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Polycarbonate cutting

So, I had an idea some time back, to inset a rectangle cutting of a lens off a pair of glasses, into an eye cup for your camera. Costco sell their lenses to minors for 20 dollars, if I could get them to sell me just lenses, would a glass cutter like they have at home depot (i think) be able to cut it down to a small rectangle? If not, how could I cut it?

Topic by Weissensteinburg    |  last reply


Is it safe to melt polycarbonate? Answered

I'm interested in trying to do something with the dozens of old CD's and DVD's.  I was thinking of trying to melt the polycarbonate and shape it while it's  Pliable. I understand polycarbonate melts at around 150 degrees C, so it's possible to melt in an oven, but is it safe?  Will it release any toxic fumes, or does it only vent at higher temps? Also, will it deform\shrink as it cools, or will it hold it's shape? Thanks!!!

Question by Morgantao    |  last reply


Polycarbonate panel thickness for secure windows? Answered

I need to glaze 16 small panes (430 x 275 mm) in very strong, cast aluminium window frames (8 per frame, either side of the door). Is 3 mm frosted polycarbonate going to be impact resistant enough to keep people out? The building these windows are part of is in a fairly remote place, so security is a concern but for cost and aesthetic reasons we don't want to glaze with glass and install a metal security screen. The current ugly solution is boarding them up and securing with screws but this doesn't allow us light inside. Cost is a consideration since I've been given permission by the company that owns the land to reglaze them and if I provide the labour they will supply the materials. 16 off 3 mm sheets, £3.85 each = £61.60 16 off 4 mm sheets, £5.14 each = £82.24 16 off 6 mm sheets, £7.70 each = £123.20 I've found lots of sites shouting "yeah polycarb is badass! It's unbreakable!" but not one that gives an idea for thinner sheets. Am I wasting money by going for thicker sheets? Or if someone's trying to get in might a 3 mm sheet be breakable?

Question by Jayefuu    |  last reply



How'd I get permanent marker off polycarbonate? Answered

I was using permanent marker to mark the fold lines for my front panel on my cnc machine. It comes off easily with methylated spirits on an earbud, but not after heat has been applied during the folding process. I've tried acetone, 2K thinners, spirits, rubbing alcohol and even PlastiX (used for renewing the yellowing on old headlight lenses) with no success. The irking factor is high and needless to say black duct tape on the back just wont do it for me. Any other ideas?

Question by petercd    |  last reply


Why would I need to know the 'extrusion direction' of Lexan?

I bought a small square of Lexan (sheet polycarbonate) to experiment with and noticed on the clear, protective laminate the words: "extrusion direction" and an arrow. I will most likely use this sheet for thermo -forming, but would like to hear any thoughts on how the extrusion direction might affect drilling, cutting, etc. Thanks, Marshall

Question by redplanetcorridor    |  last reply


How do I separate the laminate layers in an old bullet resistant window? There is no glass layer,

It is all plastics. I want to harvest the two inner 1/2 inch layers of Lexan for projects. The two outer layers appear to be 3/16ths UV resistant plexi. The center membrane is killing me. I have tried mild heat and brute strength.

Question by JimFlo    |  last reply


How to polish/buff polycarbonate (lexan) on roughly cut edge? Answered

I'm not talking about minor scratches. I would like to polish 1/2" thick cube that I cut out with table saw, it's not transparent at all on the edges (due to rough cut), but I'd like it to be :)  Can I do it with some kind of Dremel attachment?

Question by bratan    |  last reply


How do I clean the Poly Carbonate Holes? Answered

We have our car shed roof made from double walled polycarbonate sheets, the problem is that the fabricator at the time of fixing it to the frame forgot to put tape on the holes to avoid dirt getting in. and that time I didn't knew about it, but recently I read this and the dirt has seeped in the holes which are about 7mm square in area. I googled it with various queries but to no avail, Now please help me by giving me some direction and steps to clean it. The dirt is fine sand and some mud which seeped in with rain.  I do not want to cut replace or open the sheets just clean them. it has seeped in upto 1.5 feet (roughly half a meter). See the following images, the dirt is just dark areas the rest is just on surface.

Question by MYawar    |  last reply


Acrylic Resin / Polycarbonate Resin: Where can i buy?

I'm trying to find a place where i can buy Acrylic or Polycarbonate Resin to Cast. I'm trying to desgin and build ny own tables, desk, shelfs, and other small projects. 1) Where can i buy the Resin note: i did my research, Tap Plastics and other companys only ofer epoxy or polyester resins for casting 2) i decided acrylic and polycarbonate over other plastics. i would like your opinons 3) What are different types of acrylic and what do i need to watch out for, Im taking a Materials Manufacturing and Processes Class ant my college. Im learning about the chemistry of plastics and find it interesting Im trying to cast on a home level but trying to expand into a small business so comerical and home production tips would be nice But first thing first. I need "Real" Acrylic or Polycarbonate Resin.  Great Quality, it needs to be strong Casting Acrylic/Polyester Resin

Question by jschirm24    |  last reply


Where can I recover transparant plastic plates like polycarbonate from?

