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Artist in Residence Gone?

Is Instructables no longer taking applications for artists in residence? I found the page explaining it, but the application and program website are 404.

Topic by Brooklyntonia    |  last reply


The worst time of my life

If three years ago somebody had told me that I would be at Maker Faire, using my cyborg arms, watching Arc Attack playing the “Doctor Who” theme, and meeting Adam Savage from “Mythbusters”, I would have said that person is crazy or is mocking me. But I was there. With Instructables. It was awesome when Adam Savage, in the middle of his conference, yelled to me “Hey man! Nice borg!!”. “OH MY GOD!” I thought, “ADAM SAVAGE FROM THE MYTHBUSTERS TOLD ME I MADE A NICE BORG!!” But, beyond Adam Savage, the giant robots, the fire and electricity shows, the beautiful steampunk women, the good energy, the delicious food and the pictures with Daleks; the most beautiful, shocking, awesome and magical moment of the Maker Faire 2013 was when I had just arrived at the Autodesk booth. I saw the giant map of DIYers from around the world, and I realized my picture and profile were representing Colombia and I was one of the three leading makers of South America. I was paralyzed remembering all this journey, from being a complete loser without a future to that point in time and space when I felt absolutely happy, calm, and at peace with myself. It was worth it to keep fighting, just for that sublime moment. I felt like a Rock Star. Not because I was, but because Instructables and Autodesk made me feel like one. ……………………………………… When people ask me “Why do you love Instructables?” my answers are always the same: because the site is awesome, has amazing projects and great contests with cool prizes; because Instructables is the only one who has supported my DIY activities, especially in my country (Colombia) where science and technology aren’t priorities, and so on. But I never gave the complete answer. And now, after these fantastic five months as Artist in Residence, I want to tell the truth: I love Instructables because they were with me in the worst time of my life. ……………………………………… In 2009, I lost my job as Security Analyst in an important Colombian company. I thought I could subsist thanks to my junk projects and creating my own business, but almost nobody was interested on buying recycled crafts (besides, I wasn’t as good then as I am today.) And the only interested people wanted my works for free. It was not enough for a living, so after a few months I started looking for a job. Due to its economic situation, Colombia has high rates of unemployment and it’s very hard to find a job, and there’s no government subsidy for unemployed workers (sorry Colombia! One day, I will talk about all your beautiful and fantastic things, because you have a lot. But not today). Besides, when you are a former military officer the only civilian jobs you can apply for are in security because nobody thinks you can be creative; and if you are, nobody takes you seriously. Every two weeks I had an interview. Every interview ended with just another “we will call you.” It’s time to confess something to the world: at the same time, I was diagnosed with mild Borderline Personality Disorder and depression. It’s not something that “SHAZAM! You are nuts!”. No. I knew from years ago there was something wrong about me, but just in that moment I found out what I have. Just in case you ask: no, this condition doesn’t make me a bad employee, and I’m very competent in my work. No, I’m not some kind of evil psycho. Just a little bit creepy sometimes, but I always try my best to be a good person. And no, I’m not trying to look like a “dark and bizarre, Tim Burton style” character just because I want to look interesting. It may work for an artist or a teenager, but not for somebody trying to get a job in the security business or a stable relationship. I didn’t have any health insurance; I didn’t have money for any treatment and, in case I could afford it, there is a social stigma about persons with some kind of mental disorder, and no company would be interested in hiring a security manager with that kind of problem. So, I had to keep it to myself. I didn’t even tell it to my family. And my girlfriend broke up with me. So, my life was “complete.” I was without a job, love and almost without my sanity. Almost all of my “friends” were gone. I was drowning in debts. I didn’t have money even for basic things. I had to return to my mother’s house. I lost every goal, every dream, and every hope. The situation was so desperate that I seriously thought about giving up. But only two things stopped me from doing that. One was Carolina, the only friend I had in that moment. The other thing was Instructables. ……………………………………… I found the site several months after because I was looking for simple robots ideas. Then, I saw Instructables has contests, and I entered my first project (the “SPD Exoskeleton”) for the 2009 Halloween Contest. A lot of people made awesome comments about my project, and I received my first prize: the “Photojojo!” book and a Robot T-Shirt. “What? I just post pictures of my project on an internet site and they give me free stuff? Interesting!” Then, I made another project, the “Valentine’s RoboGrinch”. I was a finalist in the 2010 Valentine’s Day Contest. People around the world commented about my ideas, and my projects started to become popular being featured in other sites and blogs around the planet. When I got the First Prize on the Dead Computer Contest, I gave to my mother the netbook I won. It was the only present I could afford to give her in a long time. In my darkest moments, when I thought about giving up, I remembered I had some project on Instructables I didn’t finish or publish, and then I keep fighting just one or two days more, because I didn’t want to leave it uncompleted. When I finished it, I endured one week more, just for knowing if it was successful in a contest. Sometimes I won. Sometimes I lost. When I could get some money, I used it for buying tools or materials for the projects, instead of food or paying debts. Because I started to think that every project, every idea I was making, every instructable I was writing, was my little legacy to humanity. Probably one day I will die, but at least in some part of the Internet, it would be a proof that I made something good, something that could be appreciated by anybody, and my life was not in vain. And I started to win more contests. It felt good, because I thought “I’m a loser, but this loser is kicking butts!” With so many fantastic authors, the competition got tougher, so I had to improve my skills (and my English. Instructables was the only opportunity I had to improve and practice this language.) I became very good at making stuff with plastic trash and limited resources! Besides, without knowing anything about me and my personal situation, even without being on the same country, the Instructables staff and community were (and are) very special and kind with me. They always made me feel respected and loved. Instructables was the only escape I had from my reality. This site has thousands of users and still they had the time to talk to me, to care for me, to make me feel like part of a bunch of friends! They were the only people that didn’t see me or treat me like a loser or somebody who needed to be pitied. They were the only ones that made me feel I wasn’t completely alone on this planet. All of this situation lasted one year and two months. Instructables kept me fighting almost all of that time. ……………………………………… Finally, in September of 2010, I got a job. It wasn’t the best (honestly, it was horrible!), but at least I was working. Four months later, I got a better job as security manager of a business center, enough to start paying debts. On October 2010, I went to the Colombian equivalent of Comic-Con, using the Cyborg suit I built for the Instructables’ Dead Computer Contest. Thanks to this, a beautiful woman found me out of the crowd, because she loves robots. She became my biggest fan and we shared a big love. I never thought I could find a love like that. She was the girlfriend I got thanks to Instructables! She was the inspiration of my “Cyborg Heart in a Can”. And I gave it to her. And then Instructables interviewed me as Featured Author. I would be the first Colombian to be a Featured Author! That was awesome! In total, I have won twelve Instructables contests and two challenges. Thanks to Instructables, people of all the world know about my cyborgs and my Roboplanters. (The funny thing is I’m still feeling like the black sheep of the family!) ……………………………………… It was 2012. After one and a half year of relationship, my girlfriend and I broke up, for good (our respective problems were stronger than our love.) Besides, I was stuck at work and I couldn’t study something art or robotics related because the restrictive schedule of my job. So, the depression was returning… I was lying on the couch watching “Doctor Who” when a phrase get stuck in my mind: “All of time and space. Everywhere and anywhere. Every star that ever was. Where do you want to start?” And then I realized that nothing was tying me to Colombia and I could apply to the Instructables Artist in Residence Program. I wanted to know, at least for a few months, how it was to be in the most awesome company in this world. So I quit my job, I sold most of my belongings, I packed my Dremel, my trench coat and my sonic screwdriver, I said goodbye to my family and I traveled to San Francisco on February 27th of 2013. I didn’t come for the “American Dream”. I came for the “Instructables Dream”! ……………………………………… What can I say? How can I describe the most fantastic experience of my life, using just a few words? How can I summarize five months of happiness, learnings, DIY and good energy, when every day was an amazing adventure? I felt, after 35 years of life, I finally arrived in the place I belong. I met the faces behind the site I love and admire. You know who they are (sorry for breaking the magic but, please! Update the Instructables Team page! A lot of awesome people are not there!) I’m trying to not mention specific persons, because I shared awesome experiences with each one of you. Every one of you taught me something, every one of you made me feel appreciated, every one of you does a fantastic job keeping this site working. And I want nobody feels excluded of this post (Sherry always fights for sending out prizes on time, silently. Why nobody says “Thanks Sherry?”) Because Instructables is more than servers and computers and projects and internet. Instructables is the people. From the beginning, Instructables and the Autodesk Consumer Group made me feel like one of the team, like part of something bigger than myself. The Pizza Thursdays, the Marvelous Mondays, the Build Days, the Design Nights, became magical events for me. But it wasn’t only Instructables and Autodesk. This beautiful city of San Francisco taught me real lessons about tolerance, respect and being yourself. It doesn’t matter if you are radically different to the other people. Just be a nice person, do your job and respect the others, and everyone will respect you. I had never touched a CAD software, because I didn’t see any possible use for it in my life. And I thought it was something so complicated that only engineers and designers could use that kind of program. But then I went from 0 to 123D Design! I learned the basics in just two days and I fell in love with this awesome program, and it’s free! (But, seriously guys, try to fix that problem with the crashes. Everyone in the lab knew that when I screamed, it was because the program had a crash and I hadn’t saved the progress). And later, I learned how to use a 3D printer, a machine beyond my wildest dreams! I remember the infinite sadness the first time I went to the amazing Pier 9 (new installations of Instructables and the Autodesk Consumer Group) and thought I could never try that fantastic technology; and the happiness when Noah told me I could stay two months more! You have all the best freaking hi-tech tools in this freaking world, and you don’t need to be a NASA scientist or a millionaire to use them! This place is waiting for people of all the world, to come with their ideas! (It doesn’t matter how crazy they are). 3D printers, laser cutters, a water jet, a bunch of expensive machines I still don’t know the names of, an awesome test kitchen, metal and wood shops, even a sewing area! And all available for the DIY community! But, more than being on Pier 9 because the fantastic machines, I loved to stay here because Instructables.  My life has good things and bad things, successes and failures. But being part of Instructables and sharing moments with all of you has been the most memorable experience of my whole existence! ……………………………………… I want to say something to my dear friends of Instructables and Autodesk: if one day, for some inexplicable reason, you feel like your work is meaningless, you don’t like it’s Monday or simply you forgot what this is all about, just remember something: you will never know exactly how many lives Instructables has touched: how many persons found their true calling thanks to the projects, and how many persons found a hobby that makes their life happier. How many couples fell in love thanks to the delicious recipes and romantic crafts, and how many parents shared precious moments with their sons building something. But now you will always know, at least, Instructables and Autodesk saved one life. My life! ……………………………………… I wish to finish my post with some “Doctor Who” quote. I love “Doctor Who”, because is all about being awesome and optimistic and keep smiling even in the worst situations or despite you are feeling absolutely sad and alone. And the series has a lot of badass and beautiful quotes! But now, when I have to start packing my bags, when I have to return to my hometown where I have to pretend I’m a “normal” person and try to get a “normal” job again, when I have to say goodbye to my coworkers (that are at the same time most of the only real friends I have had in my life), and to the greatest organization I have had the honor of being part (where for first time in life I felt truly appreciated, respected and loved, and happy because it was Monday and I could go to work in a company that is making of this world a better place); there’s one, and only one phrase that I got stuck on my head; the last words of David Tennant as the Tenth Doctor when, standing alone after saying goodbye to his loved ones (and to the most awesome time of his life), his final moment comes: “I don’t want to go.” Mario Caicedo Langer Former Artist in Residence. Instructables

Topic by M.C. Langer    |  last reply


Artist in Residence Opportunity in London (open to international applications)

Do you do art "for real"? There's an opportunity you might like: LINK The selected artist will be provided with accommodation, studio, stipend and a production budget towards new work. The artist will be selected from an open call, with the 4 month residency resulting in a public exhibition and publication in 2014. We are seeking applications from artists who have been working professionally for 5 years. We welcome international applications.  The residency includes a £2000 budget towards the production of new work, a £2000 stipend and up to £350 pounds towards travel expenses. Flat Time House will offer a self contained artist's residence with en-suite bathroom. Adjoining kitchen facilities are shared with FTHo's staff.  The deadline for applications is September 8 2013. The residency is to begin late November 2013 and run until late March 2014. 

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Jayefuu as Instructables' Artist in Residence

Thursday saw the end of two of the most fun filled months of my life. Since the beginning of February I've been an artist in residence at Instructables' office in San Francisco. First impressions? The office was unlike any I'd ever visited or heard of. An open plan 2nd floor office above a deli and a night club on 2nd street, Instructables' headquarters is home to a team of 25 young and enthusiastic staff. It's not like your average software company either, no desk is the same and each is covered in or surrounded by a mix of complete and incomplete projects, or is in itself a project. Those above mentioned staff are all friendly. The office has the same tight knit community feeling that I have felt part of as a non-staff member using the site. As an artist in residence I was given no direction other than to be creative and pursue and finish projects that interested me. The environment was hugely beneficial as a maker. At home I feel that I have to explain why I want to make something. “But you can buy that!” I am often told. At Instructables I was surrounded by people who understand that making is a passion, that it's important and ideas quickly develop and grow as enthusiastic friends chime in with over the top but all too often adopted suggestions to improve projects in progress or create new projects. There doesn't need to be a reason to create something to amuse, educate or just show off. While in residence I worked on a bubble machine, a giant chess set to play in Eric and Christy's kitchen, an improved laser cut jenga pistol, a cupcake decorating stencil, several educational instructables as well as writing Perl to simplify several tedious admin tasks performed by the editors. My most used tool was the laser cutter. If I had to choose a favourite new skill that I learned, I'd be hard pressed to choose between the skills I developed with a DSLR and lighting, and how to drive a forklift. The best piece of insider information I picked up.... I know who the next artist in residence will be! Given a chance, I'll definitely be back. I love the staff, I love the city and the nearby climbing is exceptional! James

Topic by Jayefuu    |  last reply


My 2 Months as an AiR

I read through all of the 'my time as an AIR' posts to get inspiration and to dial my thoughts on what to write. There was one common theme amongst them all - Being an AIR at Instructables is the most awesomely incredible experience! There are so many thoughts running through my head and heart at the moment, it's hard to know where to begin.   I came to the Pier from Northern Idaho. Where traffic is four cars at a traffic light and criminals are high school kids smoking weed in an alley. Arriving in the Bay was a bit of a culture shock. It was great to experience the Bay Area beyond that of a vacation, and to have an idea what it was like to live here.  When I started my residency I was a bit intimidated - by the tools and by all the creative projects everyone was doing. Once I completed some training courses and got to know people at the Pier, I found it was easy to get into a routine and to be completely comfortable working away in the shop.  While I was an AIR I completed a handful of different projects (check them out!). I started the program with the idea that I would make some sort of furniture piece that incorporated plant life. What that piece was, I had no idea. After starting some other side projects, my main project really started to define itself and take some direction. It was great having the freedom to make changes to project ideas and really just go where your mind takes you.  The Pier is full of some very creative and talented people - all of which were so helpful along the way. Whether I was stuck in the design process or the building process, there was also someone to help me get over that hump.  The Best Parts: - The freedom to make what you want, when you want - The friendly, creative and knowledgable Instructables employees - Access to high quality tools and equipment - Eating too much at the food trucks - The view from the Pier! The Worst Parts: - Eating too much at the food trucks - 2 months is too short! - Leaving Advice for future AIRs: Don't be intimidated. Be confident in your ideas. And don't be afraid to change your direction when a new idea comes your way. Thank you to everyone who made my residency as amazing as it was. The people and the residency were both very inspiring. It was surreal to be able to make what you want, when you want, with access to just about everything you can imagine. For me, it felt like a once in a lifetime experience.  -Tess

Topic by tessalene    |  last reply


I feel...

