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I'm Going...

... to the Maker Faire at Newcastle this afternoon, representing Instructables along with gmjhowe (who's done most of the work), Steveastrouk and others. There should be some sort of internet access, but with a lot of people using it, I can't promise to post anything over the weekend. Look for posts on Monday, or, even better, come along to the Centre for Life, find the Instructables stall, and say hello to us all.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Instructables at the Maker Faire!

Here you go! We spent two days talking to hundreds, maybe thousands of people about the site. We were amazed at how many people had heard of us, and used it regularly, but never quite got round to joining. We were proud of the number of other Makers who were members of Instructables. We were pleasantly surprised by people presenting crafts they had learned from instructables, and were telling others about the site. We met the very nice people from Sugru.  We met the slightly manic folk from various Hackerspaces.  We met the dedicated folk from SciCast.  There were people knitting neurons, soldering badges, hacking the Kinect, battling robots, playing tennis on bicycles, controlling fire with sound, playing music with Tesla coils, building an electric Mini, chasing small children with wheelie bins, performing the thermite reaction in their bare hands, building a temporary home from "Sold" signs. Hannah wrote an Instructable. There were automata, robots, ancient computers, amazing materials, musicians, artists, crafters, and hackers. There was a giant cardboard spider, a self-balancing skateboard from this site, a water-cooled armchair, a fire-breathing dragon, 3d printers printing 3d printers, and hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of people all interested in Making Cool Stuff. Have a look at the photos - the image-notes are still buggy, so if there's one you don't understand, just ask. Oh, and the members we know we met were... Spartacus. Insomniac. XenonJohn (and his self-balancing skateboard!) Aidy22475. Sweavo. Oopstudios (I don't think I spelled that correctly) Spikeuk. Podling. JamJarcollective (I could have watched their ball-coasters all day...) Greensteam. We probably met more than that - if I missed you off the list, please let me know! The first of the videos...  

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Newcastle Makers Faire 2011 (UK)

After last years Makers Faire, me and steveastrouk decided we had to make 'Instructables at the Makers Faire' a reality. Since then we have discussed it in detail with various people from our first UK Meet up. Jayefuu and I came up with the idea of selling an Instructables Card Game to help raise some money for activities at the Faire. So we now have some funding in place for making it a possibility. The Makers Faire takes place on the 12-13 March 2011 as part of the Newcastle Sciencefest. More details can be found at the Makers Faire UK Website. If you want to take part in the Makers Faire as a Maker be sure to register your interest before the 26th November. I have already registered our interest in an Official Instructables section. We already have a small group of people on board to help out with the Instructables section, but we would be more than happy to have more people on board. We would be looking specifically for anyone with a great project that we could have on show, or for people to interact with. Obviously you need to be up in newcastle for the 12-13th March. Register interest below, or contact myself, steveastrouk, or Jayefuu directly. I plan to post another topic closer the date letting you know we are going to be there, and what we are upto! Picture attached of us all at the UK Instructables Meet up

Topic by gmjhowe    |  last reply


UK Makers Faire Newcastle, are you actually going?

So, both me and Hannah are actually going to the Makers Faire in Newcastle, we are staying in Durham, and catching the train into Newcastle for each of the days. The hotel is booked, and we both have the time off work, so were are going to be there for sure. My question is, who else can we expect to see there? Have you planned on going? It would be nice to meet up with anyone who is going, if only for a quick hello. I am hoping to have a version of my avatar on show so you can pick me out from the crowd. I also hope to have some Instructables flyer/hand out cards. Perhaps with my username link, as well as general info on the site itself. Yes I know other topics have been put up about the makers faire, but this is an ultimate final roll call to see exactly who is going.

Topic by gmjhowe  


The Instructables Card Game - Be part of our latest joint project, earn Patches while doing so.