I want to make a condo for rats out of an old closet. But because it is quite dark in the closet (even with the door removed), I want to replace the wooden side panels with something transparant like plexiglas or polycarbonate. But as a student I do not have much money so I want to keep is as cheap as possible. It has to be strong enough to support some shelves. I know I can always take away as much wood as I can from the sides and then cover it with al metal gauze but I find the idea with the transparant plastic more beautiful.

Question by ThinkFirst    |  last reply


When using an arduino what are "shields"? like ethernet shields or ones like the one in this link? Answered

Https://www.instructables.com/id/Clear-polycarbonate-enclosures/step10/Enjoy/

Question by Tomahawk92    |  last reply


Solar cells and the environment

Question about solar cells. Since solar panels are encased in glass or polycarbonate, does exposure to the elements degrade solar cells? And if so, in what fashion? Corrosion of the traces? water infiltration? etc. etc? Or is it a matter of the fragility of the cells?

Topic by Tool Using Animal    |  last reply


How to remove the metal in a CD or a DVD in a simple and ecofriendly way? I want to use the clear plastic.

I would like to upcycle the clear plastic  (polycarbonate) in CDs and DVDs to Make all sort of things like smartphone supports, boxes, structres, and so on. I have already bent, cut, polish the plastic by I haven't found a satisfactory way to remove the metalic layer. Thaks to you all. 

Question by gserrano701    |  last reply


What is the best way to waterproof a hole in a plastic box?

Hi, Picture is showing a small polycarbonate box with a 10 mm hole in the top surface. I need to find a way to cover this hole with a waterproof and elastic patch. It needs to hold tight for a minimum of 3 years of daily use in sun and water. I was thinking of covering the hole with a small rubber repair patch for bicycles. Not the self-adhesive types but with proper glue. Will this work or are there better alternatives? Thanks!

Question by karolina81    |  last reply


Is corrugated plastic (the type commonly used for signs) a good covering for a greenhouse?

I'm in the planning phase of a greenhouse next spring and I'm wondering if the corrugated plastic that you usually see election signs made of would be good for a greenhouse covering. Has anybody tried this? If so, could you post your results? Here's some information I've come up with already: 1) Corrugated plastic is relatively cheap as dirt compared to glass and corrugated polycarbonate panels marketed under "Palruf" and "Suntuf". 2) There is a greenhouse covering marketed as "Solexx" that appears to be nothing more than corrugated plastic and is claimed to be superior to glass and polycarbonate panels. It's also very very expensive. 3) Solexx panels are claimed to diffuse the light coming into the greenhouse. This is supposed to be better for the plants than direct light from glass or polycarbonate. Below is an excerpt from the Solexx website: "How does light diffusion affect plant growth? Plants create food from light so the type of light they receive is important. Plants exposed to direct light (no diffusion) produce a majority of their food from the top leaves facing the sun. The select leaves absorbing the sun energy do most of the work while the shaded leaves do very little. Direct light also creates excessive heat which causes plant stress. When a plant is immersed in diffused light, all the leaves can photosynthesize resulting in more food production and healthier, fuller plant development. In addition, the upper leaves of the plant receive less intense light which means they will not suffer from plant stress caused by sun burn and excessive transpiration. " Again ,if anyone has tried using corrugated plastic as a covering for a greenhouse could you please share your results? If anyone has their own comment or prediction please share it. If not, I plan on conducting an experiment to test the performance of different greenhouse materials on plant growth. I may have to use artificial light instead of sunlight however, since the growing season here is coming to an end.

Question by EcoMotive    |  last reply


information about acrylic...

This is an excellent site, but sometimes I just want to do the simplest or thing. For example, I want to build my own acrylic display case for a model I am making. What I'd like to know: 1. where can i get acrylic/polycarbonate 2. what kind of tool are used to cut them 3. what kind of tool/glue are used to connect them basic information about common DIY materials like that. While I'd appreciate any help in replys, perhaps there should be a section (wiki-like perhaps?) dedicated to that for beginners like myself?

Topic by mathfeel    |  last reply


Verticle Axis Wind Turbine Materials?

I've been working on a vertical axis wind turbine that uses uses 3 identical helical blades positioned around a central vertical axis. For small working models I've been using 16 gauge wire and cardstock. I'm looking to build one with 6-8 foot blades. The trouble is finding an ideal material for this. It needs to be lightweight, cheap, flexible, "malleable" (it needs to be able to be bent into a helix but then retain the shape), and come in a 4'x8' sheet. PVC/CPVC is super expensive, as is polycarbonate, and aluminum. Any suggestions? 

