3D printed shoes

3D printers are pretty awesome tools for prototyping objects. Now some people are also using hem to make shoes. People who like going clubbing with yellow skinpaint, apparently. Goofy shot aside, it's an interesting use since you can customize the shoe for your foot perfectly, but the look of something that's 3D printed will likely get old quickly. Link

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


Is it possible to make a shoe printer out of an old desktop printer?

Hi everyone, I am just a marine engineering student and I always used to visit this page before and I really learned a lot from this page I really love it. It sound wierd but I got 999 "what if's" In my mind and one of them is what if I could make my own device that could paint my sneakers In any design I want? So now I'm planning to make a shoe printer out of my old desktop printer, Is it possible? The motors and some parts might be helpful and those are needed some time and a little bit of coding. And I want it to work like a cnc plotter. But the hardest part for me is the "Inking part" A.) "How does a printer manipulate colors?" . Let's say I want to print an apple with a white background on my shoe , how does a printer selects/mix a color for each coordination they paint? ( base, outline, background and etc. ) I mean, how do they do that? what device does this part for the printer? So that I could add it on the list. B.) "What process should I use? " . Is it heating? Should I use lazer? Or should I use a tiny nozzle? Or a multiple of nozzles? Or is it piezo electric pulses? What piece should it be? that would perfectly Suitable for printing on a sneakers? (Canvas) Additional question : (if ever) what type of ink should I use ? Any answer or suggestions would be so much appreciated

Topic by glennmarksovan   |  last reply


Flying RC Starship Enterprise, USB Dead Drops, 3D Chocolate Printer

Flying RC Starship Enterprise USB Dead Drops 3D Chocolate Printer Papercraft Mech Warrior Easy Pumpkin Pie 4-In-1 Hat Glove Scarf Mittens Convert Laced Shoes to Slip-Ons Vegetarian Turkey Illusionist Heart Locket Built-In Bookcase Butternut Squash Soup Umbrella Sound Dome Glazed Doughnuts RAM Memory From Scratch Radial Arm Saw Tips Instructables.com - 82 2nd St. - San Francisco, CA

Topic by randofo 


USB Typewriter, Vacuum Former, Steampunk Mr. Potato Head

USB Typewriter Vacuum Former Steampunk Mr. Potato Head Pipe Lamp LED Table Cards Best Ever Cookie Recipe Easy Lumber Bed Frame Orange and Coffee Liqueur Toe Socks for Toe Shoes Watermelon Deseeding Tricks Motorized Longboard Brickoven-Style Pizza At Home Underwater Video Housing Wooden Rubik's Cube Lego 3D printer

Topic by randofo 


I Went to White House Maker Faire!

Hello everyone! Last week, I had to opportunity to go to the first ever White House Maker Faire!  It was an awesome experience overall, and I'm really happy I was able to be invited and attend.  A couple common themes were 3D Printing, and start-up companies.  It's safe to say that of the exhibit tables there, 30% or so had a 3D printer sitting on it.  There were quite a few start-up companies there as well, showing off everything from shoe/walking power generation to desktop milling machines.  The larger companies seemed to be represented by sending guests, as opposed to exhibiting at the Faire.   Check out the first vlog I've ever made covering some of my thoughts on the Faire!  There's more pictures on my Facebook page as well! Check it out here: https://www.facebook.com/FozzTech (I had to use an ancient photo uploader.. one at a time was painful). Are you guys as excited as I am that Maker culture got so much press because of this event!?

Topic by fozzy13   |  last reply


First Day Interning at Instructables

Today is my third day as an intern at the downtown SF Instructables office. I thought I'd recount Day 1 as a day-in-the-life! It starts off with: "Don't come in before 10am" from Eric, and a mention from Noah (my more direct boss): "We recommend that folks bring their computers, a contractor trash bag, a good pair of running shoes, a banana and hard hat on their first day - that way, they are prepared for whatever challenges may await them at Instructables." So I walked out to the office, found the robot-painted door wedged between the liquor store and the Mexican restaurant, and walked up the stairs. It's one big room- open tables everywhere covered in stuff of all sorts: duct tape, paper towels, electronics, crocheted Pac-Man, a giant styrofoam face, an electric toaster. Everyone is at their workstations- one folding a 3D paper alphabet, another fiddling with a breadboard. The devs coding on one side of the room while walking on treadmills at the computer and DJ'ing the room. Anyway, I walked in and looked around, and was greeted with a tentative "Hello?" from someone at a desk*. I clarified that it was my first day of work, and that cleared things up. Bilal, the artist-in-residence, gave me a shoulder tap, and I was welcomed by Eric and Noah. *Apparently random strangers occasionally wander up the stairs. We now have a laser cut "days since a random stranger walked up the stairs" counter for the office. Noah showed me around, introducing me to the editors' corner, the marketing team, showing me the rooms along the back wall: "Office, sewing/electronics lab, office, store room, office, prize room, woodshop/laser cut room, 3D printer. Probably ask someone before you use the 3D printer. Test kitchen, game corner." And that was it. Back at his place in the editor's corner, he nodded. A brief pause, and then I asked, "Is there anything in particular I'm supposed to do?" Noah laughed. "Good question! Since you're just here for the summer, you'll be doing a lot of making stuff. You can use any of the supplies, or if you need to buy anything, let me know." There are a few other things I get to do, too. I can feature Instructables, and am encouraged to do outreach to people who aren't on Instructables but ought to be. But right now, most people in the office are working hard on entries for the Make it Real contest. So I got to work. You can check out my page for the fun things I've begun to make here at the office. A few other key points of the first day experience: -2pm check-in: everyone in the office meets around the lunch table to say what they've been doing that day. -Membership at TechShop- lots of fun toys for making things! -Picking up things from the MakerFaire -Getting project cards Since then, I've gotten some fabric and done some sewing for a project I haven't posted yet and worked with CNC paper cutting, 3D printing, taught myself Google SketchUp and Silhouette, and have begun to list all the things I'd like to work on this summer All right, that's enough writing. Time to make!

Topic by SelkeyMoonbeam   |  last reply


Instructables in the Telegraph -- Weird and wonderful inventions

The Telegraph ran a great article featuring online DIY culture and Instructables. Weird and wonderful inventions by Chris StevensMeet the DIY enthusiasts using the internet in their fight against throwaway society.The internet has spawned a new breed of extreme DIY enthusiasts. They build jet engines in their garages using instructions downloaded from forums, and they upload videos of the explosive results. They weld together rollercoasters out of scrap materials and household items. They teach themselves taxidermy to build "The Mouse Mouse", a real mouse with electrical innards. Or, like 17-year-old Thiago Olson, who built a fusion reactor in his house, they're scouting for parts in their local B & Q. The online DIYers are rebelling against a consumer society that has convinced many of us that everything is bought, not made. "It's a reaction against a mass-produced culture," says Eric Wilhelm, founder of Instructables.com. "People want to express themselves and show their individuality - building something cool that you can't buy and showing how you did it is a great way to express yourself."While the traditional DIYer is overjoyed to have put up a set of shelves without losing a finger, the extreme online DIYer spends the weekend with an angle-grinder turning a supermarket trolley into an armchair, or building a Guitar Hero game controller from scratch. Online projects show you how to make your own USB charger, extend the battery life of your laptop, or use a Mont Blanc refill to transform a £1 pen."People are passionate about all sorts of things," says Wilhelm. "From the wacky, far-out jet engines and taxidermy to the everyday stuff like how to tie your shoes or manage washing your laundry most efficiently."The projects are uploaded by users, who offer each other step-by-step advice on everything from the sinister to the charming. The extreme DIYers dare each other to create increasingly elaborate projects, posting photos and videos of near-misses and successes. The internet is perfect for this kind of experimentation; it's a place where inquisitive geeks meet friends with power-tools. All these projects have gorgeous colour photos to go with them, and the strength of interest in these extreme-DIY sites has led communities to meet offline. This year, Makezine.com held a fair in the US attended by 45,000 "makers"."Besides the skill of building and the exchange of ideas, it's a lot of fun," says Phillip Torrone, senior editor of Make magazine. "We seem to be in an era of thinking more about the things we buy, make, consume and cherish. The result of that is people making things - it's more gratifying." Scandals over rip-offs, such as the recent study that showed ink-jet printer cartridges wilfully waste more than 50 per cent of the ink (tinyurl.com/2957jw), make Torrone's DIY ethos all the more appealing.If you're the sort of clumsy oaf that regularly snaps USB keys off in their sockets, these DIY sites also offer advice on repairing consumer electronics. Wilhem's favourite DIY project is the dachshund wheelchair (tinyurl.com/ytc6bb). The DIYer who made it explains: "Our dachshund hurt his back, so for rehab we made him swim a lot, and I built this chair until he could use his back legs again."Online DIYers have an enthusiasm for science and exploration, and many are simply reacting to the low-quality of mass-produced goods, especially consumer electronics. They object to our modern throw-away culture. The DIYers also upstage technology manufacturers by demonstrating easy ways to fix what would otherwise be thrown away. "It's really more about problem-solving with more people", says Torrone.More news articles about Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


China's first Maker Faire !

April 6th was a long night that would be followed by an even longer day. Hours stretched like taffy as the Airplane pulled me across time zones. I was on my way to the Shenzhen Maker Faire which was being put on by Eric Pan, the founder of one of the largest open sourced businesses I know. Eric is a visionary, and his vision to inspire more makers in China connecting them with a global maker movement through the concepts of openness, sharing, and innovation inspires me and hundreds others to come to Shenzhen to share in the first Maker Faire in China! Hours ago I was at Instructables cooking my Last Breakfast for the office and gaving my Last Hugs. Qarly, my new friend, had helped my stay up all night organizing my tickets and suitcase. She went with me to the Payless shoe store on her bike as I walked barefoot. Yes, I started my journey shoeless. I had traded in my Vibrams at REI for a large backpack so I could cram as many arduinos and 3D printers into it as possible before leaving to go spread the good words. Here are the good words as I see them right now: "It Can Be Done." Yes, with a solid mission, a relentless attitude and accepting being shoeless (or jobless, or hungry, or ...) it's possible to accomplish the things you dream. Boom, back in that tin can flying over the Pacific. My schedule starts with a trip to Hong Kong to meet up with instructable's member Prank. Alex Hornstein and I had recently completed an adventure in 3D printing called the Pocket Factory in which we traveled across America seeking the business models behind low cost 3D manufacturing. He is now back in east Asia being the revolutionary philosopher engineer he is. I land at 8pm and head out into the city of the future. Hong Kong is a city of millions, beautifully lit tall buildings, zippy public transportation, and the largest pay inequality in the world. Looking out the window I keep wondering if this is the rich part, or the poor. Then I was there. I made it to IFC - a gigantic mall in the heart of Hong Kong. The metro stop inside it is called "Hong Kong Station". Yep, shopping is big here. We hung out on the roof of IFC talking projects. Without giving too much away too soon let's just say Alex is on his way to revolutionize the micro solar industry. We took the familiar ferry route home and I spent the night organizing and updating the social world since I knew in a few hours I'd be in China... and in China, no one can hear you tweet. Before I knew it I had to be off! It was 6:20am (HK time) and the ferry leaves at 6:40, I had a long day ahead of me and I haven't slept yet. Holy crap! I ran and got right back on that ferry from Lama to the mainland. Passing all the tall buildings once again and rushed onto the MTR. As we sped along the Hong Kong landscape of tall towers slowly turned into green rolling hills and the people on the train spoke less and less english. I crossed the border into Shenzhen and it was there I met Ani, the Monk. What a beautiful lady! We had a great conversation involving LOTS of smiling, drawing and almost no words. She was from Hong Kong and we were now friends. We traded bracelets and now I have one more reason to learn Mandarin! I finally made it all the way to Xi Xiang, the metro stop which was walking distance to the Maker Faire! I was getting pretty excited, I had lugged all this stuff across the world, and finally I was going to meet the makers of China! After a long and potholed walk I finally made it to the gate where a nice young Chinese lady helped me carry my stuff, we walked down a long outdoor hallways at F518 the "First Experiential Sharing Space in China" which was filled with sculptures and art. Billboards around me advertised hip hop dance classes and robots peeped from the windows. I knew I was in the right place. Right near the entrence of the Maker Faire was a strange robot. It was the size of a small house and it served books. They have robot libraries in Shenzhen. Wow! The more I learn about this place the cooler it seems! The faire is a large three story space with a media space on the first floor where people can buy "chinese make" a magazine called Radio that has been teaching people how to make stuff since 1955. The publishers of this magazine are also the ones who do the translation for Makezine! The second floor is filled with long tables of makers, a huge hall filled with running robots, dancing droids, DIY laser 3D scanners, touchless IR interfaces, octocopter (no, not tacocopter) and all the awesome stuff you'd expect to see in San Francisco, except this is Shenzhen. There are makers everywhere! Upstairs there are people making clay figurines, another instructables user - Star - runs a workshop around Canidu (yes, you can do!), her company which makes an electronics learning tool. This movement is obviously global and the Shenzhen Maker Faire has pulled makers not only from all over China, but all over the world. Eric Pan, the founder of Seeed Studio employs 70 people through an open source project and through this faire has inspired hundreds. At the after party, you can really tell how proud Eric was to have brought amazing makers like Mitch Altman and David Li from the Shanghai hackerspace together. Eric has a new project in the works right now. He's soon to be a father! I can only imagine how proud he will be when baby Eric Pan picks up his first blinky LED kit. Now that's some serious making! +Bilal Ghalib PS. Eric in the last picture is not dead, only extremely exhausted!

Topic by lamedust   |  last reply


The risks of DIY carpet cleaning and how save a buck or two....

I am writing this partly because of bed experiences with rental angents/landlords and as a general help.Here in Australia as well as other parts of the world it is common pratise that a real estate agent goes through your rented home multiple times a year to check if you keep it clean and undamaged.In most cases these visits go without any hickup until you move out.At this point agents often try to make your life a misery.Some expect you get the house back to the state it was 10 years ago when you moved - an impossible task.Carpet cleaning is usually done with a rented machine.This mean you pay a deposit for the machine and "rent" is made by the highly overpriced cleaning fluid you have to use with the machine.But more and more people see that a $100 machine from the discounter is a "money saver".So lets start with the main differences between a rented, commercial grade machine and those you find at the discounter to buy.The later comes quite small and in plastic, the commercial one is usually all metal and has huge water and waste tank.And lets be honest here, if a good vacuum cleaner sets you back more than twice what your new floor cleaning machine costs.....For me the real difference is in the sucktion.If you start with 10 liters in a commercail machine then you should expect to get over 8 liters back in the waste tank.The added waste often makes it seem much more though ;)The cheap discounter vesion however often struggles to get half of the water back out of your carpet that it drained into it!This is not only due to the weaker vacuum created but also due to the general design and lack of sealing the area that is sucked up.But during a hot summer week this makes no vital difference as it dries off anyway, or does it?Dryness and contamination....If you wash your clothes than you let them fully dry before you wear them.With a freshly cleaned carpet we often don't have that luxury and if the weather won't play nice you might end with a moist carpet for weeks.A proper wash of the carpet would require that water is actually flowing through the fabric.This is achieved by designing water outlets and sucktion areas to be in close proximity.However, most carpets these days are thin and flimsy, the underlay brings the comfort and often the required insulation from the cold floor.Fun fact: Most quality carpets in the EU come with a rubber or foam like backing which prevents that little spills go through and also leave the carpet basically dry after a cleaning.If the amount of water your machine collects does not get very close to what you filled into the tank then you end with a quite wet carpet and underlay.Cold from underneath and with basically no airflow through it.And if you ever removed an old carpet that was cleaned every few years you do know why you wear a protective suit, gloves and a filter mask on your face....It is simply impossible with a handheld machine to prevent water and contaminants from getting into the foam underlay of US and AU style carpet assemblies.Once fully dry there is little chance for anything to grow, but every time you clean the carpet you add the water required...I had it in two rentals that when I cleaned the carpets with a really good machine that stains from within the underlay came back up into the carpet.A job planned for a day then turned into three days of using heater fans and living in a sauna while washing carpets :(The same is true if you end up with fresh dirt or such on the carpet while it is still moist underneat - it gets worked ino the carpet and becomes even harder to clean.Is a commercial cleaning the better option?Sadly I have to say this highly depends on your agent/landlord and how much time and money you have.In some areas agents simply ignore the law and demand from you that the carpet looks at least as good as when you moved in.And if old stains you did not know about come from the filthy underlay a rented machine can come close to the cost of getting a commercail team in to do the job once you vacated.Either way you get an invoice for the service and a statement about the condition of the carpets before and after the cleaning.These guys come with a big van and before it fires up with water only the vacuum is used.Imagine a monster sized vacuum cleaner head on steroids that connects to an industrial sized evacuation fan in the van.It literally lifts your carpet from the underlay and leaves nothing loose behind.The actual cleaning and sanitation works the same way only with the big difference that the water is sprayed with pressure through the carpet and into the underlay.Final round is done dry and with vacuum only, means the carpets are dry enough to walk on them without getting wet feet.A complete dry state is usually reached within 2 days during the summer unlike rented machines that keep the humidity in your house up and high for about 2 weeks until back to normal.Main benefit of a commercail cleaning is that you won't get any issues with your agent/landlord unless you damaged the carpets or made them impossible to clean - ever dropped an ink jet printer refill kit? ;)If I do it myself with a reasonably good machine or a rented one : Do I have options for the cleaning solution used?Trust me, I had to figure that one out quickly when I moved into my first rental down here.4 bedrooms, entire house with carpet except for the kitchen and wet areas.They appeared reasonably clean at a first look but when I used a UV flashlight at night the story was shocking....In what must have a room for a baby the carpet looked like a psychedlic art impression under the UV light.The living room was not much better.As a result the rented machine ran out of cleaning fluid quickly.Bought 2 bottles that were supposed to be suffient for the house size but if you need several rounds per room.I "finnished" the former baby room and was one bottle down already.Called it a day and in the dark the UV light showed a slithly fades art impression but nowhere clean :(The shop had a heavy duty cleaning solution but I did not consider it with a price twice as high.Instead I wondered what would make my carpet different from my clothes in my washing machine....So I got a canister of Oxy-cleaner - sometimes called nappy soaking powder, or similar.Just make sure you get one that does not foam up too much.I used a bucket to dissolve a good amount of the powder before filling it into the machine - at about 40°C.What ended in the waste tank when using this cheap alternative looked digusting to say the least!With that encouragement I decided to make a new bucket with some added washing powder, just a tablespoon worth or just over.Washing powder for front loader does not foam up much, unlike the stuff for top loader, so choose wisely.That was, all counted, the forth cleaning round for the former baby room but after this the UV light showed a clean carpet that also had nice spring fresh smell thanks to the washing powder.Using the same appraoch of lots of oxy cleaner and a bit of washing machine powder in semi hot water made cleaning the rest of the house a breeze!When going slow with the machine it was like mowing the lawn, it left a clean path behind.Not all carpets might tolerate oxy cleaners though, especially if they are quite colorful, so do a spot check first if you never used the stuff to clean up a little spill of red wine before.And please keep some of the commercial cleaning fluid at hand to give the machine a quick wash through with it, otherwise the shop might ask you if you used non approved cleaning stuff with it ;)Tips for adjustable cleaning machines....Some of the rented machines come with several possible adjustments you can make.In the most basic form you can adjust the amount water used and how strong the machine sucks.Keep the sucktion as high as possible unless you actually want to pre soak the carpet.The amount of water should be adjusted to the type of carpet not to how dirty it is!You want just enough water to soak the carpet without going into the underlay too much.A clear sign of using too much water is if you waste tank is only half full when the water tank is empty.A few of the really good machines let you adjust the distance between the water outlet and sucktion area.In most cases there pre-set to what, from experience is the most commonly type of carpet in the area.Your might be different though...A greater distance means more time for the cleaning solution to do its job.This works especially well for thicker carpets with amount of water turned down to below 50%.For thin carpets a short distance is better as the water does not have to go deep into the fabric.Here you can even increase the water flow for very dirty areas without risking to soak the underlay too much.In either case you should check the machine before taking it home and if adjustable have the options explained to you in the store.Anything for really bad areas?The entrance area is often subject to whatever our shoes collected outside, especially if you have kids or playful dogs.A bit of oil from the road, some sticky residue of something, dust, small gravel and sand....Vacuum out what comes out first, then use a suitable, not too stiff brush if your vacuum cleaner does not have a rotating brush in the head.Use a spray bottle and prepare a solution of warm water with a bit of washing machine powder and a shot glass worth of methylated spirit.Slightly wet the soiled area with the spray bottle without saturating it.Use the brush to agitate the carpet fibres - preferably directional and with even strokes.If they are not wet in the deeper areas spray a bit more.Again: you don't want to soak it you want to wet it.Give it about 20 minutes on a warm day a bit longer if the insede temps are below 25°C.Check with your hand if the area is still wet, the alcohol should speed up the evaporation here.Before it dries up repeat the process and check with a paper towel if it picks up the stains already.If so then run over the area with cleaning machine.Best results are achieved if you manage to get the fibres wet all the way down with the brush and won't let the area fully dry off again after the spraying.How can I speed up the drying time?The only way to speed things up is heat and airflow.If outside humidty is quite high then you will struggle.Even in the summer times the humidity levels over night can get well into or even over the 80% region.Opening doors and windows then to get the carpet dry won't really help you.Best time to clean your carpets is actually at night because by the time you are done the sun is out and the humity levels much lower.On a good day below 30%.This is true even for the winter times.Put a few fans up and make sure the temperatures are well above the 20°C mark.If in doubt you have to turn the heater on.Once the humidity inside is sky high you open up all windows and doors to have an exchange of air.A few minutes suffice here unless there is wind at all.If it is a hot summer day you can of course just let it all open until the sun goes down again.During colder times pay special attention to cold areas, like your toilet, bathroom or in general areas that won't warm up properly.Even if the room was not cleaned the moisture can accumulate here and cause mold and mildew.If in doubt make sure the ENTIRE house is warm enough until your carpets are fully dry again.A humidity sensor or gauge certainly helps, two are better so you can check inside and outside at the same time.

Topic by Downunder35m