As is becoming traditional for new folk in The Office, it's time for me lay down some thoughts on my first week as Artist in Residence. I feel old.  As I staggered up the stairs last Monday, luggage on my back, I looked and round at a room full of young people.  I haven't been so crass as to directly ask, but I immediately sure that there is a full generation between the people that I was looking at and myself.  Many of them are far closer in age to my sons than to me. I feel welcome. Everybody smiled at me, even if my arrival interrupted whatever they were doing, and quite a few folk that first few minutes weren't sure who who I was, but were still welcoming.  Everybody is very helpful, nowhere is out of bounds. Stumpchunkman Matt went out of his way to make sure I had a base to work at, Noahw sorted out the legals in moments, Jessyratfink gave me a tour (the place I had previously referred to as "HQ" is actually in three different places, a brisk stroll apart). I feel valued. Almost immediately, my opinion was being asked, used and acted upon.  I've helped choose contest winners, and been part of the development process for the future of the site (interesting!).  I have been included in everything. I have not been punched by a member of the dev team. I feel trusted. I have a key to the office hanging on my belt, and I know where the coffee is. I feel ignorant. These people, these young people, know so much more than I do about the high end of Making.  But, they're also keen to teach - I have had lots of offers for help to learn.  As a teacher, that feels weird, weirdly good... I feel happy. The walk from my apartment to the main office takes about 50 minutes, and goes through a somewhat dodgy area of the city, but every day I smile the full way, even singing and whistling.  The bus-ride back (it's up-hill - I may be happy, but I'm not daft) is crowded and sweaty, but I am still smiling, and still ready to sing (but quietly).  I've never been like that on a commute. I feel productive. I've only published two small projects this week, but I have two larger projects in development that will involve staff, and a bunch of other things to make as well.  It's really useful that conversations with staff go along the lines of "Can I have a...? Yes" ------------------------------ Basically, all this adds up to this being a really good experience.  It is by no means a free ride (thank goodness for credit cards!) - if you're young and single you could do this for a lot less than I have, but I could not get away with spending a month in California without bringing the family along. If you ever, ever get the chance to do this, or something similar, then grab it with both hands!

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Transformational experience for Instructables Artist-in-Residence

Instructables' Artist-in-Residence Mario Caicedo-Langer is pretty hands-on. He can make a robot out of anything, but was intrigued by the 123D suite of apps. I asked him to document his experience here... http://blog.123dapp.com/2013/04/transformational-experience-for-instructables-artist-in-residence It's pretty cool - the next step is printing the robot in one print, while still having moveable joints.

Topic by andrewt  


My Month at Instructables as an Artist in Residence

It's easy to see Instructables as a single entity who's persona is summed up in one yellow robot. During the month of November I had the good fortune to spend a month as an Artist in Residence at Instructables HQ and had the opportunity to look behind the yellow curtain and learn more about the people who craft the website and the work that they do. During my stay I met artists and technicians, crafters and programmers, and I was allowed to peek into their world and see the inner cogs whirling away. Oh yeah, I was also let loose with a million dollars worth of 3D printers and laser cutters with no more direction than to have fun and make stuff! Day to day life at the office was not what I expected. Before arriving I had envisioned a, well, a madhouse. I figured that there would be 10 ft cardboard robots beeping away in one corner, office supply archery in the other, and paper airplanes gliding over the top of it all. When inside though I didn't find a room of chaos, but a room of people quietly working. I soon found out that between community management, site development, contests and other site duties there is a massive amount of work that goes into making the Instructables DIY hub function. It wasn't all business though, there was certainly time for liquid nitrogen ice cream, communal lunch hours, and pizza Thursday! I am very much a robot / tech person, so one of the highlights of my visit was getting to talk shop with randofo and amandaghassaei, Instructables technology editors. They had the coolest gadgets, and both fit the role of tinkers perfectly. Randofo had a huge bin of motors, gearboxes and other electrical delights that he patiently let me riffle through, and Amanda's work area was mass of dismantled keyboards, wire and test equipment. They practiced a type of electronics where novelty is the main function, and it was amazingly fun to see their projects come together. And yes, of course, the 3D printers were a blast. I really was allowed to dive in and try anything I wanted with the Objet machines so I took every spare moment working with them. I spent a fair amount of time running test prints of the different materials and testing their physical and mechanical strength, (aka breaking them). Once I had a feel for the UV cure pseudo plastic, I had just enough time to print everything I wanted plus some. I should also mention that this same building had two of the fastest laser cutters I've seen, and all the plastic and cardboard I could possibly need for my scale of projects. I can't possibly relate how liberating it felt to be able to think of an idea, draw up the CAD, and have a working prototype in less than an hour. The Instructables office is found on a busy street of San Fransisco, above a deli and a bar that plays full Talking Heads albums. This was my first time in California and I loved every minute of it. There was this creative energy all about and it seemed that there was some kind of art plastered anywhere it could fit. I felt like I was on an expedition, seeing for the first time things that I had only read about; I saw subway performers, photographers, and a silver painted robot guy. I ate at a Kwik Way and bought guitar string from the store that the Mythbusters bought their trumpets from. Not only that, but there are celebrities in California and I'm almost positive that Elton John rode the same bus as me every day. I could be wrong, but he had these huge glasses and the hair cut and everything. (I've never seen a celebrity before.) I visited California for a month but it felt like it flew by in minutes. After giving a small presentation over a Thai lunch and a short goodbye, I left San Fransisco and Instructables with a greater awareness and appreciation of the creative community and the talents of its members. Visiting the office and meeting the Instructables crew was an unforgettable experience and I hope to visit again someday. I would highly recommend the AIR program to any one in the position to participate, I had the time of my life.

Topic by Tomdf    |  last reply


Who's Who in the AiR Program

Check out the talented artists we have in the AiR Program - For a full size view, click here.

Topic by Nesserz    |  last reply


Program Feedback

What's it like to be an Artist in Residence at Instructables?  Don't ask us, ask our previous residents! Being an artist in residence at Instructables by Samuel Bernier Jayefuu as Instructables' Artist in Residence by James Williamson (Jayfu) Last Day at Instructables by Kelsey Breseman (SelkeyMoonbeam) My time as an AiR by Mark Langford (Kiteman) My Summer as an AIR at Instructables by Gabriella Levine (gabriellalevine) Field Report - Mads Hobye as an Artist in Residence by Mads Hobye (madshobye) My Month at Instructables as an Artist in Residence by Tom Flock (Tomdf) What it's like to be an Artist in Residence at Instructables by Tim Wikander (timwikander) Reflecting on my AiResidency by Taylor Cone (tcone) The worst time of my life by Mario Caicedo Langer (M.C. Langer) Fozzy13's AiR Experience! by Adam Fasnacht (Fozzy13) Masynmachien's time as an AIR  by Yvon Masyn (masynmachien) My 2 Months as an AiR by Tess Howell (Tessalene) An embarrassment of riches by Rachel McConnell (rachel) My experience as an AIR by Tanner Welch (Tanner W) The AiR05 - designed and built during Q4:13 by Timothy Lipton (timmylip) Living Salad, makerbot songs, and noodle by Lauren Mccarthy (lmccart) How to got to Maker Heaven by Mikaela Holmes (MikaelaHolmes) Crazy, Amazing and Delicious AIR Experience by Rima Khalek (rimamonsta) Autodesk: Art Residency of Generosity by Scott Kildall Autodesk Artist in Residency by Anouk Wipprecht (anoukwipprecht) Duck Confit, Perfected by Aaron Geman (aaron_geman) Pier 9, I've never met anyone quite like you before. by Andrew Maxwell-Parish (ElectricSlim) To Pier 9, Thank for Everything by Thiago Hersan My Introduction to the 21st Century by John Whitmarsh My Autodesk Residency by Benjamin Cowden (tinkertinker) Talking about my Summer by Laura Devendorf (LDevendorf) Pier 9 is a Disneyland for Makers by Alejandro Palandjoglou (alepalan) Reflections on Pier 9 Residency by Andreas Bastian (andreasbastian) Making the Most of Your Time Here by Will Buchanan (buchananwp) Reflections on the Pier by Reza Ali (syedrezaali)

Topic by noahw  


AiRs in the Media

Our AiRs have been making waves both online and through published articles. Check out some of the cool articles that have been written about the work that our AiRs are doing!

Topic by Nesserz    |  last reply


Talking about my Summer

I have to admit that I was skeptical before starting my Residency at Instructables. I never felt comfortable calling myself a "Maker" and here I was, walking into the belly of the beast at Pier 9. I felt like the term "Maker" was starting to read as cold, technical, robotic and...frankly...stuff really geared towards young boys. I felt as though I was coming into the program as a spy, an outsider looking to infiltrate and be critical of the hype around 3D printing. My project was really my attempt to talk openly about how I felt about these things in a way that people who design and use these machines might take notice. I was expecting to walk into an office full of dudes that wanted to make crazy things just because they could but I was created by quite another experience. The other AiRs were all interesting, questioning, infiltrating. The entire company was full of creative, open-minded, artsty folk and I can't tell you how good it felt to be in the electronics lab one day with all these different amazing and creative women coming in and out. I end my residency (the full-time part anyway) with a different attitude and the realization that people are pretty open-minded, excited and down-right nice! I never imagined people would go to the lengths they did just to help see the project along and it felt great to help and encourage others to see their ideas though. I think I leave the summer with a few new friends. On my presentation day, I felt like I wanted people to sign my year-book - it's that kind of place.   My favorite thing about the residency was also made the residency difficult. The space and people are so interesting and engaging that conversations start all the time. It's so great, but also makes it really hard to get work done! There is so much going on that its hard to stay on top of what people are working on - especially with the residents that aren't around everyday. It would be interesting to find ways to facilitate feedback and collaboration in different ways. We do an exercise in a class I help with at Berkeley where people put their projects on the wall and the other students add post-its with feedback. Maybe if we had a wall like that in the Air-ea it could be a way to keep tabs of all the work and also give short snippets of feedback without interrupting someone's flow. It wouldn't be a way to replace other ways of sharing what we're working on, but a sounding board for just quick, "have you seen X" kind of ideas.  I can't say thank you enough. I had a great, productive summer and I'm excited to be sticking around for a bit longer and seeing the new AiRs that come in and out. I would (and have) recommend the program to anyone - it was a really wonderful experience!

Topic by ldevendorf    |  last reply


Pier 9 is Disneyland for Makers

The amount of resources this place has is impossible to describe. If you really want to learn all the equipment at Pier 9 it will probably take you 2 years to fully know how every machine works. People here love making things and it felt like home. For me making is not only the transformation of the object into the final piece but it's a transformation in me, how my emotions change as I build. I never felt more connected to my work as in Pier 9. It's been a few months since I finished my residency and to be honest every week I think of quitting my job and going back. It has been one of my most memorable experiences in the past couple of years and if you are thinking of applying, stop thinking and APPLY! (3 good friends: John, Xander and Wei are now AiR after I shared my experience with them) I applied to be an AiR because I had a bunch of personal projects I wanted to make and had been really busy working at SRI designing really amazing robots to "save the world". Most of the projects I was working back at that time were kind of long and most of them involved DARPA funding (confidential- can't talk about). In contrast, I wanted to make shorter projects, just for fun. Pier 9 seemed like a perfect place. It is located over the water, you will be literally cutting wood on the table saw with the most amazing view of downtown SF. I live in Menlo Park so I would take the Caltrain and get of at King St. Then I would bike for 10 minutes along the Embarcadero. At night, I would bike facing the Bay Bridge Lights. Overall beautiful commute. When I joined in November 2013, things were still being organized at the Pier. For example, making a reservation for a class was super easy and intuitive. a few months after that there was a more complicated process and it felt the classes were always full. The AiR lounge/office had white walls and no furniture so I decided to make a few projects to make our space a little nicer. I also made the AiR wallet to keep the credit card safe (we used to have a big clamp to store our credit card). One final addition, was the AiR roster that I pulled together to know all of the other AiR and have their contact info. One of my objectives at the Pier was learning to do CNC. I started working with the ShopBot and learned to do 2.5 CNC fairly quickly. I enjoyed making CNC furniture for the Pier. I hope the Piggy Coffee table is still in the AiR lounge. After that I continued working with CNC and made a clock and a sunglass case. I wished the DMS 5 axis was running before I left the Pier so I could make my lounge chair from a tree trunk. I do want to say sorry for all of the router bits I broke, all of the toxic materials I used and any other unethical things I've done! I will miss Pier 9 but I what I will miss the most is the people. There were about 10-15 Artists in Residence at any given time. That meant that every week or two, a new talented artist was joining and another one was saying goodbye. The best part was that we all shared our work and got great comments and feedback from the rest of the group. The amount of creativity and diversity was unbelievable. I have to make a special mention to my shop teacher and friend Sean. He has been a great companionnon several all nighters at the Pier. We would be doing some crazy amount of work in the evening and going to bed around 7 am. I would go and sleep for a long while but he always had to come back to the Pier and teach a class. Sean was responsible for teaching me some tricks on a couple of machines so thanks to him my time was more effective. Another thing I will miss is going to the woodshop and see Sam working on the next modification to the shop. He was always with a friendly smile giving us advice while he was finishing his project. I also would like to thank Taylor Stein and Arthur Harsuvanakit. Both work at Autodesk and they have tought me and a bunch of AiR how to use some of the Autodesk software. Last, another thanks to Randy Sarafan, he also was another late night worker and companion. Thanks again to Noah and Vanessa for making my dreams come true. Alejandro (alepalan)

Topic by alepalan  


You're a foreign AIR. How much is the $1.500 stipend in San Francisco?