Want to help? Fancy some patches? Read on… It has been a short while since the Three Deserts did anything big, so I am here to introduce our latest effort! The Instructables Card Game! The Instructables Card Game was inspired by the famous card game Top Trumps. Instead of cars, or planes, the entire game will be made from Instructables Members! The game will battle the stats from different members against each other. We have already selected 100 candidates to be in the deck, and they know who they are. We have some spaces left, so to make sure we have a good variety, we decided to ask you to help us. If you think there is someone that should be in the deck, shout out their name in the commments! That way you help to confirm the members we have chosen, and draw our attention to others that could be included. Oh, and by the way, every new unique suggestion will earn yourself a nice shiny Patch. (patches limited to one per member)

Topic by gmjhowe    |  last reply


Maker Faire UK

Advanced notice: Looks like a Maker Faire will be held at the Newcastle Science Fair on the 13/14th March 2010. Anyone thinking that far in advance, and wants to meet up post in here. We've already booked a hotel for the night.

Topic by steveastrouk    |  last reply


Manchester UK Mini-Maker Faire in July

News of another Maker Faire in the UK. The big Newcastle event has been postponed until next year. Its being held at the Manchester Museum of science and industry http://www.mosi.org.uk/whats-on/manchester-mini-maker-faire.aspx

Topic by steveastrouk    |  last reply


How to get colder temp from Beertender

Does anyone Know How I can Hack the T-Fal Beertender which uses Heineken and Newcastle Brown ale mini kegs. I would like to get the temp lower than the 39 degrees that the factory set it at.

Topic by TheCritic    |  last reply


Maker Faire UK on BBC

The BBC stopped by the Maker Faire UK that happened this last weekend in Newcastle. They were especially interested in the robotics. A fire-breathing horse, a walking and singing robot, iRobots, and battlebots. Nothing else about the rest of it, but the video's worth checking out.See also:Maker Faire UK in 3DLemonie's report

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


Maker Faire UK!

Maker Faire is crossing the pond and will be landing in the UK! It will be happening on March 14-15 during the Newcastle ScienceFest which runs from March 6-15. After three years Maker Faire is going international!No word on whether there's an open call for makers to go and demonstrate their own creations just yet. Maker Faire UK

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


Maker Faire UK in 3D!

Maker Faire UK went down this past weekend in Newcastle and here are the red and cyan 3D pics to prove it! So did anyone from here go? And do you have any regular pics to share? I tossed my last pair of 3D glasses away about 20 years ago. Link via Make blogUPDATE: Catch Lemonie's report here.

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


Instructables on the BBC.

"We are all makers and hackers"So declares the BBC headline published today.Make, sites like Instructables.com and video shows such as Systm strive to break projects down into manageable chunks to show people how easy it can be to create stuff.You can read the full article and see video from the Newcastle Maker Faire at the link below, as well as a PDF file on making your own Multitouch display.There is also the option to add your own comments.Please, sensible stuff only - the comments are moderated, so "W00t Instructables" would waste time, and not actually appear on the website.Link to article: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7961760.stm

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Instructables is going to be at the UK Makers Faire!

Instructables will be showcasing at this years upcoming Makers Faire UK in Newcastle! We have lots of goodies to hand out, and will have some projects on show for people to enjoy. I will be joined by, SteveAstroUK LizzyAstro Jayefuu PKM Kiteman Kitewife Rainbow_Han Last years Makers Faire was a lot of fun, I very much recommend it. I am delighted that we will have our own instructables stall this year. We very much look forward to seeing you at the faire, and be sure to let us know if you are a fellow instructablian.  Jake - gmjhowe - Maker Faire UK 12-13 March 2011 The world-famous Maker Faire returns to the UK to headline Newcastle ScienceFest. Expect a weekend of cool robots, garden-shed inventions, knitted wonders, the occasional fireball and oodles of opportunities to make your own creations. Perfect for creative people of all ages! At Maker Faire, come and play with classic synthesizers, see live 3D printing, learn to solder, play musical Tesla coils, become a Guerrilla knitter, turn a beer can into a pinhole camera, use a Wii balance board to control a robot, make your own stop-motion movie and much more… This special event takes place simultaneously at Centre for Life and Discovery Museum with one Access-All-Areas ticket available. This ticket enables you to see all of Maker Faire plus Life’s planetarium, motion simulator ride and brand-new under 7’s gallery. Tickets are available on the day or in advance. Opening hours: Saturday: 10.00 to 17.00 Sunday: 11.00 to 17.00 Head over to the Maker Faire UK website for more information.

