Makerbot VS RepRap? Answered

I've have been considering making/purchasing a 3D printer. I've slimmed down the choices to the RepRap Mendel, and the Makerbot Cupcake. Both seem like good choices, but I can't really decide. The big factors in my purchase should be performance above all else, price, availability of parts, and the type of plastic it uses. Can anyone please suggest something?  

Question by GearsOfAwesome   |  last reply


MakerBot plays Tetris

YouTube user belakor110 has posted this video of a MakerBot playing the Tetris theme. According to the brief description, this is done using gcode. This reminds me of the song "A Simple Text File" by Man or Astroman? Check out that video here as well. The video is just a still image, but I can vouch for its legitimacy. I saw the band play the song in concert with just a beaten up ImageWriter II in front of a microphone. via adafruit

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


MakerBot are hiring in NYC

Fancy a job working for MakerBot?  They're hiring in the NYC area - check this link for details.

Topic by Kiteman 


Autodesk and Makerbot are joining forces

Great news!  Autodesk and MakerBot Industries are working together to take personal design and manufacturing to the next level. Now you can simplify the process of printing your 123D designs directly to a MakerBot Replicator. Soon, you’ll be able to purchase MakerBot 3D printers through 123Dapp.com. If you sign up for a 123D Premium membership today, you’ll also receive a special discount that you can apply towards the purchase of a MakerBot 3D printer.

Topic by kazmataz   |  last reply


3d printing?

Hi every body i saw today al ot of 3d printers videos and a lot of printed things , so i get really convainced to buy one , i really liked the makerbot replicator 2  ,is it really good quality printing? can i print projects working and moving without assembly , and i need some advices about the good and bad points about this printer  , and i would like really to know can i print a mechanical object that contain movable parts in one print and get it working , and if there assembly what is the process , at the 3d library i found this engine http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:34701 is it one part working print project or i have to print a lot of pices and assemble them , and what about this one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yFI_tsuPPw is it one piece too, i couldnt really understand how the pieces get assembled ,can any body help me , give me more informations websites!!!!! i will really appreciate your help!!!!

Question by vwtm2006   |  last reply


ReRapRequest

Do you have access to a 3d printer?  Can you do me a favour? Three years ago, I published an Instructable for a paper catapult, which has had a steady trickle of interest ever since. Recently, Instructables member hintss created files for it to be printed in 3d, but i don't have access to a 3d printer :-( If you have access to a 3d printer, and the time/resources to spare, could you have a look at the files hintss has posted in the comments of the Instructable, and maybe even print one off?? Please?  I'll even create a shiny new patch for you?

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply



Living salad, makerbot songs, and noodle!

My first day at Instructables, I found myself sitting on a chair fabricated by the guy next to me, listening to plans for a living salad which would grow through your plate, fertilized by worms below the surface and a stained glass window made of dried fruit, trying to focus on absorbing all the information Vanessa and Noah were dishing out. Just beyond loomed the amazing fabrication facilities, with rows of 3D printers, zillion-axis CNC machines, a stocked electronics room, every kind of adhesive you could dream of, and even a test kitchen! It was a makers dream, Pier 9 had the material and equipment resources to allow us to realize nearly any idea we could dream up, and dream we did. It was immediately clear that the one month my collaborator Kyle (https://www.instructables.com/member/kylemcdonald/) and I had planned to spend there was not enough. Sadly, it was all we had, so we got to work immediately on Noodle, a little robot with the I/O of a machine but the thoughts and feelings of a human. I could go on about the shop at Pier 9, but the thing that really made the experience for me was the people. Hosting 10-12 AIRs at a time, the studio was always full with people building crazy things. One day we'd experiment with Nick's instruments fashioned from rocks, sticks, and water jugs while sampling cocktails from Ben's machine and Rima's cricket ganache, the next day we'd admire Aaron's work on hoodies that zipped around your hands while being serenaded by Andreas' makerbot which seemed to be singing the future. We were all so excited and inspired it wasn't unusual to find half the group there all weekend long or into the wee hours of the night. I won't go so far as to say anyone slept the night there, but...  Not only did we get to hang out in the AIRea, but we also got to know all the others working at Pier 9. This was a building full of people willing to chat about anything from caustics to contests, lend you their skateboard so you could learn how, or demo their latest projects. Vanessa and Noah couldn't have been more supportive and helpful, and it was so inspiring to run into them in the shop on weekends hacking away on crazy things of their own. With so much going on, we sometimes had to work hard to tune it out and stay focused on our Noodle. Luckily, Kyle and I had worked together before and we were able to divide and conquer pretty productively. Kyle handled the fabrication aspects, spec'ing all the hardware and designing and lasercutting then 3D printing the physical enclosure for Noodle. I was heads down on the software trying to hook up our raspberry pi to Amazon Mechanical Turk, speakers, a display, a camera, and an interface. Thankfully, the long hack sessions were broken up by Vanessa coming by to peek at my computer over my shoulder and ask, "what's taking so long? how hard can it possibly be!" ;) I will end this post here and get to work finishing up our instructable before Vanessa hunts us down. If the specifics of our project are a bit cryptic still, all will be revealed with the instructable post (see attached pictures for more mystery). And to all of you considering applying to the AIR program, DO IT! If you are a motivated, curious person with energy and ideas you will have a blast. And the weather is ok, too. Thanks Vanessa, Noah and Instructables!

