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What type of Hand-Planer is this?

My Grandpa recently gave me a super old Hand-Planer which I want to restore, But I don't know it's type... Does anyone know what type of Hand-Plane this is? I tried to search it on Google, And I think it might be a "Wooden Block-Planer", But I'm not sure I've attached pictures of it below :) Also, Am I supposed to say "Hand-Plane" or "Hand-Planer"?

Topic by Yonatan24    |  last reply


Can Painted or Stained 2x6 boards be run through a planer? Answered

I have 2x6 Painted/Stained outdoor stair treads that are a little rough and peeling from the sun. Can I run them through my planer without damaging the cutter? I'm hoping to get a nice smooth, clean surface to stain without trying to sand everything. Thanks for your help.

Question by jonallyn    |  last reply


What blades should I get for my Makita 2012 NB planer?

I have been looking on line for replacement blades for my Makita planer 2012nb but all the ones online have not looked anything like the blades I have on the machine.  Does anyone know what blades I can use?  is the power tek ones in this link actually compatible? http://www.amazon.com/POWERTEC-128320DD-12-Inch-Planer-Knives/dp/B00DERB8HU/ref=pd_sim_hi_6

Question by trbdavis    |  last reply


Are there any community shops in the Vancouver bc area?

Hi. I am wondering if there any community shops in the Vancouver bc area? I have a couple projects that require large and expensive tools / machines that I cannot buy and store myself. I think that finding a community shop would be the best option.  Any help would be appreciated Professorred

Topic by professorred    |  last reply



Utilizing a Table Saw?

Hi, I have a Table Saw Bosch 4000 and few other power tools, I do not have a Lathe, Router and planer. is there a way to utilize the table saw to compensate the lack of these tools? Thanks Nazarene

Question by nazarene    |  last reply


Fabricating advice (Knuckle dusters)

I want to create some knuckle dusters, heavy duty ones that could pack a punch (I will not be hurting anyone, just for fun and martial arts self-defence :-P). However I have almost no metalworking tools such as a welder, drill press, bandsaw (or other electric saw that cuts metal). The tools I do have are: Mitre saw Normal drill (Variable speed) Hacksaws Scroll/fret saw Table saws Sanders, planers, circular saws. Heavy duty desk vices Any tips would be greatly appreciated. They dont need to look amazing, I like 'rustic' weapons (Like 'improvised' weapons).

Topic by Hiyadudez    |  last reply


Repair Stuff

Could Instructables perhaps include the category of REPAIRS. It just occurred to me when saw His Highness, E.W. post the repair of his power saw that there is no place really for this topic. I routinely replace the power cords on all my power tools on purchase with a 5M cable. (the factory cables are always too short and sometimes the plug is just downright weird). Lately I have replaced the bearings in my planer (with 100% success). However I seriously battled with the removal of one of them and did need advice. As a farmer I am constantly repairing stuff and am currently busy vivesecting my old drill and need advice on how to check the various parts for continuity, since smoke came out of it! but don't have a clue where to post though except in offbeat.

Topic by Karroo Oakey    |  last reply


Traditionally built furniture - maybe as a contest?

I saw a quite old "home improvement" show from the 80's the other day and was stunned to remember how much we gained in ready to use parts and tools these days.A part of the show focussed on a custom made dining table with a matching cupboard/sideboard.The interesting thing here was that no nails or screw were used.Tongue and groove systems, smart notches and such were used instead with just wood glue.I admit the professionals made it look easy to use a hand planer and chisels to carve out some ornaments and details but the result speaks for itself IMHO.We now mainly use power tools, ready to go parts like metal angles, easy screw systems and so on.Wouldn't it be great to have a contest where people actually build wooden furniture, even if it is just a chair, by using traditional tools only?To misuse the term call it "Organic furniture" ;)

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


Super basic resource for learning electric motors

I watch an insane amount of YouTube, particularly woodworking, as designing and building furniture is my big passion in life. I have, however, become more and more interested in learning about motors. It has become increasingly obvious to me that literally, every tool in a workshop is simply a motor that turns something. Saws, drills, sanders, planers, jointers, even dust collectors are all nothing more than a motor turning something around and around in a circle.   I just bought a new Table Saw, and during my 6 months of researching, I read all about 1, 2, 3, and even 5 horsepower motors. Single-phase vs. three phase. rpms, 110V vs 120V vs 220 vs 240V etc etc etc... It was all mostly abstract, as I could tell that higher horsepower means "good" and lower horsepower means "less good." But now, I have a lot of projects that I want to build, but I know nothing about motors.  I've been watching a lot of Matthias Wandel on YouTube, and I want to know everything there is to know about motors. Unfortunately, I don't know anything really about electronics at all. But I feel like learning about motors is a great place to start learning. Does anyone have a book or a resource that literally takes things back to motors 101 for 10 year olds?

Topic by Dolmetscher007  


What is the best way to grind glass, somewhat smooth? Answered

Now before you rush to write down an answer let me tell you the details! The chunk of glass is 28 inches wide by 28 inches long and 2.5 inches tall. Composed of 160 painstakingly cut strips of glass that have been glued together into a jumbo block. Now try as I might, when laminating things together of ever so slightly different size together you are going to get high and low spots - And yes, this would have been soooo much easier a job if I had smoothed out the rough edges before laminating - Pesky hind-sight. Unfortunately my planer doesn't seem to work so well on glass, who knew :) Anyway, I will post some pictures to give you an idea of what it is, that has to be ground down. First off • It does not have to be perfectly smooth • A mottled surface would actually be appreciated • It is not going to be a lens of any kind, all though light will be transmitted through it. I have the following tools, but first - No I am not taking it 1700km to have it kilned. No, the local glass shop seems to have less tools then I do, at least in this scale. • Angle grinders • belt sanders • orbital sanders - but really? On the back side I used the angle grinder, with a metal grinding bit. Not to bad really all though the edges were taking a pounding. This was prior to applying resin and woven cloth, to give the glass a bit of tooth and reduce the high edges. This is for an instructable I am working on.  

Question by iminthebathroom    |  last reply


An embarrassment of riches

I was an Artist in Residence at Instructables from September-December 2013, and words cannot express how wonderful it was.  Instructables has recently built out what I can only imagine is the world's greatest general use workshop, at Autodesk's Pier 9 facility.  You are probably aware of this shop if you're reading Artist in Residency posts, but if not, check out the overview here and the machine details here.  I tried to learn and do EVERYTHING in this shop!  I didn't quite succeed in that but I came close enough that I didn't totally finish any of my projects.  I'd planned to make an articulated model of an Escher drawing and an 8 foot tall steel dinosaur statue, both projects I could probably have spent all my time there on.  There was so much awesome to learn about and experiment with, though, that I kept getting distracted by side projects and what-if's that I might not have had opportunity to mess around with later on.  So what I actually ended up making was a series of acrylic jewelry, two small cardboard dinosaur models, MOST of the Escher drawing (I finished it later), some sheet metal walking-leg linkage experiments, half of a new Mustache Ride, part of a sixth Pulse of the City heart, tests of chemically-mediated etching on metal, a pair of 3d printed snowflake ornaments, and the beginnings of a pair of antler pants.  (I will definitely write instructables for the dinosaur and the pants, when they are complete.) I loved it all.  I loved it all so much, and so consistently, that I had to try everything and was hardly able to finish anything.  I cut metal on the waterjet, I printed many 3d things on the 3d printers, I lased like it was going out of style, I lathed like I didn't know what I was doing (Yay Learnings!), I cut and welded and drilled and screwed and printed and ground and sewed and soldered and blasted and glued.  I was like a kid in a candy shop who can't finish the fudge because the lollipops are so tasty and then whoa! peanut brittle! peppermints! gumdrops!  The only part of the shop I didn't use was the test kitchen because, well, I don't really cook. Three months was not enough.  Three years would not be enough.  I feel so fortunate to have been in there doing anything at all for any amount of time, though.  Things I can do now that I couldn't do last summer include: turn wood on a lathe cut metal, stone, cardboard, etc on a waterjet etch metal on a laser printer operate a small vacuum former print multiple materials on an Objet Connex run a jointer and planer operate a Shopbot TIG weld aluminum (to be sure, I'm lousy at this still, but I know How) operate a sand blaster bend steel tubes I'm an introverted anti-social nerd so it has taken me to the bottom of this post to talk about the people.  I absolutely need to say how great the people there are - everyone, no matter their job description, makes things.  Everyone just gets how it is to lose yourself in making some weird possibly useless object that you might have to get rid of when you're done anyway, but you just need to work on it to figure out That One Thing that you didn't quite understand but now you do!  It is a rare and wonderful set of people.  And some of the people, it is explicitly their JOB to teach me about all the equipment and help me with any problems I had with anything at all. If you're reading this you should definitely apply for this program.  You do not want to miss out on working in this shop.

Topic by rachel    |  last reply


Elefanternas passion för matematik och naturvetenskap - Edublogs

Http://isabellica.edublogs.org/2013/03/09/elefanternas-passion-for-matematik-och-naturvetenskap/ UB studenter att göra lärande mer hands-on, tillämpliga för pre-collegiate studenter Den endast lärande hinder Lavone Rodolph stött på gymnasiet försökte kombinera vad han lärt sig i klassrummet med det verkliga livet, sade han. Då var utbildning ibland immateriella bortom tjäna ett betyg. “Om jag lära ett koncept i klass, fysik eller kemi, ibland jag inte visste hur jag skulle använda det i mitt personliga liv eller jag visste inte nytta av lärande det än passerar en test,” sade Rodolph. Rodolph-nu en doktorand i datateknik – försöker förbättra lärandet för studenter vid sitt alma mater, Hutchinson Central teknisk högstadium i Downtown Buffalo, så de inte behöver möta den samma problem som han gjorde. Rodolph arbetar med tvärvetenskaplig vetenskap och teknik partnerskap (ISEP), ett femårigt program som leds av UB. Dess huvudsakliga fokus är att förbättra upplevelsebaserat lärande i naturvetenskap, teknik, teknik och matematik fält (STEM) för studenter i Buffalo offentliga skolor. Forskning har visat att en betydande andel − − 33 procent av barnen börjar tappa intresset för vetenskap så unga som 8 år. Av middle school ökar andelen till nästan hälften av dessa barn, enligt National Center for STEM grundutbildning. ISEP syftar till nytändning i en passion för vetenskap och andra STEM ämnen genom att erbjuda mitten och gymnasieelever en mer praktisk, tvärvetenskapligt förhållningssätt till lärande. Det innebär planering studiebesök att stärka förståelsen av lärande material och utformning laboratorieförsök som illustrerar abstrakta begrepp. Dessa aktiviteter gör lärande STEM ämnen kul, ett mål som Rodolph anser vara högsta prioritet för ISEP. “Huvudmålet är nr 1, att göra något kul STEM fält på högstadiet nivå,” sade Rodolph. “Sätt från högstadiet nivå, de vill fortsätta det på gymnasienivå. Och igen, målet på gymnasienivå är att göra det roligt och utmanande, så från gymnasienivå, de kan fullfölja ett STEM fält på kollegial nivå.” Som en examen assistent, har Rodolph hjälpt med samordna lärare i flera projekt. Dessa inkluderar undervisning Android-programmering, instruera eleverna på att skapa kol-dioxid-drivna racecars och planerar en resa till Buffalo Museum of Science att se hur DNA kan användas i rättsmedicinska undersökningar. Sedan starten 2005 har expanderat ISEP från två pilotskolor till 12 hög-behov mitten och gymnasier. Under 2011 fick det $9,8 miljoner euro i finansiering från National Science Foundation (NSF). − och andra stödjande partner som arbetar med tre viktiga partner − Buffalo offentliga skolor, Buffalo State College och buffel Museum of Science Roswell Park Cancer Institute, ISEP syftar till att uppnå sitt mål att förbättra elevernas lärande genom att samla resurserna. Lärarutbildningen är en stor del av ISEP’S plan. För att bättre förbereda lärare att göra STEM utbildning mer relevant för eleverna, kan ISEP och dess partner lärare att bli studenterna själva. Under somrarna, lärare utveckla deras professionella kompetens genom att arbeta med UB doktorander och tillägna sig färdigheter inom forskning och utredning undervisning. Under läsåret, både akademiker och studenter hjälper lärare utforma och genomföra mer hands-on lärande i klassrummet. “[ISEP] mål är att ge lärarna en ökad professionalisering, öka utbildning lärarna själva, så de kan få sin utbildning tillbaka till skolor och skapa bestående fördelar för studenter, säger Phillip Tucciarone, en junior kemiteknik stora. Han har varit involverad i ISEP för tre terminer och designar främst och genomför “hands-on laborationer” samordna lärare. ISEP har gjort framsteg sedan dess tillkomst, enligt UB News Center. För exempelvis studenter i ISEP klassrum på Native American Magnet School, en av de två pilot skolorna, har varit ungefär “30 procent mer sannolikt än distriktet jämnåriga att uppnå kompetens på den åttonde klass stat vetenskap examen”, enligt UB News Center. Innan sådan förbättring, var Native American Magnet School på listan skolor Under registrering granskning (SURR). SURR skolor är lågpresterande skolor som inte uppfyller statliga normer, enligt New York utbildning utrikesdepartementets hemsida. Native American Magnet School kan vara stängda, sade Joseph Gardella, chef för ISEP och John och Frances Larkin professor i kemi vid UB, via e-post. Native American Magnet School togs bort från listan i 2009, fyra år efter det blev inblandad i ISEP. Se skolans akademiska förbättring bland åttonde klassare har varit en av de många minnesvärda upplevelser för Gardella. Läs fler relaterade ämnen och video: http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xwumc4_the-avanti-group-services_news#.UTgjjdZTB3A http://www.importgenius.com/importers/avanti-group-limited

Topic by DELETED_jasmineyoung