So you want to be the next Instructables Artist in Residence? That’s awesome! Being on Instructables was one of the best experiences of my life (if you read my final blog post, you already know that). The only bad part is when you have to say goodbye. But, even if you manage to get over the after-Instructables broken heart (good luck with that), you have to be careful about the risks of a broken wallet, too. Yesterday, a fantastic author from another country asked me if the $1.500 stipend was enough for living in such an expensive city as San Francisco. Honestly, I’m not the best money adviser, but as a Colombian who was living five and a half months in the Bay, I want to share with you my experience with the economical part. Despite I had an awesome AIR program coordinator (Noah Weinstein), the help of my friends Alisson Sombredero and Jennifer Hansen, and all the Internet for investigating, there are some things you can only learn by yourself, at your risk. So, let’s suppose you are a foreign artist, from the middle class of your country, with a normal job, who wants to travel to the amazing Pier 9. What kind of things you have to keep in mind? NOTE: I’m not an official spokesman from Autodesk. And some things can change from now until you read this post. So, if you have any doubt about the AIR program or need some help, ask the Instructables AIR Program Coordinator. 1. Plan ahead: The AIR program is a very tempting opportunity, and probably you want to be in Pier 9 RIGHT NOW! But think: what is the best moment for you to be in San Francisco? How much time will you stay? Do you have any savings? Will your parents support this amazing opportunity? Do you have any responsibilities that affect your decision (a steady job, girlfriend, spouse, children)? What will you do when the AIR ends and you have to return to your country? Do you have any debts? How is your English? Do you have emergency contacts on the city? When I took the decision of being part of the AIR program, it was October of 2012, for starting March 2013, with a duration of three months (at the beginning) so I had 5 months to prepare myself for the travel. So, you have to think: how much time do you need for preparing your travel? 2. Your stipend: You will receive US$1.500 monthly. With good planning and some restrictions, you can have a good time with that money. Autodesk pays the materials and tools for your projects. But remember: the AIR program doesn’t cover air tickets, visa paperwork, health insurance, taxes and other extraordinary expenses. It’s all on you. Besides, it’s a stipend, not a salary. Be careful with those words when you talk with a migratory authority. A salary implies a work contract and work visa, and you aren’t an employee, but a vendor who probably will enter to the United States using a B1 Visa (Business/Tourism), with a stipend for covering housing, food and transportation expenses. So, don’t use the words “salary” and “work”. Use “stipend”, “invited”, and “artist in residence”. Instructables helped me with an invitation letter explaining to Migration what kind of activities I would do on the AIR. Autodesk is very prompt with stipend payments, but there is not an exact date for paydays. It’s between the first and second week of every month, but it can varies. So, at least the first two or three weeks of your time in SF are on you. And you have to eat, transport, pay your rent and deposit, and so on. Think between $2.000 and $2.500. 3. Housing: You will need to rent a room and to share the house with somebody else. And getting an economic and good room is a very complicated mission in San Francisco. Especially if you will stay only for 1 to 3 months (landlords prefer long term tenants). The best site to find a room is Craiglist. However, everybody can post on that site, so be prepared to find some bizarre stuff… Before you go, Google Maps is a mandatory tab in your browser. It’s a good idea to know the area. Every time you see a room offer, look how far is from Pier 9 in San Francisco. Keep in mind something: San Francisco is just a city from a big area named “San Francisco Bay Area”. In the Bay Area you will find a lot of cities and towns like Oakland, Berkeley, San Jose, South San Francisco, San Mateo, Redwood City, Concord, San Leandro, etc. A lot of people live on the nearest towns and take public transportation to San Francisco. Don’t forget to investigate if the neighborhood of the room offer is a good area to stay. If you can’t get a room before you arrive to San Francisco, think about a hostel for the first days, meanwhile you find one. (But just for the first days). Or you can try couchsurfing. Don’t trust in the $80/night hotels on Mission, because you can find a very creepy experience. Back to the room for rent: Try to get a furnished room, or you will have to buy at least, a mattress (and you can’t take it home at the end). If you are good cooking, having a kitchen will help you to save money. When you get the room, most of the landlords ask you to pay the first month plus the deposit. The deposit is some kind of backup money for the landlord, in case you break something, damage something or don’t pay your rent. At the end, the landlord must return your money. Consider it some kind of saving. But be careful: try to have a written contract, always ask for a receipt of every money you give, show to your landlord the fails of your room (take pictures just in case), and don’t break anything. My experience: my first three months, I lived in Treasure Island (in the middle of the Bay Bridge. Believe it or not, it’s part of the city of San Francisco). Good neighborhood, old room, furnished, $625/month, $600 deposit (so, my first payment when I moved was $1.225), creepy landlord (if somebody named Israel offers you a room on Treasure Island, it doesn’t matter how nice he sounds, basically… RUN!) Next two months: I lived in Oakland (passing the Bay Bridge). Beautiful house, fantastic landlords, good neighborhood. $600/month, $500 deposit. The farther the house is from San Francisco, the better and cheaper will be the room. My recommendation: try to get something in San Francisco. All the fun is in that city! I loved Treasure Island, but probably you can find a better neighborhood. If you get a room in another town, you will have always to think how you can return to home if you are going to have some night fun. Maybe it’s more expensive, but you have to consider carefully the next point. 4. Transport: You will find these ways for commuting: • MUNI: This bus and metro system are exclusive for the city of San Francisco. $2 per ticket, but you can use the same ticket in the lapse described on it, or all night long. It works 24 hours. • BART: Bay Area Rapid Transport. This metro communicates San Francisco with the nearest cities and the SFO Airport, and it’s a quick way to travel inside the city. According to the distance, you will have to pay. If you get a room in the east bay area, think in more or less $3.65 per ride. And it doesn’t work in the middle of the night. • AC Transport: Bus in the East Bay Area. $2.10 if you are travelling inside Oakland, $4.20 if you need to cross the Bay Bridge to go to San Francisco. • FERRY: I never used it. I leave you that mystery. • CALTRAIN: This train communicates San Francisco with the farthest towns in the Bay Area. More expensive. Think in $8 per ride. • CARPOOLING: It works only at week mornings. In a marked point, a driver picks up two or three passengers for using the Fastrak (more economic toll to pay). Most of the time is free, but the driver can ask you for one dollar tip. Very economic and fast, only if you din't mind to take up a strange car with other two or three strangers. You can manage all of the public transportation options using something called Clipper Card. Avoid the taxi cabs. They are very expensive! My recommendation: If you live in San Francisco, MUNI is the cheapest, safest and best way to travel. You can get an Adult Muni-only Pass for only $66 and for that month, you can travel all you want inside San Francisco. You can get it in any Walgreens. Or you can try getting a bike. Living in another city implies you have to organize a logistic plan for your transportation, including: BART, MUNI, bike, AC bus, carpooling, Caltrain, Ferry, free shuttles, and thinking like Cinderella every time you are invited to a party in San Francisco. I prefer to pay an $800 room in San Francisco and $66 in transport, than a $600 room in Oakland and $300 in transport. Here is a recommendation from Canida: There is a bike share in SF. For $88/year, you can borrow a bike for as many 30-minute trips as you like. Exists a bike stand directly across the street from Pier 9. More info here. 5. Food: If you can buy groceries and make your own food, awesome! You can find microwaves on Pier 9. In my case, it was cereal with milk and fruit at morning, sandwiches at night, and lunch on the food trucks near Pier 9. Think in an average of $11 per lunch or dinner, depending of the place and if you want to add a soda or a dessert. McDonald’s and Burger King aren’t good options. You can find some good Chinese lunches and Safeway’s specials for less than $8. Remember: the prices showed on the menu don't include the tax. My weekly budget for groceries (for breakfast and dinner) was $30. 6. Cash: Ok, there’s some delicate point in this talk, and probably one of the only things for improving in the awesome AIR program: your monthly stipend probably will be paid in a $1.500 Rewards Card. The good news: a rewards card is very useful! You can buy on Internet, you can carry a lot of money on this single card, you can use it as a debit/credit card, and you can pay with the card in most of restaurants, food trucks and stores. The bad news: you still need cash for some things (especially for paying the rent). And there is no simple way for changing your electronic money for cash. You can’t do withdrawals in an ATM or bank, you can’t consign that money to an account, you can’t do international transfers, you can’t pay debts and you can’t get cash back when you buy stuff. Besides, some places require a minimal bought if you want to use the card, or charge an extra amount. And probably you will have to spend all the rewards card money before returning to your home country. So, be prepared. Luckily, I found an awesome person (I won’t say her name because everybody will ask her for that kind of help) who changed some of my cards for cash, so I could defend myself. 7. Shopping: You will need (or want) to buy extra stuff: personal care, towels, blankets, clothes, gifts, etc. The best places are Target (Mission St. at 4th) and Ross (Market St. at 4th). You will find some good sales, but remember: the excess baggage can be a headache when you have to return to your hometown, and airlines charges for that, $200 at least. 8. Communications: I got a good plan for my smartphone on T-Mobile: for $50/month, unlimited minutes, messages and data. Maybe you can get a better plan in another cellphones company. You will need specially the data. Believe me, in U.S., nobody does anything without consulting Internet first. 9. Tips: Tipping is very important in U.S. I’m not telling you have to give a tip in every place (you are in a personal “war economy”, after all), but there are a lot of situations where you definitively have to leave a tip, between 15% and 20% of the bill. And don't forget: you are in San Francisco, so you have to visit some cool places! Some attractions are free. Others, (like Alcatraz) are between $20 and $30. Maybe more, if you want the star treatment. Don't take a guided tour into the city. With enough planning, you can go to the best places with less money. Maybe it looks like too many troubles and considerations, but we are talking about moving to another country for at least one month. And remember, this awesome company will pay you for making whatever you want to build, using their out-of-this-world tools like 3D printers, lasercutters, waterjets and CNC machines, and giving you the materials. It's a fantastic opportunity you will love forever!!!!

Topic by M.C. Langer    |  last reply


Artists in Residence Exhibition at Pier 9

The annual Autodesk Artists in Residence Exhibition was held at Pier 9 in San Francisco from January 22-24, 2015. Check out some of the projects and learn more about the Artists in Residence (AiR) program here. (To see all AiR Instructables, follow the Artist in Residence group.) "Best art opening ever!" Some snaps from the evening: Photos by Brad Avery, Charlie Nordstrom, and Sherry Wong.

Topic by xxlauraxx  


Autodesk: Art Residency of Generosity

I’ve had the good fortune to participate in many art scenes over the last 15 years. These range from making large-scale fire installations at Burning Man, in proto-hacker spaces (2001-2003), a rigorous MFA program at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2004-2006), and a professional and international new media art career (2007-2012). What fuels my creativity is an ongoing quest for communities that support new modes of engagement: repurposing new technologies for art, encouraging others to make and asking why it is important for us not to simply be cultural consumers. I strongly believe we need ongoing DIY culture coupled with critical thinking to keep our society vibrant. In 2012, I took a break from my usual new media art practice of showing in museums and galleries. I felt like the art world — for a variety of reasons — was sequestered and wasn’t reaching as wide an audience as it could. A friend of mine forwarded me a job posting for a New Media Exhibit Developer at the Exploratorium. I applied for the job and got it. At this world-famous science museum, I learned about interfacing my art ideas to the public sphere. I worked with scientists around ideas of data visualization in Life Sciences. I designed exhibits that would last for the long-term rather than a 1 month exhibition. This changed my art practice so that I begin thinking about work that had a broad appeal: from school kids to the elderly, and above all else to value curiosity. After my fixed-term position at the Exploratorium was over, I began a residency at Autodesk, which intrigued me because it was my first artist residency in a corporate environment and they also had unbelievable resources. I expected to be in an amazing shop environment but also to be interacting with suit-and-tie corporate types. I certainly got the former but the Pier 9 environment surprised me. Everyone from the engineers to other artists to the marketing folks were curious about creative uses for 3D technologies could be used. Pier 9 was more a laboratory than a shop. With the Instructables-writing directive, it was also one where people shared their ideas rather than hoarded. Within my first week, I adjusted my expectations. The secret about Pier 9: It’s not about the tools but about the people. Yes, the water jet is amazing and I’ve fallen in love with 3D-printing, but more than anything there is a cross-section of smart and kind people, ranging from traditional artists, new media artists, various flavors of makers as well as engineers. Everyone has some sort of skill, ranging from drawing to fashion design to 3D modeling. No one knows everything. We all check our egos at the door. “What are you working on?” is the question we all ask one another. Each day, I’m surprised by someone’s ideas. The enthusiasm in the space is infectious. In those rare moments when I’m alone at Pier 9, I can gaze out the window at the Bay Bridge, where I feel connected to the rest of the world. I’ve been amazed by my co-resident’s projects ranging from the Playa-inspired costumes by Mikaela Holmes and futuristic fashion by Anouk Wipprecht to the playful work by Paolo Salvagione to the material experiments by Andreas Bastian. There are many more...too many to call out everyone. We work very, very hard. Yet, the environment is casual. When you have an problem there are people to help, and conversely, when someone is stuck on a project, I’ll drop whatever I’m doing to help them out. I never wear my headphones. Generosity fuels this community. There is no single type of artist that comes to this residency, which makes for intersecting circles. I’ve listened to many others. I’ve had to explain my conceptual practice. I’ve been (happily) forced to re-conceptualize my own artwork. I still don’t have the answers to my concerns about art-sequestering, but this is the right place for me to be. With this residency, I’ve found the path that I’ve been long searching for. Thank you. Scott Kildall

Topic by scottkildall    |  last reply


My Autodesk Residency

I was an Artist in Residence at Pier 9 from January through March of 2014, just a few months after the facility opened. I completed three projects during my residency, but split some of my projects into several Instructables. Citrus Juice Press with Mortise-and-Tenon Joinery "Tiny Planet" 3D Printed Mechanical Sculpture "The Manhattan Project" Cocktail Machine (Coming Soon!) Here are some things that were wonderful about my Residency: -Vanessa and Noah were extremely supportive as coordinators/facilitators/etc. They worked tirelessly to organize and improve a rapidly growing program filled with newbies like me. Whether it's just bouncing ideas around or getting connected with a person who has a particular skill, they were always willing to take a minute and help out. -Shop staff and Instructables staff were very helpful in navigating the tricky details of the shop, writing and publishing Ibles, etc. I relied heavily on help from Sean, Gabe, Dan, and Martin to help me work with tools in the CNC, Metal, and 3D Printing shops. They were patient and interested in helping me become a skilled operator. -Having access to the tools at Pier 9, particularly the Omax Waterjet and the Objet 3D Printers, allowed me to quickly move from design through prototype to final product. As a mechanical sculptor, I am used to spending months on a single project, waiting days or weeks for waterjet/lasercut parts to ship to me, etc.  -Classes and workshops, both formal and spur-of-the-moment style, gave me the resources to use so many tools that it was sometimes overwhelming (see below), but always awesome. Gabe's weekly software sessions, Audrey's photography tutorial, and of course all the Safety and Basic Use classes in the shop, were excellent ways to gain experience with new tools or learn how to better use familiar ones. -Free, endless coffee. Here are some challenges I faced during my residency: -The open-office style space at the Pier makes it quite difficult to focus (for me at least). Wearing headphones can help, but I also found that doing computer work elsewhere was more efficient. I know that the layout is meant to facilitate community, and it does, but I have found that I have to be vigilant so that my "talking about doing cool stuff" time does not eclipse my "doing cool stuff" time. -CNC tools can do incredible things very quickly, but they are fickle and, especially in the hands of novices, break often. Other times, they are just so popular there is a line to use them. Shop staff do a superb job of keeping the shop running smoothly, but I learned to always head to the Pier with a list of projects to work on, in case the tool I most wanted to use was unavailable. -There is an overstimulation that seems impossible to avoid at the Pier. New ideas come so fast, it becomes hard to pin yourself down to one and begin the nitty gritty work of actually making it happen. It can be quite difficult. -There is some pressure at the Pier, and I imagine it will grow, to use Autodesk software. As much as I would like to gain experience using Inventor and Maya, I decided that I would get more done by sticking with the software I was comfortable with.  -Free, endless coffee. I walked away from my Residency with a host of new skills, a number of new friends and professional colleagues, and a few projects to boot! It was a great time, and I would do it again in a heartbeat. Thanks Pier 9!

