Search for Visual Studio in Topics


Visual Studio plugin

Hello, I would like to install this realtime c++ on visual studio 2008, but I do not know how to. Thanks for any help

Question by jbaker22  


why won't VsSDK_sfx.exe respond on my computer?

VsSDK_sfx.exe (install file) won't work on my pc is there a file i need to remove with my anti virus product or is it just that vista cannot run programs higher than 2,000 GB?

Question by shoyru_master_11    |  last reply


Timer in Visual Studio 2008 Answered

I need to create a timer in visual studio 2008. I want to have a Console.WriteLine("words"); and then a timer that delays for about one second before it prints the next Console.WriteLine("words"); Can anyone help me?

Question by Jedrokivich    |  last reply


Visual Studio 2013 Troubles

I am attempting to use the C++ editor in Visual Studio, and I am not able to compile my program and create a(n) .exe file.  I am running Windows 7. Any help is appreciated!

Question by StarscreamClone    |  last reply


Arduino Bluetooth to Visual Forms

Hey folks I hav a problem: I am trying to make a GUI in visual forms which displays Data received from an Arduino via Arduino sent with a HC-06 Blutooth module, the data is a 10 cell integer array which should be displayed in 10 textboxes. my problem is how do I retrieve the data from the computer's bluetooth in Visual Forms/Studio. thank you for your help

Topic by Red-Fox    |  last reply


Arduino Bluetooth to Visual Forms

He folks I have a problem I am trying to send data with my arduino via a hc-06 bluetooth module to my pc and display the data with visal forms, my problem is how do I get the data into Visual studio/forms? the data is a 10 cell integer array wich should be displayed as 10 textboxes. or is there a better software to create a GUI thank you in advance

Topic by Red-Fox    |  last reply


Visual Studio Plug-in for Sony Clie

It's been many years, but when the Sony Clie was available I managed to get a Visual Studio plug-in for Clie development. Anyone have the plug-in? Link? Torrent? Anything? I'm trying to repurpose one.

Topic by Sovereignty    |  last reply


How to make an Internet Browser with Visual Studio free from Internet Explorer?

How can I make an internet browser using Visual Studio without just remaking Internet Explorer?

Question by ChildOfYahweh    |  last reply


where to download visual studio 2010 help library ? (i am using Visual C#)

Don't tell "there is in the CD" or "on the help tab" i want to download the "HelpContentSetup.msha" without Help Library Manager because while downloading i couldn't pause it

Question by Rendydevara    |  last reply


How can I create a program that allows me to run it and automatically upload a sketch to arduino without the software?

I have an Arduino uno board, and a robot that can follow, and have obstacle avoidance. My robot is designed for a person at school who has crutches for life, and the robot follows her with her books. I want to create a program with visual studio that automatically uploads each sketch to the board, depend on which button to click on. I already have visual micro for Visual Studio 10, and when I debug it or build it, it just uploads it to the robot. I need it to be a .bat file or a .exe file. If anyone could help me with this, I will be extremely grateful. Any ideas? Below I have a screenshot of what the program plans on doing.

Question by 28holes    |  last reply


I need help writing a short Application for the Windows Phone in Microsoft Visual Basic/Studio.

Can anyone help me write an application in Microsoft Visual Basic/Studio for the Windows Phone so i can control an LED via Arduino through WIFI. Here is an example of what i am trying to do but in visual basic for the windows phone. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v;=ECWn22zKRBA#!

Question by NIkheel94    |  last reply


Is There Any C++ Client For Mac? Answered

Aside from dashcode, is there any c++ client similar to visual c++ studio 2008 express for mac osx

Question by robots199    |  last reply


How to interfacing cc2500 into pc?

Now, i am stuck in my project this state,the data is transfer to pc using cc2500 and pic,then transfer the data pc to pic16f877a.how to takw the data in pc,also i am using visual studio,but how to get the data in cc2500. please helb me  

Question by kumar manoj    |  last reply


Is there windows program that makes apps for the iPhone 3 and 4?