Topic by gmjhowe    |  last reply


My first steps into steampunk

I've just taken my first steps into steampunk with a small display and I thought I'd share some pics. I made all the clothes and there is an LED in the contraption behind the blue window. I was making a pair of Victorian style boots for Sybil, but ran out of time, so she has a pair if Barbie shoes for now (good thing Barbie has ridiculously small feet for her size) The male doll is 5 1/2 inches tall. I'll finish the boots at a later time, but I had to finish the display to a point today as the miniature group I belong to has a display at a local model show this weekend (anyone in Newcastle, Australia - come to the Our Town Model Show :-)

Topic by Twinmum    |  last reply


Regarding Featuring at various levels...

At the moment, a full feature for a project gets that project onto the front page as an "Editor's Pick", but all a feature at Category or Channel level earns an author is a small star on the project's thumbnail. What I think should happen is... I look at the front page, I see the most recent top-level featured projects (as now) I click on a Category, say, Food, I see all the top-level food projects, plus all the Category-level featured projects. I click on a Channel, say, Sandwiches, I see all the top-level, Category-level and the Channel-level sandwiches. That way, authors will be rewarded for their work with the increased traffic they deserve. The photo is irrelevant, I just don't like publishing topics with no image.  It's the Angel of the North, with Conker-X sitting on the toes.  I took it on the way home from the Newcastle Maker Faire.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Are You Charles Yarnold?

I've just watched the first episode of Sky TV's new show, Gadget Geeks.  It's a mixture of review show, trying out real gadgets in semi-real situations, and Maker show (in this episode, they built a portable bullet-time camera rig, turned an electric tricycle into a monster truck, and made a toothbrush into a sander. This last might sound familiar, and I think there'll be a few more Instructables seen on the show, but I think there's good reason. It was only a passing moment, which I had to pause to take this photo (with my iPod - my proper camera has flat batteries).  On the lid of Charles Yarnold's laptop, for all to see, is an Instructables sticker! Are you Charles Yarnold?  Do you know him?  Did you give or send him the sticker? Did you meet this man at the Newcastle Maker Faire? The community needs to know!

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


New Scientist

I'm sure people are aware but http://www.newscientist.com/In this weeks issue:Someone in China has spent some time analysing the US power grid, and figured out that it could be collapsed by taking-out a lightly-loaded sub-network. The US department of homeland security is apparently looking into this. However, Prof Ian Fells (a jolly chap with a beard) of Newcastle University UK says "they only need a bunch of guys with Semtex to blow up the gridlines near a power station"The Mythbusters are interviewed, but even they don't know why thermite on ice explodes, do you?And Richard Dawkins has a new book out, from the review:"Implying that your audience is stupid does not qualify as a great new angle. Yet this is precisely what Dawkins does"."It's really kind of comical. If "spot the condecensions" is a new drinking game, then bottoms up! There's one in just about every chapter"LThere's much more, but I mainly wanted to post the Mythbusters link, and the Dawkins review.(There is an article on Velociraptors)

Topic by lemonie    |  last reply


DIY Dialysis - an Ultimate Make?

There are makers, and there are Makers.Two years ago, Dr Malcolm Coulthard, of Newcastle's Royal Victoria Infirmary, had a patient too small for dialysis. The baby girl had suffered kidney problems following bowel surgery, but, at only 6 lbs in weight, she was too small even for the "child sized" dialysis machines.Rather than let the girl die, Dr Coulthard, with the help of senior children's kidney nurse Jean Crosier, designed and built her a dialysis machine from scratch in his garage.Every so often, the idea of Instructables Awards pops up, but only for people on the site. Kitewife said now they are people who deserve a Robot patch, and agree, but more so. We need to recognise the achievements of people like this, so I propose we set up an award - the Ultimate Maker award.Nothing dramatic, just a simple certificate they can frame, a Robot patch, and maybe a logo they can display on their website if they have one.What say you, Makers?BBC Story

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


It's IgNobel time again!

