycling periods for the cooling. The only really working way that I found is to use a "battery" for the storage of the cold. The cooling works by checking the inside temp of the box and if above the set temp the cooling won't stop. This is all well and good while we have a constant supply of power but once we are on batteries it would be great to keep the active time to a minimum. A working solution is to build a container that fits around the cooling element. Smaller types often use an aluminium heatsink, bigger types might come with a compressor and an evaporator. In either case proper sealing is important! Most good models are fully waterproof, meaning even if you would fill them with water they would not leak in other areas than the door. But double check and if in doubt use a bit of silicone to make sure. Ok, but how do we "store" the cold coming from the device? Cold packs ;) These things contain a ready to use mix that holds cold temperatures quite well. Another really good alternative is alcohol or radiator coolant, although the last has limited capabilites in terms of holding capaity for the cold as it is desinged to exchange heat fast rather than to keep it. With a suitable sized and sealed box around the active cooling element we will need longer to actually see any cooling happen (with a warm "battery") but that can be compensated for by good planning or a frozen water bottle. If the cooling element is covered with a box of cooling gel then it has to cool this first before anything happens inside the box. But once it does the pack is already far below the normal temp it would have during normal operation. Remember the inside of the cold pack cools down first before the outside will get cold ;) So once the set temperature is reached the device will shut off. But since the cold pack is far below the set temp it will continue to cool our box until the core is warmer than the set temp. Quick thinkers will now say the benefit is lost as the time required to cool the "battery" down again is much longer than the normal cycle time - and they would be correct. But as we get much colder temps inside the gel box the overall running will still be less compared to normal operation. And since from the second cycle on the gel is only warming up to operating temp of the box it will be much faster than with a warm box. Another benefit might be the ease of cleaning and ice removal. Some peltier driven coolers have big cooling fins or a quite bad design for the heatsink allowing mould to grow where you can't remove it easy. If the box is made from stainless steel and flush with the back wall of the box we won't have that problem anymore. Ok, but how much is good or too much for the size and gel content? You got me there as it is bit tricky. You don't want to loose much usable space for starters and you don't want to wait hours for the gel to cool down if the box was not used. IMHO the size should fit the cooling element with about 20% to spare all around. If stainless steel is not an option than aluminium is the next best choice. Thin sheets can either be be cold formed with a hammer or "brazed" with a good torch and the right rods. Ok, before that route is there anything I should consider or do first? Depends ;) 3-way systems usually use a flame or heating elements to heat an ammoia solution. After years of neglect corrosion can form and reduce the amount of heat transfered into the system and reducing the efficiency this way. It might help to take the heating elements out once a year or so to clean them and the contact areas from any corrosion or dirt build up. With a fixed shedule for this you won't have the problem of never noticing a badly corroded heating element either - and this is the main failure on these systems.... Modifying your camper or making a few mods to your 4WD drawer system is not for the faint of heart and should be done with consideration. The last thing you want to do is rush things to find out it was not necessary. Before cutting holes check if you can't find the room for the fan in a different spot and use ducts to control the airflow - sometimes it is easier to blow air in than to get air out ;) When it comes to creating vents or connections for air to the outside always make sure it is waterproof and insect safe! If you can let the outlet go downwards so water won't run in, for 4WD trailers consider a flap to prevent water from going during a river crossing. Flyscreens will not only prevent insects from coming in but on the inside also prevent dust to go eerywhere - allow to the removal and cleaning! The salts used in these cold packs can be corrosive, so you have to make sure there are no leaks and that there is no steel to come into contact with gel - this includes screw ends hidden in through-holes. If in doubt use a coat of paint but keep it as thin as possible. Even on peltier systems it might be impossible to remove the heatsink without massive surgery on the internals. So before you take it all apart to gain access check if it is far easier to seal around the box opening and possible screw connections using silicone. The cooling battery can be screwed on and sealed with silicone as well as an easy escape route. Although for this to work you need to check if the material of the box allows for a proper bond with the silicone! Some materials just won't allow anything to stick at all, even after sanding them. So do a test first in an area where you would be able to cut the silicone away without causing damage. If you can rip or peel it off the surface you should not try to use a cooling battery screwed to the wall, only use a box that is fully sealed with the cooling element and has a seperate back - one complete unit around the cooling element. I have a 3-way system with a freezer compartment that does the cooling for the fridge too - what can I do? These units either provide good freezing with the fridge temps too low or good fridge cooling with no freezing capabilites - depending on the thermostat used. Our problem is that is next to impossible to add a cooling battery of the normal kind to these systems. The L-shaped freezer box can really only be added with a L-shaped cooling battery from underneath. Only if you don't need any freezing at all you could add a cooling battery to fit into the freezer box shape. In either case the benefit is somehow limited by the way the thermostat is used. If there is no temp control for freezing it should be fine. Warnings... Only peltier driven coolers are free from refrigerants. Every 3-way or compressor system uses refrigerant as evident by more or less piping and heating elements. Never attempt to screw anything into a cooling element containing refrigerant! Even if you think between the channels all will be fine it won't be! The material is just pressed to form the channels and any damage caould mean refrigerant leaking out! Use silicone instead and make sure all surfaces are properly cleaned before applying it, also wait until the silicone is really fully cured before putting any stress on it. As said, these cooling gels can be corrosive, especially if DC voltage is involved. Make sure that everything that is not aluminum or plastic is properly sealed before allowing ongoing contact with cooling gels. Do not attempt any of this if you have to ask yourself what tools you might need or how make a suitable container for the gel. If in doubt check Google on how to work with aluminium or stainless steel if there are not enough Instructables for it. The gel will expand a little bit if it freezes, this no problem in a metal container if you allow for a bit of flex or on the side added strength  - whatever suits you better. Another option is to get a few different cold packs (by the active ingredient) and to do a check in a little container. Freeze it and note whe level cold and warm. Little to no difference means nothing to worry in terms of expansion during freezing.

