Theremin Circuit?

Does anybody have a theremin circuit that doesn't have coils? I need it to be compact so programming seems ideal. A PIC solution might work...any suggestions? Any other processor is fine also. No, I can't use a light theremin... And no, I can't use Harrison Instruments' because its too big and too many connections. If possible, then this is to be used on fruit flies to see how much activity they do when foreign substances are added. Again, if possible if a PIC solution is used, then can the PIC detect when the flies move because they change an oscillation. Most likely I will wind a coil and place it in the jar and then have it detect. The best way would be to use the PIC to print an output via some sort of display so that the scientific results can be tested.

Question by blinkyblinky   |  last reply


The Virtual Theremin

Ever since seeing Bill Bailey live a couple of days ago, I was fascinated by the Theremin he used throughout his performance. I did a little googling and found that it's relatively simple to make one, but I didn't want to, I wanted one now! Back to google it was then, and I came across this beauty (link to .exe file).To play the Theremin, you click start, then move your mouse around the grid. The X axis controls note frequency and the Y axis controls volume.I'm now in the process of annoying my parents with it >:]

Topic by whatsisface   |  last reply


Cat Playing Theremin

Wow. It's a cat playing a theremin!I have nothing more to add.

Topic by canida   |  last reply


Anyone have an instructable or know how to make a theramin?

I remember seeing theremins on talent shows in the old black and white TV days. Theremins were boxes with a vertical rod and a horizontal rod. The musician played the theremin by moving his hands across the rods without touching them. The sounds produced were were akin to synth music. I suppose one could program a synthesizer to do the same but I want to build a theremin.

Question by hunter47   |  last reply


How do I make a theremin with a specific voice?

I want to make a theremin with several voices chiming in (with the use of a sampler possibly). Something similar to this http://cargocollective.com/emilygroves/Mew Does anyone have any idea how to create a voice that would come out of the theremin?

Question by a.palos   |  last reply


fixing my brothers theremin

My brother who has no electronics history bought a theremin kit from an Australian electronics store called jay car and or course it didn't work when he finished it, sp he gave it to me but in the electronics department i can only build kits with all the instructions there for me i dont know how to fix a problem with one. I have a multimeter here but im still completely not sure how to use it to find out whats wrong with the kit, it sounds dumb but i could post a picture of it but im pretty scure that would be pointless cos you wouldn't be able to see the components values. Can anyone give me some help in trying to figure out how to fix it cos i dont want to have to rebuy it and built it for him

Topic by craig3   |  last reply


What is the value of the Gakken Mini Theremin pots? Answered

I'd like to rehouse my Gakken Mini Theremin in a larger, stronger case. This, of course, means replacing all of the controls with panel mount components. So, I would replace the on/off switch and the potentiometers to adjust the sound (I already replaced the antennae). I do not know what the values of the potentiometers are, though. Anyone know? Thanks, Noah

Question by noahh   |  last reply


Using Theremin to Modulate Pitch of an Input for Use in Sonic Screwdriver?

I'm not real familiar to the in depth functioning of the Theremin, but I think I have the general gist of how it works. Specifically, I was wondering If it was possible to use a Theremin to change the pitch of a sonic screwdriver. One of my qualms with sonic screwdriver replicas is that they lack the changing pitch of the screwdriver in the show (Doctor Who, to the uninitiated). After reading about Theremins, I wondered if one could be built into the case of a sonic screwdriver (DIY with metal case) allowing the pitch of the sound to be altered in relation to its proximity to the users hand(s) and the environment. Has anyone ever heard of something like this being done?

Question by danielemur   |  last reply


Can a 500Kohm 2W audio taper pot replace a 500Kohm 1W audio taper pot?

I'm sourcing parts for a Theremin (http://www.therealcharleshobbs.com/keppingertubetheremin/) and the parts list calls for a 500K Ohm 1Watt Audio taper potentiometer. I cant find one rated at 1Watt, but I can find one rated at 2 Watts. Will the 2 Watt option be an acceptable replacement?

