CAD

Hi ppl, Recently I decided to design my own raft this year for the Guildford raft race. The raft will use pvc piping for floatation and my (and an unsuspecting friend) will sit on two bicycles which will power two paddle wheels. Anyway, long story short i thought it would be a cool idea to model it up in some sort of CAD (maybe as something to send possible sponsors to show what i am going to attempt to do if they give me a load of pvc hehe), and, was wondering what software is best to use? thanks ppl

Topic by drummer ian   |  last reply


CAD on Mac.

Does anyone here do CAD 3d modeling on mac? If So, what program, and where can I get it. Looking for open source, or free stuff. Would be great if it opened files from autodesk inventor. Thanks

Topic by LinuxH4x0r   |  last reply


Lego CAD software

I just thought that the Lego-ers (?) would like to know about Ldraw, open source CAD software specifically for designing Lego models. Have a look at this BBC News story to see a chap who built a model of St Pancras' railway station to a scale suitable for minifigs. Of course, you may not wish to go "open" with your software (I doubt that Ldraw has been as thoroughly debugged as Firefox, for instance), so you may with to use the official Lego CAD software. 

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


CAD/CAM SOFTWARE?

Hello, i am T.Y. Mech Engg. student. I want to know how software's like PRO/E are made. I mean how do they create the graphics (links of free download available graphics library's would be appreciated). Also how do they connect that(graphics) with their kernel? I know c++ already, which else languages or concepts do i need to know to create such a software? Also i would like to know how FEA is integrated in these software's. Expecting detailed reply's from all the experienced people who have worked on PARASOLID or Granite (PTC) or any other CAD/CAM software!

Question by coepian 


Printing 3d models/ prototypes affordably? Is there a cheap place to get my cad file printed by a 3d printer? Answered

So I am working on a futuristic design of a ferris wheel and am having trouble finding a company or manufacturer that could make an affordable prototype. My 3d model has the dimensions 100mm x 100mm x 75mm max size with the volume of 5 cubic inches. The school I go to does not have a 3d printer but I was fortunate to find one of my teachers came from a school who had one and she was going to try and see if they would print my model for me. It's been over a month since I heard of that option and I am assuming that option is no longer on the table. So, I am looking for an affordable option to print my 3d model. My budget is under $50. Had I been able to use the school's 3d printer it would have only cost me $4 per cubic inch, resulting in $20 cost to make. Doing a google search for 3d prototyping companies I found a few commercial options yet the quotes end up costing around $375 - $725. I know the Makerbot is one of the most affordable 3d printers out there yet $1000 is not in my price rang.

Question by mcguyverzboss   |  last reply


CAD design from paper?

Hello instructables community. I want to make this into a CAD design and have someone run the model and see if it works. If anyone has any suggestions as to how to do this or is a student and wants to make some extra money helping me with this, just hit me up. Below is a link to the device I want to make: http://www.google.com/patents/US20040130227 Amplifying instruction: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct;=j&q;=cyclic%20centripetal%20generator%20hackmart&source;=web&cd;=1&ved;=0CCoQFjAA&url;=http%3A%2F%2Fwww2.cose.isu.edu%2F~hackmart%2Fsescentrifugal.pdf&ei;=BTPQUcHrJ4zbiwKYz4DACg&usg;=AFQjCNGf_p4U4ZcmmJg9s8aYQJYcuwOfLw&bvm;=bv.48572450,d.cGE&cad;=rja

Topic by Bellerophon2200   |  last reply


Method for "extrapolating" a skull from a 3d model of a head?

Forensics teams can "estimate"/"extrapolate" a face from a skull, so what my question is would it be possible to do this in reverse? I have been playing around with the 123D apps and i was already planning on making a 3D model of my head with 123D Catch for both the purposes of having a nice 3D model of my head and also so that i might be able to create a "form" , probably with 123D Make , that could be used to create masks that actually "fit" my face, so i was thinking, with the 3D model of my head could i "extract" even a basic model of my skull from it? And if so , does anyone have any ideas on how i might go about doing so?

