Barefoot Running

Anybody ever run barefoot (on pavement)?  I did it in college (5 years ago) a lot on the grass playing soccer and rugby. I started running on pavement (with shoes) afterward and was killed by knee aches and achilles tendon problems. I connected the injuries to the pavement, not the shoes. Now I hear that maybe millions of years of evolution actually makes humans really good at running without shoes, so I decided to give it a go unshod.  Went almost a mile today on a pavement track, and it was a bizarre experience. The motions and muscle movements were all completely different. But I liked it. My feet and legs are very strong so I didn't have any problems with weak feet. It was just different motions.  Anybody else?

Topic by marcward86   |  last reply


barefoot shoes?

 Hello everyone. I've recently gotten into the benefits of going barefoot without actually leaving the house shoeless. When I run, I wear stupid-looking vibram five fingers, and I've got a pair of Vivo Barefoots by Terra Plana that were too expensive. I'm sick of looking for new shoes that meet the specifications of being classified as "barefoot shoes" because they either way to expensive or just look stupid. The solution? Does anyone know anything about replacing the soles of shoes? I figured I could just take some shoes I've already got or get some new ones and replace the anatomically flawed soles with a sturdy but flexible sole about 3 or 4mm thick throughout. But I have absolutely no idea how this would be done.

Topic by Daax   |  last reply


Diy Vibram-like Fivefingers? Answered

I was looking at Vibrams a bit, as I enjoy doing things barefoot, but I don't like the price they run. So I was thinking of maybe making my own minimalist "barefoot" shoes that had the toes like vibrams do. I was thinking maybe like toe socks dipped in rubber tool-dip. Well, not exactly like that, but something slightly similar. And obviously cheaper. Any Ideas would be appreciated :D Thanks! ~RogueLeadR

Question by rogueleadr   |  last reply


Barefoot Waterskiing, Mini S'Mores Grill, Burger Recipes

  Barefoot Waterskiing Mini S'mores Grill Burger Recipes Chocolate Stuffed Strawberries Tetris Ice Cubes PVC Sprinkler Toy Cooking From Scratch DIY Barbecue Sauce Memorial Day How to Fish USB Flag Memorial Backyard Theatre Fly a Kite Grilled Eggplant Parmesan Build a Water Mortar  

Topic by randofo 


Collaboration Launched at Web 2.0 Launch Pad

Today, we've launched the incredible new feature, collaboration! Enable other users or groups to help you work on your Instructables. Made a mistake? Don't worry, there's also now versioning, so you can rollback to an earlier version of your Instructable. Check out the slides from my talk announcing this new feature, or check out some of the Instructables I mentioned:3-D ScannerMagnetic Acrylic Rubik's CubeDixie Cup Spherical DodecahedronTeddy Bear Remote ControlDachshund wheelchairPublished Collaborations:How to Barefoot WaterskiChopping Hot Peppers SafelyChicken Chile VerdeCollaborations in progress.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Sandals made from billboard fabric

The barefoot trend keeps catching on. About half of the Instructables staff wears Vibram Five Fingers shoes and Eric has even run a marathon in a pair. But it's totally understandable that people would want some even cheaper alternatives, such as the invisible shoe. Now there's an even cheaper option coming along that's made out of billboard fabric. They're called Paper Feet sandals and are set to go on sale this summer for $5-$15. Now I'm a little dubious about the comfort of such shoes with some potentially sharp edges, but it's cool to see people constantly trying out new ideas. Hopefully this one turns out well. Paper-Feet: Sustainable Sandals that Don't Cost an Arm or a Leg

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


57-Storey Death ray

Concave, polished, and 57 stories tall - the Vdara Hotel in Las Vagas could be the world's largest death ray... Reports are cropping up around the web that the smooth curved surface of the hotel focuses the Sun's rays into a patch around 10 feet across in the pool area, soon after noon. Fortunately, the glass disperses around 70% of the solar energy falling on it, otherwise lawyer Bill Pintas might not be here to tell the tale; After a brief dip in the hotel pool, Pintas was sunning on a recliner. He was on his stomach, relaxed, eyes closed. But suddenly, the lawyer became so uncomfortably hot that he leaped up to move. He tried to put on his flip-flop sandals but, inexplicably, they were too hot to touch. So he ran barefoot to the shade. "I was effectively being cooked," Pintas said. "I started running as fast as I could without looking like a lunatic." Then he smelled an odor, and realized it was coming from his head, where a bit of hair had been scorched. It was about 12:20 p.m., as best Pintas can recall. The hot-spot, which sweeps the entire pool area during the day, spikes at least 20 degrees above ambient temperatures, and has been seen to melt plastic bags and cups (made of plastics which melt at around 70°C (160F). Other guests, including newspaper reviewers, have also observed the burning beam. The hotel management doesn't call it a "death ray", they prefer the more friendly distinction "solar convergence phenomenon". Gordon Absher, a spokesman for MGM Mirage says the hotel is addressing the problem, and comments, "Because of the curved, concave shape of that hotel, they sometimes get isolated pockets of high temperatures." ---------------------------------- Never mind dispersing the light - get those windows polished up, and let's see how many lawyers a fifty seven storey burning glass can really deal with!

