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MCPE server over vpn

Hello,  Could someone please tell me how to make a vpn server so I can play minecraft pe with my friend? More details: I have nexus 4 win 7 computer 

Question by Genius 470    |  last reply


hello Sir i need vpn server how i gate?

I need vpn server like this http://www.vpnsell.com/

Question by khrshimul    |  last reply


[TUT] Setup a VPN on an Xbox 360 and Xbox one Console

Info: There are many benefits to routing your xbox IP through a VPN connection. This ranges from utilizing exclusive American content, to hiding your IP from DDoSers, or even hiding your location from Doxers. This tutorial will show you a loophole that allows you to get around/avoid these hassles. Let us begin. Things you need: WiFi Connection Laptop with LAN port VPN (Virtual Private Network) Ethernet Cable VPN's: IPVanish PureVPN ExpressVPN This tutorial was done using IPVanish When installing these, make sure it sets you up with an American IP so you have access to American Xbox Content. How to Setup VPN on your Xbox Console Use Router Base Connection to Setup VPN on Xbox One of the methods of setting up Xbox One VPN is by tunneling your service via router and then connecting your gaming console and other devices to the router. Note that the setup may vary according to the router you use and the instructions provided by the VPN provider. Use the following steps to configure a VPN service on your router: You need an Ethernet cable and connect your modem to the WAN port in the router. Open your Router’s Control Panel – accessible from your system control panel. Go to the ‘Basic Setup’ / ‘Network’ / ‘Basic’ tab in your router control panel (where you can configure WAN or Internet settings). Enter the setup details provided by your VPN provider (username, password, gateway, subnet mask, etc.). Select the appropriate protocol settings and the change the ‘Connection Type’ based on your router and VPN providers instructions (usually to PPTP, but it depends). Select the appropriate DCHP settings depending on the requirements by your VPN provider. Click the Apply Settings / Save / Connect button and you are done. Now you can connect your Xbox to the router either through Wi-Fi or through Ethernet cable and can enjoy using VPN on your Xbox 360 or Xbox One. Use Your Computer to Setup VPN on Xbox You can also configure a VPN service on your Xbox through sharing the VPN connection on your personal computer with the gaming console. Firstly, setup a VPN connection on your computer: Go to ‘Network and Sharing Center’ from your system’s Control Panel. Click on ‘Setup a New Connection or Network’ and a wizard will appear. Select ‘Connect to a Workplace’ and click ‘Next’. The wizard will ask ‘how do you want to connect?’- select ‘Use my Internet Connection (VPN)’. Next you will have to enter the Internet Address and Destination Name provided by your VPN provider. Enter the details and click ‘Next’. Now enter the Username and Password of your VPN service and click ‘Connect’. If you already have a VPN configured on your computer, use the following steps to connect it to your Xbox: Connect your Xbox with your PC using an Ethernet cable or Wi-Fi. Go to ‘Network and Sharing Center’ from your system’s control panel. Click on the ‘Change Adapter Settings’ on the left side bar. Right click on your VPN connection and click ‘Properties’. Go to the ‘Sharing’ tab and check ‘Allow other network users to connect through this computer’s internet connection’ option. Click on the drop down menu below ‘Home Networking Connection’ and select ‘Local Area Network’. Click ‘Ok’.

Topic by linda.devies    |  last reply


?Thin Client Server help? Answered

Ok, well I am back again with my strange questions but nao this time it is about Thin Clients. I purchased Three Compaq Evo T20 thin clients on ebay, well I want to simply install them in my home, and connect them to my server (which is whatever you want it to be) {not built yet, LOL}? Well, they can use a number of protocols, as they will only be used for simple tasks I.E. Internet Word, and thats it.Here is the link....http://h18000.www1.hp.com/products/quickspecs/10865_div/10865_div.HTML

Question by bwpatton1    |  last reply


They say we should use Tor With a VPN for strong Anonymity is it really helpful ?

If we first Turn One Hotspot shield VPN and then opn tor browser then what will be the path of traffic when leaving my Computer? What i am already Assuming: Data will be encrypted first and reach to VPN server that will then forward the request to first tor relay and then to second and third then coming back in same way ?