Topic by tinkertinker    |  last reply


Kala Art Institute Residency Program and Classes

Kala Art Institute is a great resource for artists offering residency programs and workshops. RESIDENCY PROGRAMS Artists in need of space and equipment for work in printmaking, photography, or digital media are encouraged to apply to Kala's residency program in one of two ways. The Artist-in-Residence Program provides accepted artists with 24-hour access to Kala’s Print Studio and Electronic Media Center. Established in 1974, Kala’s Artist-in-Residence program is geared towards providing short- and long-term communal studio space at low monthly rates to both emerging and established artists. The program has steadily grown to reach its current annual population of approximately seventy-five artists from the Bay Area and beyond. The Fellowship Award, an international competition, annually grants nine artists a cash award, unlimited access to Kala’s facilities for up to six months, and a culminating show in the Kala Gallery, through a highly competitive jurying process. The Fellowship Award is geared towards supporting artists in completing specific projects or bodies of work that would benefit from Kala's specialized equipment. Many Fellowship winners transition to the Artist-in-Residence program at the conclusion of their Fellowship period in order to continue their work at Kala. CLASSES Kala offers some of the best printmaking and digital media classes in the Bay Area. Located in Berkeley, every year Kala offers the community close to one hundred classes in a wide range of techniques, utilizing the exceptional equipment available in our printmaking studio and electronic media center. The small, hands-on classes foster creative exchange with instructors and fellow students, and all of our instructors are exhibiting artists. We offer numerous classes combining digital and traditional printmaking in different ways. Choose a class that explores a new interest, or refines previous experience. Both beginners and advanced professional artists will find classes at appropriate skill levels, with detailed class descriptions, in Kala’s annual course catalog and on our website. The website has the most up-to-date class information. Private classes and tutoring sessions in many subjects are also available. Below is a link to our 2012 class calender: http://www.kala.org/class/class.html Carrie Hott Program Coordinator, Classes & Artist Residencies carrie@kala.org tel: 510-549-2977 ext. 303

Topic by carriekala    |  last reply


Being an Artist in Residence at Pier 9: MORE IS BETTER

My second one month term as Artist in Residence at Pier 9 was a blast, again. Now I’m back home, the jet lag is behind me and the making rush is replaced by the rush of “ordinary” life. Time for a short “retrospect” What remained the same compared to the first time, is being torn between spending as much time as possible in the awesome workshop, interacting with creative soul mates (both AIRs and Autodesk/Instructables people, all very creative and very busy themselves) and the lures of San Francisco, a city that brings the whole world to one place. What has changed that there is even more of the good stuff. When I did my first one month term as AIR, in July 2013, Instructables had just moved to Pier 9 and the workshop was brand new. Now the workshop is fully operational, with some more machines even. There is a very professional training program in place, with very good and passionate trainers, quickly learning you how to work with the machines. In July 2013 we were 4 artists, Now, April-May 2015, fulltime and part time artist together we where about 30! That high concentration of creative people, with a wide range of interests and skills, really gives a vibe. It is clear both Instructables and the Artist in Residence program thrive in the environment made possible by Autodesk. It is fantastic to see how this company believes in giving creativity the means to materialise in the widest range of projects. I’m very grateful for the chance to share in that. I did five different blimp projects, two as workshops for children, which was absolutely great. I added five new sub projects to my laser cut advent calendar project and was able to make the advent calendar itself. Clearly, I have a lot of material for Instructables. So more is better. To bad for me I can only come for one month at a time (because of family and work reasons). One month is terribly short and so is two months. I crave for more ;-) Cheers and thanks to all you lucky people at Pier 9, Yvon a.k.a. masynmachien

Topic by masynmachien    |  last reply


Field report: Mads Hobye as an Artist-in-residence at Instructables

Mads Hobye was granted an artist-in-residence at Instructables for September 2012. Instructables is a web-based documentation platform where passionate people share projects they do, and how to do it. Because of the creative nature of the website, Instructables also have lab facilities for their own co-workers and for artist-in-residences. During September, Mads had the honor to use their lab to build and document multiple prototypes to be shared on their website. I choose to put my focus on building interactive noise machines, since this ties into my PhD and my interest in creating non-trivial internal complexity. I have been working long into the night most days and it has been really interesting to have the chance to focus on one thing at the time. Although the primary purpose of the stay was to explore the potentials of designing interactive sound machines, a couple of other side outcomes were also planned. First, to see how Instructables organized their creative workspace and get inspiration for organizing the upcoming Connectivity Lab at Medea. Second, to see if Instructables would be a suitable platform for documenting the creative practices at Medea. Take aways from Instructables as a creative workspace Although Instructables primarily is a company running a website, they have quite extensive lab facilities. This consisted of a small lab at the office (sewing, electronics and woodwork) and two blocks down they had a whole space filled with laser cutters and 3D printers. This is located right beside the Techshop, which is a full-fledged lab for everything from metal to 3D printing. I have picked up the following things that struck me as really good ways of structuring lab work: Documentation table: A documentation table with lamps, camera and a white sheet of paper as background enables people to quickly document their projects with a nice white background. It was interesting to see how this improved the overall quality of the documentation. Suddenly a breadboard and some wires became a piece of art or a pedagogical platform for show and tell instead of an unfinished project. Show-and-tell meetings: Twice a week they meet at two o'clock to do a show and tell. Here they take a round and everyone says what they are working on in one or two sentences. This is a really easy way to get everyone updated and it takes no time at all. If you are not present you can email out one sentence telling everyone what you are doing. Once a week it is about the specific day and once a week it is about the coming week. Have everything in the same lab: The separation between the labs has confirmed to me the importance of having everything in the same space. It takes time to walk two blocks to lasercut which limits the creative process of iterating between e.g. lasercutting and soldering. Instructables as a workspace was one of the most easy going creative loving workspaces I have ever had the chance to be a part of. Although I never got to know the formal rules, you had a clear sense that people had the freedom to prioritise their own work day and combine it with creative side projects (as long as they documented them of course). Instructables as a knowledge sharing platform for the Medea Connectivity lab Instructables works well for sharing individual recipes for others to use, but what came as a surprise to me was the ability to create groups as individually branded websites. This enables a group of people to collect their recipes under a common theme or brand. We will use this as a common platform to share the knowledge created in the Medea Connectivity Lab. This way people can get an overview of the projects done in the lab. This will become a mandatory part of using the lab in the sense that students and co-workers will be encouraged to document their projects and publish them in the group. So far my experience with posting instructables has been quite interesting and overwhelming. Where projects normally ends as interesting portfolio documentation, the detailed documentation of the build process enables others to recreate your designs or their own versions of them. So far this has resulted in multiple people making their own version. One example is the Arduino implementation of the touche shield (https://www.instructables.com/id/Touche-for-Arduino-Advanced-touch-sensing/). This was published in May 2012. As of now, I know of ten people who have recreated the design and just as many has made suggestions for improvement. Another project has been rewritten by an enthusiast in Dubai. It now runs faster and uses less memory. You can find the preliminary group for Medea connectivity lab here. Non-trivial-internal Complexity as facilitator for curiosity = making noise machines As a part of being an artist-in-residence at Instructables, I took it upon myself to build of couple of noise machines / music boxes. My interest was in designing objects that would enable people to explore the world of sound synthesis and for me to get a better understanding of how the different interfaces enables different interactions and sound qualities. This is a part of an ongoing investigation on creating interactions for curiosity. It has been an intense experience. Trying to build as many interfaces as possible within one month. I have tried to make all of them stand-out as finished, while still being hackable pieces. Everything I have done is published on Instructables for others to experiment with. All of the projects consist of a few basic components: An interface and sometimes a screen or a led matrix. The basic sound component is either a Gameduino or a software synth written for the Arduino platform. You can find an overview of the results here and I will introduce them in this article as well. Although arduinos are good for simple action <-> reaction interactivity, there are a limited amount of examples that work with more complex interactions. Here I mean beyond game design’s way of working with narratives, but more in the sense of adding personality to your projects. Personality not as much in the way of looks (e.g. putting an Arduino into a teddy bear), but more in the way of complex interactions that makes you curious about its devices potential possibilities. My interest as an artist-in-residence at Instructables were to design different machines that would spark the user’s curiosity. Here, simply put, curiosity lies between the extremes of chaos and predictability. Where chaos becomes uninteresting (from an interaction design point of view) because of its uncontrollable nature and order becomes so predictable that the interaction itself slides into the background of the end-product of the interaction itself. One such example is the light switch. As an adult you usually do not notice your interaction with it. The core question then became how to make people who are interacting with it drawn by their own curiosity of not being able to decode the interaction pattern, all at the same time having a sense that their actions are the main contributor to the sounds. Most of these machines would have been simpler to make as software programs on a computer or even as multitouch applications on a smartphone, but I wanted to have an aesthetic criteria as a frame for my experiments: I wanted to create simple tangible interfaces that would inspire curiosity. The objects themselves should welcome the user to try out and explore their interfaces. Last, I wanted each experiment to be self-contained. Instead of them becoming interfaces for a laptop, they should be the ones who created the music. The end results are still crude and mostly serves as interaction enclosures with future potentials, although they do hint at different interesting interaction qualities. You can find an overview of the boxes here. The singing plant plays with a classic trick of sparking people’s curiosity by adding unconventional interaction qualities to a familiar object. The Kaosduino serves as a platform to explore the complexity of touch on x-y surfaces. The Matrix machine serves as a platform to explore the potential of emergent sound patterns converted from particle systems. The algorithmic noise machine serves as platform to explore the boundaries between chaos and order through complex bit shifting algorithms. Better ways to debug the internals of the Arduino board As a side project, I decided to improve on the debugging capabilities of the Arduino platform. This was in line with working with internal complexity which can be hard to comprehend as the code grows. The program enables you to visualize realtime data on the Arduino board. You are usually stuck with the standard serial output. As the complexity of your Arduino code grows, this makes it impossible to comprehend what is actually going on inside the board. To solve this I have created a little library that will enable you to create your own custom GUI for your Arduino projects. Watch this video to get a demonstration of a basic hello world with a potmeter and a diode: The following are a few key features of the tool: Custom design your interface from the Arduino board: You define which sliders, graphs and buttons you need for your interface. You do this in your Arduino sketch which means that the GUI program acts as a slave to the sketch. All information is stored in your board. Visualize and manipulate realtime data: Whether you are making an RGB light controller or a robot arm, getting a graphical feedback is crucial to understand what is going on inside the board. This enables you to understand whether it is your hardware or the code that is causing problem. Further, the sliders and buttons enable you to tweak the individual parameters in realtime. This way you can see what effect different thresholds have on the interaction. Use the same app for all your Arduino projects: I have made tons of small apps for different projects. My problem is always to find them again a year later. Because we save everything in the Arduino, I only need to keep one app around the Arduino and it will automatically configure the app for the current project. Prototype the interface before you turn on the soldering iron: Because you can design the GUI as you like it (within reasonable limits), you can prototype the interface before you have made a physical interface. This also enables you to divide the tasks between multiple people, e.g. one person is working on the hardware and another person is working on the code. When you have made the physical interface the Guino will integrate seamlessly. You can find the instructables for the Guino interface here. About the author Mads Hobye (b. 1980) is a PhD student in interaction design at Medea Collaborative Media Initiative, Malmö University, Sweden, and co-founder of the Illutron collaborative interactive art studio. He focuses on how digital material can be used for exploring social transformative play situated in the context of everyday life. He has done several large-scale installations and working prototypes, which he is using as a basis for his PhD research. More information is available on Hobye’s work at www.hobye.dk.

Topic by madshobye  


My experience as an AIR

Wow! What an experience. Probably the most enjoyable, action packed, creativity-loaded 2 months of my life.  I have been tinkering in what I used to call shops; building, hacking, creating, for as long as I can remember but this... this was more than I had ever dreamed. The residency program at Instructables is a dream come true. Access to a state of the art shop, surrounded by creative, inspiring, fun people. What more could you ask for. Take one of the most creative, forward thinking, cutting edge areas of the United States (the Bay); the coolest city in that area (San Francisco); the prettiest/most unique part of that city (the Embarcadero) and slap the worlds best creative work shop on it, right over the water (Pier 9). Walking in the doors for the first time was surreal. From the swinging meeting table to the coolest kitchen I have ever seen; water jet to brand new Bridgeport; 3-D printers to industrial sewing machines, Instructables has done it. Within hours of being assigned a desk I was signing up for workshop classes and using Autodesk software to mock up some design ideas for the bicycle frame jig I spent most of my residency building. I later used this jig to build a bicycle frame.  Not only was I having a blast building what I wanted to build, I was building skills I hope to use professionally. I am hoping to start my own business building custom bicycle frames. The time to tinker and build at Instructables gave me a tremendous jump start. I wish it hadn't ended.