Topic by Downunder35m 


Laser Rangefinder

A member PM'd me with this question, "hi im asking if i can use the arduino micro controller in distance measuring using laser" My response was "Laser distance is the time of flight of a pulse of light pulse that travels 3 feet in a single nanosecond..." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_rangefinder Do you think the Arduino can execute instructions at a fraction of a nanosecond ? What is the clock frequency of an Arduino ? . Take care of your eyes when using lasers !  

Topic by iceng   |  last reply


New Download format

I REALLY LIKE the new Download system--it is a several-clicks improvement over the previous system. About the only thing I wish it did was provide a default title for the saved file. Bravo for the improvement!

Topic by ottoj 


How not to make an instructable

This is the place you can share all those instructable fail moments and help new guys like me avoid them. Its also the place were all your waisted time and effort can at least be worth a laugh for someone else. So if you ever made something stupid, done something wrong or just waisted some time this is were you need to be. Please be respectful and have fun!

Topic by inconceivable1   |  last reply


use Alexa with x10 house

What do i need for alexa to work with my x10 house i know a computer and a CM17A what else do i need i have alot x10 modules its at one time was voice activated but it was running on widows 95 computer is not working tryrd to get it going  but software is to oil any help is appreciate 

Topic by 4wheels 


possible? the auto-cooling pillow.

I am the kind of person that flips over his pillow every fwe minutes so my face can be on the cool side for a bit. I was wondering if anyone has ever created a pillow that keeps one side cool the entire time. Can anyone help?

Topic by astrozombies138   |  last reply


RSS individual projects

What is the rss link for individual projects? Appending rss.xml doesn't work. For example: https://www.instructables.com/id/Bluetooth-Control-LED-1/rss.xml

Topic by PaulineA12 


USB heater

Hi everybody! As sais in the title of the topic, I want to realize a USB heater. Let me introduce you to what I think. Last week, I was in the store near high school with some friends, and one of them told me : "It would be cool if we could heat up things in high school, to have like a mini oven directly in our locker, working with battery." Of course, the idea is not to install a oven in our locker, firstly because it would need an incredible battery, and secondly because it would be pretty dangerous.... So here is the idea : the goal is to heat up at least 2 chocolate breads at 60°C. The heating time is not very important, but it has to be under 40 minutes (a system will start the oven before our break). But here is not the most complicated : the oven has to get its power from a usb power bank(I can plug in 2 power banks if necessary). To conclude, I have to fin a solution to heat approximately 1.5L,( but most of it is filled with air), at 60°C, with a power of a maximum of 20W. I saw things to heat coffee by USB, would it work if I take the heating pad? Also, I would like to know how much power I can  get from a power bank (in W), before it to heat too much.