Hi, i'm running a Windows Vista service pack 2 PC and i'd like to develop apps for the iPhone and the programs interface is close to the same function as Game Maker, Visual Studio and Dreamweaver MX 2002, it has got four modes that are avalible and it MUST let me select 1 of them every time i start the software and it should be a lite or beta of the software so that i can have it forever and buy it if i like it and i'd like to have these requirements: Normal app maker mode: able to build advanced software has all the formatting of Visual Studio Panels for inserting objects Buttons Web Browser formatting (web pages are viewed inside this) Comment box adder Title box adder Radio Buttons CheckBoxes  

Question by shoyru_master_11    |  last reply


Arduino Debugger Preview - 10 Beta Testers Required

The Visual Micro Arduino debug tools seemlessly combine simple debug features into the free Visual Studio plugin. The tools allow us to make use of the source code breakpoint features of Visual Studio. Please read and understand all of these documents if you are working on dangerous projects such as critical devices and/or moving machines. There are 15 draft documents available on visualmicro.com, this is a link to the first document Arduino Debugger Overview In the image below we can see a number of debug breakpoints, some are conditional. In the code, the old style debug messages are commented because they are no longer needed :) The debugger includes optional trace or break, jump to source, edit and continue. All Arduino variables or expressions can be included in breakpoint reporting. String messages are not stored on the Arduinio which allows long an informative messages to be created without using Arduino RAM and without need to alter source codes. The debug upgrade is expected to be free for educational use, $50 hobby use, $200 commercial use. 10 beta testers are required whom will each be provided with a free license. Please contact instructablesbeta@visualmicro.com Due for release June 2012

Topic by visualmicro  


Anyone know of a good decompiler? Answered

I was recently asked to make some mods to a program I made a few years ago, however, I can't for the life of me find my source code.  Does anyone know of a free decompiler that I can use?  I tried a few that I found on Google, but they all wanted money, and I'm not willing to spend the money. I made the program with VB express 2005, (the file I want to decompile is a .exe file obviously) and I currently use Visual Studio 2010.  (I still have my VB 2005 install disc if I need it... but I think there is no reason why I should need it) Thanks in advance!

Question by thegeeke    |  last reply


Controlling multiple Arduino pins in VB or C#? Answered

How do I control different pins of an Arduino via VB or C#. Something simple, for instance; if I created 4 buttons. Button 1 would turn ON pin 13, button 2 would turn OFF pin 13. Button 3 would turn ON pin 12 and button 4 would OFF pin 12. I know that it works via a serial port, but I can only control 1 pin. Simple stuff, but I just can't figure it out. PLEASE HELP!!!!

Question by cmcg182    |  last reply


Programming compilers?

Hi guys! Well, I usually program using Microsoft's visual studio suite; however, I'm getting tired of my programs requiring the .net framework to run. Basically, I was wondering what compilers programmers use to write their programs. I really don't care what the language is, I have a fairly broad knowledge of programming languages, and I could always pick up another if need be. Anyway, could anyone point me out a few names of compilers? I would be very grateful. (Particularly if they were free) Thanks!

Question by transistorguy    |  last reply


How to connect an RFID card with a database?

Hello. I have been able to successfully read data from my RFID card using the card reader but I cant seem to connect my RFID card with my database that I have created using Microsoft Access and Visual Studio 2010. I want to be able to use my card to read data from the database when i swipe it and also be able to store data back to the card in order to update the information on each card. Please how do i go about this? I am using an arduino uno board and an RDM 6300 RFID reader 125kHz.

Question by rasy09    |  last reply


UART programming for AVR Butterfly help

Hey everyone, I need help with programming the AVR Butterfly with an FM transmitter code that I found on the net. I have all the pieces soldered together (nothing exploded or smoked) and I am trying to upload a file, however, I cannot get it to connect to the BASIC Stamp adapter from serial-to-UART. What I have: Usb-To-Serial Basic Stamp Adapter AVR Butterfly (Butterfly is being programmed through the UART ports) I am using AVR Studio 4 to upload the code, but it will neither confirm that the serial cable is there nor after doing the holding-the-joystick process to tell the butterfly to go into programming mode for the program to see it. Am I doing something wrong? Or is there an easier program to upload the code? I also have Visual Studios '05 and the Basic Stamp program from the Parallax website. If its any good to say, I also have the USBTinyISP programmer that can connect to the ISP ports on the Butterfly. Any help would be appreciated!

Topic by KT Gadget    |  last reply


Use Computer To Control A Simple Alarm System?

I have a project for a course in school where I have to develop an interface for a specific task. The task that I would like to choose is a simple home alarm system. I would like to essentially control a simple device by my computer. I am not sure what would be the best method of connecting the device to my computer, be it USB, Serial, or Parallel. I would like to create a sort of alarm box with sensors, I can arm  / disarm the alarm from the computer interface, and if the alarm is armed, and a sensor is triggered (for example, magnets in a door are separated), then the alarm will sound, and to get the alarm to stop sounding you have to enter in a code into the GUI on the computer. I think I can code the GUI fairly easily, but as far as hardware side of things I'm really not sure where to go. I don't have any experience with things like arduino. Unfortunetly for this assignmnt I have to write the code aspect in C# (Visual Studios .NET) Any help is much appreciated :). Thank you,