Question by smkoberg   |  last reply


Theremax -Theremin from PAiA electronics

PAiA electronicsthis is a great source of electronic music equipment kits. Scott is great and easy to work with. I have built a Theremax for my wife and plan on building the Fatman Analog Synth soon (i hope)

Topic by knarfoo 


In kipkays optical theremin, would you make the pitch lower?

Http://rsinventionlab.com/optical-thereminI'm trying to play the sound through a 12 inch sub, and i need a lower pitch

Question by rickyd! 


HELP!!!!?

HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   I am still "green" in the arduino feild and dont understand the code completly and I am trying to make an arduino theremin using a speaker and a ldr (light-dependent resistor)   PLEASE HELP!

Question by Laserman595   |  last reply


where can I get 50-300 uH adjustable coils?

I'm trying to build my friend a Theremin for Christmas (obviously wont be finished by then), and I can't seem to find a few parts for it. Its a design that comes from Popular Electronics November 1967 Issue (http://bit.ly/gNaQVH). It calls for 50-300 uH adjustable coils and I can't find 'em anywhere. I have found adjustable coils/variable inductors but I haven't been able to find any with this inductance rating. Aside from building my own, I'm at a loss here.

Question by smkoberg   |  last reply


What do I have to change to use a 9v battery in this circuit?

This is the light theremin from Make Projects http://makezine.com/projects/light-theremin/ It uses 4 AA batteries, so 6 volts.  Can I use a 9 volt battery instead?  If so, what would need to be changed in the circuit?

Question by rachl009   |  last reply


Interactive lights with sensors and such

I am currently working of my BFA in sculpture and I have a couple of gallery shows coming up and it would seem that my ideas are bigger than my knowledge base (which is okay by me, but sometimes frustrating). My current work revolves around posthumanism and I am working to blur the lines between human and machine, working with circuitry, xrays, and prosthetics. I have one set of work that I am currently a bit stumped with. I have three copper PCB boards that I am going to etch into circuits, but the lines of the circuits will resemble human faces. Each board has a character: the introvert, the extrovert, and the antagonist. The introvert will be silent, but I want the lights that glow behind it to flicker faster, or get brighter when the viewer nears. Essentially, he is quiet, but has a LED driven anxiety attack when people approach. I did this with a dark sensitive photosensor thinking that the viewers shadows would activate the light. While it worked in my living room, I realized that the gallery lighting would not lend itself to this method. So my next thought was a theremin that had light output instead of sound output. Possible? The next two will make sound and light. The extrovert needs to seek attention. I was hoping to figure out something that would talk back when something is making noise around it. So it would need to pick up the vibrations of someone talking about my work, or possibly even their footsteps, and then begin to "talk back" (lighting up and making noise). Intstead of sensing vibrations I was thinking that proximity might be easier so maybe an IR sensor. (?) The last one hate the second one. I was thinking I might be able to do something like this with a kit I have that allows me to plug one circuit into another, , where I would have it sense the light or sound coming from the extrovert and in turn verbally assault him. However,it is not a definite go, still lots of kinks so I am up for any solutions. I hope this is somewhat coherent to you. If you could give me any leads on where to start, or any places to get good information/products, that would be immensely appreciated. Thanks for your time!

Topic by idaholaura   |  last reply


Weird and wacky electric sounds (theremin, vocoder etc.)

Anyone know of any really cool sounds you can make with electronics?I'm thinking of making both a Theremin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theremin) and a Vocoder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vocoder), the first of which seems like a relatively simple circuit, the second seems much harder.there are a few wiring diagrams on the 'net for a theremin, there's links on the wikipedia page (check http://home.att.net/~theremin1/). and you can also buy kits at some electronics shops.vocoder seems like it must be a load harder, and I haven't been able to find any wiring diagrams, and as far as I know, there aren't any kits available. there's a demo of what it does at http://www.sirlab.de/linux/download_vocoder.htmljust wondering if anyone has experience with either of these weird and wonderful devices, either using them or making them, or if anyone has any other strange sound makers that should be brought to public attention?hrrmm... wonder how hard it would be to turn that old evolution MK-149 into one of these http://www.gizmag.com.au/go/5091/ ?

Topic by naught101   |  last reply


What is this component? Answered

I recently took up an interest in selling kits for my instructable "The Light Theremin." However upon ordering the exact parts I realized I still don't know what type of capacitor I used! When I built it I assumed from its size that it was 1.0uF, and judging from the lack of complaints on the instructable I must be somewhat right. Here is all the information i know and can provide... - its marked "104" on one side - It is a ceramic disk capacitor. - light brown in color. - and seems to work well in an experiment around 9 volts direct current. Here is a link to my instructable: https://www.instructables.com/id/Light-Theremin/ Thank You!

Question by TXTCLA55   |  last reply


i would like to build a small simple synthesizer using 555 chips if possible. any oe haeve ideas or help?

I have a few 555 timers and  have always wanted to build a sythesizer but i just don't know where to start. i have seen the optical theremin and  the 555 metronome. i could add a pot instead of the photo transistor, and maybe connect the out put from the theremin to the metronome  i would like some thing more like this ,http://hackaday.com/2009/08/28/xr-noise-box/ . i would like to kow if it is possible with 555 timers.

Question by zs   |  last reply


Electronic Kits Where To Buy Them?

Hi I am looking for "electronic kits". For instance the kit would come with all the necasary comonents to make something but I just have to assemble it kinda like these belowElectric Guitar KitTheremin KitEffects Pedal KitsMAKE Magazine kit section this is the most exstensive collection of kits I could find Thanks for all your help yall!

Topic by jackillac92   |  last reply


"Taller de Inventos", Jameco Build Night @ Buenos Aires

On Saturday August 24th we held our very first “Instructables Build Night”, which we baptized “Taller de Inventos” (Inventions Workshop). It was a free event aimed for anyone older than 10 ys old. We had around 15 participants that joined us on the quest for technological reappropiation. We knew beforehand that most of them had never touched a soldering iron, so the first activity that we held was an improvised desoldering workshop where people cheerily removed components from electronic garbage. Most of them became immediately enchanted with the mighty desoldering pump ;) After the participants had settled in their preferred spots, we opened the event by talking about what we (Wazzabi) do as a group and what this event sponsored by Instructables and Jameco was all about. We were thrilled of having so many new faces around. What the Build Night meant to us was the opportunity of holding a free event without having to care about components. Since we received 100USD worth of goods by Jameco, we decided to keep it free. We offered the participants various projects to work on: a "Wazzabi Punk" Light Theremin (a light theremin based on our take on the classic Atari Punk console), an audio switch for choosing between two inputs, a LED Blinking Light for bike and a classic Wazzabi Punk console. Every one of them was incredibly eager of soldering components to the PCBs that we gave away and getting their hands on their own creations. They left not only having learned that they were capable of some awesome things, but also with some pretty cool devices made by themselves :) Check the pictures after the jump. They were taken by Cristian Reynaga and Amina Luveaux.

Topic by wazzabi   |  last reply


New Weekend Projects

What do you think of the new weekend projects with kipkay at MAKE? I personally really don't like them. Coming home on a friday to relax, watch a new project that starts turning the gears in your head to create something really imaginative. Now I come home to a droll (yet clear) voice that you don't even want to sit through the whole project. I do not get the creative inspiration from the new ones as from the bre ones. everything bre made had potential for creative add ons. Mousey the junkbot, that is so cool and easily branch off of. Beam bots, inspiring for creative electronics? Theremin, intro to a cool instrucment, that goes for the mellophone too etc.etc.etc I don't need a video to make something look uglier, bigger, fatter, less portable that sucks hours out of my free time. Cutting a book to put something in it. On the popular video areas bre did it, but made it imaginative kipkay did it, but sexy in the front, I mean come on Kipkay did it AGAIN except for taking off of the cases of electronics, taking out connectors and hard wiring everything instead, where's the imagination! I mean I could see if you made it better than before, but come on!!! anyone's thoughts?

Topic by guyfrom7up   |  last reply


McMADSAT make and do, show and tell. Scotland's first Maker Event 2009. Full report

Report of the McMADSAT event 14th March 2009, at the Glasgow Science CentreWe had a fantastic day. Outside it was a grey gale of a day, but inside was a riot of colour and activity. The aim was to enthuse the public with the fun of making things from a variety of technologies. Anyone who wanted to, could join in, make something and take it away with them, and all for free. Hundreds of people of all ages came along and had a great time. A general video of the event can be seen at https://www.instructables.com/community/Mc_MADSAT/ (Thanks to Les Oates for making this excellent film for us).I am happy to discuss further with anyone planning their own event, and you can see more about it and the process by which I got the event going, at http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com/ExhibitorsStar Guest, all the way from London, was Professor Maelstromme (AKA Amanda Scrivener), who brought her beautiful creationsWhat can you make from a dead umbrella? Display of the possibilities for reusing the fabric and structure of dead umbrellas.The Tea Party. 1950s style tea party made from a combination of hand made fabric and edible pieces.Cardboard structures from the students of the department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde.Greensteam's steampunkery, 101 uses for a dead keyboard and other examples of her work as shown on Instructables.The Offline Mechanical Blog – a very old manual typewriter with continuous paper available for the public to type their messages and thoughts on for all to shareLemonie (another Instructables enthusiast, who travelled up from York especially) brought his amazing conversion of a VHS player-into-toaster that makes toast with VHS imprinted in it. He also brought his nice LEGO USB stick, a lantern made out of a tin-can & glass. and his *untested* wind-turbine, made from VHS player parts.On the Young Makers stand we had a display of virtuoso Lego constructions and an extensive collection of home made Steampunkery.The self-replicating machine from the department of Design Manufacture and Engineering Management at the University of Strathclyde, the Reprap, was on display and moving but sadly not reproducing on the day.ActivitiesThe public were offered a wide range of free hands-on activities, which ran continuously all day, to 'Make and Take'Soldering - make a solar theremin (or a robot). 16 of these were made and all worked first time. Some were taken for a trial run in the sun and a video of this can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzUZMon3vpA The Stemnet ambassadors helped visitors to make their own Musical Straw Oboes.One of the most popular activities – especially with children – the Stemnet ambassadors supervised the making of many handsfull of Gloop.The Stemnet ambassadors used the plastic Polymorph for visitors to make a fingerprint keyring to take away.Fishy things - Busy Bees Art studio provided painting and collage fishes to make, particularly for our very young visitors.The Glasgow Crocheted Coral Reef invited visitors to try their hands at crocheting and contribute to the growing coral reef, all made from wool and even strips of plastic bag. Many total novices not only tried their hands but actually completed a piece of coral to contribute to the reef. This workshop area was very busy throughout, with visitors typically spending 30 minutes or more participating. Many thanks to my civil engineer pal who ran this.House of Cards - visitors could make and take their own set of the design classic 'Eames cards', which slot together to form fantastical structures. Ideal for recycling old greetings cards.Cable necklets, keyboard bracelets and keyboard film wallets. All made from recycled/repurposed materials from dead keyboards. Popular with adults and children alike.Risk assessments were provided to the Glasgow science centre, for all the activities. There were no injuries and the 'emergency first aid bucket of water' was not needed as there were no soldering or gluegun burns.Participant Presenters30 people were involved on the day, either as exhibitors or as workshop facilitators. An essential component of the team was the group of11 Stemnet ambassadors, most of whom were there all day. It would have been impossible to run so many activities without them. Another group in the team was the members of the Glasgow Electron Club who, with some friends and a Stemnet ambassador, ran the soldering workshops continuously all day. We were particularly fortunate to have two exhibitors travel up specially to take part. Several exhibitors were entrepreneurs who gave their time for nothing, even though the venue rules meant they could not sell anything, nor charge for the activities being provided. This was especially generous given the harsh financial climate just now. Everyone said they had lots of fun.PublicOver 1,000 people visited the Glasgow Science Centre on the day. The BSA/NSEW assessment forms collected only represent <10% of the visitors to the McMADSAT area. Stallholders and workshop facilitators estimated a total of about 425 active participants (people who did an activity, or asked questions and generally interacted with the displays) by 1530 (GSC shuts at 1700). However, even these only represent a proportion of the people visiting the event which, although not recorded, probably amount to about double that, since most of the activities were taken up by children accompanied by other family members. The numbers at any given time were variable, depending upon the GSC's own activities/talks etc. I would estimate that the McMADSAT area was visited by at least 700-800 during the day. From the few assessment forms returned, and from chatting to the public, it was clear that most had come simply because they were coming to the GSC anyway, but some (mainly young adults) had come as a result of internet and email information or because of the Metro article. The GSC visitors seem to be mainly families with children of primary school age. The University of Glasgow Steampunk Society had come especially to make contact with the steampunk element, as featured in the Metro article. We also collected some contact details for future events. BudgetThe total budget for the event was the £500 grant provided from NSEW Scotland scheme. This had to cover all the exhibitors' costs and the costs for the free make and take activities, plus all publicity etc.In-Kind Sponsors:The Glasgow Science Centre provided free space, tables, cloths, technical assistance, without which the event would not have been possible at all.The publishers of Make and Craft magazines, O'Reilly's, did not feel able to sponsor us in the same extent as they did for the much larger event in Newcastle on the same day, but did send boxes of back issues of their magazines to give away, which probably amounted to an equivalent of about £300 at UK newsstand prices.Clockworkrobot.com provided more theremin kits than contracted for, which were themselves at cost price.Madlabs provided free batteries for all the kits they supplied at cost.Instructables.com assisted with publicity and allowed the use of their logo.VenueNone of this would have been possible at all, particularly on this minimal budget, without the kindness of the Glasgow Science Centre. The Director agreed immediately to offer us the space free, plus the use of tables and technical help to enable this event to take place. We were able to partially set up the night before which was very helpful in avoiding a scramble on the day. We were able to get the loan of 4 GSC soldering irons which avoided us having to get personal ones PAT tested. This was the ideal venue for us as it meant we really didn’t have to do a great deal of publicity as we could be sure of an audience from the GSC's normal throughput.PublicityThe event was listed in the NSEW diary and in the university of Strathclyde's NSEW information. Posters were distributed around venues in Glasgow and information posted on relevant websites. A blogspace http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com was set up as a temporary web presence to refer people to. The Metro published a small piece which was a wonderful boost.Lessons for the futureNeeded more helpers and more exhibitors. Outdoor displays would have been impossible as the weather was dreadful, but it is still necessary to have some more dramatic displays as well as the hands on activities. Successful soldering for novices really needs 1:1 or 1:2 supervision. The budget only worked because minimal publicity was done at low cost and all the participant presenters were generous with their time and resources. Anything more ambitious than what was done on this occasion would need a larger organising team and significant sponsorship.

Topic by greensteam   |  last reply


Electron Club Open Day Show and Tell, Glasgow 13 June

Electron Club Open Day2pm-8pm Saturday 13th June 2009Centre for Contemporary Arts (CCA), 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow, G2 3JDThe Electron Club is a voluntary run space where people interested in things like free open source software, circuit bending, hardware hacking, computer recycling, streaming, audio and video editing, green technologies, and amateur radio can meet, use equipment, and share anddisseminate their skills and ideas. The space supports both individuals developing their own projects and a number of group projects, all of which are not-for-profit initiatives with a community, educational or environmental aspect to them.Now in our third year, the Electron Club Open Days are an opportunity to see and try out a range of things that people do, as well as having the opportunity to meet others with similar interests, make, chat, discuss and enjoy.TESLA SOUL - Electron Club Makers Fair and homebaking - Bajery in the Makery!Stalls and demos by electronic makers, designers and artists. An opportunity to see and play with some of the projects created by Electron Club members and related groups - a theremin menagerie and mini synthesizer kits, 3D paper engineering, circuit bending, micro FM radio,DIY wind power technology, creative computer trash recycling, 101 things to do with a dead keyboard and much more. Plus some of the excellent home-baking that has been hallmark of all our Open Days. Come and do a bit of soldering or have a cup of tea and chat with the people who make things.TAPE-WIRE-HEAD-SCREEN - music, film and sound artsThe Electron Club includes many people working in music, film and experimental arts. For the Open Day we will be showing a preview of films from Document, the UK's leading human rights film festival, with works ranging from front-line reportage to cinematic explorations of what it is to be human, along with films made at the Electron Club by the Digital Desperados, a film-group for young black and Asian women. We'll have a live performance of Alvin Lucier's legendary "Music on A Long Thin Wire" by members of 'Obscure Desire of the Bourgeoisie' and BuffalobuffalobuffaloBuffalobuffalo'. Outdoors, artist Lucie Potter will invite people on a specially planned sound walk around the Garnethill area.THE LIFE OF SOCIAL THINGS - socially-engaged technology forumA series of discussions about different ways in which society and technology come together.Glasgow FabLabsFabLabs are small scale fabrication and construction workshops that provide computerised production technologies on an artisanal scale making them available to communities and independent makers and designers. From inner-city Boston to remote Indian villages, FabLabshave become a worldwide network of community technology centres. Glasgow FabLabs is a project aiming to bring such a centre to Glasgow. This forum will present the ideas behind the Glasgow FabLabs project and explore the benefits of community-access technology.Community Media and Citizens JournalismThe internet has offered a platform for communities and groups outside of the mainstream media to have a voice and share knowledge. Whilst there are many notable examples of such activity, the tools to create such a democratized media space are still often out of people's reach.This forum will look at some practical examples of community media coming from Glasgow, present some current projects looking to make ordinary people's voices more prominent and explore the relationships between the grass-roots and mainstream media.Technology, Social Justice and the EnvironmentHow can we use technology for the greater common good? Whilst the advance of technology promotes the promise of a better world, that promise has often been compromised or undermined in how we make use of such advances. Certain technological developments have contributed to environmental and social problems on a scale arguably never seen before.Technology, however, has also been used to tackle such issues as climate change and social injustice. This forum will share and explore some practical examples being used in Scotland today, from noise monitoring devices to participatory video and community mapping projects.RAFFLE - broadband fundraiserThis year we are raising funds to improve our network facilities at the Electron Club and we will be doing a raffle with prizes including a group voucher to go paintballing.http://www.electronclub.org Contact: openday@electronclub.org

Topic by greensteam 


Hydrophobic music, dubstep windchimes, Smash Smash Revolution and etc @ Knox Makers Build Night w/ MaKey MaKey!

Wow, what a month at Knox Makers! We were absolutely invaded by MaKey MaKeys at our hackerspace all throughout January. To start us off, we released a freebie project a little early to help out members and guests get some ideas, to drum up local support for our events, and to offer a fun + easy starter project for the other spaces participating: Oversized Music Chest This ended up getting featured in Electronics! It leaves a lot of room to add extra components and tote the MaKey MaKey around, and we turned ours into a musical advertisement for our first Build Night, a mystery hack night about music. Mystery Hack Night: Music! What a blast! Talk about a weird time.. One family brought a theremin and a circuit bending kit for kids; another group brought an amp and speakers, a suitcase of effect pedals and circuit bent instruments, and a 4 channel mixer; we had a random component table for open hacking; an acoustic and broken ukulele was converted into an electronic instrument; we had painters painting music instrument for the MaKey MaKey with conductive paint; there was a table with our hydrophobic drum pad, bananas, an eggplant, flowers, and a grappling hook all controlling a set of browser based drums through the MaKey MaKey; we had members hooking up tactile buttons and levers to MaKey MaKeys; and we closed with the weirdest jam session this side of Alpha Centauri with all the things playing all the sounds at the same time. Mystery Hack Night: Video Game Controllers! This was a fun night, and we had a few new people show up. We tinkered with a platformer adventure game called Fancy Pants Adventure, where we assigned each person one button. At one point, the whole table was controlling the game's protagonist. Somehow, we made it pretty far into the game, considering. A few people commented that this type of exercise seemed like a really useful team building exercise, so we might look at creating some tutorials with this in mind. We also had individuals and small groups testing out their own inventions and games, again revisiting concepts like conductive ink or simple conductive objects. A two person team tinkered around with some simple fighting games that only use one button for each player, there were people playing Tetris and other games with their inventions, and we again offered a random hack table with an assortment of items and components to rummage through. MaKey MaKey Build Night I: When MaKeys Attack.. We had a nice turnout for this event. This was an introduction to the basic concept behind MaKey MaKey, how to remap the beta v1.2 boards using the web remapper, different applications that make a MaKey MaKey naturally awesome to use, and a few sample projects. We opened up the floor to open hacking, and that day our Adafruit group buy had just come in. We were able to add to the random hack table some awesome components, such as: male/male and female/female jumper wires, various diffused LEDs, slow and fast cycling LEDs, conductive thread, flat LED panels, sewable LEDs, tactile buttons, and other items. We wrapped up and one of our newest members stayed late to craft a thin copper wire into a flat copper instrument using a mallet. He ended up using a breadboard with the MaKey MaKey and Wolfram software to write his own music program. As with our other Build Night events this month, we also had people working on side projects in the background which added to the creative energy of the room. For this event, one of our members tested out a Gocupi that managed to draw Rear Admiral Grace Hopper and Albert Einstein on the whiteboard in dry erase marker using continuous lines. MaKey MaKey Build Night II: Big Projects! We had a decent turnout for this event, but mostly the attendees were there for their own big projects unrelated to MaKey MaKey. We got a few MaKey MaKey projects in around good company, though. We had members working on a large geodesic Airolite boat, someone showed up to work on their 3D printer and print out their first scale model of a scanned person, our Facilities Director was able to get some critical inventory done, a couple members mounted new shelves that had been donated that day, and one member's daughter wanted to play around with hydrophobics. We also were able to get electronic musical wind chimes made that work very nicely with the MaKey MaKey, and the same member who tinkered with Wolfram software at the prior event made more progress on some of his own MaKey MaKey ideas. MaKey MaKey Build Night III: Advanced Reprogramming! This was one of the build nights I was most excited about, and we had a nice turnout. We walked members through reprogramming the older MaKey MaKeys using the MaKey MaKey sketch for Arduino IDE. We bested Windows and its infernal resistance to unsigned 3rd party drivers, and we advanced onward. We looked at basic reprogramming of the settings.h key bindings, and we also looked at other Arduino programming such as delay, Keyboard.print, Keyboard.press, Keyboard.release, and some other concepts. A father team duo that are also involved in a local high school robotics club showed up and schooled us a little on Arduino with some tricks they had up their sleeves, another father son duo showed up to experience the MaKey MaKey for the first time together and it seemed to blow their minds, and we talked about the new web remapping tool for the beta v1.2 boards. Mad Science Bingo For one of our educational outreach events, we attended hijacked bingo night at a local senior citizen community center. We let everyone have their bingo fun without interruption, but as bingo concluded we invaded with a MaKey MaKey, our hydrophobic drum pad, fruits and veggies, and some flowers. The senior citizens loved it and have invited us back. At one point, we had three participants record themselves singing into a Scratch program that we mapped to the flowers. The room erupted with laughter when the community center manager went to touch the flowers and they sang at her in her patrons' voices. She even lent her voice to be recorded, which sent the room into mad howls. We also made a chain of about dozen people between ground and the triggers. We didn't really invent anything unique here, but it was a fun bonus event for the community center patrons. We ended up tinkering around a little with hydrophobics and electronics. So far after all our events, we ended up with a few more Build Night projects: Hydrophobic Drum Pad (featured in Science and then Homepaged!) annoy friends with this party game: Wonky Pong Smash Smash Revolution ... black acrylic, conductive paint, and conductive thread Electronic Windchimes sewable Cardboard Feet DDR (featured in Video Games!) We've also set out our MaKey MaKey kits for space use now that our January Build Nights are over with. We have a few members with projects they are still working on at the space, a few projects that are still being documented to upload to Instructables, and a few people batting around their own ideas. If we come up with anything else, we'll be sure and update. A couple "lessons learned" here: Random hack tables are awesome. But.. if they are too chaotic and without the right presentation, these can be intimidating to beginners that may want more direction. Multiple Build Nights rule! But.. it is probably best not to hijack every Saturday of a shared workspace like a hackerspace. This could have been orchestrated a little better (my fault). Overall, this was a blast to participate in. Thanks to Joylabz and Instructables! PS.. with two features and one homepage, that gave us 1 and a half years of Pro. One got used, but we're giving away the remaining year of Pro and 3 months of Pro. The bounty: quick connect projects for MaKey MaKey. Ends 3/1 EST. You know what to do..

Topic by smalltortoise