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Born to Run the Oakland Marathon

On Sunday, I ran the Oakland Marathon, finishing in 3:54:29, and placing 215th out of 945 runners.  I know it's cliche, but I read Born to Run and got inspired me to run a marathon.  It's the best book I've read in years:  the characters (all real people!) are fascinating, the setting and story are fantastic, and it just made me want to get out and go.  Halfway through the book, I decided to run a few miles to the grocery store in the rain just to run out back, not because I needed anything. Prior to reading Born to Run, I had been running a 2-3 miles twice a week to vary my preferred morning exercise routine of biking or swimming (the kitesurfing season hasn't really started yet).  Running was something I did if I couldn't get to a pool or didn't have the time for a long enough bike ride; it was exercise I did while traveling and when there were no better options.  Born to Run made me question that assumption, and I decided to see how longer runs would feel. Over a year ago I read "You Walk Wrong", a New York Magazine article on going barefoot.  It convinced me that I should be able to go unshod, or at least with minimally foot coverings.  Why would 30 years of running shoe development be able to produce better results than millions of years of foot evolution?  So I bought some Vibram Five Fingers  to protect my delicate soles, and had been doing lots of hiking and a bit of running.  The difference between running in running shoes and Vibram Five Fingers was profound for me.  In running shoes, I typically stopped running because my knees and hips hurt, not because I was exhausted.  The Vibrams forced me to take smaller, faster strides without heel strikes, and suddenly I was getting closer and closer to being able to run long enough to catch exhaustion without any joint pain.  The concept of going barefoot was initially tough because of my flat feet and overpronation, and the possibility of re-dislocating a kneecap. I never went anywhere barefoot, and after I initially dislocated my kneecap in 2000, I was told by a sports medicine doctor that I should never walk without the aid of custom orthotics in my shoes.  However, barefoot websites and forums are full of stories about people's arches coming back, and how kids raised without shoes never have flat feet.  Amazingly, it's all worked perfectly for me.  I now run without my orthotics without any knee pain, and my arches appear to have (re?)formed.  After hopping out of the pool, I always inspect my wet footprints, and they now have distinct arches.  I wish I had taken photographs every day to plot progress. With the characters and race in Born to Run still fresh in my mind, I looked for nearby races to give myself some motivation and something to train for.  When I discovered that Oakland was holding its first marathon in 25 years, and that the route literally went through my neighborhood, I immediately signed up for the half-marathon and convinced Christy to do the same.  I researched training regiments online, and discovered many were 4 and 5 month plans; since I had 50 days before the race, I decided simply to run longer and longer distances at a comfortable pace, and not worry about a rigid structure.  I ran most of my miles on trails in the Oakland hills, and some on the streets, but all of them in my Vibrams.  During a practice run on the half-marathon course three weeks before the race, I completed the half in less than my target time for two hours and felt so good that I opted to do the full marathon. In the marathon, I ran with GEICO-sponsored pacers aiming for a 3:50:00 time (8:46 miles on the flats, and slower miles in the hills; course elevation PDF here).  Of the three pacers, one was running his 34th marathon, and the other two were ultra-marathoners training for a 200 mile race from Calistoga to Santa Cruz; their normal weekend run was 50 miles, so a marathon was like taking a break.  Running in a group is awesome and way better than running by myself listening to audio books.  On multiple occasions, I imagined that we were the hunters of a tribe out running down game -- water stations every couple of miles broke the illusion, but I still eagerly grabbed cups, and the community support was tremendous.  There were bands, drummers, DJs, and gospel choirs making music along the route; families with full brunch buffets setup in their front yards offering all the runners fresh fruit and homemade baked goods; and many people just thanking us for running in Oakland.  The second image shows all my runs in the 50 days leading up to the marathon.  The first 5-mile run on the chart was the longest I had ever run at that point.  While I was coming from something of a limited endurance background (I've biked 135 miles on a tandem from Boston to Provincetown in a single day), I didn't really know my limit.  At mile 23 of the marathon, I finally caught up to exhaustion, and fell behind the pace group.  The last three miles were painful, but in the last quarter mile, I couldn't stop grinning and felt like I might laugh and cry at the same time.  When it was over, I just wanted to sit down. I was aiming for a sub-4-hour marathon, and I'm really proud to have done that on my first try.  Everyone made fun of me for walking like a zombie the next day at work, and I have some pretty large blood blisters on my feet, but nothing that won't disappear in under a week.  Go and read Born to Run, it might inspire you, too. Christy says: I'd always had to run as cross-training for other sports (I swam competitively for 13 years) and ran when I needed quick exercise, but hated it - my joints hurt, and it just wasn't fun.  I was a distance swimmer and can hike nearly forever, but could literally swim farther than I could (or would) run.  The most I'd ever run before was about 4 miles.   I got my Vibrams with Eric, and really enjoyed hiking with them on my feet.  I hadn't run in nearly a year and a half (pregnancy loosens the joints, which made running feel even worse) so when Eric announced he was signing up to run 13 miles I was dubious.  However, I read Born to Run and was suitably inspired - I was in good cardio shape from swimming and stationary biking, and would happily hike 13 miles, so why couldn't I run that far?  I decided to go out for a 5k jog to see what running felt like in my Vibrams. Long story short, I accidentally ran 6 miles, stopping not due to fatigue or joint injury but because of a blister from a poorly-adjusted shoe strap.  I signed up for the half marathon that evening, and started taking increasingly pleasant runs through the parks and across the city.  I ran the half-marathon course with Corvidae in her jog stroller, stopping to feed her periodically.  Eric finished while I was on mile 8, so he backtracked along the course and met us at mile 10, by which time she was thoroughly done with this stroller nonsense and had migrated to the sling.  I left the two of them to their own devices and jogged the rest of the way to the finish, about 3:25 after I started in the morning.  Not terribly speedy, even given the breaks!  The next day the bottoms of my feet were sore, and one of my Achilles tendons was a bit inflamed - I'd describe it as having overused my springs - but even though I was limping, my muscles were still in good shape. My pace is still quite slow (I ran the half-marathon in 2:42, for roughly 12:26 mile splits) but it's frighteningly consistent - I negative split most of the race, and at the end discovered I still had plenty of energy to sprint past a dozen exhausted runners.  Clearly I didn't run fast enough or far enough, but I was specifically setting a pace I felt able to maintain indefinitely.  The weak link is still my feet!  While I had plenty of muscle and energy left at the end of the race, the bottoms of my feet were tired from use - more practice is necessary to balance out years of shoe-wearing.  However, I recovered much more quickly this time, and was able to run again by Tuesday morning.  No zombie shuffle for me!  Of course, this means next time I'll be running the marathon, and at a faster pace!