Topic by lmccart   |  last reply


Has anyone used the new Makerware 2.2.0?

Makerbot released the newest version of their Makerware last week. I haven't had a chance to play with it much.  There are some updates, but I've heard that some aren't so new (if you used skeinforge).   As cool as kitty-cat infill is, what do you guys think? Autodesk also released a 3D printing utility - on your 123D models page, click the "Fabricate" dropdown, then "3D Print at Home".  Give them a try!

Topic by andrewt   |  last reply


Looking for help with makerbot software!! Duel printer head!!

I am currently designing a duel printer head for the makerbot platform, and I need some help with how the decoder software whould reconize to move the tool head over an millimeter to change colors. I am also intrested in wheter I whould need to do any reprogramming of the motherboard on the makerbot its self.

Question by dgi10   |  last reply


Is ABS/PLA filament from china okay to use in a makerbot. ? Answered

The price difference is what throws me off, should i be worried about the quality of this filament vs the $48 makerbot filament? Makerbot : http://store.makerbot.com/filament Cheap Alternitive: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Repraper-Reprap-3D-Printer-Filament-ABS-3-0mm-1-75mm-12-Colors-For-3D-Printer-US-/190847246981?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash;=item2c6f61e285

Question by LucasOchoa   |  last reply


How can I get a cheap 3D printer and not have to do complicated building? Answered

How can I get a cheap 3D printer and not have to do complicated building?  I want to be able to make things, but don't have much money and I can't build them very easy.  I would preferably want under $1000.   thanks- Pufferfish9108 

Question by pufferfish9108   |  last reply


The return of DIY - the history of the maker movement

As a total beginner to the Maker movement who was born in the 70's, I am really excited about people returning to DIY, something that's been out of favor for the last 20 years. I wrote a brief article that gives some historical perspective, but I really want to capture a lot of the recent history of a really incredible movement. What are some of the significant events that shaped the maker movement?  http://www.goddardtech.com/blog/modem-%E2%80%98maker%E2%80%99-movement-and-return-diy-part-1

Topic by dkeith-lucas 


I'm looking for an affordable and complete 3d printer (or CNC) kit for under $550. Any suggestions?

I just want something small for my little projects, nothing fancy. I want a kit because it's cheaper, and I love putting things like that together. It just needs to come with every part necessary for it to run (electronics, mechanical, printer head, frame, etc)   I'd be fine with a two-axis CNC machine kit within that range too if it had its own spindle. I'm looking at this right now: http://printrbot.com/ Thanks.

Question by DIY Emilio   |  last reply


How to use lasercut t-slots properly in a design?

I am in the process of designing a laser cut 3D Printer with some of my friends. I have never used a laser cutter before. We are trying to use t-slots that are similar to those used on the old makerbots. Does anyone have a suggestion of the lengths of the slots and the frequency (spacing between joints)? Thanks!

Question by thekendall   |  last reply


Show and tell

Hey all, I am super keen to see projects using 3D printing for personal fabrication, whether it be via RepRap, Makerbot, Shapeways whatever.. Just to share the 3D printed goodness

Topic by dscott4   |  last reply


I won a prize, how do I get tax information.