Question by Hexbomber    |  last reply


Pan Tilt Face Detection

HI I'M GETTING THESE ERRORS IN VC++ 2010, HOW DO I RESOLVE THIS? 1>facedetect.obj : error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "public: void __thiscall Tserial::disconnect(void)" (?disconnect@Tserial@@QAEXXZ) referenced in function _main 1>facedetect.obj : error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "public: int __thiscall Tserial::connect(char *,int,enum serial_parity)" (?connect@Tserial@@QAEHPADHW4serial_parity@@@Z) referenced in function _main 1>facedetect.obj : error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "public: __thiscall Tserial::Tserial(void)" (??0Tserial@@QAE@XZ) referenced in function _main 1>facedetect.obj : error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "public: __thiscall Tserial::~Tserial(void)" (??1Tserial@@QAE@XZ) referenced in function "public: void * __thiscall Tserial::`scalar deleting destructor'(unsigned int)" (??_GTserial@@QAEPAXI@Z) 1>facedetect.obj : error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "public: void __thiscall Tserial::sendChar(char)" (?sendChar@Tserial@@QAEXD@Z) referenced in function "void __cdecl detectAndDisplay(class cv::Mat)" (?detectAndDisplay@@YAXVMat@cv@@@Z) 1>c:\users\auvsi2014\documents\visual studio 2010\Projects\facedetect\Debug\facedetect.exe : fatal error LNK1120: 5 unresolved externals

Topic by dnarayanan93    |  last reply


Judging Criteria concern...

I was just looking at the Finalist in the Coded Creations Contest sponsored by Microsoft. There are very few where the main part of the project they built was "programming" based, One I read even stated right in the instructable that they just "copied the code from somewhere online which they could not remember were". Another showed how to install software which did involve programming... While the finalists chosen were definately cool and Great instructables were they really "Coded Creations"? Of the entries submitted there were several that did not make the finals that took advantage of thing specifically mentioned in the contest description:  "use of Visual Studio, Microsoft Azure, Kinect/Xbox, Windows Phone apps, or any Windows app". One entry did a phone app that even had voice control.. it was super cool and showed great programming tecniques and cool features but again did not make the finals.  Should the judging not have looked closer at the theme of the contest when picking the best to be finalists? It is like if I build an awsome Jet car from scratch and as part of it I programmed the clock by using code I found online... would that deserve to be in the finals? Sure a Jet Car is awsome but copying code for a non integeral clock while technically it is "coding" but it is not what makes the jet car awsome. I bet if it was stricktly a team from Microsoft doing the judging it would be a totaly different list. Anyone else have thoughts on this?

Topic by MadDocks    |  last reply


ME Position at IDEO Chicago

Global design and innovation consultancy IDEO, in search of a creative, cutting-edge senior engineer to help bring user-centered designs products and services to life. Start date: immediately. Location: Chicago. YOU: * Are naturally curious, creative, and on top of technology trends. * Are an inspiring engineering thinker and doer who works well with individuals of varying (i.e., non-engineering) backgrounds. * Are an engineer at heart, but like the idea of embracing tasks as varied as building prototypes for field-testing in Kenya to helping a large Midwestern consumer goods company plan out a strategic roadmap for a new product category. * Are a good visual and verbal communicator who can explain complex technical concepts simply and clearly to clients—and fellow team members. * Have deep engineering expertise (3-5 years) stewarding innovations from concept through launch, or analyzing and solving complex problems. * Love creating looks-like/works-like prototypes and have relevant skills such as fluency in 3D CAD, basic skills in interactive electronic prototyping, good shop skills etc. * Hold a master’s degree in an engineering or related field or have equivalent professional experience. * Have a diverse and eclectic background that will add new perspective to our team. IDEO CHICAGO: * Is a design and innovation consultancy that uses human-centered design-thinking to help businesses and not-for-profits grow via the creation of new-to-the-world products, services, and environments. * Provides a creative playground for just a few of following disciplines: Human Factors Research, Engineering, Industrial, Communication, Business, Environments, and Interaction Design+ Is a studio environment that is highly collaborative and unconventional, that encourages and supports new ideas, and that is playfully serious and non-hierarchical. If you like getting your hands dirty, you’ll love our organic rooftop garden. * Is known for its award-winning work in the areas of branded experiences, energy, financial services, health and wellness, consumer products, and food and beverage, among others. * Counts among our diverse clients: AT&T;, PNC, McDonald’s, Target, Ford Motor Company, and Bayer, among others. * Is a 55-plus-person studio in the heart of Chicago’s West Loop. If this sounds like a good professional and personal match, please provide us with a portfolio of previous work. The portfolio may include—but doesn’t have to be limited to—CAD images, technical drawings, part/prototype pictures, and mathematical and technical simulations. We’d also love to hear about your hobbies, passions, and creativity outside of engineering. We’re looking forward to meeting you. http://www.ideo.com/culture/career/senior-mechanical-engineer/