Topic by FLskater3696    |  last reply


Can someone help me with plastics? Answered

I'm making a project and I dont know what plastic I should use. I need it to be painted, kinda pretty, and durable. It will not be out in the sun. It will only take its own weight. The measurements are 24'' x 18'' + 24'' x 18'' ( there are two pieces) .There will be hinges screwed to the plastic to hold together the 2 pieces. It also needs to be in sheets (there is no problem getting this, I just wanted to let you know). What choice would you choose? These are some of the plastics they sell in my local plastic shop (I would like to use one of these): -Acrylic -Polycarbonate -Polyethylene -Polypropylene -Nylon -Delrin -Teflon -PVC -ABS

Question by Dr. Pepper    |  last reply


Terrace Cooling System - Ideas

Hi, my name is Michael and I'm from Austria. Nowadays we have about 38°C (100°F). We have a Terrace which has a area of 33m² (355.21ft²). This terrace has a roof, which consists of polycarbonate plates. We have the problem that it is very hot on our terrace although we use awnings. Now I've discovered some ideas how i could cool down our terrace. The first one could be a water cycle, with a container and a pump. Then the pump could pump up the water. The water flows down the roof and flows back into the container. I don't know if this is a efficient way to cool down our terrace? The 2nd possibility I discovered is water mist. I found this video to show the principle: http://youtu.be/bYTcMCm2zWg I don't know if it is possible to sit underneath the water mist without getting wet?? I just want some Ideas and oppinions. Maybe some of you have realized their own cooling system? I know how to program an Arduino and other microcontrollers and I am able to develop electronic circuits. So I think i have the basic knowledge for building such a system, but I can't decide which principle i should use? I am sorry for my bad english skills, but i hope that you can understand me.  Thanks in advance Mike

Topic by MiKe1753    |  last reply


Need someone who can laser-cut/machine a number of parts based on my design...

Hello all! I need some custom-designed parts for a project I am doing and I don't (yet) have the machinery and means to make them. I could go to any number of online places for custom parts, but I ask here first because I am trying to both support and rely on the community spirit of the site, and because the members here are more sensitive to some of the weird stuff people around here make and therefore are not simply suggesting materials based on "industry standard" uses. Additionally, I thought I would probably get a better deal without the "limited production run" price hike that machine shops usually charge. To add to that, I don't need new and shiny materials. As long as it works, I don't mind using what comes off of other people's scrap piles. I don't have the designs laid out yet, but I'm thinking I will probably have a need for cutout polycarbonate or aluminum about 3/16 to 1/4 inch thick (4.7-6.3mm), I'm not sure of the material yet. Basically, it would involve drilling one or more holes at each end of a short strip of that. Dead simple, and a pain that I can't do it, but like I said, I don't have the tools. For now, that's all I can think I need. If you're interested, send me a message and we can talk about details and compensation. I look forward to helping the Instructables community be as self-sufficient as possible! Thanks, Gareth

Topic by victus_maestro    |  last reply


building winter greenhouse.... need ideas

Hi there,I live in Boston, MA and I am looking for some advice on Greenhouse construction for winter gardening only (and vegetables that are appropriate for that as well). I am looking to build a greenhouse that I can put up in the fall and take down in the spring for growing a winter garden. It will have to be able to be taken apart into its components and stored in a shed in summer months since my family has no need for it then. Due to the fact that it will be used in the winter, it will have to be highly insulated and have a heat sink that will be able to help maintain a constant growing temperature for the plants inside. Ideally I would like to avoid expending much energy heating the greenhouse. I am, of course, also doing this on a budget. Here is what I have come up with so far. 1. I will use triple-wall or 5 wall polycarbonate panels for the walls of the greenhouse2. I have found a few insulating products that look like they could be useful3. I am thinking of using a solar collector water heater as part of the heat sink- easy to construct on my own : https://www.instructables.com/id/Solar-Thermal-Water-Heater-For-Less-Than-Five-Doll/ that could circulate hot water into the heat sink4. I am learning about heat sinks and thinking that I want to use the simplest design and organic materials (mud, rocks, or water) to hold the heat during the day and release it at night.5. The greenhouse footprint can’t be larger than 8’ x 10’ 6. I prefer the simplest construction that meets my needs (and the easiest to put up and take down)Questions that I have:1. What are the possibilities for using compost as a source of heat?2. What about a PVC frame?3. How would I circulate hot water through the heat sink?4. What are methods to reduce daily management of the project?5. Types of hinges to use?6. What type of material should I place the greenhouse on?- it will be sited on the concrete area around our swimming pool and I don’t know what sort of insulation is necessary after that. I had the idea of wood pallets with insulation inside them but that may not be enough at all.7. Any ideas of ways to re-use materials to do this cheaply and reduce waste?8. Any suggestions on the optimal shape of the greenhouse roof/sides to increase heat retention and circulation of warmer air.9. Any suggestions of retailers that might have the materials that I am looking for.Some links that have been useful so far:http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/solar-gh.html#storagehttp://growerssupply.com/farm/supplies/cat1;gs1_greenhouse_building_materials;gs1_corrugated_sheets_panels.html