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


New drums: Kick pedal question. Answered

Greetings! Background: My xmas 'from me to me' present was a Roland TD-9K electronic drum set.  I have a concern with the drum kick.  I think I have it set up properly and it's either a setup problem or a user/technique issue.  The instruction manual says you can adjust (insert list of a bajillion variables) and 'set it up how you like' basically, without explaining how each variable effects the end result. My problem:  The kick pedal is set up as per the instructions and occasionally (every few beats) double-taps.  The hits are extremely close together, and are hardly audible if you're not listening for them, but they do exist in the midi data. (i.e. 1/64th beat later) The hammer is physically bouncing and hitting twice, it's not just spurious noise or an oversensitive pickup.  The brain lcd has a What I can adjust: Technique:  If I move my foot a bit it changes the harmonic frequency of the hammer, and it can solve the problem, but sometimes my foot ends up back where the problem exists The pedal assembly: -Spring return tension -- more tension = ability to hit faster but more effort required, problem exists everywhere from full soft to full firm. -Hammer location - it's centered on the sensor per instructions, and strikes flat and square. I could move the pedal off to one side slightly, or change the effective length of the hammer so it hits higher or lower (would change the periodicity of the system). -Angle of the sensor - per instructions is set straight vertical. -Electronic filtering - I can tell the brain to ignore hits for a period after a given hit to eliminate the spurious hits, but this wrecks my ability to intentionally use techniques where fast double-hits are wanted -'Home' angle of the hammer -- the angular moment with which the hammer moves with each kick.  Setting this too far away tends to make it hit the top of my foot (quite painful), and too short means its hard to make it work. Other Thoughts: I play barefoot, should I have a set of drum shoes?  Would that make a difference? I want to use these also to play rock band thru the midi adapter (people report its fun) -- but the double-hits would seriously impair scoring ability, and I need a way to fix them!

Question by frollard   |  last reply


China's first Maker Faire !