Topic by Tanner W    |  last reply


Fozzy13's AiR Experience!

Being an Artist in Residence at Instructables was an amazing experience.  It's difficult to put into words but I'll give it my best shot. Let's start at the beginning!  Because where else would you start?  I'm a college student, but I wasn't when I started to love building things.  A knee injury years ago took me out of wrestling for a summer and I used my ample free time during that time period quickly filled up as I was excited by the idea of breaking water into hydrogen and oxygen.  Over the past five years, I've grown to love making all sorts of things.  Instructables has always been a fantastic community to get ideas for projects and share what I've made.  After being part of the community for so long I wanted a chance to be a bigger part of Instructables and have the opportunity to meet some of the people who I've been following on this website for years!  Hopefully that only sounds mildly creepy.  The Artist in Residence program allowed me to have just that opportunity. I had the honor of being one of the very first Artists to make use of Instructables/Autodesk's brand new facility.  It's incredible.  If you're on a tour, it will be referred to as the greatest workshop and creative space in the world, and after working in it for a month,  that's an easy statement for me to believe.  The metal shop is where I loved spending most of my time as I worked on my main project: a jet engine.  However, I barely scratched the surface of what's possible even when I dabbled in playing around with 3D printing and laser cutting.  I'll post links to the projects I did when I'm done at the bottom of this post! I could go on and on about how exciting it was to learn how to TIG weld, or pull my first 3D printed object out of the printer for cleaning.  That's not what I loved most about being an Artist in Residence.  Don't get me wrong, that's why I was there, and I loved every minute of it!  But what I loved most was just being in the office at Instructables.  It was an amazing feeling to get to interact with lots of different people who all in some way loved to make things.  Being around people who know what Maker Faire is meant a lot to me!  Usually mentioning it only yields confused faces in my city.  It was great getting to talk about different projects people had done or were working on, which made me love "Build Day"s more than anything.  Being at the headquarters of Maker Culture made me feel at home. I've been away from the Pier where Instructables HQ is for a few weeks now.  I miss everyone I got to meet there, and I miss having the resources to make anything I could imagine.  Being and Artist in Residence will always be one of my best memories ever, and I can only hope that at some point I'll end up back at Instructables to see the awesome people I met and build some more cool stuff. Thank you to everyone at Instructables who made my short stay a great experience!  I can't thank you enough. - Projects! https://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-Make-a-Mini-Compressed-Air-Turbine/ https://www.instructables.com/id/3D-Printed-Modular-Ball-and-Socket-Joints/ https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-your-own-Instructables-Robot-Keychain Jet Engine Instructable coming later!

Topic by fozzy13    |  last reply


Reflections on Pier 9 Residency

My residency on the Pier lasted from January through June 2014, a total of six incredibly busy months, during which time I built a 3D printer with an un-bounded build volume and a low cost metal laser sintering 3D printer. It took nearly three months to learn to handle the overwhelming potential of each new day on the Pier. The Pier is such a focal point of creative energy and flux-- every day the Pier hosts thought leaders in design, fabrication, art, and engineering. I've never seen such a critical density of talent. In the residency program, I had the unique opportunity to collaborate with fashion designers, furniture makers, illustrators, and other engineers with a freedom and agility that I've never seen anywhere else. In one of many sudden collaborations, Anouk Wipprecht returned from a trip to LA and showed me an SLS 3D printed tentacle that she was considering using in a dress she was designing. I began thinking about FDM-printable compliant mechanisms and designed a tentacle more compatible with the fabrication process. Mikaela Holmes then saw the tentacles that I was printing and based on her input, I ran a couple more iterations. She then showed Paolo Salvagione these more developed designs, who in turn took it even further by adding servo-actuation to automate the piece's motion. Mikaela then iterated on the concept for several weeks, and settled on a multimaterial Objet fabrication process to make her amazing blossoming headdress. This kind of interaction could only have happened in the residency program. The other striking thing about the Pier is the learning infrastructure that surrounds each machine and process. Residents can get trained up on a machine under the instruction of the shop staff who have put together amazing documentation surrounding each machine (just see Dan Vidokavich's Haas VF-2SS video series). Tools, it turns out, aren't very useful unless you know how to use them and the Pier is full of extremely knowledgeable folks who always teaching through even the smallest actions. It's a very positive and healthy culture of always giving each other a hand. I have also never encountered so much support for realizing such personal projects. Noah Weinstein and Vanessa Sigurdson made sure no obstacle was insurmountable. When I needed to move my 3D metal printer prototype briefly off the Pier, Noah immediately located additional space and helped me move my prototype that weekend. Julia Cabral, Autodesk's environmental health and safety officer was also an amazing resource and advisor to my metal printer project, which involved high voltage, high powered lasers, explosive materials, and pressurized gases. Not only did Julia do tons of research to advise on proper sealing, venting, material selection, and gas sensing techniques, she also helped me draw up all the associated safety protocols for operating the prototype machine. I'd recommend the residency program to artists, designers, and engineers alike. The human and fabrication resources tare unparalleled and reside in a spectacular culture based on respect, openness, and mutual support.

Topic by andreasbastian    |  last reply


Popular Mechanics Takes a Tour of Pier 9

"Inside Instructables' Kooky, Creative Warehouse Wondershop" "There's a place where artists can create whatever they want, using the most advanced equipment on the planet. It's in San Francisco (of course). In a warehouse (of course)." Come read the article to hear more about the Pier and what some of the Artist in Residence are up to!

Topic by Penolopy Bulnick    |  last reply


Teaching Artists Wanted for Summer 2015 Program

Arts Place is looking for artist instructors for our Summer 2015 Arts in the Parks program. Arts in the Parks works with children in rural communities across East Central Indiana and West Central Ohio to introduce them to the arts and foster their creativity. Skills taught in past years include ceramics, fiber art, poetry, theatre performance, puppetry, dance, sculpture and so much more. Classes run from early June through the beginning of August at approximately 15 different sites throughout our service area. We are looking for enthusiastic, creative, and accomplished artist instructors who have a passion for sharing their craft with children aged 6-14. Our teaching artists generally have at least a four-year degree in the arts, but significant experience will also be considered. The selected candidates will have sizable input with the Arts in the Parks coordinator on the community arts projects and workshop curriculum. We are seeking instructors who are flexible, love working with children of all ages, can teach art in new and interesting ways, and are passionate about community building. Teaching artists will be contracted for one- to two-week residencies. Our artists are placed with compatible local families in pleasant surroundings.  This is an important part of our residency experience as local families assist the teaching artist in making meaningful connections to the community. Arts Place is a rurally oriented arts council that operates arts centers in Portland, Indiana, Hartford City, Indiana and St. Mary’s, Ohio. It is our mission to foster the creative spirit in anyone. To apply, please send a resume, samples of your work, class samples or community project ideas, and a letter of interest to llane@artsland.org by January 30th, 2014. To inquire about positions and the program prior to applying, contact Lauren Lane at (270) 726-4809 ext. 230 or at llane@artsland.org. Teaching artists typically earn $650 to $1,000 per week based on training, experience, and demand. Supplies will be provided for classes and mileage between class sites is reimbursed. Artists are responsible for their own meals and travel to and from the area.

Topic by llaneartsland  


Instructables on New Scientist TV

Instructables "artist in residence" Mikeasaurus has had his magnetic silly putty featured on New Scientist TV. Kudos, Mike!

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


UK Residency Opportunity (Engineers, Makers, Designers)

The Victoria & Albert Museum have announced a residency programme that might be right up your street: We have just issued a new open call for a one year residency targeted at UK based engineers, makers and designers who wish to develop their practice by responding in their own way to the rich engineering heritage of the Museum – from the Collection’s origins in the Great Exhibition of 1851 and architectural history of the site, to the pioneering engineering systems at work in the Museum’s ongoing Exhibition Road Building Project.   We are ideally looking an engineer and welcome applications from practitioners from a variety of engineering disciplines (structural, civil, mechanical, engineering design, electrical, biological etc.) but we also welcome applications from makers and designers with a demonstrated interest in engineering. The resident should be interested in engaging with an operational building site and live architecture project. At the same time, he/she should be keen to develop public programmes with a range of different audiences linked to the Museum’s 2016 Engineering Season. We are therefore looking for practitioners who want to use this residency to create, build and present their work to the public while allowing museum visitors to follow their work in progress and understand their creative process through open studios, workshops, talks and other participatory programmes. http://www.vam.ac.uk/blog/artists-residence-va/new-open-call-exhibition-road-engineering-residency Information for applicants Residency period: April 2016 – April 2017 Bursary: £10,000 for twelve months (subject to tax and national insurance) Studio at the Victoria & Albert Museum in South Kensington An additional budget for production of public-facing activities or displays Deadline for applications: midnight, 17 January 2016 Interview date: 26 January 2016

Topic by Kiteman  


Reflections on the Pier

Writing this is one of the hardest things to do. Writing this means that my artist-in-residence at Pier 9 has come to an end. What motivates me to keep writing is something that I learned and deeply embraced at the pier. The pier taught me that giving back to the community you're in is priceless and extremely valuable. More on this later. First, I want to tell you a little bit about my journey at the Pier.  During the first quarter of the residency I was overwhelmed by the things I could make at Pier 9. Pier 9 has it all, it's a makers / artist / designer / engineers paradise. So when I got there, I realized that I could make anything, which then made me question why I wanted to make those things and if those things really mattered... What impact would they have on the world, on me, on my surrounding community... This period of questioning was frustrating and hard. While others at the pier were making amazing objects and projects that were getting a lot of press and attention I was just sitting there... thinking as time was quickly passing by. Maybe this was something akin to writer's block. Maybe this was just me being an emotional artist. Maybe this was just me being burned out from a hard year of working at start ups in Silicon Valley. Maybe this was just growing pains (because I was transitioning from writing software to making physical things).  Things got better tho. What really helped get me out of this rut was the community at pier 9, especially Vanessa and Company. The community at Pier 9 is hands down the most valuable asset the pier has. The machines are great, but its really about the people that the pier attracts. Never have I worked in a space where everyone is so excited, helpful, funny, and happy about their work and the community around them. The culture at the pier is what helped me find my path and eventually helped me make a couple fun projects. I could go on and on about how awesome the community is, but I want to give you a couple concrete examples of things that happened to me that helped me grow and morph into who I am today.  Vanessa Sigurdson would sit down with me every so often and ask me how things were going. When I got really stuck on something she would immediate connect me with someone who could help me or show me something that could inspire me or help me get through my block. Thanks Vanessa, I owe you big time.  I asked Noah Weinstein a ton about his shop in Oakland and how he started it. His super valuable knowledge made me feel empowered and able! He is an individual that really follows through with what he says, very admirable! Thanks Noah!   Andy Lee and I would sit around and talk about triangles and math. Andy is an awesome maker and brave individual. He taught me to just try things out and not care too much if they failed. Andy's experiments at the pier made me feel comfortable prototyping ideas and concepts. Not everything has to be a final art piece. Being an artist / engineer is also about exploring and failing! Thanks Andy! Paolo Salvagione connected me with a major museum in SF. Next year I'll be showing a couple pieces there. His work has been an endless source of inspiration for me. The mechanical beauty in his designs inspires me to make every element in my art pieces elegant and beautiful. Paolo you are the man.  Dot Matrix and I went on runs along the Embarcadero to Crissy Field. Dot gave me some great perspective on the projects I was working on and vice versa. These runs helped clear my mind. In addition, looking at the ocean reminded me that the world is bigger than me. Its a great stress relief. Thanks Dot!!! Sitting next to Andreas Bastian was one of the best parts of the residency. Every time I thought what I was doing was hard, I'd just look at this desk and be humbled by the challenges he was taking on. Thank you Andreas, your work ethic is off the charts.  Craig Dorety blew my mind with his LED sculptures. Experiencing one of his pieces was like a DMT trip (from what I've heard :) ). Craig also taught me a ton about the art world and about how to do miter cuts on the water jet! IGES files are the key!! Thanks Craig!  Robb Godshaw taught me how to follow my impulses. If you have an idea brewing inside of you, you MUST make it! You are an awesome individual Robb! Keep killing it!  Observing Anouk Wipprecht taught me about being fearless and tackling challenges with authority. In addition to being an amazing designer, maker, hacker, and person, Anouk really knows how to reach out to her networks and communities for feedback, involvement, and help.  Dr. Woohoo taught me how to connect with people, and empowering others around me. His optimistic & mature perspective and hilarious nature always helped me find my way though all sorts of problems and challenges.  I could go on and on. So many good memories and so many things learned... Side note, I believe that Autodesk's Pier 9 will go down in history as the Xerox Parc of our modern day. So many talented people / things / concepts / ideas / pieces of knowledges come in and out of it, I don't know of any other place in the Bay I'd say is more innovative, cutting edge, open and inviting. Maybe Google X, Maybe Tesla / Space X... MAYBE.... Towards the middle/end of my residency when I was wrapping up projects, and new artists were coming in, I had this deep urge to help the new artists find their way just as the coordinators and other past artists had helped me find mine. Helping the new artists was one of the most satisfying things I did at the pier. I'd like to think my residency at Pier 9 has come full circle, but I think it even goes deeper than just my time at the Pier. I did my first instructable (as in I made someone else's creation) in 2007. Now 7 years laters, I hope that the instructables I have written and will write in the future will inspire young makers to keep making and eventually give back to their community in any way they can!  Thank you Pier 9, Thank you Instructables, Thank you Autodesk, Thank you fellow Artists. I will try to pay you back one day.  

Topic by syedrezaali    |  last reply


Your Project, posted elsewhere?

It's always nice when your work gets popular, and the latest example is Artist-in-Residence Tomdf having had his tentacle straw project featured on Hack-a-Day.  I found this out because I saw it on their twitter feed. Have you had your Instructables featured elsewhere?  How did you find out? (And are you following the Instructables feed?)

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Meet the Boy With the Lego Hand

When Coby Unger makes, he makes the world a better place. The Atlantic recently published an article about the artist in residence and his work to build better prosthetics for children. Unger worked with a boy named Aiden Robinson to dream up the swiss army knife of prosthetics with attachments that include a Wii controller, spoon, legos, and a bow for playing the violin. Check out more of Coby's projects, and read the article to learn more about Aiden, the boy with the Lego hand. 

Topic by tinaciousz    |  last reply


It's fozzy13's AIRniversary!