Topic by ocea46    |  last reply


need ideas on greenhouse

Hi there,I live in Boston, MA and I am looking for some advice on Greenhouse construction for winter gardening only (and vegetables that are appropriate for that as well). I am looking to build a greenhouse that I can put up in the fall and take down in the spring for growing a winter garden. It will have to be able to be taken apart into its components and stored in a shed in summer months since my family has no need for it then. Due to the fact that it will be used in the winter, it will have to be highly insulated and have a heat sink that will be able to help maintain a constant growing temperature for the plants inside. Ideally I would like to avoid expending much energy heating the greenhouse. I am, of course, also doing this on a budget. Here is what I have come up with so far. 1. I will use triple-wall or 5 wall polycarbonate panels for the walls of the greenhouse2. I have found a few insulating products that look like they could be useful3. I am thinking of using a solar collector water heater as part of the heat sink- easy to construct on my own : https://www.instructables.com/id/Solar-Thermal-Water-Heater-For-Less-Than-Five-Doll/ that could circulate hot water into the heat sink4. I am learning about heat sinks and thinking that I want to use the simplest design and organic materials (mud, rocks, or water) to hold the heat during the day and release it at night.5. The greenhouse footprint can’t be larger than 8’ x 10’ 6. I prefer the simplest construction that meets my needs (and the easiest to put up and take down)Questions that I have:1. What are the possibilities for using compost as a source of heat?2. What about a PVC frame?3. How would I circulate hot water through the heat sink?4. What are methods to reduce daily management of the project?5. Types of hinges to use?6. What type of material should I place the greenhouse on?- it will be sited on the concrete area around our swimming pool and I don’t know what sort of insulation is necessary after that. I had the idea of wood pallets with insulation inside them but that may not be enough at all.7. Any ideas of ways to re-use materials to do this cheaply and reduce waste?8. Any suggestions on the optimal shape of the greenhouse roof/sides to increase heat retention and circulation of warmer air.9. Any suggestions of retailers that might have the materials that I am looking for.Some links that have been useful so far:http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/solar-gh.html#storagehttp://growerssupply.com/farm/supplies/cat1;gs1_greenhouse_building_materials;gs1_corrugated_sheets_panels.html

Topic by ocea46    |  last reply


Motorized Monitor Lift idea - could I use a 775 motor (or 2) to power a lead screw lift?

Okay so I have a couple of extra 775 motors laying around (12V-36V, roughly 8A and 10K rpm). Also some cheap lead screws and some fittings, and I'm wondering if I can use them for sort of a crazy idea I'm formulating (which I'll explain more later if you're curious). I'm not sure if I've ever seen a lead screw actuator with BLDC motors, which makes sense because lead screws are for precision and that's what steppers are for. But I don't really need precision at all. I'm not sure which kind of motors they use in the actuators that are pre-built for things like this, they're usually hidden inside a housing. I've seen the DIY Perks build on YT where he used a 775 motor and a pulley system, and I realize pulleys are probably easier/better for a higher RPM motor. But I'm under the impression that BLDCs have more torque at lower speeds, and I want the whole lift assembly to be more compact than his if possible. Could my idea work if I was using a PWM controller to set the speed and some limit switches to shut it off? The load per monitor is about 10-15lb (5-7kg) and I have 8mm T8 lead screws. I basically have two of everything so if I figure out a lift that works well, I'd like to do a double monitor lift. Is this viable or no? Would it need reduction gears or something and just be too complicated? I'm about to mock something together and test it, but wanted to ask around first. I'm willing to scrap the lead screw idea if there's a better way. My crazy idea if anybody's interested: I want to build the most over-complicated electronics station/desk PC ever. (If you haven't heard of a desk PC, it's exactly what it sounds like - a PC inside a desk.) I'm thinking the PC portion will remain static, but it will have the hidden double monitor lift, an adjustable height KB + M surface, and an extra ATX PSU inside the desk. With a remotely wired access panel for all of the switches, some binding posts, volt/ammeter displays, etc. A very literal take on the "benchtop power supply." Oh and also maybe a hidden wireless charging surface somewhere in there too. I realize it will take wayyyyy more work than it's worth, but it would sorta be the culmination of several different skills I've been learning... but I'm still trying to learn some of them. There are two ways I can go about it. 1) If the lead screws work, I have more or less everything I need to build a version of it. But it would be a janky, bulky, heavy version with a lot of wood (I get tired of seeing wood, I like a more industrial look). 2) My dream come true would be to build the whole frame with 8020 aluminum, then use polycarbonate or something for the top. More expensive for sure, but it would be much more rigid and compact. I built my sim racing rig with 8020 a couple years ago. Love that stuff. And you can get it for close to 50% off from their ebay store.

Question by formVfunction  


Aircon or fridge compressor to solar?

Sometimes I get weird ideas that I can't shake off :)When I was looking into options for a 12 compressor fridge freezer combo I was stunned.You a get a fullsized frrezer for far less!A further check revealed that it is mainly the linear compressor that makes the price plus the usual mark ups.Efficiency and especially start up is far better with thes compressors than out standard rotary and piston drive models.But why would it be so impossible to replace the motor from a standard compressor with a brushless DC one?I focussed on three things for the start:Lubrication, cooling and sealing.There is no such thing like a simple compressor with a piston system that does have some leaking.So apart from the noise the enclosure really needs to be welded and sealed again.Everything moving inside is lubricated by the drive shaft - it acts like a little pump.Same for the cooling of these vital parts.The oil flow exchanges heat through the big metal housing.A replacement motor would need to be suited to run in such a messy enviroment.Of course something to provide a proper oil flow needs to be created too if the drive shaft is replaced.With some basic enineering this might be possible, same for the motor mount and wiring to the outside.But what to do about the full load starting conditions that can happen?Even with no load from the cooling system the motor needs massive torque to get the piston moving.A bypass valve that closes once the motor is at proper speeds might work but hard to implement in a tight space.Any ideas?Did you ever try something that stupid?Could you make it work?What about a rotary compressor with external drive?We use ice blenders that have a magnetic base and the actual connection is made through the magnetic forces alone.A scroll compressor has lots of space without the original motor inside.Plus, a round pipe is easier to work with when it comes to adding or removing things.Small scroll compressors from an airconditioner or small industrial freezer wouldn't have to do much work in a small setup.Best thing is that with a variable speed the cooling power can be adjusted.How feasable would it be to use some polycarbonate end plate and a magnetically coupled drive ?Modern BLDC motors offer great performance and suitable gear systems are readily available.N52 neodymium magnets of the block type provide several kg of force if close enough to each other - should be enough to make a compressor spin...In return it could mean to have a nice freezer or even airconditioner that runs directly on solar power.No massive losses from inverters, no need for huge battery banks either.As long as the sun is out you have free power, once down you can still switch to a power supply for the motor or use battery power.Just imagine you come home after long day of work and the house is already cool.And you did not have to pay a cent to get it cool or wait for hours for it to reach this temperature!We love to add solar panels to our houses in the hope to get a few cents back from our energy providers.The sad reality often is that you might be able to power all your needs during the day but the excess that goes back to the grid often pays next to nothing.But if you could power a lot more things like a compressor directly with the electricity from your panels....Then these kWh would not appear on your usage bill either.Means you neither use what the power provider compensates you for nor is it "wasted" thorugh this bogus compensation.The normal solar setup can then provide you with this little extra money while an additional set powers the motors for your big freezer or little airconditioner - little being relative to what you make of the idea ;)If you really dare than you could even use your bike and legs to power your fridge directly ;)Use your imagination :)