Topic by mweibler  


One-Stop Shop for Makers

Hi Everyone,  I'm Sarah Calvillo, a visual artist and interactive designer based in San Francisco. I created Steampunk Mr. Potato Head on instructables a while back.  I recently built the first one-stop shop for makers in the U.S. to find and book affordable studio time. Growing up, I've watched my father build our house from his personal workshop. Living in the city, I've found there is limited space to build my own projects. I wanted to create a platform where you could rent space and resources from your community. Funding this project was a major challenge, so I resorted to bartering design for development services with a friend to build Concourse. It took us a couple months to build and launch the site. My only advice for someone replicating this project like this is not to fear being scrappy or hacky. Build what you can, then iterate on what you've built. As a one-woman operation, I’ve been focusing my efforts on helping the Bay Area to start. However, Concourse is open for anyone anywhere to use. You can either rent out your workshop or rent someone else. Visit us Concourse.co.  Hope I can help you continue making a create cool stuff on Instructables. DM me for more information about Concourse. Alright ladies and gents, take good care and thanks for your time. All the best, Sarah

Topic by saritamarianyc  


August 2015 Build Night with Freescale

#BUILDNIGHT 25 SPACES AVAILABLE Deadline to sign up: June 12, 2015. Accepted spaces will be notified by June 15, 2015. Read our FAQ to learn more about the Build Night program rules and how to make the most out of this event for your space. AUGUST BUILD NIGHT We are partnering with Freescale, DIY kits and products, for our August 2015 build night. Sign up to participate in the build night and we will ship you a package that includes the following: (2) FRDM-K64 Development Board (2) Accelerometer/Gyro shield boards (3) FRDM –KL25Z Development Board HOW TO PARTICIPATE: Host a Build Night: pick a time in August to host a project build night using the Freescale boards. You can host multiple build nights during August to work on your projects. Post 2 Instructables: post 2 Instructables using the boards. Not posting these Instructables will affect your chances to participate in future build nights. Brownie Points (not required): after the build night post a forum topic on Instructables about your event. Include pictures, stories, etc... Here are two examples from past build nights: Noisebridge and Makers Local 256. We may even feature your photos on the homepage. REWARDS: If your submitted Instructable for this event gets featured by one of our editors we will send you an Instructables Prize Pack which includes: Instructables t-shirt, stickers, and patches. This forum post has guidelines for posting feature worthy projects. Be sure to let people at your event know so they can win a prize pack! Limit 3 per makerspace. RESOURCES: Instructables App (for documentation during the build night): iOS and Android FRDM-K64F: Segger debug driver tutorial, Toggling an RGB LED, Using a timer interrupt FRDM-KL25Z: Projects & Examples, Blinking LED with Visual Studio Accelerometer/Gyro Shield Boards: Hackaday collection of Freescale-inspired projects REACH OUT TO US ON SOCIAL MEDIA #BUILDNIGHT #INSTRUCTABLES #FREESCALE Twitter: @Instructables, @freescale Instagram: @Instructables www.facebook.com/freescale https://www.facebook.com/instructables SIGN UP: Fill out this form