At the beginning of last year I won a MakerBot. (hurray!) Now it is time to do taxes. (not hurray!) My question is, how do I get the tax information I need to fill out my tax forms?

Topic by PS118   |  last reply


What Kind of 3D Printer?

I am looking into getting a 3D printer for hobby projects and what not.  I don't have a lot of experience with 3D modeling, or 3D printing and 3D printers are expensive.  I would like to get a good printer but not spend a lot.  Does anyone have any suggestions of what kind of printer I should get, should I get single or double extruders how big a printing area etc?  I have been looking at Makerbot, and Rap Man.  Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Question by Dreadphill   |  last reply


3D Printing Competition

Hi everyone, Hope you're all well? cartridgesave.co.uk recently held their first ever 3D Print Cup - A challenge issued to 3D artists to design an original 3D character, which they'd then print off (for free!) using a 3D Printer. The designers were all allowed to finish off their creations, and awards were given out at the wrap party, with the best overall design winning a Makerbot 2x Replicator. We had some amazing entries, from all over the UK and even the USA, South America and Europe. A gallery of the all the entrants has been uploaded at www.cartridgesave.co.uk/3dprintcup Hopefully there will be another 3D Print Cup next year, so keep your eyes peeled on the site.

Topic by Asekhri   |  last reply


Smoothing the rough surface

Hello everyone. My name is Thomas and I am very new to this 3D scene but still very glad to be here. I would like an input from everyone about something. Recently I purchased MakerBot printer and printed something simple. At first glance I was amazed by the finished product. I'm sure you've felt the same way. But on a closer observation and physically picking up the object, I realized that the outer surface was rough (or more like layered). Now my question is what is your solution to this rough surface? I tried sanding to smooth it out. But I'm pretty sure there's a much starter way to tackle this problem. Thank you have let's make something!

Topic by m3shin   |  last reply


3d printer service

HI everyone. I am wanting to start a 3d printing service business. This would be on a small scale to start. My question is how to securely download 3d files from customers so that I can use those files to create a 3d printed object for them, then ship objects back. I thought about offering the service on craigslist and receive the customer's file through email. But I know that a website would be better, but have no idea as how to implement the capability to receive customers' files securely and while keeping those files organized. Items will be printed using a makerbot, so I would communicate to potential customers as to the limitations of said printer. Thanks, and would appreciate any answers or advice.

Topic by RoboStack   |  last reply


Best program for creating 3D models

Ok I want to make a 3D model for printing, what is the best program to use.  I have Maya 2013 (DEMO) , and 3DSMax 2013 (DEMO), and sculptris 6.  What program is the best to create and convert for 3D printing.  I want to enter in the new 3D Printing contest and if I make something 3D I want it to work on someones printer for them to print.  Plus if the software can make it fool proof, I don't want to make a model that won't print, and don't really know what is possible and what is not. Any help would be great.  Biggest concern it converting it over to 3D printing format, and making a model that would be able to be printed (with lets say makerbot, or the most common 3D Printer able to be printed by anyone). Thank you in advance.

Topic by spyder2021   |  last reply


Smoothing out the rough surface on 3D print?

Hello everyone. My name is Thomas and I am very new to this 3D scene but still very glad to be here. I would like an input from everyone about something. Recently I purchased MakerBot printer and printed something simple. At first glance I was amazed by the finished product. I'm sure you've felt the same way. But on a closer observation and physically picking up the object, I realized that the outer surface was rough (or more like layered). Now my question is what is your solution to this rough surface? I tried sanding to smooth it out. But I'm pretty sure there's a much starter way to tackle this problem. Thank you have let's make something!

Question by m3shin   |  last reply


Printing 3d models/ prototypes affordably? Is there a cheap place to get my cad file printed by a 3d printer? Answered

So I am working on a futuristic design of a ferris wheel and am having trouble finding a company or manufacturer that could make an affordable prototype. My 3d model has the dimensions 100mm x 100mm x 75mm max size with the volume of 5 cubic inches. The school I go to does not have a 3d printer but I was fortunate to find one of my teachers came from a school who had one and she was going to try and see if they would print my model for me. It's been over a month since I heard of that option and I am assuming that option is no longer on the table. So, I am looking for an affordable option to print my 3d model. My budget is under $50. Had I been able to use the school's 3d printer it would have only cost me $4 per cubic inch, resulting in $20 cost to make. Doing a google search for 3d prototyping companies I found a few commercial options yet the quotes end up costing around $375 - $725. I know the Makerbot is one of the most affordable 3d printers out there yet $1000 is not in my price rang.