Topic by shabaki   |  last reply


Fusion 360 Classes

RockIT CoLabs is hosting a a couple of inexpensive Fusion 360 classes.     July 16 - 3D Modeling Basics for Beginners - Sketches and Essential tools.   - $20 July 23- 3D Modeling Basics for Beginners - Using Sculpting Tools - $20 With 3D printing you can turn ideas into reality, but how do you make YOUR ideas into a printable design? Even with no previous experience, you can learn all the basics for modeling software in one day using Autodesk Fusion 360. Create a custom name tag keychain while gaining experience and confidence with using the most commonly used tools in the modeling environment and learn how to use a 3D printer to print your design. Kris Struble of Near Future Education Advocates is providing RockIT CoLabs students with an amazing low-cost educational opportunity for students to learn the software and skills to make your ideas a reality with 3D printing. This class is limited to only 10 students so Kris can provide each student with the attention they deserve. CLASS OUTLINE Introduction to 3D printers and how a file is printed using Host software Learn how to navigate around the Autodesk Fusion 360 modeling environment Step by Step walk through using the all the most used tools for 3D model creation Use those skills to create a custom name tag key chain Hands on experience printing your model REQUIREMENTS A laptop running Windows 7 or OSX10.7 or newer Operating System. Autodesk Fusion 360 software downloaded and installed, creating a free account with Autodesk A mouse with a scroll wheel ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR Kris Struble is an education advocate who specializes in teaching CAD and 3D printing. He routinely teaches this craft to young students in various public schools, after-school programs and summer camps. Kris has an amazing ability to make CAD and 3D printing interested, fun and understandable to students of all ages. He is currently working on a bicycle powered hat knitting machine made nearly entirely with 3D printed parts.

Topic by doverby   |  last reply


Metal Work

Does anyone out there have any knowledge on Cadam programming? I have a mini lathe and milling head and thinking about putting a Cad system on them. Would it be cheaper to just buy one already set up? Also looking for model plans to build and construct.

Topic by Roy Space   |  last reply


Where can I download .123d files?

I was wondering if there was anywhere on the internet where I  can download .123d models for free. I have downloaded them from autodesks website but they have a rather limitted selection. Thanks.

Question by nurdee1   |  last reply


Need help with making a CAD model, or interested person in a generator project

Greetings citizens of instructables, I want to make a power generator, but I want to make a CAD model, and analyze the thing in motion before I build it. It's based on a patent and it supposedly makes free energy....so if this turns you off then turn 360 degrees and moon-walk away. That being said, to keep it short and to the point, this is for proof of concept and will be used in a creative work for proof of concept.  It's not for profit.  I'm actually going to put my own money into building this thing, so, yeah, I just want to see it come to fruition; see if it will work. Design: http://www.google.com/patents/US20040130227 For amplifying instruction: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct;=j&q;=cose.edu%20centripetal%20generator&source;=web&cd;=1&cad;=rja&ved;=0CCoQFjAA&url;=http%3A%2F%2Fwww2.cose.isu.edu%2F~hackmart%2Fsescentrifugal.pdf&ei;=bjbQUfCyLKaJiAKU1oCwCw&usg;=AFQjCNGf_p4U4ZcmmJg9s8aYQJYcuwOfLw&bvm;=bv.48572450,d.cGE (I also attached the PDF's below) If anyone is interested in working on this project with me because they genuinely think it's friggin awesome, or if you want to make a little money because you're a starving student (that's cool, I'm fine with that), or have any other constructive input to offer, then please hit me up or post below. Finally, if you're in question about how the machine works, then please post it here so I can clarify, it's actually pretty simple and the math is very simple as well. Thanks! Ian

Topic by Bellerophon2200   |  last reply


Beginning with fusion 360, trying to CAD few already available objects, designing a soap holder dish.

Hello, I am a beginner with CAD and with fusion 360. I am trying to model out some already available items, I tried few solid objects which went well and to gain more experience I selected this soap holder/dish as shown in the below images. I am using a vernier caliper to get dimensions of the soap dish. But, I am not able to get it to design correctly since the object has too many curves and crevices, especially from the bottom view and legs for which I am not able to figure out a workflow. Can someone help me with planning out the steps needed to get the desired CAD. Unable to upload the partially complete .f3d file since files other than images are not supported in a question.