Topic by Carleyy    |  last reply


Something from Nothing: Films on Design & Architecture

If you're interested in Yerba Buena Center for the Arts' TechnoCRAFT exhibition, you might also want to know about the design film series we're hosting this summer.  See below for more information. SOMETHING FROM NOTHING: FILMS ON DESIGN & ARCHITECTURE Sundays, Jul 11 thru Sep 5, 2 pm In conjunction with our TechnoCRAFT gallery exhibition, we present these eight matinee screenings, covering not only design, but architecture, motion graphics and craft. Sun, Jul 11, 2 pm Refrigerator Fetish: Vintage Industrial Design Films We kick off the series with a selection of funny, bizarre, and maybe even educational vintage product design films, from the 1920s forward. Examining the sensuality of the fridge, the rhapsody of the pencil and the mysterious polishing of unknowable objects, this promises to be a one-of-a-kind day at the movies. Presented live by film archivist Dennis Nyback. Sun, Jul 18, 2 pm Citizen Architect: Samuel Mockbee and the Spirit of the Rural Studio By Sam Wainwright Douglas Citizen Architect chronicles the work of the late activist architect Samuel Mockbee, and his radical educational program known as the Rural Studio. The program teaches students about the social responsibilities of architecture and charges them to provide original and inspirational homes and buildings (mostly from salvaged materials) in rural west Alabama, one of the poorest communities in the country (2010, 60 min, digital video). Preceded by the short Robin Hood Gardens (Or Every Brutalist Structure For Itself) by Martin Ginestie (2010, 17 min, digital video) Sun, Jul 25, 2 pm wow+flutter Assembled by onedotzero, the London-based cutting-edge new media group, this compilation program showcases the most progressive and unpredictable work in motion graphics and short-form media. Fresh talent and celebrated masters alike strive to expand, blur and explode traditional notions of what future moving images could be as a playground for creative expression. (2009, 70 min, digital video) Sun, Aug 1, 2 pm The Greening of Southie By Ian Cheney This incisive new documentary is set in the traditionally Irish-American working-class neighborhood of South Boston, where a new kind of building is taking shape. From wheatboard cabinetry to recycled steel, bamboo flooring to dual-flush toilets, the Macallen building is a leader in the emerging field of environmentally friendly design. But Boston's steel-toed union workers aren't sure they like it. And when things start to go wrong, the young development team gets a little more than they bargained for. A film about building the city of tomorrow…today. (2008, 72 min, digital video) Sun, Aug 15, 2 pm Infinite Space: The Architecture of John Lautner By Murray Grigor John Lautner was the Southern California architect. Even if his name isn’t familiar, you have likely seen pictures of some of his most famous works, such as the space-age “Chemosphere,” the octagonal house on a hill, which has become a Los Angeles landmark. Lautner believed that the purpose of architecture is to create timeless, free, joyous spaces for all activities in life. Infinite Space traces the lifelong quest of a man to create “architecture that has no beginning and no end.” (2009, 90 min, digital video) Sun, Aug 22, 2 pm Rem Koolhaas: A Kind of Architect By Markus Heidingsfelder and Min Tesch Rarely has an architect caused as much sensation outside of the architecture community as Rem Koolhaas. His outstanding creations such as the Dutch Embassy in Berlin, the Seattle Library, and the Casa da Musica concert hall in Porto are working examples of his visionary theories about architecture and urban society. An engaging portrait of the man and his work, the film takes us to the heart of his ideas. Koolhaas has stated "it's the only film about me that I have liked." (2008, 97 min, digital video) Sun, Aug 29, 2 pm The Visual Language of Herbert Matter By Reto Caduff SPECIAL SNEAK PREVIEW! A revealing look at the life story of a highly influential mid-century modern design master. Known as a quintessential designer's designer, Swiss-born Herbert Matter is largely credited with expanding the use of photography as a design tool and bringing the semantics of fine art into the realm of applied arts. Through never-before-seen footage, personal photography and stunning graphic design, the film explores the social and cultural impact of his personal visual language that influenced a generation of designers and artists. (2010, digital video) Sun, Sep 5, 2 pm Handmade Nation By Faythe Levine This charmingly low-fi film documents the contemporary crafting community. These artists, crafters and designers marry historical techniques, punk and D.I.Y ethos while being influenced by traditional handiwork, modern aesthetics, and politics. (2009, 65 min, digital video) Where: Something from Nothing: Films on Design & Architecture – 701 Mission St., San Francisco, CA 94103 – YBCA Screening Room Public Info: 415-978-2787 or ybca.org $8 regular; $6 students, seniors, teachers & YBCA members Enjoy same-day gallery admission for all YBCA presented films!