"AIRniversary" meaning, one year anniversary of being an Airtist in Residence. It has been over a year since I left San Francisco when my Artist in Residency ended.  The experience was awesome and it has been exciting to see the program grow with the new wave or artists that have created so many incredible things.  It has been a big year for me personally.  I changed my major in school, I joined a fraternity, I cut my hair, and things that I learned at Instructables keep popping up every day. During the past month or so I found myself reflecting on the experience in all of its different aspects.  The experience at Instructables was fantastic, but moving to such a big city was, in hindsight, more stressful than I thought when I was living there.  It was a big change to what I was used to at home, and was pretty overwhelming at times.  The vlog I have embedded is meant to describe some of the stress that I had while moving to a big city, by sharing part of the story of my first hours in San Francisco. That said, I'm incredibly thankful to have had the opportunity.  I learned so much from the experience including new things every day that I can take away when thinking about my time there. Today, and over the past year, I have began to see my projects in a new way.  I value planning way more than I used to.  I value using the right tool for the right job.  I have tried to put more effort into the quality of my documentation and explanation for all of my projects, and to make more videos to give a better feel for what the project really is. I have to end with saying "Thank You" again to everyone at Instructables, and the extended community for supporting not only my projects, but the projects of everyone in the community by giving them a means to share and connect with other makers. -Adam

Topic by fozzy13  


International CYNETART competition

Call for Entries for the 14th Festival of computer-based art CYNETART || entry deadline 28.02.2010 TMA Hellerau hosts this international competition of CYNETART, inviting artists and art groups to present their projects, every two years. They can apply with projects that fully utilise digital technologies in their conceptual, creative and performing processes, thereby opening up opportunities for digital performance and their relationship to factors such as time, space, physical presence and social encounters. An international jury with representatives from well-established media culture institutions and experienced scientists with a background in media art history will decide about the winner of the CYNETART-award and the sponsorship award. It will also decide on the award of the artist-in-residence-grant funded by the Saxon Ministry of Science and the Fine Arts. Further information/ Entry Form: http://t-m-a.de/cynetart/wettbewerb?lang=en  

Topic by TMA Hellerau    |  last reply


PIZZA THURSDAYS!

Hey Everybody! Today is the day I decide to share this gem with you. Here at Instructables HQ, we often have pizza on Thursdays. It was initiated by Randofo's deep desire to keep his office companions happy and fed, and has evolved into a reason for me to make the following artworks. Each image is mailed out to the entire office as soon as the pizza delivery person arrives. Pizza Thursdays also lives on tumblr. Made on Mad's last day as an Artist-in-Residence. SelkeyMoonBeam and AmandaGhassaei playing Psycho Scooter Scramble   I will continue to generate sweet pizza art, every Thursday that we have pizza (and maybe forever). I will keep adding the new .gifs to the comments of this blog. Stay tuned.  

Topic by audreyobscura    |  last reply


Graffiti artists replicate The Matrix on Instructables.com--and win $15,000 Universal Laser Cutter!

Instructables and Universal Laser are happy to announce that the incredibly creative Instructable, How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) has won the Grand Prize in the 2008 Instructables.com and Universal Laser Cutter Contest: a 40-watt VersaLaser laser cutter valued at over $15,000!Grand Prize Winner How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) How to Enter the Ghetto Matrix (DIY Bullet Time) provides an extremely detailed Instructables tutorial on how to build a cheap, portable special-effects rig to create "bullet-time" animations--a technique, popularized in The Matrix movies, where the audience's point-of-view moves around the scene at normal speed while the action on screen is slowed down."We want to inspire great ideas and provide skills, tools, and shared know-how," Instructables CEO Eric Wilhelm explained. "This project represents exactly what we're trying to achieve with Instructables."The DIY Bullet Time Instructable was created and documented by the Graffiti Research Lab, an open-source urban art and communication collective supported by the Free Art & Technology Lab, a Brooklyn-based non-profit research lab creating work at the intersection of popular culture and the public domain."This will be the cornerstone of our new lab space," said GRL member fi5e. "A whole crew of creative people are really excited to put this thing to use! Thanks for helping us bring the VersaLaser to Brooklyn."The winner was chosen by votes from Instructables users and our panel of expert judges, who reviewed the 14 finalists drawn from a pool of over 600 entries. Congratulations to fi5e and everyone at the GRL - we know you'll really put the VersaLaser to work, and can't wait to see what great things you make! First Prize(in alphabetical order) Autonomous Foosball Table Blu-Ray Laser Phaser! Build a Greenland Kayak Build a Wind Harp! Build yourself a portable home - a mongolian yurt Extreme Business Cards Giant Fresnel Lens Deathray How I built a carbon bike frame at home (and a bamboo frame too) How to Make a TRON Style Lamp: The MADYLIGHT How to build a sit down driving arcade cabinet Laser cutter, start slicing stuff for under 50 dollars Laser Image Projector The Spiral Data Tato -- A Curiously Complex Origami CD Case Second Prize The authors of these Instructables win a robot t-shirt and a laser-etched plaque. Listed in alphabetical order. 30 minute USB microscope The Ambience Enhancer Autonomous, Wirelessly Controlled Hovercraft Conductive Glue And Conductive Thread: Make an LED Display and Fabric Circuit That Rolls Up. Cool Wave Ring Dollar Store Parabolic Mic Handcut inlay A Home Power Plant - Wind Power Generator Revised How to Make a Color-Changing Lighted Faux Fur Scarf How to make a pair of Angel Wings How to Make an OAWR (Obstacle Avoiding Walking Robot) Make DIY Vanilla Extract "Quicksilver" Retro-Future Scooter from appliances and scrap metal Solid Wood Digital Clock The Stirling Engine, absorb energy from candles, coffee, and more! Squishy Breast Stress Relief Toy TiggerBot II Robot Tube Amp Rebuild (and Mod) U-Disp - The Digg (tm) display (Open Source)Wooden Gear Clock Expert JudgesTo help us judge, we assembled an amazing team of expert designers, engineers, hackers, journalists, scientists, technologists, and other really smart people. They spent hours examining each of the finalists Instructables and helping us make a decision. We'd like to send a huge "Thank You" to each of our incredible judges. We couldn't have done it without you.Violet Blue (author, blogger, podcaster, columnist, and SRL vet)Gareth Branwyn (Contributing Editor, MAKE Magazine)Zoz Brooks (Host, of the upcoming TV Show Prototype This)Joe Brown (Editor, Wired Magazine)Colin Bulthaup (CTO of Potenco, co-founder Squid Labs) David Calkins (Co-founder of RoboGames) Julia Cosgrove (Deputy Editor, ReadyMade Magazine)Chris Csikszentmihalyi (Professor at the MIT Media Lab, Computing Culture Group)Simone Davalos (Co-founder of RoboGames) Lenore Edman (Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories)Dan Goldwater (Founder of monkeylectric, co-founder Squid Labs)Saul Griffith (President of Makani Power, co-founder Squid Labs, MacArthur Fellow)Duncan Haberly (Instructables)Matthew Hancher (NASA Researcher in the Intelligent Systems Division)Brian Lam (Editor, Gizmodo)Ed Lewis (Instructables)Jeffrey McGrew (Designer, Because We Can)Chuck Messer (Tackle Design, The Open Prosthetics Project, host of Discovery's Smash Lab)Megan Miller (Editor, PopSci)Jim Newton (Founder of TechShop)Quinn Norton (Journalist)Windell Oskay (Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories)David Pescovitz (BoingBoing, Institute for the Future, MAKE Magazine)Cloude Porteus (Instructables)Randy Sarafan (Instructables, Eyebeam Resident)Peter Semmelhack (Founder of Buglabs)Tyghe Trimble (News Editor, Discover Magazine)Noah Weinstein (Instructables)Eric Wilhelm (CEO of Instructables, co-founder Squid Labs)Dan Woods (Associate Publisher, MAKE Magazine) For the full information on how the winners were chosen, click here.

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply


Eyebeam Fellowship Program

Eyebeam, renown for projects such as LED Throwies and The MintyBoost!, is seeking fellows for their 2007/2008 Fellowship program. Fellowships will be offered in the R&D; OpenLab, the Production Lab and the Education Lab. The focus of the Fellowships varies depending on the tools and skills available and the creative objectives and philosophy of each Lab. Up to five Fellowships will be granted for 2007/08.For all of the Fellowships we are seeking applications from artists, hackers, designers, engineers and creative technologists to come to Eyebeam for a year to undertake new research and develop new work. The ideal Fellow has experience working with and making innovative technological art and/or creative technology projects and has a passion for collaborative development. Fellows will bring this experience and working approach to their own independent projects, projects initiated by other Residents or Fellows and projects conceived collaboratively during the Fellowship period.More info here.

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply


Samuel Bernier gets Runner Up in Core77 Design Awards 2012

Instructables member and artist-in-residence alumnus Samuel Bernier was recently awarded Runner-Up in Core77 Design Awards 2012 for his amazing Instructable Project Re_, an exploration into 3D-printing as a DIY tool for upcycling. Here's an exerpt from the Core77 page: "This experiment of Project RE_ explores 3D-printing as a DIY tool for upcycling. Customized lids are created using low cost 3D-printing. They are then clipped or screwed onto standard jars, tin cans and bottles to create new and personal objects" If you're not already familiar with Sam's work with Project Re_ you should check it out, he updates the Instructable with new design ideas and regularly answers questions about his 3D printing experiences.

Topic by mikeasaurus    |  last reply


Pier 9, I've never met anyone quite like you before.

Instructables' first artist in residence to start at Pier 9.I lucked out and happened to be that person. I also lucked out and happened to be at Pier 9 for about nine months. I feel like I've had one of the strangest residencies at Instructables. Noah was willing to be flexible enough with me to allow me to still work full time while I was there. It only allowed me my free time to work on projects at P9. I found myself there early in the mornings, late into the evenings, and consistently all day on the weekends. I've seen the sun rise at P9. I've seen the sun set at P9. I've been a lone person at P9 surrounded by millions of dollars of incredible machines. Machines that I have been dreaming about having access to for years. Free range of what I could do. Creativity overload. It becomes overwhelming at times. Some days were spent with anxiety over doing something that you hope is impressive. It can make it an intimidating place to start at. Somehow, I found myself in a building filled with some of the most competent, experienced, and creative people I have ever met. Ultimately, my biggest regret is not having enough time to spend more of my time there. The conversations you have at Pier 9 are incredible, aided with an amazing view of the San Francisco Bay and free coffee made by a robot. “What are you making?” I think this is the unofficial slogan of Pier 9 because that is the first thing someone will ask when you meet. Your response is always greeted with genuine enthusiasm. That's the culture. You are given the tools and resources to create anything. The thing that you create is welcomed with high regards. Positivity flows in everything. I am so humbled to be able to be part of what is happening at Pier 9. I think everyone agrees that something amazing is happening there. I am thankful to everyone who helped make it happen. To Noah, Vanessa, Randy, Amanda, Audrey, Gabe, Dan, Sean, J, and everyone else. Thank you. It is you that makes Pier 9 the special place that it is. The machines are only an added bonus. High fives all around.

Topic by ElectricSlim    |  last reply


Draw Some Circuit Art, Win a Pro Membership!

Hello! I am starting a new instructables series called "Know Your Integrated Circuit" which will feature popular ICs and go over their history, uses, and quick projects you can make with them. What i need from all you artists is a mascot for this new series, if your drawing wins you win a 3 month pro membership! awesome right? What i Want: I want a cute, cartoony looking IC, preferably an 8 legged one. Think brave little toaster status. Rules: - Drawing must be vector and scalable. - Must be released under Creative Commons, but when used your member profile will be cited. - Must be posted as a comment before july 1st. - Give it a name as well when you submit. - Contest IS open to international residents.

Topic by frenzy    |  last reply


Ice Art Alaska: San Francisco Art Institute Team

INTRODUCTION:In March 2008, a team of five graduate students from the San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI) are determined to participate in the World Ice Art Championships in Fairbanks, Alaska. Four sculptors will compete in the Multi-Block Classic event, which involves carving over 700 cubic feet of ice in under 132 hours. Additionally, we are bringing one archivist who will record and write about our experience. We seriously consider Ice Art as an opportunity to enhance our artistic knowledge and ingenuity, as well as to positively impact the communities involved.TEAM:Jesse Hensel, Team CaptainEric ReyesStephanie InagakiJesse WaltonLaura Rogers, ArchivistCONTEXTIce Art brings together communities from various countries -consistently from Canada, Norway, Russia, Japan, and China - and at all career levels including professional artists, students, and local residents. Each team has a different approach. Some will celebrate traditional craft while others will pursue edgy artistic expressions. Some will produce monumental forms while others will carve small-scale objects. For six long days, the SFAI team will work intensely together in the harsh Alaskan environment. During morning and evening meals they will reenergize and discuss different carving techniques and landscape traditions with other participants. This experience will undoubtedly benefit those in the competition in addition to educating and entertaining audiences worldwide.For general information about the competition visit: http://www.icealaska.com/COMMUNITY PARTNERS1. San Francisco Art Institute2. Make Magazine3. Morrow and Hensel Consulting4. Instructables

Topic by jesse.hensel  


How to Go to Maker Heaven

Dear Pier 9, You are a place like no other, and I’m so glad you came into my life.  I was a full time Artist in Residence at the Pier for 4 months, and I doubt I have ever been so simultaneously intellectually stimulated, inspired and intimidated at any other point.  When I came to the Pier I had been living in New York for 8 years, and I had just decided to make a permanent migration back to my homeland on the West Coast.  I’d heard rumors about the rampant culture of innovation in the Bay Area, but I was still totally unprepared for the explosion of creative energy and excitement that is the nerdy artist heaven called Pier 9. Maybe I’m just getting older and less jaded… but in the last few years, I have felt a change in the world, a shift in attitude from angst to optimism, from critique to creation, and I think places like the Pier exemplify this new positive force.  The fact that a multinational corporation like Autodesk has allocated a significant amount of resources to giving the imaginations of a bunch of madcap inventors, artists, engineers and other creatives free reign in a beautiful lab with a bunch of cutting edge machines… well, to me that says good things about the direction of the world.  But what really makes the Pier special, I think, is the fact that all the creativity taking place there is fundamentally motivated by the philosophy of Instructables; by the idea that knowledge should be shared.  I have never encountered a group of people so willing to share their ideas and skills, and so excited to help make other people’s dreams a reality.  And the feeling was really infectious!  Everyone was so ridiculously helpful, that on the rare occasion I had the opportunity to teach someone else a skill, it felt like a treat. That’s not to say that my experience at the Pier was all sunshine and roses.  It was exhausting and draining, and very ego challenging.  When I first arrived I was incredibly overwhelmed by all the new information I was intaking.  I had projects in mind, but those ideas were quickly swept away in the tide of new ideas that arose with every fascinating technology, and possibility I encountered.  Having nearly unlimited options can be paralyzing, and I fell pray to this paralysis many times at the Pier.  One of the pitfalls of having so many amazing minds in one place is that someone always has a new idea that will either revolutionize the project you are working on, or cause you to completely change direction and start working on something new.  That can be great, but if you aren’t careful it can cause acute artistic ADD. I think most creative journeys have a similar arc.  When you are learning new skills, it can take a while for the quality of the work you are producing to catch up with your creative vision.  I definitely felt that way at the Pier.  During my time there, my work ended up going on a journey from two dimensions to three dimensions.  I started out by experimenting with laser cutting.  I am a costume designer, and was interested in creating a wearable mechanical flower that would illuminate and open and close in response to its environment.  My first attempts to create this form felt very flat and lifeless to me, so I stepped away from the flower project and focused on figuring out how to create something much more three dimensional with the two dimensional process of laser cutting.  The result was a costume constructed from laser cut leather and el wire.  After that I decided I was ready to tackle 3D modeling and 3D printing, so I went back to my flower idea, and spent the rest of my time at the Pier testing and developing this form.  It was a really new and interesting process, 3D modeling and prototyping with the amazing Objet printers.  It also gave me the chance to work closely with two other awesome Artists in Residence, Paolo Salvagione and JoeJoe Martin.  It really underlined for me that the most important resource at the Pier is the people.  No matter how many incredible machines you have under one roof, they are only as good as the minds running them.  Noah Weinstein and the other amazing innovators who run the Pier have done such an incredible job of gathering together a diverse, brilliant, exciting, and truly kind-hearted group of people… the place practically buzzes with welcoming creative energy as soon as you walk through the door.  Also, putting relatively self-actualized creators in an environment where there are so many options and resources results in some incredibly interesting glimpses into individual human passion and curiosity.  I might not have fully understood why some of my fellow AiRs were so fascinated by stacking tetrahedrons, drawing graphically detailed pictures of intestinal parasites, or creating physical bodies for virtual bots, but witnessing each artist’s commitment to their singular pursuit was in itself a fascinating and beautiful experience. So much of our lives are spent trying to make practical things happen, it’s an rare opportunity to get to spend a dedicated amount of time just exploring the potential of creative ideas.  I really think that is what Pier 9 is about, providing a place that nurtures our human desire to create, explore and learn… with a kick ass set of resources to facilitate that exploration.  Honestly, during my time there I wish I had been able to let go and enjoy that process more.  It’s not always easy to escape the concepts of deadlines and expectations, but sometimes freeing yourself from those constraints is the only way to create anything truly new.  I very much believe that what is growing at Pier 9 is a new and exciting kind of creative ecosystem, and I hope it will inspire the creation of many more similar environments.  I feel incredibly lucky to have gotten a chance to be an explorer on the frontiers of Maker Land.  Thank you so much Noah and Vanessa.

Topic by MikaelaHolmes    |  last reply


masynmachien's time as an AIR

I had the honour and pleasure of spending the month of July 2013 as an Artist in Residence at Instructables HQ. An unforgettable experience! I feel like I cannot even begin to describe it, so forgive me for keeping it simple. The most tangible amazing thing is the unbelievable workshop, a true makers heaven! I mainly worked on the laser cutters and the 3D printers myself, but these are just a part of the new workshop set up at Pier 9. There’s also the experimental kitchen, the sowing corner, the electronics lab, the high-end CNC machines, a complete wood shop and a full blown metal shop. More importantly however was working among the people behind Instructables. To experience up close how they work very hard to make Instructables not only the biggest and best Show-and-Tell buy also the best “maker medium” ever. Having just moved to the new facilities at Pier 9, there was a lot of extra work to get the workshop accessible and operational, but they moved mountains to get us Artists in Residence onto the machines and making things. Working alongside three other Artists in Residence was also unique chance. Usually, when I’m surrounded by makers, most of them aren’t older than 12. But even as each of us had his inner kid very much alive, having some serious making going on around you is very inspiring (as some of my Instructables will show). I also very much appreciate how my daughter Tika was warmly received when see joined me at Instructables HQ. One month was far too short to spend with the people at Instructables HQ.  I was constantly torn between on the one hand getting to know the people better and on the other hand leaving them continue there hard work and trying to make as much things as possible myself. And to make it even harder there were the lures of the magnificent city of San Francisco and of the Bay Area. My conclusion is clear: I want to come back! But then, being a month away from home is not easy either. Tika joined me during the second half of my stay, which was great, but I missed my wife and youngest daughter. Back home in Belgium I’m first taking some rest, spending time with family and friends, working on some due home improvements and preparing some kids workshops. Writing up the Instructables on the projects I did will take some time. They will be published over the coming months. After all, I have about 15 new projects to document. The thread through my AIR was a laser cut (advent) calendar. A series of toy/gift assembly kits designed to be laser cut out of one acrylic sheet and to be wrapped into a cardboard package opening separately on each kit. The only parts added to the laser cut parts are some elastic bands, screws and nuts. The idea is to have a calendar that is easily made in several copies, with designs accommodating for thickness variations in the acrylic sheet and a concept of cutting and wrapping it all with little handwork. I managed to design, cut and test 13 different toys/gifts. I consider it the first chapter of a full advent calendar. I will make an Instructable on each of the 13 and put them in a collection, together with an Instructable on the calendar concept. The eye catcher of my stay was an iPhone/iPad (or Android) controlled RC Blimp with video feedback. For this I used the plug-and-play Dension WIRC system. This system leading to rather heavy build (200g) comparted to my other blimp projects, I decided upon using a large spherical balloon. From this (and from watching Doctor Who) sprung the idea to make it into a large eye. I named it ‘In the blimp of an eye”. The project that was the most of a learning experience was designing and 3D printing nested dolls. Deviating from the classic Russian dolls, I learned how to design these in 123D Design, how to calculate sizes and experienced the possibilities and limitations of different 3D printing techniques. I hope you will enjoy reading the resulting Instructables, just as I enjoyed doing these projects at Instructables HQ. I want to thank once more the people at Instructables and Autodesk for this wonderful opportunity. Thank you, thank you, thank you! Yvon Masyn aka masynmachien

Topic by masynmachien    |  last reply


I need some brainstorming help w/funds transfer

Hey all;  I need a way to transfer 1,000,000 rubles.... NAH just kidding. I have someone that  says they are in Australia, and they would like to purchase my HOPE ticket, but their paypal "has been canceled". Can anyone come up with a safe (and cost effective) way of them making a payment without me having to give out my home address? Cost effective = would not cost me anything or at very least $5 or less.  I might even see it in  my heart to award a patch to the best answer :-)   Athough, I will have to find some time to actually make one (or ask one of our resident artists to help ;-)   Please understand....I am not asking anyone to help me DO the transfer,  I just need an idea on how the fellow CAN get the money to me without telling him where I live.    

Topic by Goodhart    |  last reply


Interactivos? @ Eyebeam: June 26 - August 9

Interactivos? @ Eyebeam: June 26 - August 9Better Than the Real Thing: Call for CollaboratorsMay 30: Call for Collaborators Deadline | June 3: Notification of acceptanceWe're pleased to announce that we (Eyebeam fellows, residents and staff) have selected nine projects--from the 60-plus submitted applications--to be realized during a two-week workshop in late June.But we need help, and that's where you come in. We are now recruiting collaborators--artists, engineers, musicians, programmers, designers, and hackers--to help bring these projects to life. While this position is unpaid, it is an opportunity to work with international artists including current Eyebeamers Zachary Lieberman, Taeyoon Choi, Jeff Crouse, Friedrich Kirschner, and others. Collaborators will participate in skill-based workshops, and attend public lectures and associated events, and be an integral part of the production of exciting new interactive projects. The completed projects will be included in Eyebeam's Summer 2008 exhibition. All collaborators will be credited in the exhibition for their roles in the realization of the projects.To be considered, send us a letter outlining your skill set and what you think you could contribute to the workshops, with a CV (word documents or pdfs only please, no image attachments) to interactivosinfo AT eyebeam DOT org by May 26. Selected collaborators will be notified May 29.Interactivos? was initiated two years ago by the Medialab-Prado program and the Madrid City Council. This is the first time it has taken place outside Spain.The full list of projects, and further detail on the kind of collaborative help we are looking for, can be found here:Interactivos? @ Eyebeam: June 26 - August 9

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply


An embarrassment of riches

I was an Artist in Residence at Instructables from September-December 2013, and words cannot express how wonderful it was.  Instructables has recently built out what I can only imagine is the world's greatest general use workshop, at Autodesk's Pier 9 facility.  You are probably aware of this shop if you're reading Artist in Residency posts, but if not, check out the overview here and the machine details here.  I tried to learn and do EVERYTHING in this shop!  I didn't quite succeed in that but I came close enough that I didn't totally finish any of my projects.  I'd planned to make an articulated model of an Escher drawing and an 8 foot tall steel dinosaur statue, both projects I could probably have spent all my time there on.  There was so much awesome to learn about and experiment with, though, that I kept getting distracted by side projects and what-if's that I might not have had opportunity to mess around with later on.  So what I actually ended up making was a series of acrylic jewelry, two small cardboard dinosaur models, MOST of the Escher drawing (I finished it later), some sheet metal walking-leg linkage experiments, half of a new Mustache Ride, part of a sixth Pulse of the City heart, tests of chemically-mediated etching on metal, a pair of 3d printed snowflake ornaments, and the beginnings of a pair of antler pants.  (I will definitely write instructables for the dinosaur and the pants, when they are complete.) I loved it all.  I loved it all so much, and so consistently, that I had to try everything and was hardly able to finish anything.  I cut metal on the waterjet, I printed many 3d things on the 3d printers, I lased like it was going out of style, I lathed like I didn't know what I was doing (Yay Learnings!), I cut and welded and drilled and screwed and printed and ground and sewed and soldered and blasted and glued.  I was like a kid in a candy shop who can't finish the fudge because the lollipops are so tasty and then whoa! peanut brittle! peppermints! gumdrops!  The only part of the shop I didn't use was the test kitchen because, well, I don't really cook. Three months was not enough.  Three years would not be enough.  I feel so fortunate to have been in there doing anything at all for any amount of time, though.  Things I can do now that I couldn't do last summer include: turn wood on a lathe cut metal, stone, cardboard, etc on a waterjet etch metal on a laser printer operate a small vacuum former print multiple materials on an Objet Connex run a jointer and planer operate a Shopbot TIG weld aluminum (to be sure, I'm lousy at this still, but I know How) operate a sand blaster bend steel tubes I'm an introverted anti-social nerd so it has taken me to the bottom of this post to talk about the people.  I absolutely need to say how great the people there are - everyone, no matter their job description, makes things.  Everyone just gets how it is to lose yourself in making some weird possibly useless object that you might have to get rid of when you're done anyway, but you just need to work on it to figure out That One Thing that you didn't quite understand but now you do!  It is a rare and wonderful set of people.  And some of the people, it is explicitly their JOB to teach me about all the equipment and help me with any problems I had with anything at all. If you're reading this you should definitely apply for this program.  You do not want to miss out on working in this shop.