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


XYZ Recumbent Trike

So I've been wanting a recumbent bike to help me get in shape. I'm far enough out of shape that a standard bike is uncomfortable to the point of being a deterent. The biggest obstacle to me is the price. Even the Terra Trike which is supposed to be an affordable, entry level option is almost a grand even bare bones. I tried looking on craigslist but even used ones rarely dip below 800. So I looked for something I could diy. My biggest obstacle on that front is I don't own, or know how to use a welder. I think I've found something promising though.  There is a group in The Netherlands called N55. They are sort of a engineering/art collective and they focus on things to improve modern life. One of the projects they have out there is their XYZ Vehicles. They are pedal powered vehicles designed so that they can be put together with a minimum of tools. All that really should be needed is a power drill, some wrenches and a metal saw. From what I understand, they do classes where they build the 2 upright versions, the bakfiet and the tadpole design with the cargo box, but these are all over in europe and I am in Arizona so... I haven't been able to find anyone as of yet who has made one of the recumbents here in the states and posted about it. I would love to do this and post it as an instructable but I need some help. All of the materials list is metric and while I personally think a base-10 system makes a heck of a lot more sense that what we call standard measurements, I'm still not familiar with metric. So my question to the community is, should I convert all the measurements to standard or is there someplace i can buy these materials from here in the states in metric sizes? B I L L O F M A T E R I A L S : B O L T S & N U T S M6 SELFLOCKING NUTS, stainless (DIN985) - ca. 150 pieces (TWOSEATER: 200 pieces) M8 SELFLOCKING NUTS, stainless (DIN985) - ca. 5 pieces (TWOSEATER: identical) M8 NUTS NORMAL, stainless - ca. 5 pieces (TWOSEATER: identical) M6 and M8 BOLTS with Hexagon head, stainless, (DIN931): 6mm x 140 mm - ca. 2 pieces (TWOSEATER: 3 pieces) 6mm x 90 mm - ca. 15 pieces (TWOSEATER: 20 pieces) 6mm x 90 mm - ca. 5 pieces in DIN 933 (full thread) (TWOSEATER: identical) 6mm x 60 mm - ca. 60 pieces (TWOSEATER: 120 pieces) 6mm x 65 mm - ca. 10 pieces (TWOSEATER: identical) 6mm x 40 mm - ca. 25 pieces (TWOSEATER: identical) 8mm x 120mm, 2 pieces (TWOSEATER: identical) 8mm x 100mm, 2 pieces (TWOSEATER: identical) M6 WASHERS - ca. 300 pieces (TWOSEATER: 400 pieces) M8 WASHERS - ca. 10 pieces (TWOSEATER: identical) A L U M I N U M 2x25x25mm ALUMINIUM SQUARE TUBE: 15m (TWOSEATER: 34m) 3x30x30mm ALUMINIUM SQUARE TUBE: 1m (TWOSEATER: 2.5m) 4x60mm ALUMINIUM FLAT: 1m (TWOSEATER: identical) 2x22mm ALUMINUM ROUND TUBE Ø 22mm: 1m P L A S T I C S 3x880x340mm POLYCARBONATE SHEET (TWOSEATER: 2 times) ENDCAPS (PE), black, for 2x25x25 tubing: ca. 70 pieces (TWOSEATER: 100 pieces) ENDCAPS (PE), black, for 3x30x30 tubing: ca. 10 pieces (TWOSEATER: 15 pieces) POM or PE black, round Ø 25mm: ca. 0,3m (TWOSEATER: 0,5m) POM or PE black, square 21x21mm: ca. 0,6m (TWOSEATER: 0,5m) POM or PE WASHERS M8: ca. 20 pieces (TWOSEATER: identical) M I S C E L L A N E O U S AXIAL NEEDLE BEARINGS M8: 4 pieces (TWOSEATER: identical) NYLON SPHERE w. screwthread, black, diameter 50mm: 2 pieces (TWOSEATER: identical) NYLON RIBBON, black, width 25mm, for seat side support: 1,7m (TWOSEATER: 3,5m)