Topic by YBCA  


Field report: Mads Hobye as an Artist-in-residence at Instructables

Mads Hobye was granted an artist-in-residence at Instructables for September 2012. Instructables is a web-based documentation platform where passionate people share projects they do, and how to do it. Because of the creative nature of the website, Instructables also have lab facilities for their own co-workers and for artist-in-residences. During September, Mads had the honor to use their lab to build and document multiple prototypes to be shared on their website. I choose to put my focus on building interactive noise machines, since this ties into my PhD and my interest in creating non-trivial internal complexity. I have been working long into the night most days and it has been really interesting to have the chance to focus on one thing at the time. Although the primary purpose of the stay was to explore the potentials of designing interactive sound machines, a couple of other side outcomes were also planned. First, to see how Instructables organized their creative workspace and get inspiration for organizing the upcoming Connectivity Lab at Medea. Second, to see if Instructables would be a suitable platform for documenting the creative practices at Medea. Take aways from Instructables as a creative workspace Although Instructables primarily is a company running a website, they have quite extensive lab facilities. This consisted of a small lab at the office (sewing, electronics and woodwork) and two blocks down they had a whole space filled with laser cutters and 3D printers. This is located right beside the Techshop, which is a full-fledged lab for everything from metal to 3D printing. I have picked up the following things that struck me as really good ways of structuring lab work: Documentation table: A documentation table with lamps, camera and a white sheet of paper as background enables people to quickly document their projects with a nice white background. It was interesting to see how this improved the overall quality of the documentation. Suddenly a breadboard and some wires became a piece of art or a pedagogical platform for show and tell instead of an unfinished project. Show-and-tell meetings: Twice a week they meet at two o'clock to do a show and tell. Here they take a round and everyone says what they are working on in one or two sentences. This is a really easy way to get everyone updated and it takes no time at all. If you are not present you can email out one sentence telling everyone what you are doing. Once a week it is about the specific day and once a week it is about the coming week. Have everything in the same lab: The separation between the labs has confirmed to me the importance of having everything in the same space. It takes time to walk two blocks to lasercut which limits the creative process of iterating between e.g. lasercutting and soldering. Instructables as a workspace was one of the most easy going creative loving workspaces I have ever had the chance to be a part of. Although I never got to know the formal rules, you had a clear sense that people had the freedom to prioritise their own work day and combine it with creative side projects (as long as they documented them of course). Instructables as a knowledge sharing platform for the Medea Connectivity lab Instructables works well for sharing individual recipes for others to use, but what came as a surprise to me was the ability to create groups as individually branded websites. This enables a group of people to collect their recipes under a common theme or brand. We will use this as a common platform to share the knowledge created in the Medea Connectivity Lab. This way people can get an overview of the projects done in the lab. This will become a mandatory part of using the lab in the sense that students and co-workers will be encouraged to document their projects and publish them in the group. So far my experience with posting instructables has been quite interesting and overwhelming. Where projects normally ends as interesting portfolio documentation, the detailed documentation of the build process enables others to recreate your designs or their own versions of them. So far this has resulted in multiple people making their own version. One example is the Arduino implementation of the touche shield (https://www.instructables.com/id/Touche-for-Arduino-Advanced-touch-sensing/). This was published in May 2012. As of now, I know of ten people who have recreated the design and just as many has made suggestions for improvement. Another project has been rewritten by an enthusiast in Dubai. It now runs faster and uses less memory. You can find the preliminary group for Medea connectivity lab here. Non-trivial-internal Complexity as facilitator for curiosity = making noise machines As a part of being an artist-in-residence at Instructables, I took it upon myself to build of couple of noise machines / music boxes. My interest was in designing objects that would enable people to explore the world of sound synthesis and for me to get a better understanding of how the different interfaces enables different interactions and sound qualities. This is a part of an ongoing investigation on creating interactions for curiosity. It has been an intense experience. Trying to build as many interfaces as possible within one month. I have tried to make all of them stand-out as finished, while still being hackable pieces. Everything I have done is published on Instructables for others to experiment with. All of the projects consist of a few basic components: An interface