Question by hussainb   |  last reply


Make Ideas Real: Share your SketchUp Story

Today, the SketchUp team is launching a new project called Make Ideas Real. The purpose of this project is to showcase work from SketchUp users who (in some way) have made their models into something real. SInce so many of you are already discussing and sharing your projects here, I wanted to reach out and introduce the project to the Instructables community specifically. We think SketchUp users do amazing work, and that sometimes this work gets lost in the 3D Warehouse. If you're particularly proud of a model that you've turned into reality (using SketchUp somewhere in your workflow), we hope you'll share the project and the story with us here. And please, we also want to hear about the role that Instructables played in your project! Our plan is to collect the most compelling stories and feature them in a special showcase, so that people who are new to SketchUp can be inspired by the work of others. If you have any questions, I hope you'll respond to this post and let me know! Mark Google SketchUp, Community Manager

Topic by mharrison11   |  last reply


AutoCAD 2012 for 1:1 3D model making/printing?

The title just about sums up my question. I am using AutoCAD 2012 to make 3D models for the intent of 3D printing. However, all the models I make in CAD are smaller then they are showing. For example, I draft a 5x5x5 cube, and export it as an STL. Then open in a a few different STL viewers, and the cub has shrunk down to about 2.5x2.5x2.5. Now, I can always just scale up my models to fit the needed size, but if I can get CAD to agree with me to make a 5x5x5 cube that will really come out to be 5x5x5, that would make things easier.  Also, as a precursor, I have changed the units in CAD to match my needs, but it the models are still coming out small

Question by DoctorWoo   |  last reply


Fusion 360 on Apple MacBook

Hello - I've recently been having troubles running Fusion 360 on my Windows 10.1 laptop. I've seen that most people use Apple MacBooks with Fusion 360 CAD software, and it runs quite fast and reliably too! So, I was wondering which MacBook would be the bet for this application? I am thinking about getting the new MacBook. Let me know what you think, and past experiences you have had.  http://www.apple.com/macbook/ Thank, Dylan

Topic by DylanD581   |  last reply


How do I create a curved cone shape in Google SketchUp? Answered

 Just as the question is. I need to create a cone in Google SU, which I can do. But then I want to make the cone bend slightly. Is there any easy way to do this? And, can I make the cone hollow?

Question by BretMattingly   |  last reply


Are there any other free CAD programs that I canuse with .123d files in place of autodesk?

I was wondering if anybody knew of some free CAD programs that I can use with .123d files other than autodesk. The reason I want this is because I can not get autodesk to work on my computer. Thanks.

Question by nurdee1   |  last reply


What 3D printers can do... and what they can't

3D printers have seen insane amounts of attention in the past year with lots of stories coming out about how amazing they are. How they can make replacement parts for anything that breaks. How they’ll revolutionize manufacturing. How everyone will have one and they’ll do everything that you need ever. Long story short, 3D printers are pretty amazing, but they aren’t quite the miracle on a stick that the hype is pushing them to be. So let’s sift through and see what there really is to get excited about right now. Consumer 3D printers AKA what most people will be using The 3D printing that’s available to consumers right now is fused deposition modeling or FDM. These printers build up a model layer by layer by extruding ABS or PLA into the build area. It’s basically a much fancier version of a glue gun. A tiny glue gun controlled by a computer, that is. These 3D printers typically run $1k - $2k, but smaller ones can be had for as little as $200. The MakerBot Replicator 2 is the most popular printer of this kind, but there are dozens of others to choose from as well. With some fiddling and work you can pretty much print any shape that fits inside the build volume. So if the printer can fit it, you can make it. That’s simplifying it a bit (OK, a lot), but that’s the idea, and it’s a very cool idea. After some practice you can learn how to design new things like jewelry, ornaments, or toys. Since everything is printed out you can customize any piece that you’d like. Take a couple hours to learn 123D Design and you’ll start to have new things to print out. That’s the power of 3D printing right there. You can quickly go from an idea to a design and then to reality. Your skills in making things by hand don’t matter here. This is why it’s so amazingly helpful to use a 3D printer for prototyping your ideas. I recently worked on a flash drive case and the first model took about 2 minutes to design. After that it was about 15 minutes to print out on a Replicator 2. Then I tested it and adjusted the design for another print. I repeated the process a few times and within 2 hours I had a file that I was happy with. This is even better considering that I only spent about 20 minutes of those 2 hours actively working. The rest was spent on other non-related work. All about the materials So that’s the power of 3D printing. With services like 3D Creation Systems you can upload your file and get it printed on much fancier machines with better resolution. There’s no immediate gratification, but you still get a high-quality print quickly and access to more materials. Even with this expanded selection of printing materials, it’s still a very limited selection. If we were just to look at all the plastics out there we’d be here for days. There are thousands of them and that’s just plastics. There’s also wood and metal and more beyond that. Each different material in this insanely huge selection has a different quality to it. I’ve seen countless people print out items in ABS or PLA and complain about how their printer must not be working since the printed piece doesn’t work like the original. But of course we can’t recreate every item out there with a couple kinds of plastic. It's about using 3D printing with other tools The key forward in using 3D printing is to use it as an amazing new tool of forming great pieces to work alongside all the other great items and materials out there. Why bother making a weak spring out of plastic when you can drop in a metal spring? So 3D printing isn’t everything, but it can be used alongside most everything. It can get us where we want to go so much faster than before it’s ridiculous. But it’s still not the miracle on a stick, not the only tool we’ll ever need from here on out. When the hype dies down we won’t be looking on at amazement at something being 3D printed, we’ll be looking at lots of awesome new things that were made faster with the help of 3D printing. And that is going to be incredible.

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


3D Viewer

Instructables Team - I don't know when it was changed but the "View in 3D" upgrade works very well. I especially like the section analysis and exploded views.Makers - if you are like me and enjoy showing your work in CAD, please consider dropping STP/STEP files into your instructable.

Topic by mtairymd   |  last reply


Any other engineers have trouble getting used to 123D design?

I'm wondering if anyone else who has experience with professional CAD software has tried 123D and finds it difficult to use. I have ~7 years of experience using Solidworks in a mechanical engineering and robotics context. I recently tried to pick up 123D for use with my home 3D printer and find it absolutely infuriating to use. It feels like working with oven mitts on. But, I see screenshots of very complex models people have made all over the place. So, I'm not sure if: - I'm spoiled from the use of "professional" software and need to lower my expectations for free consumer software. For example, I'm very used to full control over creating reference geometry like axes and planes, and creating everything from 2D sketches that are then extruded/revolved/swept (as opposed to 3D shape primitives) and having direct control over all of the dimensions the entire time. In 123D I find it difficult to do something as simple as create two rectangular prisms and put them a fixed distance from each other, or create a rectangular prism and then put a hole in it a certain distance from one edge. - If this is just a difference between Autodesk and Dassault software - e.g. if I was used to using Autodesk Inventor instead of Solidworks, maybe I'd have an easier time picking up 123D. - If I'm just being lazy/impatient, and need to watch more tutorial videos and give myself more time to pick up the software. So, just curious if anyone else has a similar experience coming from using professional software (as opposed to a maker/hobbyist who had never used 3D CAD at all before).

Topic by Ben Finio   |  last reply


My Sketch Up designs (rendered)

 These were made in Sketch Up over the past 2-4 months. Most of them are almost finished, they just need texturing. Index: List of ships: - 3300mm anti-capital gun - CCM-21b "Heron 2" - Battleship and it's render /w/ editing - XUAP Medium Assault Craft (Atomosphere model, space version coming soon) - Missile Cruiser (based on missile frigate in halo) - MGV (Modular Ground vehicle) And I had an issue on another forum... If you don't like it so much that you have to start flaming... just click the little x in the top right (or the red button on the top left for Mac users) or click the back button. Please, if you wanna use this, give me credit for what I did. I spent about 4 months almost

Topic by ry25920   |  last reply


My Sketch Up Ships

     I started working with sketch up about 3 months ago, since then, I've been converting my 2 designs into 3D models. www.conceptships.org/viewtopic.php  This the link to Concept Ships.com, where I have my 2D and some of my 3D designs posted. Other link: www.conceptships.org/viewtopic.php  . List: -- 1.) Convoy front isometric -- 2.) Convoy close one- General Frigate -- 3.) Convoy close two- Heron II with container -- 4.)  Convoy close three- side -- 5.) Convoy rear -- 6.) Heron Front iso (the thing below is the container) -- 7.) Heron Back iso -- 8.) Heron front -- 9.) Transport front iso -- 10.) Transport back iso -- 11.) Transport bottom -- 12.) Transport turret -- 13.) Dropship front -- 14.) Dropship Weaponry -- 15.)  Dropship rear -- 16.) Life support pod front -- 17.) Life Support pod back -- 18.) OH SANP!!! Instructables HQ is under attack!!! Ship explainations:: -- CCM-21b "Heron II" - UH-60 of this faction - Can be used as a gunship, APC, fighter - bomber, transport, or ECM/ Support, depending on the module. - The cargo module (below craft) can be load with anything from missles, to bombs, to twin 30mm gating guns (personal favorite). - Carries two (pilot, co-pilot/ gunner). - VTOL - Basically my spin on the Pelican from Halo (hopefully it doesn't get shot down as much) LSPS II "Messiah" (life Support pod) - This is the generic life support pod. Similar to halo, but no re-entry... we all saw how reliable that was. - Holds 6 people (pilot, 5 auxillery) - supports 6 for up to 2.5 weeks. - Has a powerful SOS beacon. - Used by military and civilian. - Launch method: launched from ship by air rushing from the pod's chamber and conventional thrust (Fuel + oxidizer). All ships were designed and 3D- ified by me... google earth was used in the ibles HQ screenshot

Topic by ry25920   |  last reply


Wind Dam

Architects and designers Chetwoods have proposed building a wind dam. A giant sail would funnel air flowing through a canyon into a wind turbine to generate electricity. The pictures look unreal, even for CAD models, but the idea is pretty cool. More here at Inhabitat and Ecotality Life.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


How would I make a prototype/final model of this speaker design?

Hello all, I am working on a design project in one of my 3rd year university classes in which I've to create a final model of my speaker design. It is in the form of a black hole and I would wish to make it from a plastic (preferably ABS or some hard, durable material). I've attached some images of the CAD model and I was just looking for some ideas, techniques and suggestions on how I could make this form. Any machine and technique is relevant as I have access to a wide range of equipment, I was just looking for some pointers on how I could potentially go about making it. Any help would be greatly, GREATLY appreciated, thanks for your time! James

Question by JamesMcKernan   |  last reply


Official instructable robot plans ?

Hi, I've seen severall nice projects for creating Instructable Robot oriented things (paper robot, plushie, drawing, ...). BTW, every one seems to have hes own interpretation of the robot. Would'nt it possible to create 2 cad drawings (one with all details, an one simpler with, eg, torso boutton just included in the texture and not modeled in 3D), in a open (participativ) way ? Discussion is open. (please, also include discussion about copyright/licensing issues, ...)

Topic by treg   |  last reply


Thoughts on a prototyping device

Hey I'm a college student trying to create a specialty extruder to aid in prototyping, possibly to be used along side a 3D printer.  Attached is a CAD mockup but we're in the process of building this.  The applcations are fairly broad at the moment and if you think of a cool way to use long pieces of plastic for modelling, crafts, art, whatever, please let me know. This is my kickstarter and I'm trying to get any feedback you have, thanks! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects...?ref=discovery

Topic by saudade-pigeon 


I want to make a laptop case from scratch. How can I get the dimensions of my laptop?

Hi instructables! I recently bought an expensive laptop and want to protect it, but all the protective covers on the market for this particular model are terrible (damaging to the laptop over time or ill-fitting). I want to build a case from scratch by CAD modelling the design, then running it through something like a wood cnc. The only problem is, I need the exact dimensions/form of the laptop to create a skin-tight fit. Any ideas on how I can get this data? Can you think of a better process than the one I've outlined? I'm open to working with new materials! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Some inspiration: http://design-milk.com/images/2010/09/macbook-cutting-board.jpg

Topic by orangejuicedisco   |  last reply


Help Build a Giant Inflatable Instructables Robot

Can you keep a secret?For the Austin Maker Faire in October, I'm hoping to build an 8-foot tall inflatable Instructables Robot. I want it to be easy to find the Instructables booth.For his wedding, Saul, built an inflatable elephant using many of the techniques from inflatable kite design and papercraft. There's a lot of CAD work required, and since I know there are some people here much better at Rhino and Blender than me, I'm asking for help. If we can pull it off, you'll get the joy of having something you designed be made very large.Here's the process and where you can help: 1) creating a model of the robot that is appropriate for cutting in fabric, sewing together, and inflating. chooseausername did a brilliant job here, but the model has too many polygons, and just reducing the number of polygons in his model results in something that doesn't quite work.So first, I need a model of the robot that is less than 1000 polygons while still retaining the robot's personality. Also, since it will be inflated, the robot's wheels should be retracted (its legs should just be cylinders of the same height as its legs plus wheels). We can print on the fabric, so the line on its belly doesn't need to be physical, but its buttons, eyes, ears, and antennae should stick out as they normally do; no need for individual fingers. Make sure all the normals point outward in the model.Saul isn't quite ready to share his CAD files, so I've included screenshots of his elephant as an example. The full grey elephant has 1000 polygons. 2) modifying the model to account for real-world limitations and to make it easy to import into Pepakura Designer. As the elephant is symmetrical, Saul cut it in half, split out various body parts -- ensuring that they exactly fit back together on the vertices of the polygons (seam lines for sewing), -- and made some part of the ears a single piece of fabric which would not inflate. In the robot's case, we would probably split the legs, body, head, and ear-and-antennae assemblies. The antennae will probably need to be a slight larger diameter than they normally are. Since the robot isn't symmetric, we'll keep it whole. 3) using Pepekura to create panels4) arranging the panels, adding seam allowances, and sewing instructions.5) repeating steps 1 - 4 to create the bladders for inflation with a model that's slightly bigger than the skin.6) getting a factory to cut and sew everything together.As you can see, step 1 is the most important part. If you'd like to help, create a model of the robot, and add it to a step of the collaboration I've started here (PM me for an invite):https://www.instructables.com/id/ETZ3QJSFKD1LWHU/We definitely have more than one person working, as I'm sure everyone will have something valuable to contribute.If you're interested in other giant inflatable creatures, leave a comment here. If we can streamline this process, we might make a complete zoo!

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Real-Life X-Wing Set to Fly

No, really.Andy Woerner and his crazy rocketeer friends have built a 21-foot long X-Wing model that can actually fly. Yes, this is a real X-Wing powered by four solid-fuel rocket engines complete with radio-controlled moving wings. It blasts off in California next week, and we talked with Andy about the project, and how they expect it will do. The X-Wing model is huge. At 21 feet long and with a wingspan of over 19 feet it is, in fact, big enough to fly a kid in. However, knowing that it will be powered by solid-fuel rockets, they wouldn't put a kid, dog, monkey or Gizmodo editor inside, even if it uses three full parachutes to land.After drawing the plans using CAD software, Andy's team and his friends at Polecat Aerospace (with the help of RMS Laser and Aerotech Consumer Aerospace) used laser cutting to make the pieces out of Baltic Birch wood. They also used solid aluminum for some parts, like the rods which are the pivot point for the wings. full story with more pics

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


Confused Crocodile

I'm a confused crocodile...I wanted to compete in the 3d money clip challenge and will still design something for it :) . After numerous times of trying to make the software work it just didn't so I'm going to try to use some other CADs that I have. With that being said here lies my confusion about this contest.The prize(s) for the 3d money clip contest is a $100.00 credit for five winners. I went to the website and there's a membership fee and if you aren't a member then the cost of services is higher. Plus, there's an hourly charge for the services and I'm basically confused as to the benefit of a $100.00 voucher/credit. Would that be enough to make a 3d print of the 3d model for the winners of the contest?

Topic by N1K1_1NC.   |  last reply


Converting a .dwg into a .stl for 3D printing a house design (Converting to watertight mesh/ 3d volume)

Hey you guys,I am hoping to use the powers of a crowd to find a quick answer to my problem. I have the architectural Design (.dwg) of a given house (simple model for comparison attached). I need to convert this into a .stl file, preferrably using Fusion360 or Autocad. (newest Version)I understand that the type of the walls and roof is not a 3D volumetric type or a watertight mesh, so the question is how to get there. (Also: of what type of "structure" are these walls - I mean .. they are 3D?)I am an electronics engineer by training, so my CAD knowledge is rather restricted to PCB design. I would be pleased if you can help me out with this, so I can get back to those PCB's :)Thank you guys a lot!lusch

Question by lusch   |  last reply


Uncharted Play is looking for talent

The creators of the SOCCKET, the first energy-harvesting soccer ball, are currently seeking creative thinkers with engineering backgrounds for our our 12-week Product Development Internship Program. All associates will be working on Uncharted Play's new product lines, as part of a multidisciplinary team of engineers and designers. The program is based in New York City. Scheduling is flexible, with a minimum of 20 hours per week required. As this is an unpaid internship, school credit may be offered as compensation, as well as consideration for joining our team after program's end.  Openings: Mechanical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Operations Engineer Personal Characteristics: Go-Getter Attitude Fast Learner Creative Thinker Problem Solver Technical Aptitudes (Mechanical Engineer): Excellent visualization and 3D CAD skills Demonstrable Prototyping skills Knowledge of manufacturing processes Product development experience is desirable Knowledge of Design for Manufacturing knowledge is a plus Technical Aptitudes (Electrical Engineer): Ability to design, develop, test and troubleshoot analog and digital circuits Demonstrable prototyping skills Robotics experience is desirable Experience in the DIY community is a plus Technical Aptitudes (Operations Engineer): Knowledge of Supply Chain Management principles Willingness to interact with suppliers, both domestically and internationally Ability to construct models and metrics for operational efficiency Experience in the manufacturing industry is a plus If you are interested in becoming a Product Development Associate, please email your cover letter, resume and a brief example of your technical and/or creative skills to info@unchartedplay.com with "Product Development Candidate" in the subject line. You will be contacted within 7 business days on the status of your application.

Topic by vangelUP   |  last reply


To Pier 9, Thanks for Everything !

Tl;dr : 1. people are the greatest resource at the pier 2. sometimes it’s hard to work due to too much awesomeness Seriously. Me and my collaborator, Radamés Ajna, had a couple of projects we wanted to do in the spring/summer of 2014, and while looking for some shop space in Oakland, someone recommended we check out the AiR program. We applied. We thought that if we got accepted Autodesk would give us a desk, some nice hand tools, and access to their software. And that would’ve been great. Coming from Brazil, where it feels like we solve everything using hot glue, zip ties and duct tape, that would have been more than enough. Weren’t we surprised when we visited the shop. . . Holy crap, everything is here. Some of the machines are bigger than my apartment, and there’s even a swimming pool ! I’m pretty sure everyone has written about all the great machines, because, yeah, they are great, but to me, the most important aspect of being an AiR at the pier was the people. The shop staff who not only teach you how to use the machines, but also have enough collective experience to help you solve any kind of material/machining/construction problem. Want to vacuum form foam? No problem. Want to glue glass to cement? Someone has done it before. Want to weld titanium? Easy. Having access to the tools is good, but having people that know how to use them is even more awesomenest. The same is true for the CAD people who help you set up and use all kinds of modeling and design software. Not only that, but they get excited when you use their software. Not having had a lot of experience with 3D modeling prior to my residency, it was a great opportunity to learn it using Fusion 360. Another very special group of people were the other AiRs. The ones that came in with us (Anouk, Alex, U-Ram, Adrien, Paolo, Scott, Mikaela) and the ones that were already there when we  arrived (Andy, Aaron, Rima, Andreas, Ben). What a diverse crowd. It was great to get to know everybody, and also to be able to share experiences and expertise. I don’t even know how many times Paolo and Andy saved me from searching for “metal thing with a hole” or “thing with a thing inside” on google, because they knew exactly what I was looking for. Invaluable! Sometimes it’s a bit tricky to explain your project and get everyone excited about it, because everyone has such a diverse background and set of interests, but learning how to talk about our projects from different perspectives was a challenge that I enjoyed. And, last but not least, the IRL Instructables community; another very diverse, active and enthusiastic group of people at the pier. I don’t know how they do it, but it seems like they are always happy, and making cookies. The sum of all of these people is something awesome. There’s always something interesting going on at the Pier (even at night and on the weekends), which sometimes can be a bit distracting, but also motivating. I will sorely surely miss them all.

Topic by thiagohersan   |  last reply


The Dream Factory - Squid Labs and Instructables in Wired September 2005

This was Instructables' big debut. The author, Clive Thompson, came and hung out at Squid Labs for a couple of days, and later on we had a hilarious half-day photoshoot where the photographers couldn't remember Dan's name and had to keep calling him "wrench."Wired 13.09 The Dream Factoryby Clive ThompsonThey're already living that future in a small warehouse in Emeryville, California. It's the headquarters of Squid Labs, run by a gang of five MIT alums who by day create prototypes of new technologies for outside firms - and by night fabricate weird gizmos just for fun."Everything I own is basically one of a kind," says a cheery Saul Griffith, one of the cofounders, as he crouches on the floor of his dust-covered workshop, rooting through an enormous bucket of metal brackets and bolts. A tall, shaggy Australian, he's wearing ragged flip-flops and a pair of cargo pants so stained with oil and grime that I can't determine their original color. Dozens of his group's inventions lie scattered about: a Frisbee embedded with microchip-driven LEDs, a set of robots precision-cut from plastic, a bunch of helmet-mounted laser-and-GPS sensors designed to help firefighters locate one another in a blazing house.Today, Griffith is building a "hybrid electric bicycle" with a hidden battery compartment inside the bike's 4-foot-long, chopper-style front forks. To hold the forks in place, he spent the morning designing a bracket, then cut out a flat template for it on Squid Labs' laser cutter. Now, with that template as a guide, he hacks the shape out of quarter-inch steel, using a terrifyingly loud metal cutter. "I'm really into this 'tractor' aesthetic, getting everything to look like industrial machinery!" he hollers over the cutter's shrieks, while a 3-foot cone of orange sparks flies up and ricochets off his face.Every few minutes, Griffith pauses to snap a photo of his progress. When done, he'll write up a comprehensive guide on how to build his project. This, he argues, is the next crucial step in fab culture: getting hobbyists to carefully document their plans and share them online. Squid Labs is hoping to kick-start such sharing this fall when it launches Instructables.com - an open database of interesting projects and fab techniques, "kind of like a Wikipedia for making stuff," Griffith explains. If people want to build his electric hybrid chopper bicycle, they'll be able to download the CorelDraw design of the bracket and send it someplace like eMachineShop to have their own copy printed."We got inspired when we looked at all these guys who'd engineered these incredible, modded parts for their Harleys. They'd have amazing photos of them, but they'd never post the CAD image," Griffith says. "We were like, Why not go open source?"Later that day, I get a taste of how weirdly transformative this idea is. I'm hanging out with Dan Goldwater - another Squid Labs cofounder - and admiring one of his inventions. It's a pair of plastic gears that sit on a bike pedal and power a tiny generator. As you ride, you can run LED lights or a radio. I tell him I'd love to have a version of it myself. So a couple of Squid Labs guys go over to the laser cutter, pull up the design, and a few minutes later hand me exact copies of Goldwater's gears. Design once, print often. "Pretty cool, eh?" Goldwater grins."Griffith imagines that fab tools could produce new economic models for creators. Suppose a hobbyist made a cool plastic exterior for an MP3 player. Suppose she put the design online, and 700 people downloaded the file and had it printed at eMachineShop. "At what point," he asks, "would a manufacturer say, Hey, there's a market here - and offer to buy the design from her?""So, sure, soon we'll be able to build anything. But should we? "Let's say everyone suddenly can make their own hood ornaments. What if they actually do that? The real world would look like the Internet in 1996, when people started making their own Web sites." Griffith shudders. "Remember those hideous-looking psychedelic backgrounds and stupid animations? And blinking tags?""Rainbow dividers," Goldwater adds.It's a good point - and it makes me anxious about my guitar. Sure, it looked fine onscreen. But what if it turns out to be a monstrosity in my hands? Recalling my decision to use clear acrylic for the body, I break into a nervous sweat. It's going to look like something from a mid-'80s, big-hair heavy-metal band! What the hell was I thinking?Griffith interrupts my panic to announce that his chopper is ready. He wheels it onto the street, all five Squid Labbers in tow. Eric Wilhelm, a lanky designer, offers to be the test pilot. He straps on a helmet and mounts the seat. "Does it have brakes?" he asks."Sort of," Griffith says."It's amazing how often brakes are an afterthought," Wilhelm sighs. Then he hits the electric starter and peels off.

Topic by ewilhelm