The 19th IgNobel Awards were presented this week (Thursday 1st):VETERINARY MEDICINE PRIZE: Catherine Douglas and Peter Rowlinson of Newcastle University, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, UK, for showing that cows who have names give more milk than cows that are nameless.PEACE PRIZE: Stephan Bolliger, Steffen Ross, Lars Oesterhelweg, Michael Thali and Beat Kneubuehl of the University of Bern, Switzerland, for determining — by experiment — whether it is better to be smashed over the head with a full bottle of beer or with an empty bottle.(I don't know their conclusions, their paper isn't available for free - anybody care to test for us?)ECONOMICS PRIZE: The directors, executives, and auditors of four Icelandic banks — Kaupthing Bank, Landsbanki, Glitnir Bank, and Central Bank of Iceland — for demonstrating that tiny banks can be rapidly transformed into huge banks, and vice versa — and for demonstrating that similar things can be done to an entire national economy.CHEMISTRY PRIZE: Javier Morales, Miguel Apátiga, and Victor M. Castaño of Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, for creating diamonds from liquid — specifically from tequila.(Seriously, they did!)MEDICINE PRIZE: Donald L. Unger, of Thousand Oaks, California, USA, for investigating a possible cause of arthritis of the fingers, by diligently cracking the knuckles of his left hand — but never cracking the knuckles of his right hand — every day for more than sixty (60) years.PHYSICS PRIZE: Katherine K. Whitcome of the University of Cincinnati, USA, Daniel E. Lieberman of Harvard University, USA, and Liza J. Shapiro of the University of Texas, USA, for analytically determining why pregnant women don't tip over.(Possibly "because they have spines"?)LITERATURE PRIZE: Ireland's police service (An Garda Siochana), for writing and presenting more than fifty traffic tickets to the most frequent driving offender in the country — Prawo Jazdy — whose name in Polish means "Driving License".(I remember this story breaking - the confusion was immense.)PUBLIC HEALTH PRIZE: Elena N. Bodnar, Raphael C. Lee, and Sandra Marijan of Chicago, Illinois, USA, for inventing a brassiere that, in an emergency, can be quickly converted into a pair of protective face masks, one for the brassiere wearer and one to be given to some needy bystander.(How many teens are going to use difficulty breathing as an excuse to get into their girlfriend's underwear?)MATHEMATICS PRIZE: Gideon Gono, governor of Zimbabwe’s Reserve Bank, for giving people a simple, everyday way to cope with a wide range of numbers — from very small to very big — by having his bank print bank notes with denominations ranging from one cent ($.01) to one hundred trillion dollars ($100,000,000,000,000).BIOLOGY PRIZE: Fumiaki Taguchi, Song Guofu, and Zhang Guanglei of Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences in Sagamihara, Japan, for demonstrating that kitchen refuse can be reduced more than 90% in mass by using bacteria extracted from the feces of giant pandas.(You've got to ask - where did they get the idea to try that?)References (and past award winners) available at http://improbable.com/ig/winners/#ig2009

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Buy the Official Instructables Card Game NOW!