Question by nomzaf    |  last reply


Tor/VPN Router [How To Auto-Connect VPN After Tor Connected at Boot]

Dear Instructables Family,Hope you are well and healthy. My name is Enes and i am living in Istanbul. As you know in my country everything is being enforced by brute force to people. Tor, Wikipedia, Imgur, Pastebin, NordVPN, ProtonVPN, Privateinternetacces, PureVPN, etc. many website and service is blocked. There is no "privacy" in my country. For this reason i am looking for a "full privacy solution" for me and who is living same fate since years. I read many article and project but i couldn't believe they are "full privacy solution". Today i encountered with a "Raspberry Pi VPN server project" and i liked it. I have one (RPI 3B) and want to make a full privacy solution with VPN and Tor (with obfs4 bridges it is working but they are blocking everyday our bridges and we need to find another bridges every day). I created a Tor router with RPI and it is working good (little bit slow but i don't have any choice). But i want to add more security and privacy to this router. For example i have a VPN membership but i can not use it because it is heavily blocked. I want to do something but i couldn't find how can i make. Let me explain.My Onion AP is working for now good and when i connect as a client from a computer, i can access https://check.torproject.org website and everything is OK.My VPN membership supports TCP and UDP OpenVPN. It has TCP and UDP .ovpn files with a lots of country. I installed Open VPN on Raspberry and configured it for auto-connect at boot. It is working, when i reboot Raspberry, it connects automatically. But i have a problem.This VPN firm is heavily blocked and i can't use it. I tried ikev2, L2TP, Obfuscated Servers, Onion Servers, Double Servers and Standalone Servers of this VPN but there is no luck. Then i tried something. I connected Tor Router from computer and tried to connect this VPN firm. I could connect, it worked. Because i connected first Tor router and then VPN.My current schema is this:RPI ---> Internet comes from eth0 ---> Tor ----> Share Tor Connection by wlan0To Do:RPI ---> Internet comes from eth0 ---> First Connection Tor (I don't want to share Tor connection immediately because i need to connect VPN with Tor, if i share immediately by iptables, there is no Tor connection and i can't connect VPN) ---> Then connect VPN ---> Share Tor/VPN internet by wlan0I searched on forums, blogs and websites lots of. OpenVPN is using tun0 interface. I have three (3) questions. I am stucked here.1) How can RPI connect VPN with Tor without forward Tor connection? (Connect VPN with Tor and then share Tor/VPN. 2) When i achieved these steps how can i test Tor/VPN connection from a computer (client)? I mean how can i seperate them? 3) Should i add these commands to iptables-ipv4.nat script?-A POSTROUTING -o tun0 -j MASQUERADE -A FORWARD -i tun0 -o wlan0 -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT -A FORWARD -i wlan0 -o tun0 -j ACCEPTIf i achieve this i will be so happy and restful.Could you please help me about these issues?P.S: Sorry for my bad English.Thanks in advance.Best Regards, Enes

Question by ahududu  


Am i really secured and anonymous with HOTSPOT SHIELD?? Answered

Question i want to ask that if i have turned on hotspot shield and i run a port scanner will that port scanner data pass by hotspot shield VPN or from my real ip address? I am confused because i have studied somewhere that hotspot shield vpn actually Only encrypt HTTP and HTTPS protocols so if i run nmap port scanner throw Ms dos command line or any other this type of software or tool by ms word will all my traffic pass by VPN or my real ip? I will select the best answer immediately after i get clean explanation from anybody :) Thanks in advance

Question by nomzaf    |  last reply


Cisco AMP (How to bypass or make a file invisible)?

Hello, I'd like to know how to bypass Cisco AMP so I can use my VPN. I'd also like to ask how to bypass administrative restrictions on plugins so that I may install adblock plus to google chrome. Thank you to any responses.

Topic by NicholasG3    |  last reply


How to remotely shutdown a computer on ANOTHER (EXTERNAL) network?