April 6th was a long night that would be followed by an even longer day. Hours stretched like taffy as the Airplane pulled me across time zones. I was on my way to the Shenzhen Maker Faire which was being put on by Eric Pan, the founder of one of the largest open sourced businesses I know. Eric is a visionary, and his vision to inspire more makers in China connecting them with a global maker movement through the concepts of openness, sharing, and innovation inspires me and hundreds others to come to Shenzhen to share in the first Maker Faire in China! Hours ago I was at Instructables cooking my Last Breakfast for the office and gaving my Last Hugs. Qarly, my new friend, had helped my stay up all night organizing my tickets and suitcase. She went with me to the Payless shoe store on her bike as I walked barefoot. Yes, I started my journey shoeless. I had traded in my Vibrams at REI for a large backpack so I could cram as many arduinos and 3D printers into it as possible before leaving to go spread the good words. Here are the good words as I see them right now: "It Can Be Done." Yes, with a solid mission, a relentless attitude and accepting being shoeless (or jobless, or hungry, or ...) it's possible to accomplish the things you dream. Boom, back in that tin can flying over the Pacific. My schedule starts with a trip to Hong Kong to meet up with instructable's member Prank. Alex Hornstein and I had recently completed an adventure in 3D printing called the Pocket Factory in which we traveled across America seeking the business models behind low cost 3D manufacturing. He is now back in east Asia being the revolutionary philosopher engineer he is. I land at 8pm and head out into the city of the future. Hong Kong is a city of millions, beautifully lit tall buildings, zippy public transportation, and the largest pay inequality in the world. Looking out the window I keep wondering if this is the rich part, or the poor. Then I was there. I made it to IFC - a gigantic mall in the heart of Hong Kong. The metro stop inside it is called "Hong Kong Station". Yep, shopping is big here. We hung out on the roof of IFC talking projects. Without giving too much away too soon let's just say Alex is on his way to revolutionize the micro solar industry. We took the familiar ferry route home and I spent the night organizing and updating the social world since I knew in a few hours I'd be in China... and in China, no one can hear you tweet. Before I knew it I had to be off! It was 6:20am (HK time) and the ferry leaves at 6:40, I had a long day ahead of me and I haven't slept yet. Holy crap! I ran and got right back on that ferry from Lama to the mainland. Passing all the tall buildings once again and rushed onto the MTR. As we sped along the Hong Kong landscape of tall towers slowly turned into green rolling hills and the people on the train spoke less and less english. I crossed the border into Shenzhen and it was there I met Ani, the Monk. What a beautiful lady! We had a great conversation involving LOTS of smiling, drawing and almost no words. She was from Hong Kong and we were now friends. We traded bracelets and now I have one more reason to learn Mandarin! I finally made it all the way to Xi Xiang, the metro stop which was walking distance to the Maker Faire! I was getting pretty excited, I had lugged all this stuff across the world, and finally I was going to meet the makers of China! After a long and potholed walk I finally made it to the gate where a nice young Chinese lady helped me carry my stuff, we walked down a long outdoor hallways at F518 the "First Experiential Sharing Space in China" which was filled with sculptures and art. Billboards around me advertised hip hop dance classes and robots peeped from the windows. I knew I was in the right place. Right near the entrence of the Maker Faire was a strange robot. It was the size of a small house and it served books. They have robot libraries in Shenzhen. Wow! The more I learn about this place the cooler it seems! The faire is a large three story space with a media space on the first floor where people can buy "chinese make" a magazine called Radio that has been teaching people how to make stuff since 1955. The publishers of this magazine are also the ones who do the translation for Makezine! The second floor is filled with long tables of makers, a huge hall filled with running robots, dancing droids, DIY laser 3D scanners, touchless IR interfaces, octocopter (no, not tacocopter) and all the awesome stuff you'd expect to see in San Francisco, except this is Shenzhen. There are makers everywhere! Upstairs there are people making clay figurines, another instructables user - Star - runs a workshop around Canidu (yes, you can do!), her company which makes an electronics learning tool. This movement is obviously global and the Shenzhen Maker Faire has pulled makers not only from all over China, but all over the world. Eric Pan, the founder of Seeed Studio employs 70 people through an open source project and through this faire has inspired hundreds. At the after party, you can really tell how proud Eric was to have brought amazing makers like Mitch Altman and David Li from the Shanghai hackerspace together. Eric has a new project in the works right now. He's soon to be a father! I can only imagine how proud he will be when baby Eric Pan picks up his first blinky LED kit. Now that's some serious making! +Bilal Ghalib PS. Eric in the last picture is not dead, only extremely exhausted!

Topic by lamedust   |  last reply