Question by mcguyverzboss   |  last reply


3rd Creative Prototyping summer school in Belgium, September 3rd - September 7th 2012

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v;=HQAHsL8dzEE www.howest.be/summerschool2012 Prototyping is a process in which a working model or prototype is developed for the purpose of testing various design aspects like features, ideas, viability, functionality, tactility, output and performance. Prototyping can help streamline creative (design) processes. Industrial Design Center (Belgium) therefore organizes the 3rd Creative Prototyping summer school, which is an opportunity for designers, engineers, (PhD) students, teachers, researchers and creative-technical people from all over the world to meet and train their model making skills.  The program offers 1 week full of maker workshops for people who share the passion for design and prototyping, co-creation and materialization of ideas: quick & dirty prototyping, clay modeling, laser cutting, 3D printing, wood turning, welding, plastic shaping processes, product photography, 3D scanning, foam modeling and arduino open source electronics (makey makey invention kit for everyone). The participants are coached by professionals: Lékué (Barcelona), Jürgen Heinl (former BMW modeler, München), Pilipili product design, Atohms design,.... Industrial Design Center is an open research-through-design-lab and a communication platform between the industry and the product design & design engineering programs offered at Howest University College West Flanders (Belgium).

Topic by bverthe 


Discussion Regarding Search For Best Multi-Application 3D Printer

I should wish to have the input of the community regarding the best multi-application 3D printer. Some of the qualities that I'm looking for include the capacity to handle a variety of filaments (notably the Poro-Lay porous foam filament and a variety of carbon fiber reinforced filaments, in addition to the standard ABS and PLA filaments), an extremely high detail resolution capacity, and consistent, high-quality prints. I've seen a number of 3D printed items have sections "unwind" after printing, which is not something that I want to have happen. I'm also hoping to have something with a fine enough output that the printed item doesn't look horribly striped.  Naturally, I'm looking for a machine that's good quality and easy to maintain (relatively speaking), meaning that parts that wear out quickly, such as the filament feed head, should be replaceable by someone that's not been trained as an authorized service technician. While I am not overtly concerned with price, keep in mind that this is for medium-scale personal use (read that as NOT industrial use). I've done a bit of researching, and have found that the MakerBot systems are generally lauded in some circles, but when I've went to look at the reviews posted to a variety of retail sites that carry the item, I've found that they've gotten generally negative reviews. Granted, I'm not entirely sure how much of this negativity is the result of user error / ignorance, vs how much of it is legitimate. Similarly, the printers that have great reviews on the retail sites have very little mention elsewhere, such as in the number of 3D printing communities that I've been reading through.  That all having been said, I have been quite impressed by the work I've seen coming out of the 3D printing section of Instructables, and figured that this would likely be a good place to begin a discussion on this matter.