Just like the question states i am trying to remotely shutdown a computer on another network . basically: MY computer (192.168.0.2) ---------> my Router-------> Internet--------> other router (24.36.64.xxx)--------> other computer (192.168.5.7) I would not like to use vpn or port forwarding. Any Help is appreciated. ps both computers are running windows 7/10 (dual boot)

Question by Genius 470    |  last reply


Portable media build parts question!!

I'm looking to build a portable gaming and media station but I'm stuck on a couple things and am hoping people here might have some suggestions and/or links. Basically, I bought a large aluminum camera case, big enough to hold a 22" led tv in the lid. I am going to mount the tv in the lid, thinking of just drilling the holes and mounting the tv directly to the lid. Any critiques or problems with that would be nice.https://showbox.red/ https://downloadnox.com/ https://downloader.vip/vpn/

Topic by achanakbhayank  


Manually controlling keyboard?

I am looking to control a keyboard using output from another computer. The output must control the other computer by the keyboard. or send keyboard strokes through the wireless keyboard adapter. I can not control second computer by a program, ethernet, or usb direct cable. I might be able to use usb if the imput show as if its a keyboard. I can use old style keyboard ps/2 or usb. I,m trying to control a computer that is on a VPN and it wont allow and connection or programs running like I mentioned. I could get by only controlling the mouse of the other computer from the frist.  

Question by dbartoletbet    |  last reply


How to go to youtube and bypass a zscaler block?

Ok so here are the details, I want to access sites like youtube, and well just youtube and I tried the https protocol and that didn't work and on top of that there's a bug installed within our computer especially designed to keep us away from changing any of the proxy settings in all of these browsers and I only have these 2 browsers: google Chrome and internet explorer. and now i can not send stuff to it via usb and install a vpn they have the usb ports disabled and even if i was to download it i can not run any exe the laptop is running windows 7 pro.     

Question by -f    |  last reply


Wind powered desktop PC, is it remotely possible?

So I was thinking up an idea this afternoon about how I could be more of a PC enthusiast, I came up with this idea: What if I could power a desktop grade PC on just the power supplied by a wind turbine (preferably that I had made myself), and batteries? My plan was to set up a (either or) BOINC Computer specifically for research, or something like a DNS/VPN server or failing that something like a NAS. Anyway, heres what I have been able to find so far in terms of wind turbines and power... http://www.mdpub.com/Wind_Turbine/ https://www.instructables.com/answers/how-to-battery-power-a-desktop-pc/ It seems way over my head, especially the second link to the other question. Computer Specs that I had in mind: Intel i5 K series chip of sorts 8-16 GB of (presumably DDR3 memory) A motherboard, again, not sure exactly what but this can be chosen nearer the time, if it helps, something with around 2-4 PCI-e lanes for numerous GPUs. (This is NOT meant to be a gaming rig). A couple of GTX 760's I was having in mind, something older will do too. (This would be using the CUDA technology for accelerated processing) A Power supply that would fit the bill... 1000 watts? May be needed depending on the number of GPUs I have. I am so ignorantly unaware of how this would work.  Other things that I would need: - A wind turbine that was able to charge batteries during the day (for example) - Batteries - Some sort of converter (I think) to change whatever AC power there may be into DC. I think that is what I need,  Thanks in advance! slippers.

Topic by slippers_    |  last reply


ISP's an their sneaky ways of limiting your internet to a crawl

With more and more restiction hitting internet users I though I write a bit about the methods used to make our life harder than necessary. First example: Heavy gamer... Some people love their Xbox or PC for only one reason, online gaming. Too bad when all of a sudden your ping rates go sky high or the chat has a lag making good conversations during the game impossible. Second example: Streaming media... People like to watch what they want and when they want. Online streaming is a good way to get the latest trailers, catch up with your favourite shows or just to kill some time. Too bad when you notice the connection takes forever and that you can only watch in low quality without running into buffer problems. Last but not least P2P.... Although used for mainly illegal stuff, P2P is still not dead. A lot of software and even collections of documents are shared by the use of various P2P networks. Torrents are the most common ones but it really does not matter once your ISP has hit you hard. So what have all these in common when we speak about ISP troubles you might wonder? Well, firstly they cause a lot of traffic and secondly a large number of connections at the same time. Why would my ISP limit me? 1. You are using your internet for illegal downloads. Although in many cases the ISP won't be able to tell what you are downloading, but they can clearly see the volume of the downloads and that a P2P system is used. Does not take a genius to realise several GB a week on a constant base can't be all legal. 2. Cheap ISP A lot of our providers rent their bandwidth from another provider. This way they can provide cheaper prices but have to make sure not go over the allowance as it would could dearly. A good way of preventing this is to limit speed during so called peak hours - basically whenever a lot of people are online. 3. Your area.... Let's say you are living in a densly populated area. There you often have a single exchange for all internet and phone users. Although the numbers of possible users can be increased by adding more hardware, the bottleneck is the feed to this exchange. As they are owned by a single provider and every other ISP has to pay for the use it becomes clear that this provider will have the best speeds and traffic allowances for the people connected. In return the other ISP(s) will be reduced in speed and sometimes even the type of connection possible, for example blocking all P2P traffic completely. How do I find out what is happening to me? This is indeed a hard one! No ISP will tell you "Yes, we limited you to xxxx and these services are not working on your connection: ...." Their fineprint states you have internet and Email, depending where you are maybe online TV services. But this is only true for standard ports and protocols used! So for your favorite online game it might be possible to download the latest update in the GB range within minutes but still encounter a massive lag during the play sessions. Similar story for low speeds. It is common practise to prioritise traffic to local speed testing servers. This means no matter what "problem" you might have all test will give positive results. So you might be able to get high speeds in your tests but watching a Youtube video can mean to first buffer the entire video before you can watch it. You ISP won't support any requests as long as common speed tests work fine for you. A sure way of testing is to download a Linux distribution from a remote server. How long does it take to download? Now do the same using a P2P download of the same distribution. Did it take much longer or did you have problems connecting to peers? If so you are limited by your ISP. Be aware that this might be true for only one type of P2P network, while others are uneffected. For games check your Ping times against ping times done manual against a known server, for example Google. If they are close all is good, if the game ping is much higher (often in the thausands compared to around 300ms max) you are sucked into limitations. Ok, I am fairly sure I am limited by my ISP, is there anything I can do? If you mainly use the internet for illegal downloads you might want to consider going the legal way. For all others, check below. Main reasons for limits put on your account or connection are congestion (nothing you can do about except trying the ISP that owns your phone network and to pay more - and of course the amount of connections you make. Let me give you an example: Downloading a huge file from a server usually needs a single connection on port80. Doing the same using P2P services requires a lot of simultanious connections to many servers/PC's around the world. Only with enough, fast connections your download will progress at good speeds. You ISP can see the number of connections and cut them at a limit or completely disable the protocol used for the download. The result is crawling speeds for the download and you only see a few peers available. Multiplayer games often use several ports for the traffic, game status, chat, graphic updates like location of other players and so on. So if you play in a world with 8 of your friends and fight against 200 online players all these infos has to get to your system. Having a few kids all enjoying different online sessions at the same time certainly does not help either. ;) Unless you are permanently limited there are a few options to make things better: 1. Limit yourself to the off-peak times for big downloads. 2. Try to avoid multiple game sessions and downloads from a single internet connection, e.g: let the kids play with one console at a time. 3. Change the ports used by your program, sometimes the standard ports are used by everyone else around, changing them gives the ISP the option to spread the load. 4. Last and best option: Limit the amount of allowed connections. For games this is not always possible but for other services it is. Imagine your P2P program using 300 download sources at the same time. Every one has the actual data and a lot of other informations to transmit while your system has to send the receiving info to every single one. On top of all that you have the informations needed to find new peers, coordinate the parts and so on. You can limit those in the settings of the program. So instead of allowing 500 or more connections at the same time go down to 100 or less. Instead of allowing 100 half open connections (used to negotiate the download for a new peer) go down to 20. And of course limiting your own upload and the connections used for it does help a lot. Myths and alternatives.... You might have heard the things like "protocol obfuscation", "port hoppers" and similar exist, same for the "Tor" network and maybe even the "usenet". The myth behind all of them is the claim that oyur ISP won't actually see what you do and what your download. On top of that you have so called "VPN' services. Although some of the services will help you to overcome certain limits it does not change the fact that you ISP still can see your up- download volume and the number of connections in use. And trust me, they are not dumb either, so they will know anyway that you mostly use the internet for illegal downloads. After all, what reasons could you have to use encrypted services or to direct your traffic over VPN networks? Of course being in China or similar countries is a different story due to gouvernment restictions on the internet. As long as you do direct download with only a hand full of connections you should be fine, for everything else it comes down to luck. Protocol obfuscation worked for a few months until ISP's fixed it. The usenet might be an alternative but not for everyone. Even the famous Tor network or dedicated VPN services won't help you once your ISP got you flagged. The will simply limit everything besides standard protocols and ports, so you can use you Email and surf the net, even download directly for a server but everything else might be crippled. As I said earlier there is no way for the user to truely check what limits he has or what ports and protocols might be affected - you ISP won't tell you either. Before you get trapped into a new contract because your ISP is no good turn off all P2P and gaming for a day or two. Try again at night times after a reset of your modem/router. Quite often you will see it works just fine for a while. If so you can limit yourself, use off-peak times and so on. Sometimes it also helps to simply limit the download speed itself. Of course the best alternative is not to use illegal downloads and to seek local content for game servers or online video.

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


Quick rundown various Linux and BSD operating systems:

1.  Debian - one of the older base distributions and currently one of the most popular.  Uses the "apt" package manager for software installation.  Excellent server distribution. 2.  Fedora - the free community edition of Red Hat Linux.  Sponsored by Red Hat Linux.  Uses the "rpm" package manager for software installation. 3.  openSuse - sponsored by Novell, originally developed largely in Europe. 4.  Mageia - fork of an older distribution called Mandriva Linux. 5.  PCLinuxOS - also a fork of Mandriva.  Looks to provide out-of-the-box support for graphics and sound cards. 6.  Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) - based on Fedora, RHEL includes many enterprise-level enhancements and is supported Red Hat corporation. 7.  CentOS Linux - free enterprise-grade operating system that is built from the same source code as RHEL without the proprietary enhancements or support from Red Hat.  8.  Puppy - very small Linux operating system that boots the OS and applications completely into RAM.  Can operate on older computer equipment.  Excellent for use in emergencies and to recover data from hard drives. 9.  FreeBSD - operating system that is based on BSD code. 10.  Ubuntu Linux - easy to use operating system that is based on Debian Linux.  Supported by the Canonical corporation.  Ubuntu means "humanity to others".  Excellent server distribution. 11.  Linux Mint - currently one of the most popular distributions, based on Ubuntu Linux.  Looks to provides complete experience by including browser plugins and media codecs (ie: Flash) upon installation.  Excellent desktop distribution.  Also comes in lightweight editions for older hardware 12.  NetBSD - based on BSD code.  Can be run on a wide range of hardware.  Currently there are 57 different hardware architectures that can run NetBSD. 13.  OpenBSD - based on BSD code.  Source code built from the ground up with security first and foremost as the goal.  Ships "secure by default", that is, all non-essential services are disabled.  OpenBSD has embedded cryptography throughout the operating system; it utilizes OpenSSH, Pseudo Number Random Generators, cryptographic hash functions, cryptographic transforms and crypto hardware support. 14.  ClearOS - server and network distro designed for small businesses.  Based on Red Hat Linux.  Web-based interface controls anti-virus, anti-spam, VPN, content filtering, bandwidth manager, file services, SMTP services, print services, SSL certification, and web services. 15.  Kali Linux - distro that specializes in penetration testing and security auditing.  Over 300 penetration testing tools.  Based on Debian Linux. 16.  Lubuntu - lightweight version of Ubuntu Linux for older computers and netbooks. 17.  Gentoo - highly customizable distro that uses a package system called portage written in Python.  Mascot is Larry the Cow.

Topic by matt392    |  last reply