Topic by Romdu421   |  last reply


May 2014 site update - achievements + new editor

Last night we rolled out a few new features of the site that you may have already noticed, the largest impact will be around the new editor when authoring an Instructable and achievements badges (as seen on comments). New Editor: We've had a "try the new editor" button at the top of the old editor a few months now, giving you ample opportunity to kick the tires, test out the new interface, and see the direction we're heading. We've now officially dumped the old editor in favor of the new. We're sad to see our faithful old editor go, but the new editor has many enhancements (like image dropping, step swapping, and enabling hyperlinks just by pasting them as text). We've worked hard for this new editor to be more robust than its predecessor and last just as long. As with all new things, there's going to be some hiccups along the way. If you notice anything don't be shy about leaving a comment here detailing what you've experienced. Achievements: About 3 years ago we started kicking around the idea of rewarding authors with medals for milestones reached on our site. We thought it would be a fun way to showcase amazing authors at a glance beyond just the "featured" banner (which is now a medal that hangs at the top of your Instructable). A few things came in the way of making that happen when we first thought of gamification (launching of the international Instructables and some major back-end overhauls) but we've finally made the time to make it a reality. We've started with bronze/silver/gold achievements for featured Instructables, comments, and views and have plans to roll out more achievements later. For now, these will display on comments you leave which will augment the profile card that generates when you mouse-over your username. Look for medals to make their way to your profile page in an update soon. Other notes from this release: (fixed) heaps of boring back end stuff (fixed) Instructables with more than 50 comments have the 'next' button to view remainder of comments (fixed) remove related collections from draft preview (new) editor supports youku.com embed links (you're welcome, China) (new) revamped keyword entry (new) as we work with sponsors there will be a 'sponsored' label in lieu if a 'featured' label (new) International Instructables received some much needed love for user interface As with all updates to Instructables we want to hear your feedback. In the coming weeks we'll be tweaking this update so things all play nice together and work like they are supposed to. Remember to clear your browser cache completely and refresh the site to get the best results. So, what do you think?

Topic by mikeasaurus   |  last reply


Extreme water cooling idea for computer chilling plus dust protection

I started to play around with some compressor cooling devices, otherwise known as fridges, freezers or airconditioners ;) As with everything it started with a lot of reading, some doing, more reading, well you get the point... Anyways, I am now running an old and portable split airconditioner on hydrocarbons instead of the already escaped R22 refrigerant. With all this experimenting I got reminded that my computer does not really like to do hard gaming work on these hot days. There are already a lot of infos out there on how to use water and/or heatpipes to cool your system. One thing that they all have in common is that you need a chiller to cool the water. Now, there are really tons of options here - from using an old bar fridge to hold the water up to big direct chillers that can be used 24/7 and cost a small fortune. Here in Victoria the weather might be more forgiving but up north the humidity will be your main enemy if you want to use any decent cooling system. Imagine 90% humitiy and the water condensing on pipes and coolers inside your computer... Some systems compensate here by using a temp of around 12°C at the lowest to minimise the risk of condensation. But I think we can do better for cheaper if we are willing to get dirty and salvage some scrap. If it also a great way to protect your computer in a dusty and hot workshop enviroment! Let me explain the thought: Considering the costs for a decent air cooled system over the expense for just a basic water cooling kit it might be worth spending the extra money otherwise. What makes a normal and not overclocked computer go too hot assuming it is clean and free from dust? Right - the outside temperature and how hard we actually use it. Normal systems are designed to work at a room temp between 18 and 24°C, we are often lucky to have it under 30 in the summer. Getting a CPU to just under 70° if the outside air is already over 30° is hard if not impossible. But what if the computer would be in one of these fancy server rooms that are kept at 16° throughout the year? Problem solved, just win the lottery to get your server room build. Step back a bit and think again ;) If we make an additional and well insulated enclosure to put the computer in we would only need to worry about making it pretty much air tight and keeping the inside always under 20°C. Now follow me to my imaginary shopping trip... First step is getting a decent sized cooler box - you can build your own of course I would go for these oversizes Esky chests. Next step is a visit to the local hard rubbish collection or scrap yard. We look for a bar fridge or water cooling tower that has a condenser that will fit on the side or back of our cooling box. Prefer something old running on R22 instead of R134a if you can. If the system already has one or two service ports for filling even better, otherwise see you get one from a different fridge or freezer. The fun starts back home where we now make a big mess. The cooling system needs to come apart and if not a tower the fridge around it has to go without damaging pipes or condensers. Perfect would be to have a working system and to keep it in this condition to avoid the illegal escape or refrigerant. It also make it easier than having to refill it again. On the other hand getting a system that is already professionally evacuated as most scrap yards now do anyway can make the modding easier - up to your skill set and options to have the system checked and filled. Once we have a naked cooling system we get the cold side into the cooler box. Either by creating a slot to slide it in or by feeding the hoses through holes if you plan to do your own thing in terms of testing and filling. The compressor part and "hot side" are mounted securely to the outside of the box. If you still have the thermostat working and connected you can now check your homebuild fridge. To get the computer inside you have several option, IMHO the easiest is use one big enough hole to get all cables to the outside. You want this hole to end up as airtight as possible, I found candle wax to be a good sealer if you place some painters tape on the box first. So far this was the easy part, the hard part is now to make sure the humidity inside the box stays as low as possible. When the compressor starts cooling the evaporator will go to very low temperatures, even if you set the thermostat to 10° the cold side will condese or even freeze the moisture in the air. Unlike with direct cooling option inside your computer we now have a "cold trap" outside the coputer that we use to our advantage! Easiest option here is to have a catchment under the cold side to collect the condensing water and to let it discharge through a small tube to the outside. Once the system was operating for a few days there should be no moisture left inside our box unless it is not properly sealed. At this point you could be tempted to just set the thermostat to the coldest possible - I advise against it! Imagine the inside of the box is below freezing - the capacitors won't like it to start with and since we now have all surface subcooled the moisture can condense everywhere not warm enough, including your mainboard. A temp of around 10°C should be more than enough for normal gaming and gives the compressor a chance to turn off every now and then so any ice can drop off and exit. If you like the idea use it and make a featured Instructable out of it, my time is too limited at the moment to get serious with this.

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply


1 month pro membership?

Hello All! I am interested in finding out how I can purchase one month of service to try out the site? I have been searching for a bed frame design and found a really nice one on here!  The only problem is I can not download the PDF without being a Pro member. Is there any way I can do a "trial" membership and pay a one time month fee and test if I would use it for more than the one project? I really like the bed and would like to try the site for a month to see if i use it for any other plans/projects/ideas. Any help on this is greatly appreciated! Thanks

Topic by Jackson420   |  last reply


K'nex Contest 2016???

Will there be a K'nex contest this year ????????

Topic by FanPlastic   |  last reply


I need assistance please with trying to run 2 arduino codes at once

Hi. I am new to programming with Arduino so basically I am noob at this and I only know the basic etc. but what I want to do is be able to run 2 codes at the same time, the codes are soundreactive led and relay control via a serial port and because of this I am having problems combing them both don't if any one help ,e with this. Here's the code that I ended up creating.(Testing Sound reactive Led with plug control) as well added the 2 codes that I tried to combine.

Topic by JohnR267   |  last reply


Computer Power Supple to Power 2 Computer Fans

I have a wine fridge with two fans (computer fans)  that cool a massive heat sink, but the temperature gauge is faulty so they constantly power on and power off. I was hoping to remove the existing controller and power the existing computer fans (that are already mounted) with an old Computer Power Supply to have them constantly on. Any ideas?

Topic by AlC23   |  last reply


Can someone help me with common cathode leds and push buttons?

Hello everyone! Im planning on doing a thingy like this for my son, can it work? Im going to use a 3V 1A power source to connect 3 push buttons to a common cathode led, like on the image included. I was planning to use this led: http://www.ebay.com/itm/2p-10mm-RGB-LED-Common-Cathode-4-Pin-Tri-Color-Red-Green-Blue-3v-6v-9v-12v-FCL4P-/290802586540?hash=item43b52f53ac:m:m6IDFR2pATn4PfCbuH-kqzw and switches like this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/152146897080?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName;=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT is says: Light Voltage DC 3V In my mind it looks like this: if u push the red, the led will turn red, and u can add additional colors to it with the other 2 buttons. Could this work? If I figured it out good, I wont need a resistor for the blue and green, but I will need one for the red. How big it should be? Is it a good setup that I solder the positive to the switches and the black/negative to the one led? Can I add an another lead from the power supply to an another independent switch and single color led?

Topic by Smitiz   |  last reply


DIY Bluetooth speaker build, advice please

Hi all Apologies for the newbie questions, I've decided to build my first portable speaker system. I was hoping to make my own version of the 'Vintage Audio Suitcase Speaker' e.g. www.vcase.com.au I have found some second hand 6.5 inch 'Response' woofers for a cheap price and I have two spare satellite speakers from my Logitech Z-5500 system. Suitcase should be relatively easy to source. What I'm struggling with is the amp and battery choice. I'd like this to be able to run for a few hours on battery, and be easy to recharge via mains or USB. I don't mind spending a bit of money on the amp as I'd like this to last a good few years. The tricky part is, with my current speaker plan, it would need to run 4 speakers that are rated at 70wrms each. Plus the Logitechs are 8 ohm and the Response woofers are 4 ohm. Is this possible? Advice much appreciated.

Topic by SpookyGhost 


Visit My Site issue.

Hi Guys, I'm trying to add my blog to my profile information, but after I inserted it and went to an Instructable I created, if I press the "Visit My Site" button(Website URL), it redirects me to the same page I am instead of my blog. How can it be fixed? Regards  

Topic by duartejm   |  last reply


USB to AA converter?

Basically, I want to power a small AA device from a usb port, preferably terminating in something that will fit snugly into the two-AA receptacle. I searched the archives, but couldn't find an equivalent project. Any assistance would be appreciated. Thanks.

Topic by J0ub3rt   |  last reply


If you could ask God one question what would it be?

          If God came to your house and said that you have one question you can ask him and he will answer it what would you ask?

Topic by daredevil499   |  last reply