Topic by rachel    |  last reply


Open Call: Pier 9 & Market Street Prototyping Festival Keystone Project

MARKET STREET PROTOTYPING FESTIVAL OPEN CALL Autodesk Keystone Project Call Opens: July 11, 2014 Call Closes: September 2, 2014 Shortlist Interviews: September 17-19, 2014 Proposal Selection: October 1, 2014 CALL SUMMARY: The San Francisco Planning Department has partnered with Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) to produce the Market Street Prototyping Festival: an innovative, hands-on, publicly sourced approach to creating the next chapter of San Francisco’s public life. The Market Street Prototyping Festival builds upon a five-year, multi-agency effort for a Better Market Street to re-establish San Francisco’s civic spine as a place to stop and spend time, meet friends, people watch, or just stroll and experience the scenery. As a formal piece of the planning process, the Prototyping Festival will commission and exhibit up to 50 design projects that aim to improve lives by improving public spaces. Each of the selected prototype projects will be installed on Market Street for the full duration of the three-day festival, which will take place in April 9-11, 2015. Matched with one of five Festival Districts on Market, selected teams will work directly with community members to shape the direction of their designs. The call for applications for those 50 projects is currently open and will close on September 2nd, 2014. More information on that process can be found on the Market Street Prototyping Festival website. Market Street will be broken out into 5 districts along the corridor: Civic Center, Central Market, Retail, Financial, Embarcadero. Each district, or "Block," will be represented by a Block Captain. Each Captain will mentor 10 selected prototyping teams and will be responsible for developing their own Keystone Project that will serve as the primary focal point for each district. As the Block Captain for the Embarcadero district, Autodesk is seeking proposals from engineers, industrial designers, architects, artists, and interactive designers for a large-scale Keystone Project to serve as a physical, visual and social anchor for the Embarcadero section of the festival. While there is no official theme for the festival itself, the Autodesk Keystone Project should relate to the ethos “Inspire, Design, Create.” Additionally, it should connect to the character of the Pier 9 Workshop where artists, designers and fabricators are empowered to test the limits of existing technology, both digital and mechanical. Special consideration may be given to projects that incorporate the following themes related to place-making and the unique social and spatial conditions of the Embarcadero district: • site specificity: social, cultural, geographic, and civic histories • connecting digital and physical realms • daring experimentation/playful prototyping • edge condition: city + waterfront • wayfinding and transportation networks LOCATION: Over the course of the festival, the city anticipates foot traffic of over 300,000 visitors. The Keystone Project may be installed anywhere within the festival’s Embarcadero district, which starts at the intersection of Market and Spear Street, extending to the traffic island at Embarcadero and Market, possibly including Jimmy Herman Plaza. See the map on the Market Street Prototyping Festival website for more details and note that Autodesks main San Francisco office is located at 1 Market. PRECEDENTS: The following projects are examples of what the application review committee is looking for in terms of scale, tone and available resources. These samples are meant to serve purely as a reference and are not works that will be featured at the festival. - Sukkah City, Various, New York - 21 Balançoires (21 Swings), Daily tous les jours, Montreal - Light Drift, J. Meejin Yoon, Philadelphia                 (Note: Projects for the 2014 Urban Prototyping festival cannot be installed in the bay.) - Digital Empathy, Julianne Swartz, New York LOGISTICS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SUPPORT: The selected project and team will be fully supported by the Pier 9 Workshop! We look forward to having you join our creative community of Artists in Residence, other Creative Projects Teams, and the folks who make Instructables.com go. We provide ample opportunities to collaborate with other designers and makers, to receive training on any of the machines in our workshop, gain software support for all Autodesk products (including free software licenses), and call upon the expertise of our fantastic Shop Staff. We can supply a modest office workspace and 24-hour access to the workshop. All basic workshop supplies will be covered, including hardware, sheet goods, finishes, and prototyping materials. Additional funding will be provided at an amount to be determined. We expect to support an innovative and inspiring project that reflects the use of our world-class facilities, at a scale similar to the precedents listed. For more information on the amenities available at Pier 9, see the Pier 9 Overview and Machine Catalog Instructables. Your project will also receive support from Autodesk’s public relations team, marketing team, video and photo documentation team, software specialists, and workshop fabrication specialists. There will be an expectation that you will work collaboratively with all of these groups to share the progress and product of your work. Finally, we have an Advisory Committee representing expertise in areas of landscape architecture, sustainability, and digital fabrication that can be called upon for consultation and critical feedback at particular points in the project timeline. The selected artist or team will be expected to formally share their progress throughout the development and fabrication process with the creative community at Pier 9 and beyond. This includes: • posting Instructables related to the making of the project • 2 presentations to the Advisory Committee for feedback • 1 lunchtime presentation to the full Pier 9 community, near project completion TIMELINE: July 11, 2014 —RFP Release July 22, 2014 —12pm lunchtime RFP Info Session at Pier 9 September 2, 2014 —Proposals Due September 17-19, 2014 — Semifinalist interviews October 1, 2014 —Keystone project announced October - December, 2014 — periodic consultations with members of Advisory Board Early December, 2014 — Presentation and critique with the Advisory Board Early February, 2015 — Follow-up presentation and critique with the Advisory Board 2 weeks before festival —Dress rehearsal (deadline for full assembly and functionality) April 9-11, 2015 —Installation and three-day festival presentation APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: - 1 page statement regarding the concept, siting, and fabrication strategy for your proposal - Up to 5 photos/videos of mock-ups or prior work - CV including exhibition history (if applicable) - Proposed budget outline (Please include direct costs, materials, artist fees, contractors, and any additional project contributors or contractors) - Draft project calendar including proposed dates for prototyping workflow, workshop production time, completion time(s), and out-of-town dates (if applicable) - List of anticipated machines and materials needed ABOUT PIER 9: Autodesk’s Pier 9 workshop is a world-class fabrication facility on the San Francisco Bay. The Artist in Residence (AiR) program gives artists, designers and Instructables authors a chance to work with us in our lab and workshops to explore, create, and document innovative projects with our tools and resources and share them with the DIY community. AiRs are invited to come for a period of several weeks to several months, during which they will work on projects that are shared across the Autodesk Studio Communities. The primary goals of the residency program are to produce top-level inspirational content and to connect innovative and creative individuals with our unique set of tools and resources. Questions and inquiries are encouraged. We look forward to learning more about your work. Please submit applications with all materials compiled in a .zip file titled with your project name to: P9PublicPrograms@Autodesk.com. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: Market Street Prototyping Festival Homepage Autodesk Engagement Announcement Pier 9 Overview Pier 9 Machine Catalog

Topic by brinstructables  


Still More DIY Open Studios in Sheboygan!

Fabulous DIY Open Studios continue at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The open studios are part of our continuing series of Do-It-Yourself (DIY) program series. Ages 13 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. Cost: $5.00For more information, visit http://www.jmkac.org/DIY.Enjoy a fall Saturday making art, browsing our intriguing exhibitions, walking through our colorful gardens and taking a break with a delicious meal or drink in our ARTcafe. We are located within walking distance of some great shops and pubs in downtown Sheboygan, plus just blocks away from the beautiful Lake Michigan beach.Saturday, September 20, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.Workshop: MYOB (Make Your Own Bag) Open StudioLocation: John Michael Kohler Arts Center, SheboyganBetz White, artist and author of Warm Fuzzies: 30 Sweet Felted Projects, recycles wool sweaters to create felted pillows, baby blankets, felt-covered journals, bags, and more. She is passionate about recycling, specifically of plastic bags. In the open studio, White will teach participants to make reusable bags using an endless variety of recycled materials including plastic disposable bags, sweaters, sheets, jeans, juice pouches, Tyvec mailers, vinyl banners, and anything else participants have on hand. See the photo of White's You Know...For Kids bag made of Capri Sun drink pouches.Saturday, October 4, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.Workshop: Handmade Nation Embroidery/Applique Open StudioLocation: John Michael Kohler Arts Center, SheboyganPhotographer, entrepreneur, artist, and prominent figure in the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) ethic indie craft movement, Faythe Levine will share her unique embroidery/applique techniques along with her savvy marketing skills and knowledge of the emerging self-reliant movement during her residency. A twenty-minute preview of her film Handmade Nation: The Rise of DIY Art, Craft, and Design, will be featured at the open studio and a discussion session on how to market your newfound DIY talents. Saturday, October 18, 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.Workshop: T.O.M.T. (The Other Man's Treasure) Open StudioLocation: John Michael Kohler Arts Center, SheboyganArtist Rodney Allen Trice created T.O.M.T. with the vigilante mission to recover and reassign the purpose of objects considered too difficult to recycle. This open studio gives you the opportunity to save your own trashed or forgotten objects or anything else you might throw away or overlook in your garages, pantries, and other storage spaces, and give them new life. See the photo of Trice's Tri-Bulb Hoover Floor Lamp.For more information, phone the Arts Center at (920) 458-6144. See you soon!

Topic by Kohler Arts Center  


October 2013 Build Night - Creative Reuse

This October we are hosting a creative re-use build night.  DETAILS: There is no formal sponsor for this build night, thus we won't be shipping out any materials. The goal is to use materials such as e-waste, trash, and found objects to create amazing projects during a build night at your makerspace. PRIZES: Submit Instructables from your creative re-use build night and enter to win a prize. We will have a panel of judges from the Instructables staff vote on the projects submitted and the winning makerspace will win 10 Instructables t-shirts and 30 Instructables patches for your makerspace. All projects must be submitted between October 1 - November 10. SIGN UP: Sign up to participate here. Signing up doesn't put you on the hook to submit Instructables. This is just so I have a general mailing list to send updates. It will also help us when picking the winners so we know you are a formal makerspace, hackerspace, school, fabrication lab, or student group. JOIN OUR ANNOUNCEMENT LIST If you are interested in being directly notified about future build nights fill out this form. You will receive an e-mail when the events are announced in the forums. If you have signed up for a past build night or this build night you are already on our announcement list. This build night was inspired by former Artist-In-Residence, long time author, and my good friend M.C. Langer (featured author interview). Check out his projects for some inspiration!

Topic by Carleyy    |  last reply


Crazy, Amazing and Delicious AIR Experience

What a wild ride... So here's the recipe.  Take one computer illiterate lady who's got a lot of random skills she's learned along the way and throw her into a room with 12 other people who's second  language is CAD or 0110001 or some other variation of looking into the eye of a screen and typing sweet nothings into its curvacious keyboard. Man did I feel like a fish in the desert.  I left orientation completely overwhelmed, flattened, and having no idea what I was doing there amongst all these obviously tech savvy folks. Once again odd man out. Now let me be clear, this has nothing to do with the people. Everyone was super sweet and willing to help. I was out of my element, which is exactly what I needed. For as long as I can remember, I've always thought in art. From the clothing and accoutrements I make for myself  to the images I capture. From the food that I create to the materials I bind together, or the mood i can set in an empty space if given a couple days to have my way with it.  Creation and art are an integral part of my existence as an external expression of my internal voice. So having three paid months to spend on my own work was a dream come true. For the first time in my life I was able to really focus on my work with 100 %  of my attention and not juggle how I was going to pay rent    and which piece goes where or how am I going to afford that thing I need for it.  It was fantastic to have that kind of creative freedom and I feel incredibly lucky to have had that opportunity.   I was able to finally create my stained fruit windows, something I've been imagining and working on in my head for many many years. I was able to experiment with different coatings and textures, slice thickness and transparency  to best preserve the beauty of the sliced fruit.  I spent day after day in the kitchen testing gluten free meal-worm flour bread amongst other insect delights. This was really an important experience for me due to my issues with factory farms and its effects on the environment but still feeling my bodies need for animal protein to perform. Once I felt comfortable with my results in the kitchen, I decided to explore the rest of the workshop at Autodesk / Instructables. Let me start by saying Holy $hit is that shop incredible. There are classes that are required to be able to use any one piece of equipment from the 3D printers to the drill. There were tools in the metal shop that I knew how to use but was unable to because I didn't take the class or get signed off. I recommend that any new AIR be realistic in what they want to use and take those classes right away. If you need a hole drilled and you aren't signed off on the drill, just ask someone who is signed off, they'll drill that hole for you because it's that kind of place. Time goes fast and if there is something you want to learn, go for it because when are you going to have that opportunity again? All the instructors are great and willing to answer all your crazy questions. A special thanks to Gabe for helping me so many times with all my computer questions and when the laser cutter doesn't feel like cooperating. (I did mention I'm computer Illiterate right?) On that note, I have learned soooooo much here and though I still feel that computers are generally going to shut down when I touch them, I have learned how to create an image and laser cut that image. I started with leather and made a few water bottle sheaths, dog collars, a leather necklace and a beautiful bag.  Now I'm working with wood and the detail is pretty incredible. I dabbled in the 3D software world and learned a little with Fusion 360 but I wasn't willing to take my precious residency time to learn it. But I do plan on pursuing that education. It's interesting to me and important for the way the world is going which I'm still trying to wrap my head around being a very old school DIY hand made kind of gal. I really cherished my time as an Artist in Residence at Instructables. Honestly, when I was there, I never wanted to leave and would stay into the wee hours. The people are very kind and its like a large quirky family. I've never worked anywhere where employees voluntarily and enjoyably come in on the weekend to work. By the time my residency was over, I think there were forty-five Airs. So many interesting and creative people.  What an amazing idea this is. What an amazing opportunity for growth this program has given so many people. A truly beautiful gift that I am forever grateful for. Thank you to all the people in the foreground who help us on a daily basis and form this place and for those behind the scenes that make it possible. Thank you, you are so appreciated. Sincerely, Rima Khalek

Topic by rimamonsta    |  last reply


To Pier 9, Thanks for Everything !

Tl;dr : 1. people are the greatest resource at the pier 2. sometimes it’s hard to work due to too much awesomeness Seriously. Me and my collaborator, Radamés Ajna, had a couple of projects we wanted to do in the spring/summer of 2014, and while looking for some shop space in Oakland, someone recommended we check out the AiR program. We applied. We thought that if we got accepted Autodesk would give us a desk, some nice hand tools, and access to their software. And that would’ve been great. Coming from Brazil, where it feels like we solve everything using hot glue, zip ties and duct tape, that would have been more than enough. Weren’t we surprised when we visited the shop. . . Holy crap, everything is here. Some of the machines are bigger than my apartment, and there’s even a swimming pool ! I’m pretty sure everyone has written about all the great machines, because, yeah, they are great, but to me, the most important aspect of being an AiR at the pier was the people. The shop staff who not only teach you how to use the machines, but also have enough collective experience to help you solve any kind of material/machining/construction problem. Want to vacuum form foam? No problem. Want to glue glass to cement? Someone has done it before. Want to weld titanium? Easy. Having access to the tools is good, but having people that know how to use them is even more awesomenest. The same is true for the CAD people who help you set up and use all kinds of modeling and design software. Not only that, but they get excited when you use their software. Not having had a lot of experience with 3D modeling prior to my residency, it was a great opportunity to learn it using Fusion 360. Another very special group of people were the other AiRs. The ones that came in with us (Anouk, Alex, U-Ram, Adrien, Paolo, Scott, Mikaela) and the ones that were already there when we  arrived (Andy, Aaron, Rima, Andreas, Ben). What a diverse crowd. It was great to get to know everybody, and also to be able to share experiences and expertise. I don’t even know how many times Paolo and Andy saved me from searching for “metal thing with a hole” or “thing with a thing inside” on google, because they knew exactly what I was looking for. Invaluable! Sometimes it’s a bit tricky to explain your project and get everyone excited about it, because everyone has such a diverse background and set of interests, but learning how to talk about our projects from different perspectives was a challenge that I enjoyed. And, last but not least, the IRL Instructables community; another very diverse, active and enthusiastic group of people at the pier. I don’t know how they do it, but it seems like they are always happy, and making cookies. The sum of all of these people is something awesome. There’s always something interesting going on at the Pier (even at night and on the weekends), which sometimes can be a bit distracting, but also motivating. I will sorely surely miss them all.

Topic by thiagohersan    |  last reply


Instructables + Autodesk, the beginning!

Yesterday was my first day as an "artist in residence" here at Instructables - which also happens to be the first day that we all became employees of Autodesk! Good timing on my part, I think. :) Last night we got to visit the Autodesk offices here in San Francisco to become official employees and get a tour of their gallery. They also fed us lots of fancy tiny foods (if Autodesk ever offers to feed you, I recommend the spring rolls, samosas, and brownies. nom.) and gave us drinks. Oh, and water bottles and books. We have been courted! And I have to say that everyone I met on the Autodesk staff was so nice and so excited about bringing Instructables on - they all had so many questions about how the site worked and how it was run. They were very curious about every little thing, and wanted to hear our suggestions as well. Many people had already looked at the site and talked to me about specific projects they liked or asked me about what projects I had worked on. They also told us tons about projects they were working on - all the stuff they thought we could work into the site in the future to help our users. It sounds like there a lot of possibilities out there for us right now. :D I am feeling very optimistic after meeting the Autodesk folks... they showed so much enthusiasm for the site the general gist of all of my conversations with them is that we're only going to improve on what we've got here. I'm excited to see where this will go! I can say that nothing has really changed as far as the interns and crazy projects from when I was here a few years ago - just yesterday SHIFT!, penfoldplant, and I were on the roof finishing up penfoldplant's latest ible, which should be quite exciting. (Let's just say it involves giant plastic bags, duct tape, safety goggles, and shooting each other in the face.) And today the office is busy as usual... people are working on projects, Eric and Christy are doing the live chat, contests are being worked on, moderation is happening, bugs are being fixed, the internets are being scoured for new content, etc. So, you know, business as usual. Hopefully made more awesome in the near future. :D P.S. Random photos from the gallery below... I didn't take as many as I liked because I was eating and drinking and talking!

Topic by jessyratfink    |  last reply