Topic by dark8587    |  last reply


Summer, sun and what to do with faded plastics

A lot of us have machine, bikes or such with plastic parts.And if you are in a country where a UV rating of 10 is a nice spring day already plastics seem to fade away and fail quicker.Over the years I experimented with a lot of things to either prevent this or to fix it.If you ever had your old farm basher parked next to the same but sun protect model you almost start crying LOLColors look like you painted a white haze over it, white plastics turn yelloish and clear plastic, like on the head lamps of your car go dull and yellow.You might know what I mean if have really nice and long summers...So what is the reason for this problem that only seems to affect things in hot and sunny countries?A lot of plastics are actually fully UV resistant and they won't be harmed or changed.Great but they still suffer! ?Not really, it is the softeners, fillers and pigments that suffer most.In the case of clear plastics it is usually polycarbonate mixes and the culprit is the scratch resistant coating applied on it.The hard UV rays promote the oxidisation and break down.So whatever is not resistant to UV will suffer in and mostly on the outside of the plastic.Problem is that UV penetrates quite deep and as a result we often find that UV protecting agents are added.Sometimes as a coating, sometimes as a mix throughout.Older cars often show peeling paint onthe roof or boot lid - the UV protecting in the coating has failed or was just bad.Back in the old days there was whiteners in washing powder, we had white sheets for the beds and other things and leaving them in the sun to dry actually made them whiter and kept them looking fresh - a positive use for UV bleeching ;)In terms of real prevention options are almsot fully limited to keeping the xposure as low and short as possible.There is no clear coating you can apply to keep the UV out that won't affect the looks of the paint job or plastic.And not all of these coating work on all plastics.One option though is to keep the plastic clean and shiny.A highly reflective surface will not scatter the sunlight as much throughout the plastic.Oxidisation is limited as well, especially if you add some polish every now and then.In a lot of cases though this is either no option or way too time consuming for us to keep it up.As a result we start to neglect the routing here and there andover they years the plastic ages faster than what it should.How to fix or restored faded plastic without paying an arm and a leg for specialised products?White is always nice and if you have a washing machine or fridge close enough to a window you might have noticed over the years that the plastic parts now appear a bit darker or slightly yellow, often just on one side of the thing...Old electronics, like Gameboys are doing this too.Red is my other favourite as like black it produces a white haze easy.Either way the solution is pretty much the same: reduce the oxidisation by oxidising it more ;)Whatever is really oxidised in a bad way changed the color instead of just breaking dow the pigments.UV does this...On the other hand hydrogen peroxide bleeches and breaks down stains....As long as parts are small enough it is quite easy to put them in a zip lock bag to submerge them for a few hours or over night in hydrogen peroxide.Otherwise use a suitable container and keep turning and moving the parts around every hour or so until all looks even again.In severe cases and if the plastic permits it you can also add a small amount of diluted hydrochloric acid.Talking diluted! So that means of a low concentration!In most cases though a day or two with just hydrogen peroxide will suffice.Do a little test first though as some plastics might just be caoted and either show no reaction at all or the coating has pigment that break down in the peroxide - I never had this happen to me but I have read reports of it and seen the pics of the results.When it comes to really big parts, like the spoiler on your car or plastic covers on your bike and boat it can be impossible to submerge them even partially.In most cases people try to fix these by polishing them until the faded areas are litterally removed.A much nicer and easier way to cheat is to use a simple car polish that is suitable for plastic parts.Means it should have no warning on it to keep away for plastic parts ;)Wearing proper gloves you can add some hydrogen peroxide to a small amount of the polish.And I mean polish, not the stuff to fix a dull or bad paint - what you would use on a new car...The trick is that the polishing cleans the surface while the peroxide works on the staining and fading.You just don't let the stuff dry after applying it and polish the dry stufff of, you keep going wet until your color comes back ;)After that give it a final polish the normal way with just the polishing compound and no peroxide.Clear plastic...If it is just yor headlamps or other smaller parts for a once off it might make sense to go to a auto shop and buy a head lamp polishing kit.Thing with clear plastics is that only too often they come in shapes or installations that make a full access impossible.Like your head lamps that you can only reach from the front as they are glued into the assembly.Another problem is that they are aslo almost always coated with some protective stuff.If hydrogen peroxide alone does not help here then polishing will always remove some of this coating or even all of it.If the coating happens to be the culprit of the fading and yellowing then you of course get it all nice and shiny by just polishing the coating off - but you also loose all benefits of the coating.Some car models have headlamps where just the coating discolors and once removed the plastic start to crack under the exposure from UV and through all the tiny damages it get when driving around.For things like clear covers over a little display there is the problem as access as you might not be able to remove the window pane, a replacement might be the best option.Hey! Why all the fuzz? I use just oil and it works perfectly!!You can find online videos and full tutorials where people show you that just a bit of some oil and polishing it off with a lint free cloth brings all you faded colors back out again.Don't be fooled just because it works so great!Take a frosted piece of glass and put some oil on it and it becomes clear enough to see through again.Even works with very thin paper...What the oil really deos is to coat all these microscopic imperfections.And with the light now having a very easy way to get through it won't scatter anymore and the fading appears to be gone.Once the oil is gone the plastic looks as bad as before, hence the need to use an oil that dries off.Worst thing is that these oil affect the softeners in the plastic.In some cases this might be benefitial in most it is really bad though.Like any other solvent the oil mixes with these softeners and over time they are removed from the plastic, the more you use oil to keep it shine the more brittle you plastic might get.Once you did that it is next to impossible to remove the oil from within the damaged plastic and only way out i to polish it off after sanding it.The benefit of seemingly protecting the plastic from dirt and water is short lived as well.Some old oil you got on it would just wipe off but with the added oil in the plastic it can now penetrate.And that little black dot becomes hard to get rid of...Last words of wisdom:Check the type of plastic before you decide on anything!Especially when it comes to the black plastic with fibre re-inforcements.Do a tiny spot test in an area that is not so important before going full scale!Trust me, nothing is worse than only realising too late you selecting of choice is actually removing the pigments from the plastic - hint: if your cloth tunrs into the same color as your plastic then something is wrong.Use PPE! Gloves and face shield or at least goggle are a must have when working with hydrogen peroxide or acids.Even at just 3% the peroxide will bleech your skin quickly and long exposure won't be better either.Once you got a drop of peroxide in your eye you will never forget the googles, so just wear them right away please ;)If the fading is due to the breakdown of pigments that give the color like a white haze on red or blue plastic you might still have to polish off that thinnest layer on the surface to remove the fully bleached out layer.This however is really quickly done and after that the smooth surface will last much longer.Work clean!! It is of no use to start before you actually fully cleaned the plastic!

Topic by Downunder35m  


Tempered glass screen protectors - understand and beware!

I recently had the joy of needing a new screen protector for my mobile after being dumb enough to drop it on gravel. The hard cover took all the impact but the film protector on the screen was scratched badly. Was old and partially worn anyway so I decided to upgrade to a Tempered Glass screen protector. Being somewhere rural I had no chance to get one in a shop so I ordered online. With no intention of advertising for some sellers, I collected a few links so you can check what I am talking about: Item1 Item2 Item3 Item4 Item5 Item6 So, what is my concern with these? They all can be found on amazon and other online services as well as on local markets... As I said I ordered a glass screen protector. If you check these listings and even some of the packing you will notice they all have a thing in common - being shatter proof and of 9H hardness. I also love this video showing how to remove and fix a glass screen protector! The last time I checked glass had one very distinct feature: It is hard and before it really bends it breaks - unless you use fibre optics of fibre glass cloth... What is my concern and warning here? Pretty simple: Stay away from expensive scams! Some claim their screen protector is only 0.25mm thick, even the 0.2mm one I measured was over 0.5mm with the glue... The hardness of 9H refers to the so called Moh's hardness - look it up on Wikipedia if you like. That means these tempered glass protectors would have a similr hardness than a diamond, or at least close to it. Problem is that they are made from plastic to start with and not glass at all. They claims that the screen protector is flexible because it is so thin - again a fake! Even the thinnest tempered glass will shatter if you bend it enough, not so these plastic ones. If you think I am making all this up try to use a really sharp knife or deburring tool and cut the thin sides of one of these protectors. All the ones I tested could be cut quite easy - and I though glass can't be cut with a kinfe... A nice website showing that the scratch resistance is far from the claims can be found here. And a video showing how a real glass screen protector sounds and breaks can be found here. So is it really all bad and should I avoid getting one? Not really if it is only for the added protection. To be clear here, and without the intention to blame any of the above sellers, some protectors actually do have a top layer made from glass and you can hear it as in the above video - it sound solid and not like plastic if you tap it with something hard. Another factor is the simple fact that plastic absorbs impact much better than glass. So where a real glass screen protector might shatter and crack like in the above video, the fake ones might one get a nasty dint or scratch. But you should be aware and clear about what you get and what to expect from it. These glass imitations are made from a strong polycarbonate plastic, similar to the stuff used for bullet and explosion proof "glas" windows - if you every watched the Mythbusters you have seen the big sheets I mean. The top layer of these things is specially treated to repell water, oil and dirt, it also gives the surface the good scratch resistance. The technique is nothing new, camera lenses, plastic sheets and the clear covers you see over the timetable at your bus stop all use it. The new thing is to intentionally mislable a product to make the consumer think it is glass ;) What is the real difference for the user? Check this video. Here a guy performs a drop test with a real glass screen protector. Thing is once the protector breaks the screen itself is broken too but until then it was not too bad. Here it is demonstrated how a real glass screen protector reacts to certain types of abuse - one of the reason I decided on glass. Compared to the plastic counterfeits just the sound on the glass is worth it, but I think the hacksaw was best. Another video from XDA gives a bit more info on how the glass is made - if you can't seeing a phone being abused then don't watch the drop tests at the end ;) Glass with these hardness levels and types of surface protection will give the user a long and worry free use of the phone. The plastic fakes will perform at a similar level for some time but will show signs of wear long before even the top coat of the glass one fails. Both types have their uses and if the fakes would be labeled correctly the user would actually benefit from that. On bigger screens like a tablet I would actually prefer the plastic ones to prevent damage once it needs replacing. On a mobile used in less than perfect conditions I would also go for plastic as it usually is a bit thinner and will fit better within quality hard covers. But when it comes to real abuse like using with dirty fingers most of the time or mostly outdoors where a lot of dust and fine sand can be involved I always go for glass. If you paid attention to the surface treatment then you already realised that the plastic and the glass are in the same region, making them quite scratch resistant. Still fine sand or metal dust will scratch it.... The difference is in the hardness of the actual material that was covered with the oleophobic film. Glass will not give in any way, where plastic is much softer - so not to be confused with the surface hardness! This mean that sharp and point object will easier penetrate the plastic than the glass, something to be considered if you often ecounter harsh use. In terms of actual protection we need to differenciate between surface quality and actual screen damage. After all when badly scratched we can replace the protector but if the display got damaged we are back to square one. The surface hardness was already covered so let's move on to the screen itself. In some of the above videos you can see the abuse a screen might see in normal conditions, and if we would not drop our phones so often repair shops would not be at every corner LOL I have done quite a few screen repairs, mostly for friends and work mates that did not want to pay the hefty extras in a repair shop. From there I got the stories on how it happened and in almost all cases the screen cracked when the phone landed on the corners. In one case the screen and glass protector failed, including the actual display when the phone was dropped out of a 4WD and landed screen first onto a rock. A glass protector will spread the (direct onto the face) impact force onto a much larger area, where a plastic one will produce a dint onto the actual screen much sooner. So again glass wins in terms of actually protecting your expensive screen. But be aware that all this is useless if the phone lands on the corners!! Let me explain: Both the top glass on your screen and the screen protector have a thin layer of "glue". This acts like a shock absorber, so unless an impact goes deep enough so the pressure on the actual screen is too much only the protector should fail. But the screen itself is a tight fit into the frame of the phone, so all side and corner impacts go directly into the glass. As the rest of the glass has no way to give or go the stresses will crack the screen. How should I treat my phone with the new screen protector? Exactly the same way you would without it of course. But if you don't have a proper cover that offers protection of the corners you should invest in one. Having a quality protector and a good case does not mean your phone can be used as a football, see it as an added insurance in case something does go wrong. For obvious reason it can also pay off to have a spare at hand, if something bad happens that requires replacement of the protector you won't be left with an unprotected screen ;) Last but not least, double it up: For people that already know their screen will see a fair bit of abuse in term of scratches it is a good idea to put an extra film protector onto the glass one. Once it is too scratched you peel it off and replace it, while the glass protector gives you the actual protection for your screen. Corning Willow glass As time of wrinting Corning Willow glass is the only "flexible" glass on the market, unless stated with your flexible screen protector you can assume it will be just plastic. I did not list it above as this high tech material is mainly reserved for displays and at least to my knowledge is not available for screen protectors, although I will stand corrected as I have to assume some big players use it for their protectors. The material is actually a sandwich where an ultra thin sheet of glass stis bewteen two layers of durable coating, read it up on their website it is quite interesting. It won't reach the strength of their famous Gorilla glass so without an outer plastic that has the additional oleophobic coating it won't provide the strenght of real tempered glass protectors. Some phones like the Galaxy Round and the fleixble HTC phones use it for example.

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply