3D stickers, holographic sticker ¿How to make one?

Hello community, I would like to know if someone knows how to make one of this, they look amazing. Thank you in advance! http://www.holograma-fabricacion.es/images/vas/medved_3d_small.gif

Question by J0ny 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


My first Free3D print

Three months ago I submitted instructables into one of the challenges, and was selected to received Free 3D print. I chose to have my 3x3x3" 3D print instead of a famous 3D instructable robot. Two weeks ago, my 3D print got delivered in the 123D box, to my door. Also included in the box are an instructables patch and stickers. My 3D print is the case for my RevIO, an Arduino compatible board. A prototype that I'm made recently. (https://www.instructables.com/id/Build-The-RevIO-Arduino-Clone-My-Way/) Thank you very much for the Free3D Print program and everyone behide this program, otherwise I won't be able to see my project moving forward to this point. Thanks sath02

Topic by sath02 6 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Make it Real Free 3D Printing Giveaway - EXTENDED!

DUE TO POPULAR DEMAND, THE 50 PRINT GIVEAWAY IS BEING RENEWED THROUGH JUNE 4TH! Instructables is giving away FREE 3D prints to the first 50 projects to enter the Make It Real Challenge this week that get featured on the site! Simply enter your project into the contest, and if it gets featured, you get a FREE 3D Print. The Make It Real Challenge is open to any project that was at least partially designed using a computer: it could be a preliminary digital sketch, a sticker, an electronics schematic, laser-cutter files, a 3D design, or even an inkjet printer template - anything digital!  And the prizes are insane - we're giving away a $50k Objet 3D printer, 11 UP! personal 3D printers, and even more free 3D prints.  To win your FREE 3D print, just enter your project into the Make It Real Challenge this week and meet our featuring criteria!  Everyone who does will win a 3" x 3" x 3" 3D print of anything they choose, a 3D printed Instructables robot, or 5 pieces of their choice from the Free Universal Construction Kit.

Topic by randofo 7 years ago


Instructables "Thank you"

Ok Im updating this post, just to say Thanks again as over the last 18 months or so Ive been sent so much stuff from instructables! So thank you for the wolf blanket 8 tee shirts many many stickers, patches and sugru coffee cup sledge hammer solar phone charger raspberry pi maker do kits monsters of rock CD spark plug corn cob holders Monkey light shapeway credit 3D printer Tool box full of specialized bike tool Extraordinary projects for ordinary people book A special thanks to Penolopy Bulnick for  telling me "to get your instructable into a competition"  and for the 3D printer that, was completely unexpected, its going to get a lot of use.

Topic by liquidhandwash 6 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Photojojo Photo Month Winners Announced

Instructables and Photojojo are happy to announce the prizewinners from the Photojojo Photo Month!We saw lots of fantastic Instructables that covered all sorts of photo tricks and techniques. From classic darkroom methods to photoshop skills to faking a Polaroid picture, the entries displayed an incredible amount of skill and creativity. Thanks for sharing your projects and ideas! Photojojo and Instructables staff judged the contest, then added in the user votes. Winners will receive notifications within the next couple of days.Now, on with the winners! First PrizeThe authors of these Instructables each receive an Eye-Fi Wireless Memory Card, an Instructables Robot t-shirt, and Instructables stickers. In alphabetical order: Forge a Polaroid (kinda) by Seppuko How to Steady a Camera with Stringby marc92 Make your own Gorilla Pod by benthekahn Second Prize The authors of these Instructables each receive a Monsterpod, an Instructables Robot t-shirt, and Instructables stickers. In alphabetical order: 3D Shadow-Box Photo Begin photography and work your way up to pro... How to Take a Picture of the Steam from your Meals Quick and easy macro "attachment" Ten Second Kaleidoscope Lens Third PrizeThe authors of these Instructables each receive Magnetic Photo Rope to display their pictures and an Instructables robot patch and stickers. In alphabetical order: Canon Wired Remote Choosing and Using a P&S; Camera DIY Flash Diffuser with Hundreds of FREE Color Filters DIY PVC $10 underwater light arm Free Alternatives to Photoshop for Editing and Finalizing Your Photos! The Hands Free Bicycle Camera Tripod How to make a Tripod out of a 2 liter How to Print B&W; Photographs in a Darkroom Macro Photography: An Essential Skill for Good Instructables Make any digital image into a tattoo on a photo Panorama: How to Poor Man's Photoshop - Using Powerpoint to make Invisibilia

Topic by fungus amungus 11 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Come see us at Maker Faire NY 2015 (come be in a group photo!)

Maker Faire New York 2015 Instructables is going to have a booth at Maker Faire, and we want to see you! September 26-27, 2015 This year we're going all out with our largest booth ever. We're going to have a very special artist creating a display over the entire weekend. We're going to have some 3D printers making a small robot which you can assemble and take with you, and we've got plenty of T-shirts, stickers, and patches, too! Group Picture We're also having a group picture and want you to be part of it! Come to our booth on Sunday at 4pm and be included.  Leave a comment below, I'd love to know if you're coming. See you there!

Topic by mikeasaurus 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Vancouver Mini Maker Faire 2012

The Vancouver Make Faire 2012 was this past weekend. Those that could make it out were rewarded with seeing a 2-person bike spider, drawing robots, a whole village of 3D printers, a fire-burping machine controlled by a Fisher Price keyboard, and of course the Instructables booth where we were giving away stickers, patches and pins to all our fans.  Instructables members did not dissappoint, I met =D, Kev_MacD and fastermiles who came by the booth and talked about their passions. Also at the Faire: We were booth-neighbours with diyified, who showcased her DIY Toys I had ChrysN and nick2334 help me staff the Instructables booth and greet so many makers (thanks guys!) alejandroerickson had a "zest for mathematics" booth with a tensegrity workshop (it was packed) avid bike-hacker snotty shared a few of his custom rides (one of them had a sweet sound setup) I learned just how difficult it is to tie Chinese knots at arghc's booth aggrav8d had his $100 mural drawing robot in full effect (and it was awesome) Thanks to everyone who came out and stopped by our booth, it was a lot of fun meeting everyone. Below are a few pictures I took of the event, please feel free to share your own pictures of the Vancouver Maker Faire in the comments below.

Topic by mikeasaurus 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Silhouette Build Night at the Taipei Hackerspace

Hi, We just had our Silhouette Build Night in the Taipei Hackerspace yesterday. It was a blast, I was totally blown away by the many ideas people came with, even though we barely knew how to use the Silhouette paper cutter. We had participants of all ages, and many different backgrounds. The projects that came out of it, in no particular order: Dog silhouette cuts: apparently wiener dogs and corgis were the most popular, most just to keep, but there's an ongoing project to do a corgi-fan (hand-held fan in corgi shape) Custom cut name tags: because it's more fun than writing (Instructable) Cipher grille: because secrets are always fun, and it's easier than with scissors (Instructable); in the future might try circles instead of squares, that would look much cooler (hindsight...) Party props: most popular were lips and moustache, as usual... Flipbook: characters were cut and glued onto the flipbook, called "The missing piece" (Instructable) iPhone sicker: using some kind of 3D effect sticker, cut a it in the shape of the iPhone, perfect fit Pop-up word card: know the kind of greeting cards that you open up and there's a quasi-3D scene or text? That kind! Vitruvian man decoration: use transparencies with printed Vitruvian man, cut it out, then assemble into globes  for home decor (Instructable) Greeting card: creating a design with generous negative spaces, and use two layer of paper to assemble. Font selection is important (Techno Overload works quite well!) All in all it was good fun. I think we've ruined our mat by cutting too deep occasionally, running test cuts without pulling in the mat to the right position, sticking the printed transparency with the printed side down, and these little things. The biggest issues were the cut setting selection (lots of trial and error), and creating the design (now we have much better idea how to make JPEGs that work well in Silhouette Studio, but sometimes it was tricky using images grabbed from the net) Cheers! Greg

Topic by taipeihackerspace 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Silhouette Black Friday Promotion!

Our latest winner has responded!!! Thank you everyone for participating! It is Promotion Time! All you need to get any of the following awesome deals is our super secret special code for Instructable authors only! Ready? Do you want to know it? ,,, ,,, It is... INSTRUCTABLES Just go here to start shopping!  Promotion runs November 28—December 8, 2013. You may be asking yourself, what can I get with this promotion? Well, I'll tell you! A Silhouette CAMEO®, Silhouette Studio® Designer Edition Software, a dust cover (the color is decided by Silhouette), a $25 download card, a hook, a scraper, a spatula, and a pick-me-up® tool for $229.99. Retail price for all of this would total $406.93 (over 40% savings!) A Silhouette Portrait®, Silhouette Studio® Designer Edition Software, a dust cover (the color is decided by Silhouette), a $25 download card, a hook, a scraper, a spatula, and a pick-me-up® tool for $129.99. Retail price for all of this would total $286.93 (over 40% savings!) A Silhouette CAMEO® and a Silhouette Portrait®, plus two $25 download cards for $299.99. That’s right: If you buy a Silhouette CAMEO® at full price, you get two $25 download cards and a Silhouette Portrait® ABSOLUTELY FREE! Retail price for all of this would be $406.93 (over 40% savings!) 40% off consumable products at silhouetteamerica.com. This excludes machines, subscriptions, download and gift cards. Cannot be combined with any other offers. Rain checks not available. FREE SHIPPING on orders over $25. This is Silhouette America's biggest promotion ever, so don't miss out! You may be asking yourself, what can I do with a Silhouette machine?  The answer is: Everything!  (or at least almost everything) I've gathered together some of the awesome projects you can do with a Silhouette Cameo or Portrait. Han Solo and Princess Leia Silhouettes DIY Stickers 3D LEGO Card Custom Embellishments from PNG Files Put a Bird On It! | Portlandia Apron - Cut Fabric! Iron On Shirt Stencils DIY Clear Playing Cards ...and that's just the tip of it!  There are so many awesome accessories you can use and so many materials you can cut! We have a Silhouette Cameo at Instructables HQ and I use it whenever I can!  I have done a bunch of projects already and I have so many more planned!  It is great for making greeting cards for every occasion, for decorating shirts, cutting transparencies, making stickers and cutting fabric shapes for sewing or ironing on fabric.  I love that Silhouette Studio is an easy program to use. There are tutorials all over the web to learn how to do everything or you can just mess around and discover all the crazy things it can do (like I did).  Not sure where to start?  Just go to the in application store and look at all the awesome designs they have available.  There is a free shape of the week and they always have awesome designs on sale!  I just bought the awesome 3d poinsettia flower by Lori Whitlock for a cute little project soon to come! Get a machine for yourself, and your mother, and your father, and your BFF, and your boss, and your daughter ..... these deals are pretty darn sweet and if you've ever wondered: Should I get one?, now is the time to do it! *The giveaway will be going until 11:59pm Pacific Time.  The Promotion starts at 12:00am Eastern / 9:00pm Pacific.  The winner for the giveaway will be announced here as soon as it is over! a Rafflecopter giveaway

Topic by Penolopy Bulnick 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Help coming up with how to make robotics project (RFID/iButtons/sensors/chess/microcontrollers)? Answered

Hi all! :3 For my 2-year high-school robotics project (last two years of High School) we were allowed the freedom to choose whatever project we felt like working on, as long as it got approved by the teacher. Me, being a huge fan of chess, decided to make a chess-related project. Unfortunately, I dashed into it without giving it much thought. So I'm here asking you guys if you can think up of a way for me to achieve this. Afterwards I'd like to take it a step further and have it not be related to chess at all, and make my own board game with my own rules, but that's afterwards. Alright, I'm really bad at explaining things (English = not my native language), but here goes. I'd like to make an interactive chess board. The chess board would be grid-based, obviously, with possibly LEDs inside each square. I'd also have my 16 (or well, 32) chess pieces that would all be custom made. (I have access to any materials I need, so don't worry; I have a big budget, 3d printers, plenty of microcomputers and microcontrollers, you know. All I need to know is what to get X'D) Now let's say I place/take off a piece on the board. I'd want the grid to light up the corresponding squares/blocks. E.G: I pick up a pawn, and the square right in front of it lights up. So You understand what I mean? If possible there could be some button on the chess piece. Heck, it doesn't have to be a chess piece, as the shape would make it weird. I can just have blocks with a button on top and a little sticker indicating what piece it is. Anything like that works. I'm guessing the board would have some kind of microcontroller/microcomputer integrated into it that would process the logic for the lights/movements. The part that really gets me most is how it will know what chess piece it is and how I would go about implementing the code and such. If you had to make this, and had 2 years time, how would you make it? What kind of materials would you use? I've been doing a bit of research on this, and through my research it seems like using Arduino or something of the like along with iButtons or some sort of RFID/NFC would be ideal. I don't want to do anything optical, like utilizing cameras, etc. I'd like each piece to store memory and information related to it and for it to be able to be read and written by the board (well, the microcontroller/microcomputer). Again, I don't have that much expertise with anything related to radio frequencies, or a lot of the part of the hardware-side of the project, I'm more of a software-buff. But I really want to learn which is why I'm doing this! I have a bit over a year's experience in C++ and Java, since that's most likely going to be required. Anything helps! Thank you so much for your help! :')

Question by h4n4t0 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


How to make Flip Clock Numbers and build a "like"-counter around it?

Hey All So I've got this client, who's absolutely crazy about the "FLIKE" (A physical like counter.). But he can't have it for another couple of months, and he'd like it to be a little more custom... Long story short, I might end up making a similar product in a few weeks. it will probably consist out of 5 digits and if it's up to me (not sure what the client wants) I'd stuff them behind a long picture frame. Something like this but actually mechanical and not just a picture of it:  http://www.notonthehighstreet.com/thedriftingbear/product/personalised-framed-vintage-flip-clock-print So I started googling every hardware piece I needed and it turns out it's a huge pain to find Flip Clock Numbers / Flip Board Numbers... whatever you want to call them. (What's the right name btw?) You can't just buy these things, let alone in a custom size. So the idea is to build them myself. I found this on wikipedia, which gives a clue about the inside: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Analog_clock_with_digital_display.png So I'm figuring out what needs to go in it to make this work. (I'll end up making an instructable about it) The numbers themselves are going to be made out of vinyl stickers. You can easily buy those from ebay in about any size if you look for them. The stickers will be put on to plastic boards. But I'm not totally sure what kind I should get. They should be thin and must be able to stand up straight, yet "easy" to fold. I'll probably get them lasercut, but you should be able to cut them by hand as well. Currently I'm thinking about gluing small metal or carbon rods on the back of those letters. Although I'm not sure if that would be strong enough. Would it be enough to file one side of the rods to get a bigger contact surface? (What do you guys think?) I'm planning of putting the half letters in a drum of ABS or PLA. it should be shaped like this:  |--------| I'm thinking about 3D printing this. But no idea how it'll do... One side of the drum will be connected to a small stepper motor (5.625° with 1/64 reduction). I don't have real experience with stepper motors, but this resolution seems more than sufficient. The other side will be connected to a metal or plastic positioner. Each digit might end up with it's own "unit" so I can swap them separately if they'd break. I've got great experience with lasercut plexi, so I might use that because it's more accurate than wood and I might have some lying around. I was first thinking about 1 stepper motor and a set of gears. I decided not to do that in the end because I don't have good experience with making gears and I can never find the right sizes online. Also, it'll make everything way more complex. So each motor will have it's own controller connected to it. Those controllers would have to talk to an ATMega or something. (I'm planning on using an arduino to prototype, but then just swap the chip and make a stand-alone version without usb etc) The ATMega has to be connected to the internet of course to get the current number of likes, so I'd connect it to a raspberry pi via I²C. I'm not familiar with the GPIO pins on the pi so I figured this would be a save and convenient way to handle this. The ATMega is robust, and I love the Arduino bootloader. A sketch is written in no time, but I have no idea how to start writhing this code for the GPIO pins. So why the Raspberry Pi? First off, this thing might end up being wireless, and since a wifi module for the arduino costs as much as a Pi, I figured this would be easier. The plan is to make the pi run python script that could ask the number of likes from the facebook API. Once returned, it'll send +1 or +5 or +10 over I²C. The arduino shifts the numbers to the correct position and replies with the total number it's displaying (3012 for instance). The PI can then recheck if everything is in sync. As for the set up. Since we have Pi, we can put on a LAMP stack (I know, this is overkill, but it wouldn't hurt either). So for initial set-up, we'd connect the counter to ethernet, browse to it on a different computer via "http://counter.local". And we'd be presented with a web interface. You'll be able to set the URL of the page u want to get the likes from, set and reset the number that is displayed on the counter, and the WIFI settings. The WIFI settings can be saved in the wpa_supplicant.conf file and on reboot it'll automatically connect to this network. From now on the whole system is manageable over wifi via a html interface. For debugging I might enable ssh though. So I guess you've got the whole outline now. I'd like to get your feedback on this! And this for the mechanics, electronics, and software side of things! 

Question by woutervddn 5 years ago  |  last reply 7 months ago