Topic by Mardalla   |  last reply


Program Feedback

What's it like to be an Artist in Residence at Instructables?  Don't ask us, ask our previous residents! Being an artist in residence at Instructables by Samuel Bernier Jayefuu as Instructables' Artist in Residence by James Williamson (Jayfu) Last Day at Instructables by Kelsey Breseman (SelkeyMoonbeam) My time as an AiR by Mark Langford (Kiteman) My Summer as an AIR at Instructables by Gabriella Levine (gabriellalevine) Field Report - Mads Hobye as an Artist in Residence by Mads Hobye (madshobye) My Month at Instructables as an Artist in Residence by Tom Flock (Tomdf) What it's like to be an Artist in Residence at Instructables by Tim Wikander (timwikander) Reflecting on my AiResidency by Taylor Cone (tcone) The worst time of my life by Mario Caicedo Langer (M.C. Langer) Fozzy13's AiR Experience! by Adam Fasnacht (Fozzy13) Masynmachien's time as an AIR  by Yvon Masyn (masynmachien) My 2 Months as an AiR by Tess Howell (Tessalene) An embarrassment of riches by Rachel McConnell (rachel) My experience as an AIR by Tanner Welch (Tanner W) The AiR05 - designed and built during Q4:13 by Timothy Lipton (timmylip) Living Salad, makerbot songs, and noodle by Lauren Mccarthy (lmccart) How to got to Maker Heaven by Mikaela Holmes (MikaelaHolmes) Crazy, Amazing and Delicious AIR Experience by Rima Khalek (rimamonsta) Autodesk: Art Residency of Generosity by Scott Kildall Autodesk Artist in Residency by Anouk Wipprecht (anoukwipprecht) Duck Confit, Perfected by Aaron Geman (aaron_geman) Pier 9, I've never met anyone quite like you before. by Andrew Maxwell-Parish (ElectricSlim) To Pier 9, Thank for Everything by Thiago Hersan My Introduction to the 21st Century by John Whitmarsh My Autodesk Residency by Benjamin Cowden (tinkertinker) Talking about my Summer by Laura Devendorf (LDevendorf) Pier 9 is a Disneyland for Makers by Alejandro Palandjoglou (alepalan) Reflections on Pier 9 Residency by Andreas Bastian (andreasbastian) Making the Most of Your Time Here by Will Buchanan (buchananwp) Reflections on the Pier by Reza Ali (syedrezaali)

Topic by noahw 


Archaeology Student needs help with 3D scanning and printing

Hi Guys and Girls, first time posting like this so i hope this is in the right place, and if it is i can get some help. I'm currently studying Applied Archaeology, in the Institute of Technology Sligo, in Ireland, I'm in my fourth and final year and as part of this I have to research and write a thesis. The topic I am planning on doing involves 3D scanning, and if everything goes to plan, it will turn out great, and is something no one has done before in Irish archaeology, Ok so here’s the thing. It is still early days, I haven’t even decided on the title or gotten a chance to experiment with the scanner, and I am relatively new to 3D imaging and all that it involves. But as part of the overall concept of my thesis I would like to haves some of these scans print using as many of the various different methods of 3D printing as I can. This is so I can compare and analysis there suitability. This is where I hit a wall and I hope someone can help. There aren’t many companies that do 3D printing in Ireland and those that do usually deal with medium to large company’s and thus are way out of my price range. Edit: 21.09.2011 Ok after a doing a boat load more reserch I have been able to pick three methods of 3D printing I would like to use: 1. Fused Deposition Modeling using the, RepRap and MakerBot. 2. Laminated Object Manufacturing. 3. Stereolithography. If any of you out there have an interest in Archaeology and can offer advice on 3D scanning, image editing, has access to a 3D printer or are lucky enough to own one of these machines, and are willing to help me out I would be extremely grateful. I am more than willing to contribute what I can to the cost of raw material, cover the postage to Ireland and of course give massive amounts of praise and acknowledgement to all those that have helped, when I’m writing my thesis. Many Thanks Michael Michaelfeeney01@gmail.com  

Topic by Amon-100   |  last reply


Leaving China and Taking a Part With Me.