Top Trumps is a card game of chance, knowledge and skill. A fight to the death to posses the whole of a deck of special cards. This version of the game replaces the classic cars, aeroplanes and tanks with you, the instructables community! The following steps explain why we did it, how we did it, how you can get some and how to play. This collaboration was brought to you with massive help from gmjhowe, Lithium Rain, Kiteman, Yokozuna, KentsOkay and Lemonie. Video starring gmjhowe and rainbowhan. We wanted this project to be open to as many people as possible! For that reason you have two options to get hold of some instructables top trumps to play with your friends, family, colleagues and other instructables lovers! Buy 'em: If you'd rather have some nice glossy, double sided, rounded corner, professionally printed card cards, printed by gmjhowe at his UK print shop, click here to order a pack using Paypal. They're 10GBP/15USD/11.5 Euros. All profits after paying for materials and time go towards our Instructables stall at the Newcastle Maker Faire 2011. Check back here in a few weeks to see how much we've made to go towards spreading the Instructables love at the UK Maker Faire. Print 'em: Once we've sold 100 packs of printed cards to raise money for our Instructables table at the Maker Faire UK in 2011, a pdf will be added to this step so you can print your own! Please add your ibles username as a note in the paypal payment 10 GBP ~15 USD ~11.5 Euros What are you waiting for? Buy a pack now! Help support the Instructables Makers at the UK Maker's Faire! All profit made from sales will go directly into our stall, and projects for the makers faire.

Topic by gmjhowe    |  last reply


McMADSAT make and do, show and tell. Scotland's first Maker Event 2009. Full report

Report of the McMADSAT event 14th March 2009, at the Glasgow Science CentreWe had a fantastic day. Outside it was a grey gale of a day, but inside was a riot of colour and activity. The aim was to enthuse the public with the fun of making things from a variety of technologies. Anyone who wanted to, could join in, make something and take it away with them, and all for free. Hundreds of people of all ages came along and had a great time. A general video of the event can be seen at https://www.instructables.com/community/Mc_MADSAT/ (Thanks to Les Oates for making this excellent film for us).I am happy to discuss further with anyone planning their own event, and you can see more about it and the process by which I got the event going, at http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com/ExhibitorsStar Guest, all the way from London, was Professor Maelstromme (AKA Amanda Scrivener), who brought her beautiful creationsWhat can you make from a dead umbrella? Display of the possibilities for reusing the fabric and structure of dead umbrellas.The Tea Party. 1950s style tea party made from a combination of hand made fabric and edible pieces.Cardboard structures from the students of the department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde.Greensteam's steampunkery, 101 uses for a dead keyboard and other examples of her work as shown on Instructables.The Offline Mechanical Blog – a very old manual typewriter with continuous paper available for the public to type their messages and thoughts on for all to shareLemonie (another Instructables enthusiast, who travelled up from York especially) brought his amazing conversion of a VHS player-into-toaster that makes toast with VHS imprinted in it. He also brought his nice LEGO USB stick, a lantern made out of a tin-can & glass. and his *untested* wind-turbine, made from VHS player parts.On the Young Makers stand we had a display of virtuoso Lego constructions and an extensive collection of home made Steampunkery.The self-replicating machine from the department of Design Manufacture and Engineering Management at the University of Strathclyde, the Reprap, was on display and moving but sadly not reproducing on the day.ActivitiesThe public were offered a wide range of free hands-on activities, which ran continuously all day, to 'Make and Take'Soldering - make a solar theremin (or a robot). 16 of these were made and all worked first time. Some were taken for a trial run in the sun and a video of this can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzUZMon3vpA The Stemnet ambassadors helped visitors to make their own Musical Straw Oboes.One of the most popular activities – especially with children – the Stemnet ambassadors supervised the making of many handsfull of Gloop.The Stemnet ambassadors used the plastic Polymorph for visitors to make a fingerprint keyring to take away.Fishy things - Busy Bees Art studio provided painting and collage fishes to make, particularly for our very young visitors.The Glasgow Crocheted Coral Reef invited visitors to try their hands at crocheting and contribute to the growing coral reef, all made from wool and even strips of plastic bag. Many total novices not only tried their hands but actually completed a piece of coral to contribute to the reef. This workshop area was very busy throughout, with visitors typically spending 30 minutes or more participating. Many thanks to my civil engineer pal who ran this.House of Cards - visitors could make and take their own set of the design classic 'Eames cards', which slot together to form fantastical structures. Ideal for recycling old greetings cards.Cable necklets, keyboard bracelets and keyboard film wallets. All made from recycled/repurposed materials from dead keyboards. Popular with adults and children alike.Risk assessments were provided to the Glasgow science centre, for all the activities. There were no injuries and the 'emergency first aid bucket of water' was not needed as there were no soldering or gluegun burns.Participant Presenters30 people were involved on the day, either as exhibitors or as workshop facilitators. An essential component of the team was the group of11 Stemnet ambassadors, most of whom were there all day. It would have been impossible to run so many activities without them. Another group in the team was the members of the Glasgow Electron Club who, with some friends and a Stemnet ambassador, ran the soldering workshops continuously all day. We were particularly fortunate to have two exhibitors travel up specially to take part. Several exhibitors were entrepreneurs who gave their time for nothing, even though the venue rules meant they could not sell anything, nor charge for the activities being provided. This was especially generous given the harsh financial climate just now. Everyone said they had lots of fun.PublicOver 1,000 people visited the Glasgow Science Centre on the day. The BSA/NSEW assessment forms collected only represent <10% of the visitors to the McMADSAT area. Stallholders and workshop facilitators estimated a total of about 425 active participants (people who did an activity, or asked questions and generally interacted with the displays) by 1530 (GSC shuts at 1700). However, even these only represent a proportion of the people visiting the event which, although not recorded, probably amount to about double that, since most of the activities were taken up by children accompanied by other family members. The numbers at any given time were variable, depending upon the GSC's own activities/talks etc. I would estimate that the McMADSAT area was visited by at least 700-800 during the day. From the few assessment forms returned, and from chatting to the public, it was clear that most had come simply because they were coming to the GSC anyway, but some (mainly young adults) had come as a result of internet and email information or because of the Metro article. The GSC visitors seem to be mainly families with children of primary school age. The University of Glasgow Steampunk Society had come especially to make contact with the steampunk element, as featured in the Metro article. We also collected some contact details for future events. BudgetThe total budget for the event was the £500 grant provided from NSEW Scotland scheme. This had to cover all the exhibitors' costs and the costs for the free make and take activities, plus all publicity etc.In-Kind Sponsors:The Glasgow Science Centre provided free space, tables, cloths, technical assistance, without which the event would not have been possible at all.The publishers of Make and Craft magazines, O'Reilly's, did not feel able to sponsor us in the same extent as they did for the much larger event in Newcastle on the same day, but did send boxes of back issues of their magazines to give away, which probably amounted to an equivalent of about £300 at UK newsstand prices.Clockworkrobot.com provided more theremin kits than contracted for, which were themselves at cost price.Madlabs provided free batteries for all the kits they supplied at cost.Instructables.com assisted with publicity and allowed the use of their logo.VenueNone of this would have been possible at all, particularly on this minimal budget, without the kindness of the Glasgow Science Centre. The Director agreed immediately to offer us the space free, plus the use of tables and technical help to enable this event to take place. We were able to partially set up the night before which was very helpful in avoiding a scramble on the day. We were able to get the loan of 4 GSC soldering irons which avoided us having to get personal ones PAT tested. This was the ideal venue for us as it meant we really didn’t have to do a great deal of publicity as we could be sure of an audience from the GSC's normal throughput.PublicityThe event was listed in the NSEW diary and in the university of Strathclyde's NSEW information. Posters were distributed around venues in Glasgow and information posted on relevant websites. A blogspace http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com was set up as a temporary web presence to refer people to. The Metro published a small piece which was a wonderful boost.Lessons for the futureNeeded more helpers and more exhibitors. Outdoor displays would have been impossible as the weather was dreadful, but it is still necessary to have some more dramatic displays as well as the hands on activities. Successful soldering for novices really needs 1:1 or 1:2 supervision. The budget only worked because minimal publicity was done at low cost and all the participant presenters were generous with their time and resources. Anything more ambitious than what was done on this occasion would need a larger organising team and significant sponsorship.

Topic by greensteam    |  last reply