and sometimes a screen or a led matrix. The basic sound component is either a Gameduino or a software synth written for the Arduino platform. You can find an overview of the results here and I will introduce them in this article as well. Although arduinos are good for simple action <-> reaction interactivity, there are a limited amount of examples that work with more complex interactions. Here I mean beyond game design’s way of working with narratives, but more in the sense of adding personality to your projects. Personality not as much in the way of looks (e.g. putting an Arduino into a teddy bear), but more in the way of complex interactions that makes you curious about its devices potential possibilities. My interest as an artist-in-residence at Instructables were to design different machines that would spark the user’s curiosity. Here, simply put, curiosity lies between the extremes of chaos and predictability. Where chaos becomes uninteresting (from an interaction design point of view) because of its uncontrollable nature and order becomes so predictable that the interaction itself slides into the background of the end-product of the interaction itself. One such example is the light switch. As an adult you usually do not notice your interaction with it. The core question then became how to make people who are interacting with it drawn by their own curiosity of not being able to decode the interaction pattern, all at the same time having a sense that their actions are the main contributor to the sounds. Most of these machines would have been simpler to make as software programs on a computer or even as multitouch applications on a smartphone, but I wanted to have an aesthetic criteria as a frame for my experiments: I wanted to create simple tangible interfaces that would inspire curiosity. The objects themselves should welcome the user to try out and explore their interfaces. Last, I wanted each experiment to be self-contained. Instead of them becoming interfaces for a laptop, they should be the ones who created the music. The end results are still crude and mostly serves as interaction enclosures with future potentials, although they do hint at different interesting interaction qualities. You can find an overview of the boxes here. The singing plant plays with a classic trick of sparking people’s curiosity by adding unconventional interaction qualities to a familiar object. The Kaosduino serves as a platform to explore the complexity of touch on x-y surfaces. The Matrix machine serves as a platform to explore the potential of emergent sound patterns converted from particle systems. The algorithmic noise machine serves as platform to explore the boundaries between chaos and order through complex bit shifting algorithms. Better ways to debug the internals of the Arduino board As a side project, I decided to improve on the debugging capabilities of the Arduino platform. This was in line with working with internal complexity which can be hard to comprehend as the code grows. The program enables you to visualize realtime data on the Arduino board. You are usually stuck with the standard serial output. As the complexity of your Arduino code grows, this makes it impossible to comprehend what is actually going on inside the board. To solve this I have created a little library that will enable you to create your own custom GUI for your Arduino projects. Watch this video to get a demonstration of a basic hello world with a potmeter and a diode: The following are a few key features of the tool: Custom design your interface from the Arduino board: You define which sliders, graphs and buttons you need for your interface. You do this in your Arduino sketch which means that the GUI program acts as a slave to the sketch. All information is stored in your board. Visualize and manipulate realtime data: Whether you are making an RGB light controller or a robot arm, getting a graphical feedback is crucial to understand what is going on inside the board. This enables you to understand whether it is your hardware or the code that is causing problem. Further, the sliders and buttons enable you to tweak the individual parameters in realtime. This way you can see what effect different thresholds have on the interaction. Use the same app for all your Arduino projects: I have made tons of small apps for different projects. My problem is always to find them again a year later. Because we save everything in the Arduino, I only need to keep one app around the Arduino and it will automatically configure the app for the current project. Prototype the interface before you turn on the soldering iron: Because you can design the GUI as you like it (within reasonable limits), you can prototype the interface before you have made a physical interface. This also enables you to divide the tasks between multiple people, e.g. one person is working on the hardware and another person is working on the code. When you have made the physical interface the Guino will integrate seamlessly. You can find the instructables for the Guino interface here. About the author Mads Hobye (b. 1980) is a PhD student in interaction design at Medea Collaborative Media Initiative, Malmö University, Sweden, and co-founder of the Illutron collaborative interactive art studio. He focuses on how digital material can be used for exploring social transformative play situated in the context of everyday life. He has done several large-scale installations and working prototypes, which he is using as a basis for his PhD research. More information is available on Hobye’s work at www.hobye.dk.

Topic by madshobye  


Open Call: Pier 9 & Market Street Prototyping Festival Keystone Project

MARKET STREET PROTOTYPING FESTIVAL OPEN CALL Autodesk Keystone Project Call Opens: July 11, 2014 Call Closes: September 2, 2014 Shortlist Interviews: September 17-19, 2014 Proposal Selection: October 1, 2014 CALL SUMMARY: The San Francisco Planning Department has partnered with Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) to produce the Market Street Prototyping Festival: an innovative, hands-on, publicly sourced approach to creating the next chapter of San Francisco’s public life. The Market Street Prototyping Festival builds upon a five-year, multi-agency effort for a Better Market Street to re-establish San Francisco’s civic spine as a place to stop and spend time, meet friends, people watch, or just stroll and experience the scenery. As a formal piece of the planning process, the Prototyping Festival will commission and exhibit up to 50 design projects that aim to improve lives by improving public spaces. Each of the selected prototype projects will be installed on Market Street for the full duration of the three-day festival, which will take place in April 9-11, 2015. Matched with one of five Festival Districts on Market, selected teams will work directly with community members to shape the direction of their designs. The call for applications for those 50 projects is currently open and will close on September 2nd, 2014. More information on that process can be found on the Market Street Prototyping Festival website. Market Street will be broken out into 5 districts along the corridor: Civic Center, Central Market, Retail, Financial, Embarcadero. Each district, or "Block," will be represented by a Block Captain. Each Captain will mentor 10 selected prototyping teams and will be responsible for developing their own Keystone Project that will serve as the primary focal point for each district. As the Block Captain for the Embarcadero district, Autodesk is seeking proposals from engineers, industrial designers, architects, artists, and interactive designers for a large-scale Keystone Project to serve as a physical, visual and social anchor for the Embarcadero section of the festival. While there is no official theme for the festival itself, the Autodesk Keystone Project should relate to the ethos “Inspire, Design, Create.” Additionally, it should connect to the character of the Pier 9 Workshop where artists, designers and fabricators are empowered to test the limits of existing technology, both digital and mechanical. Special consideration may be given to projects that incorporate the following themes related to place-making and the unique social and spatial conditions of the Embarcadero district: • site specificity: social, cultural, geographic, and civic histories • connecting digital and physical realms • daring experimentation/playful prototyping • edge condition: city + waterfront • wayfinding and transportation networks LOCATION: Over the course of the festival, the city anticipates foot traffic of over 300,000 visitors. The Keystone Project may be installed anywhere within the festival’s Embarcadero district, which starts at the intersection of Market and Spear Street, extending to the traffic island at Embarcadero and Market, possibly including Jimmy Herman Plaza. See the map on the Market Street Prototyping Festival website for more details and note that Autodesks main San Francisco office is located at 1 Market. PRECEDENTS: The following projects are examples of what the application review committee is looking for in terms of scale, tone and available resources. These samples are meant to serve purely as a reference and are not works that will be featured at the festival. - Sukkah City, Various, New York - 21 Balançoires (21 Swings), Daily tous les jours, Montreal - Light Drift, J. Meejin Yoon, Philadelphia                 (Note: Projects for the 2014 Urban Prototyping festival cannot be installed in the bay.) - Digital Empathy, Julianne Swartz, New York LOGISTICS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SUPPORT: The selected project and team will be fully supported by the Pier 9 Workshop! We look forward to having you join our creative community of Artists in Residence, other Creative Projects Teams, and the folks who make Instructables.com go. We provide ample opportunities to collaborate with other designers and makers, to receive training on any of the machines in our workshop, gain software support for all Autodesk products (including free software licenses), and call upon the expertise of our fantastic Shop Staff. We can supply a modest office workspace and 24-hour access to the workshop. All basic workshop supplies will be covered, including hardware, sheet goods, finishes, and prototyping materials. Additional funding will be provided at an amount to be determined. We expect to support an innovative and inspiring project that reflects the use of our world-class facilities, at a scale similar to the precedents listed. For more information on the amenities available at Pier 9, see the Pier 9 Overview and Machine Catalog Instructables. Your project will also receive support from Autodesk’s public relations team, marketing team, video and photo documentation team, software specialists, and workshop fabrication specialists. There will be an expectation that you will work collaboratively with all of these groups to share the progress and product of your work. Finally, we have an Advisory Committee representing expertise in areas of landscape architecture, sustainability, and digital fabrication that can be called upon for consultation and critical feedback at particular points in the project timeline. The selected artist or team will be expected to formally share their progress throughout the development and fabrication process with the creative community at Pier 9 and beyond. This includes: • posting Instructables related to the making of the project • 2 presentations to the Advisory Committee for feedback • 1 lunchtime presentation to the full Pier 9 community, near project completion TIMELINE: July 11, 2014 —RFP Release July 22, 2014 —12pm lunchtime RFP Info Session at Pier 9 September 2, 2014 —Proposals Due September 17-19, 2014 — Semifinalist interviews October 1, 2014 —Keystone project announced October - December, 2014 — periodic consultations with members of Advisory Board Early December, 2014 — Presentation and critique with the Advisory Board Early February, 2015 — Follow-up presentation and critique with the Advisory Board 2 weeks before festival —Dress rehearsal (deadline for full assembly and functionality) April 9-11, 2015 —Installation and three-day festival presentation APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: - 1 page statement regarding the concept, siting, and fabrication strategy for your proposal - Up to 5 photos/videos of mock-ups or prior work - CV including exhibition history (if applicable) - Proposed budget outline (Please include direct costs, materials, artist fees, contractors, and any additional project contributors or contractors) - Draft project calendar including proposed dates for prototyping workflow, workshop production time, completion time(s), and out-of-town dates (if applicable) - List of anticipated machines and materials needed ABOUT PIER 9: Autodesk’s Pier 9 workshop is a world-class fabrication facility on the San Francisco Bay. The Artist in Residence (AiR) program gives artists, designers and Instructables authors a chance to work with us in our lab and workshops to explore, create, and document innovative projects with our tools and resources and share them with the DIY community. AiRs are invited to come for a period of several weeks to several months, during which they will work on projects that are shared across the Autodesk Studio Communities. The primary goals of the residency program are to produce top-level inspirational content and to connect innovative and creative individuals with our unique set of tools and resources. Questions and inquiries are encouraged. We look forward to learning more about your work. Please submit applications with all materials compiled in a .zip file titled with your project name to: P9PublicPrograms@Autodesk.com. ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: Market Street Prototyping Festival Homepage Autodesk Engagement Announcement Pier 9 Overview Pier 9 Machine Catalog

Topic by brinstructables