My time was short, it seems my time is always short. Groggily I was pulled from bed the day after the Maker Faire. Spending the night at Eric's place was so wonderful, it was my first nights sleep since leaving America a few days earlier. We loaded Eric Pans car with gear and headed out to pick up a 3D printer. 3D printing technology is booming in the states, nearly every hackerspace in America has a Makerbot and design firms have Shapeways to turn to to get their rapid prototyping. But elsewhere in the world these things are still fresh! Sharing tools is something I love to do because you never know where people's creativity will take them. You never can know all the problems in the world, but all the people know all their problems! One of my missions then is to share low cost and open technologies to people I think can make awesome use of them! The night before after the Shenzhen Maker Faire all the Makers were invited to a gathering. Beer, frogs on skewers and peanuts were all provided free of charge. We ate, drank, wheeled and dealed. Wiess Tech is a filament company in Shenzhen and they have started noticing that more and more of their customers were 3D printers. Especially DIY 3D printers. So they've begun to make Makerbot replicas with some modifications. And there I was - I wanted a 3D printer to bring with me to Beirut and they wanted… Well, I wasn't sure. The language barrier between us was strong. Somehow Eric and I convinced them that it would be a good idea to give me a machine, and perhaps I'd pay them back when I got to the states. At this point I was at $244 dollars and dropping and I couldn't even afford the incredible hackerspace price the company was offering of $500 dollars! They agreed, and that's how I found myself rushing off to their head quarters the next morning before catching my ship. But first. We must go to Seeed Studio to buy a cup of coffee from the robotic tweeting (QQ) coffee machine in their break room. Hahaha! We headed out to Wiess Tech and on the way there we drive by construction zone after construction zone. Aparently Shenzhen didn't exist 30 years ago, and now you can still see the signs of a rapid expansion. Everything here is growing at an incredible pace, and apparently even maker culture. We arrive at Wiess HQ, which is housed in a 30 story complex decked out with multiple confusing entrances, cafeterias and dual elevators for the odd and even numbered floors. After spending a bit of time wondering how to get to floor 22 and circling the building, we found ourselves face to face with a small crew of about 8people. A few people managing papers, a secretary, some of the marketing team, and one guy sitting at a table putting together Wiess Tech versions of the thingimatic. After speaking with them we find that they also sell a machines based around the Reprap project, one of the earliest open 3D printing projects and have in the works a few models of their own designs. I'm excited to see how Weiss Tech bootstraps itself off of open sourced designs and starts producing their own versions! I hope to see a whole new generation of better, faster and cheaper machines that stay open! Go Weiss Tech! Heading out to take a 3D panorama from their deck Eric rushes and tells me that my ship leaves in 20 mins and that the time is now. After an awkward moment or two talking about paypal and me giving them advice on staying open we undo all their packing (too bulky) throw the machine into my luggage and run. In the car Eric and I discuss the future of Chinese makers. It really seems this is just the start of something much larger. It's an exciting time, his company is building great products, more Chinese companies are looking at open source technologies and more people are calling themselves makers. Perhaps it's through Maker culture China will be able to become more than the King of manufacturing, but also participate in producing quality designs and solving serious problems. Leaving China, the baggage handlers on the ferry were rough handling Adriana, my 3D printer, and it really cut deep. But as I watched Shenzhen bay slowly recede, I knew the next time i came back, again, everything would again be different. This is the pace of China and yet it seems softened by the fog falling over the rolling green hills. +Bilal Ghalib

Topic by lamedust   |  last reply


The Power of Making: V&A Museum, London

"Making is the most powerful way that we solve problems, express ideas and shape our world. What and how we make defines who we are, and communicates who we want to be... Many people think that craft is a matter of executing a preconceived form or idea, something that already exists in the mind or on paper. Yet making is also an active way of thinking, something which can be carried out with no particular goal in mind. In fact, this is a situation where innovation is very likely to occur. Even when making is experimental and open-ended, it observes rules. Craft always involves parameters, imposed by materials, tools, scale and the physical body of the maker. Sometimes in making, things go wrong. An unskilled maker, hitting the limits of their ability, might just stop. An expert, though, will find a way through the problem, constantly unfolding new possibilities within the process." I just found out about an exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London; The Power of Making. The V&A; and Crafts Council celebrate the role of making in our lives by presenting an eclectic selection of over 100 exquisitely crafted objects, ranging from a life-size crochet bear to a ceramic eye patch, a fine metal flute to dry stone walling. Power of Making is a cabinet of curiosities showing works by both amateurs and leading makers from around the world to present a snapshot of making in our time. The exhibition showcases works made using a diverse range of skills and explores how materials can be used in imaginative and spectacular ways, whether for medical innovation, entertainment, social networking or artistic endeavour. Making is the most powerful way that we solve problems, express ideas and shape our world. What and how we make defines who we are, and communicates who we want to be. For many people, making is critical for survival. For others, it is a chosen vocation: a way of thinking, inventing and innovating. And for some it is simply a delight to be able to shape a material and say ‘I made that’. The power of making is that it fulfills each of these human needs and desires. Those whose craft and ingenuity reach the very highest levels can create amazing things. But making is something everyone can do. The knowledge of how to make – both everyday objects and highly-skilled creations – is one of humanity’s most precious resources. Items on show include a life-sized crocheted bear, an electric guitar worn on a high heel, extreme cake decorating, and our old friend the Makerbot. The show also includes a Tinkerspace - meet designers, and see Making in action

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


The Autodesk 123D Design Challenge is now open for makers between 13-18 years old!

The contest has just started! It runs from now until 10/21. Click here to view the contest. Innovation! Cool, innovative products are all around us, many that we use every day. But do you ever stop to think about where they came from? From intelligent robots and cooking utensils to water purifying pitchers and self-parking cars—no matter how simple or complex the product, it all started with an idea and a design. Think you can design the next amazing product? Enter the Autodesk® 123D® Design Challenge, apply your inventive skills, and you could win cool prizes and earn bragging rights among thousands of students! To enter, simply reimagine an existing product or design a new one that can take the world by storm. Use the easy and powerful Autodesk® 123D® Design app to model your innovation, then show off your skills by creating an Instructables® project and posting it here. We dare you … are you up to the challenge? Here’s how to enter. Please read the Official Rules for more information. 1) Get the Autodesk 123D Design app for free!* •  Go to http://www.123dapp.com/design. •  You can try the app online, get it for your iPad® tablet, or download to your Mac® computer or PC. •  Select the option you want, and start creating!   2) Learn how to use the app by watching these video tutorials: •  http://www.123dapp.com/howto/design •  http://autode.sk/19ZcDCo •  http://autode.sk/19ZcIG0   3) Create your amazing product idea or enhancement with the Autodesk 123D Design app. Remember that you can use a product that exists today as your inspiration, but you should not copy it in a manner that infringes another party’s intellectual property rights. 4) Post a step-by-step photo or video Instructable that explains how you made your product come to life by using the 123D Design app. Be sure to include screen shots from the app, and tell us what cool features you used to bring your product to life! Remember, you are creating a step-by-step tutorial so that we can follow along using the 123D Design app. Don’t forget to include details on how to use the app, so that we can create your amazing product too! Learn how to create an Instructable here. Submit your invention and you could win loads of fun prizes, including a MakerBot® Replicator® 2 Desktop 3D printer, a 123D Design Premium Account Membership, a free 3D print of your design, e-patches, the right to have your work showcased on the Autodesk® Facebook and Community pages, and much more! We’re awarding one Grand Prize package, 10 First Prize packages, and 25 additional prizes. You are responsible for the payment of any taxes or other costs related to receiving, claiming or collecting any prize. See the Prizes page for additional information. 

Topic by jessyratfink   |  last reply


3D Printer Enters A New Stage Of Development

  As a new type of manufacturing process that using rapid prototyping technology,3D printers aroused widespread concern when it was published. A new product was initial pushed into the market, people concerns its functionality and price more than its shape and so on. 3D printer is no exception. Initially, people's attention focused on its cost and performance.   What way reflected cost and performance for 3D printers? I believe that there are three main areas, including printing speed, printing volume and resolution. For consumers, what level achieve these three areas and which brand is more competitive? Next, I will be based on my own experience for everyone to make a resolution.   As a Chinese brand that created independently, LXMaker won the favor of consumers from different countries by its excellent performance when it was pushed into market and sales was rising gradually. Recently, LXMaker launched a new all-metal 3D printer that was named Iron Man series.Three aspects of the machine has been greatly improved.   First is the super high printing speed:Take advantages of the cross shaft structure innovation and the unique design to separate feeding device  with extruder at both sides, instead of Makerbot's heavy printing head (loaded with 3 electric motors, illustrated as below). LXMaker's light & handy extruder guarantees high speed printing. Imagine, if you are running, unloaded or  carrying bags, which is faster? The maximum nozzle moving speed of LXMaker can reach 500 mm / sec .     The novel cross shaft structure introduced above has win the big prize of "The Best Open Source Hardware"and"The Most Precised and Fastest 3D Printer",nominated by the world-wide well-known Make Magzine.   Second is the super large printing volume:The maximum printing volume is up to 260x260x400mm, outstanding of 3D printers at the same price.    Finally is the super high resolution:LXMaker has a very precise Z axis movement, which ensures the precision in practical. The theoratical precison of Z axis is 0.01mm, while the actual test precision is only 0.02 mm, which guarantees the super high quality of the workpiece, and can effectively prevent deformation in the printing process. Ths precision of X & Y axis can also be as high as 0.125mm.   In addition to excellent performance,the price of the Iron Man is very close to the people.The machine of maximum print size that need 2199 dollars was located in moderate level in similar products, so that consumers that come from all countries were able to withstand it. Because of this,LXMaker owned today's sales.   As time goes by, the point that people focus on the 3D printer was also not limited to the cost and performance, but rather more attention appearance and stability of the machine. Because considering this change,LXMaker introduced Iron Man series.   Iron Man series used all-metal structure and the whole machine has a very high stability.In addition,it was very strong.And it didn’t produce crack or fracture because of a slight collision. So it has better adaptability for long-distance transport, consumers do not have to worry about damage of product because of long bumpy.   At appearance of the machine, Iron Man series launched black red and blue creatively.According to their preferences,consumers can customize the 3d printer that belong to themselves.And three colors of the machine is filled with the fashion sense and the modern sense.This feature meet the requirements of the product appearance that digital technology enthusiasts. The method of LXMaker is designed to meet the trend of customization.   New products always went through a process that from performance to shape after published. Eventually,the overall level of products will be improved by leaps and bounds. 3D printer reflects the development process of this law fully. Therefore, the most critical for the business is to discover consumer’s mindset changes and adjustments based on the changes in a time.It is the only way that owned good yields and returns. The only constant is change.

Topic by LXMaker 


What 3D printers can do... and what they can't

3D printers have seen insane amounts of attention in the past year with lots of stories coming out about how amazing they are. How they can make replacement parts for anything that breaks. How they’ll revolutionize manufacturing. How everyone will have one and they’ll do everything that you need ever. Long story short, 3D printers are pretty amazing, but they aren’t quite the miracle on a stick that the hype is pushing them to be. So let’s sift through and see what there really is to get excited about right now. Consumer 3D printers AKA what most people will be using The 3D printing that’s available to consumers right now is fused deposition modeling or FDM. These printers build up a model layer by layer by extruding ABS or PLA into the build area. It’s basically a much fancier version of a glue gun. A tiny glue gun controlled by a computer, that is. These 3D printers typically run $1k - $2k, but smaller ones can be had for as little as $200. The MakerBot Replicator 2 is the most popular printer of this kind, but there are dozens of others to choose from as well. With some fiddling and work you can pretty much print any shape that fits inside the build volume. So if the printer can fit it, you can make it. That’s simplifying it a bit (OK, a lot), but that’s the idea, and it’s a very cool idea. After some practice you can learn how to design new things like jewelry, ornaments, or toys. Since everything is printed out you can customize any piece that you’d like. Take a couple hours to learn 123D Design and you’ll start to have new things to print out. That’s the power of 3D printing right there. You can quickly go from an idea to a design and then to reality. Your skills in making things by hand don’t matter here. This is why it’s so amazingly helpful to use a 3D printer for prototyping your ideas. I recently worked on a flash drive case and the first model took about 2 minutes to design. After that it was about 15 minutes to print out on a Replicator 2. Then I tested it and adjusted the design for another print. I repeated the process a few times and within 2 hours I had a file that I was happy with. This is even better considering that I only spent about 20 minutes of those 2 hours actively working. The rest was spent on other non-related work. All about the materials So that’s the power of 3D printing. With services like 3D Creation Systems you can upload your file and get it printed on much fancier machines with better resolution. There’s no immediate gratification, but you still get a high-quality print quickly and access to more materials. Even with this expanded selection of printing materials, it’s still a very limited selection. If we were just to look at all the plastics out there we’d be here for days. There are thousands of them and that’s just plastics. There’s also wood and metal and more beyond that. Each different material in this insanely huge selection has a different quality to it. I’ve seen countless people print out items in ABS or PLA and complain about how their printer must not be working since the printed piece doesn’t work like the original. But of course we can’t recreate every item out there with a couple kinds of plastic. It's about using 3D printing with other tools The key forward in using 3D printing is to use it as an amazing new tool of forming great pieces to work alongside all the other great items and materials out there. Why bother making a weak spring out of plastic when you can drop in a metal spring? So 3D printing isn’t everything, but it can be used alongside most everything. It can get us where we want to go so much faster than before it’s ridiculous. But it’s still not the miracle on a stick, not the only tool we’ll ever need from here on out. When the hype dies down we won’t be looking on at amazement at something being 3D printed, we’ll be looking at lots of awesome new things that were made faster with the help of 3D printing. And that is going to be incredible.

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply