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Call for Designers: Wearable Tech Showcase at Bay Area Maker Faire 2012

Call for Wearable Tech Designers Bay Area Maker Faire 2012 Please contact Lynne Bruning lynne@lynnebruning.com  or Alexa alexa@artfuture.com website Open to all makers of wearable tech.   Bring out your smart clothes, blink and bling and rock the runway at Maker Faire.

Topic by Lynne Bruning  


Exploratorium's 2nd Skin: Call for Artists

Hi Instructables community - Do you work in wearable computing? 2nd Skin will be showcasing works that fuse fashion, technology, and art to address life in the 21st century on April 25th at the Exploratorium. This call closes Friday, February 29. Thanks for your time! -Jessi ~Call for Artists: 2nd Skinhttp://www.exploratorium.edu/2ndskin/The Exploratorium invites artists creating wearable computing, wearable art, or related performances to submit works for 2nd Skin: Imaginative Designs in Digital & Analog Clothing. This exhibition features works that fuse fashion, technology, and art to address life in the 21st century. Existing or proposed works in all media are welcome, including fabric, soft-circuitry, found-object, video, installation, and performance. 2nd Skin opens Friday, April 25 at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, CA. The opening night celebration will include performances, a runway show, and installations. Select works will remain on display through Sunday, September 7, 2008. Participating artists will receive a modest honorarium.To apply, please submit: 1-5 images (JPEG or PDF under 1 MB/ea) or URL link Brief statement (1-3 paragraphs) describing the art and concept behind it Artist resume / CV Estimated costs for shipping, fabrication, or installation, if anyPlease email submissions to Pamela Winfrey, Curator/ Senior Artist, at pamw@exploratorium.edu.Deadline: Friday, February 29, 20082nd Skin WebsiteExplOratorium2nd Skin Press Release

Topic by JessiJ  


OPEN CALL: eTextile and wearable computing fashion show

OPEN CALL: Maker Faire eTextile and wearable computing fashion show location: Hall of Science NYC date of show: 25/26 September deadline: 15 September 2010 requirements: item must be wearable and utilize a computer in some manner submit entries: lynne@lynnebruning.com website: http://bit.ly/9b4PpP video of eTextile show from Maker Faire Bay Area 2010 Bring it on!

Topic by Lynne Bruning  


Wearable laptop computer sling for stand-up use?

I want to stand up while using my laptop, but instead of putting the laptop on a stand, I want to WEAR it like a sling in front of me while I'm using it.  Maybe something strappy that would hold the laptop securely while I type etc. It's a 15" (diagonal) screen laptop, and not especially lightweight, so I'd prefer not to support its weight entirely by my neck. I'd appreciate any ideas for how to make something like that!

Question by wimsycat    |  last reply


Open Call: Detroit Maker Faire: eTextile Fashion Show

Have an eTextile wearable computing project to share at the Detroit Maker Faire? Then email me and get your garment on the runway at the Detroit Maker Faire eTextile Fashion Show! date: 31 July 2010 - 1 August 2010 location: The Henry Ford producer:  Lynne Bruning contact: lynne@lynnebruning.com Please check the website for more information. See what your Bay Area eTextile colleagues have been innovating: Bay Area eTextile fashion show video from ArtFuture http://bit.ly/aN9ZcJ Come on Detroit - you can do it better! Bring it on!

Topic by Lynne Bruning  


Wearable digital billboard (DIY battery powered monitor)??

Hi, I am looking for a way to turn an LCD computer monitor into a wearable digital billboard, but I don't really know where to start. I thought someone may did already a similar hack so I try posting here my questions. Is it possible to use batteries for a screen about 22" big? Could someone point me to any tutorial, documentation on how to hook up these batteries on an LCD monitor? Thanks, vedtam

Topic by vedtam    |  last reply


Call for Participation: 3lectromode - DIY Wearables

3lectromode is looking for designers/programmers interested in doing an internship to co-develop future D-I-Y projects. In particular, we are looking for fashion designers skilled in pattern making with an interest in textile design and programmers interested in further developing the Arduino platform for wearables. Respond before May 1 w/ cv & portfolio. Founded and directed by designer-artist Valérie Lamontagne, 3lectromode holds the vision of innovating in the field of wearables by combining technology with customizable prêt-â-porter fashion. We aim to inspire a future where wearables are democratized, aestheticized, and performative. We are a small design group interested in developing accessible wearables which combine D-I-Y technology with current fashion research. We are fascinated with the potential for technology to create new modalities of interaction between the body and its environment, and are interested in the performative potential of technology. Key to our design ethos is a to create a library of open sourced tools which can be used easily by anyone. We develop wearables which we hope will be meaningful to the wearers by enriching everyday experiences with an awareness of both ourselves and the world around us. We see our work as creating a further connection between humans and the world at large of machines, information patterns, environmental data, and organic material. Associate designer at 3lectromode is Magalie Coulombe-Noël, a trained fashion designer and technologist. Fellow collaborators include: Elio Bidinost, physical computing expert; Claudine Lamothe, web programmer and technologist. 3lectromode was founded in 2010 and is located in Montréal, Canada. Contact: valerie@3lectromode.com 3lectromode: democratized, aestheticized, performative wearables. 

Topic by 3lectromode    |  last reply


Attempting to create tiny, wearable, covert, simple button click counter for behavioral mod

Hi all, I've been searching both this forum and the internet in general and strangely have not come across what I'm looking to do even though to me it seems very simple. Here are the specifications/requirements of the device that I am trying to create: -extremely tiny form factor (ideally a ring sized device but I'll settle for a thin bracelet) -unobtrusive/inconspicuous (I guess a thin bracelet that could hide under a sleeve might be best) -battery powered/untethered (This is essential. The device would be useless if depended on a connection to a computer or wall socket) -battery life must last a full day -data logged is just a simple time/day stamp that would indicate when a button was clicked by the wearer      (wearer would manually click the button during the day when certain thoughts came up for him/her)       This requirement indicates that the micro controller chosen would need a clock built in and        some kind of storage - be able to upload the data to a computer I did my preliminary research considering these requirements and I came up with the following electronic components that might work: - teensy 3 (has real time clock and 2K EEPROM which should be plenty of memory for storing date stamps) - ulog (1MB of usable space across 3 analog channels, couldn't find anything about a built in clock) - Pro Micro - 3.3V/8MHz (not sure about built in real clock  but storage is 32K flash space) - OpenLog (wasn't clear about how much built in storage and didn't see any build in real time clock) These are the best I could find. If anyone has better suggestions please let me know? My idea is to connect a Mini Push Button Switch to one of the digital inputs on one these micro controllers/data loggers and write a simple sketch that records the time the button was pushed in a MMDDYYhhmm format (10 bytes per click). To power any of these micro controllers/data loggers I was planning to use a Coin Cell Battery - 12mm. I was going to sew the micro controllers/data loggers on one side of a thin piece of material that would serve as a bracelet and sew the battery on the other side. Although I'm not sure how to fix the battery to the cloth and how to connect it to the micro controllers/data loggers. I'm guessing I could find some kind of battery holder for the 12mm cell battery? Other Questions about my assumptions: Will I have enough storage left over on the flash space or EEPROM to store the data click after the sketch code has been loaded in? Will a watch battery provide enough energy to run this device all day? Is the Coin Cell Battery - 12mm the correct external power source for this project? I encourage any feed back, criticism, comments, help of any kind to move me along with this preparation so that I can move forward and purchase the parts I need. Thanks! Michael

Topic by mhussar    |  last reply


Programmable T-Shirt

Saw this shirt and thought it was cool. They said it was expensive to make. How much do you think they made it for and do you think you could do it for less?

Topic by ehudwill    |  last reply


How to make a simple circuit, that has two unidirectional microphones?

I need to make a wearable headband which has two microphones at either side of the head. I know that i need a battery and two electret microphones and a lily pad??? but i don't know what else. it needs to be extremely simple. and i need someone to show me how to put it together, like an easy to follow drawing with all the parts clearly labelled. I will be recording alot so it needs to store at least 10 mins worth of recordings. Do i need another device for that? would i be able to upload that audio to a computer too?

Question by PenelopeS6    |  last reply


eTextile Lounge: Featured Project for Tuesday 21 June: Touch Glove

Tuesday 21 June 2011 8PM denver time The innovator of the Touch Glove Instructable will talk about her project on the eTextile Lounge. Join us Tuesday's at 8PM on lynne bruning's uStream channel for eTextile tips, tricks and innovations.

Topic by Lynne Bruning  


Call for Makers, Presenters and Workshopers for The eTextile Lounge at Bay Area Maker Faire 2012

Call for participants in the eTextile Lounge at Bay Area Maker Faire 2012 Have a project to share? Want to give a lecture? How about hosting a workshop? This website gives you more information. or Please contact  Lynne Bruning lynne@lynnebruning.com Ally Seeley allyseeley@gmail.com for all the details

Topic by Lynne Bruning    |  last reply


Leah Buechley and Instructables Written Up by Forbes: "A Blinking Fashion Statement"

Instructables members Leah Buechley, Plusea, and enlighted got a nice mentions by Forbes in A Blinking Fashion Statement.For all their talk of breaking glass ceilings, Sarah Palin and Hillary Clinton have nothing on Leah Buechley.In the several years since she first sewed a circuit board to a T-shirt, the 31-year-old University of Colorado computer-science researcher has done a lot to bring gender equality to the world of do-it-yourself, perhaps shattering a certain silicone-based ceiling once and for all."The tinkering group has always been a boys' club," says Buechley, referring to the DIY movement's loosely formed faction of tech geeks, gear heads and circuit wizards who tinker with electronic gadgets in basements and garages across America. At the same time, she says, the arts-and-crafts contingent (think knitters, sewers and silkscreeners) has traditionally been a more feminine domain. ...True to their fashion roots, DIY wearables are not always practical. A recent tutorial on Instructables.com gives readers a step-by-step for making what the author calls a "wearable waste of energy": a sweatshirt affixed with a glowing light-emitting diode (LED)."It's not purely functional," says Syuzi Pakhchyan, author of the new book Fashioning Technology. "It's functional and aesthetic."..."Turn your favorite clothing item into a wearable waste of energy!" writes Hannah Perner-Wilson in her tutorial on Instructables.com. The project is as much a teaching tool as it is a fashion statement. Perner-Wilson takes readers step-by-step through how to use conductive fabric, pressure sensors and a vibration motor to make a final product. She also encourages fellow tech-crafters to think about making the shirt less wasteful: "Solar cells are an option," she writes.More news and press about Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply


Thesis project engineering

Hello everyone, i'm in my fifth year industrial science, and next year I need to accomplish a thesis project. At the end of this year I need to find an interesting project, something that has to do with fysics, math, mechanics and electronics. of course its almost impossible to have a project that has to do with all of those subjects so you can leave some out. Has anyone some bright ideas? I've been looking but I have not found what I need yet.

Question by SimonG86    |  last reply


Bio-mechanical electricity - 13W per knee.

A stroll around the park may soon be enough to charge the raft of batteries needed in today's power-hungry gadgets.US and Canadian scientists have built a novel device that effortlessly harvests energy from human movements.The adapted knee brace, outlined in the journal Science, can generate enough energy to power a mobile phone for 30 minutes from one minute of walking.A slow walk can generate an average of 5W of electricity, but they have models that will produce 13W - enough power for a one-minute stroll to provide half an hour of talk-time.The prototype makes you sound like an extra in Terminator, but the inventors are predicting saleable products within 18 months, probably powering (in the first instance) modern prosthetic limbs.Soldiers may also benefit from wearing the knee brace to power the multitude of devices they now carry ,such as night vision goggles and GPS."They treat batteries like they treat food and water - they are so essential to what they do," he said.Link to BBC articleLink to BBC VideoLink to Science Magazine articleThis whole idea seems like a "Good Thing" to me - even without the computer-control, I don't see why a pedestrian or jogger couldn't wear a pair of generators similar to those in wind-up torches, charging phone and PDA as you stroll around doing the shopping or jogging across the park. Get them with a Nike or Motorola logo, and we'd see hundreds of people wearing batman-style utility belts, stacked with all the gadgets the modern human "needs". It could really help wearable computing take off as well.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


What would you like to do with a laser engraver?

I've recently seriously looked at what they are capable of.I saw a few demo's at the Maker Faire and I got a little Aztec calendar at the Epilog booth. The detail these laser engravers are capable of is amazing.http://www.flickr.com/photos/xaminmo/40206881/This just instantly opens up a lot of doors in ideas and making things. Craft Technology Lab a group from Colorado had a verry cool booth. Besides the wearable e-textiles peices they had fun laser cut kinetic sculptures. A little twist of a crank and it spun a ball balanced on a seals nose and waved his tail. The sliceforms were another amazingly designed laser cut project. Imagine larger scale peices with cushions! Could make every furniture peice in your house!Anyhow here is their page, they had a lot more laser cut kinetic sculptures at the faire though that arent on the webpage.http://l3d.cs.colorado.edu/~ctg/Projects.htmlMyself some of the things I'd make is ships and airplanes frames.Remember this burning man peice?http://www.home.earthlink.net/~traubleaux/link.jpg/temple.jpgWouldnt be too hard tracking down who has the files on their computer. With a litle manipulation you'd have a minerature model of it.I'd have to make my familys home. Scale replicas of things you own is always fun.With a laser cutter your xmas and b-day gift ideas are set for life.

Topic by FreakCitySF    |  last reply


(newsletter) LED Ceiling Fan, Hot-Wire Nunchuks, Pulled Pork...

Sign-up for this newsletter: Welcome back! We still have three fantastic contests running!Art of Sound Contest - Win an incredible custom hi-fi tower set with subwoofer, monster speakers, and more!! Last chance to enter: this Sunday, July 26!Show off your creative cardboard skills in the Gorilla Glue Cardboard Contest and win a huge package of Gorilla Glue supplies and gear!Cook up something tasty for the Low & Slow BBQ Contest and win a Weber Smokey Mountain Cooker, and autographed copies of the new Low & Slow BBQ book! Help choose the winners by voting for your favorites in these contests: Pocket-Sized Contest - Help decide who wins a custom laser-etched Leatherman! Get in the Garden Contest - Help decide who wins a computer-controlled indoor composting machine from NatureMill! Make Pocket Drunken Robots An Improved Raised Bed Garden Make a Steampunk Pen Knife Ceiling Fan LED Display Enter your audio project now! Closes this Sunday! Maker Tin PVC Fruit Picker 8-Track Walkman Make Pulled Pork Submit a cardboard creation and win a prize pack from Gorilla Glue! Cook up something tasty! Run Ethernet and Phone on Cat-5 Cable Wearable Sound-to-Light Display Pocket Screwdriver Pocket Sized Soldering Kit Help decide who wins the Leatherman! Help decide who wins the composter! Anti-Boredom Pocket Kit Make a Book Headboard! Build an Attractive Upside Down Planter Hot-Wire Foam Cutting Nunchucks Sign-up for this newsletter:

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


Outdoor Suspension Worktable: Thin, Rigid, Strong, Lightweight Panels/Sheets

Hi all! I go into the wilderness with my research and build electronic gizmos. See this overview of our camp: https://youtu.be/RSKbZFIG62g?t=2m11s and the desk in question! To support this me and Hannah Perner-Wilson have been trying to create tools for infrastructure for backpacking in the wild (also see her wearable studio descriptions http://www.plusea.at/?p=5385). The tool im working on right now is a modular lightweight desk we can suspend between trees. It's actually going pretty great! You can see Matt here soldering and building on this bench. it worked WAY BETTER than expected. I though it was gonna be TOO wiggly, or bouncy and impossible to work on. Turns out, it just worked really well! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJQrnl3-27c the only PROBLEM however was with our panels. I used these sheets of like MDF (or something). They are that material that pegboards are made out of. They were great because they were thin and rigid. But they were still pretty heavy and they absorbed water. I want your advice on materials. I want something that Is rigid! (will hold its own shape under compression and/or tension) Can support lots of tools and stuff on top Strong (will stand up to beatings in the field, and smashproof inside backpack) Thin (packs into backpack well)   Cut-able (less important) (won't give off evil fumes or particles if i need to cut or modify it at home (or even in the field) Not crazy-beans expensive (like it seems like carbon fiber panels are) I was thinking like fiberglass maybe? http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-fiberglass-sheets/=xu6e5k is that a good idea? Carbon fiber (though super expensive)? what are your ideas?

Topic by blorgggg    |  last reply


Redesign instructables to make searching easier and more practical!?!?!?

I'm fairly new to instructables. i've only read about 100 or so and not made any myself. for the most part i can rarely find an instructable that is of high enough quality end-product or end-result for me to commit to making it instead of starting from scratch and designing my own thing, or buying something that has already been produced for a more affordable and higher quality end-product. but there is one huge reason i remain committed and interested in instructables as a website and a community! my dad has a garage full of high-potential junk! now if only there were an easy way for me to search instructables for projects based on my plethora of ingredients (inventory) rather than typing finished project titles or end-result names of creations into the search bar. i understand that this may be extremely hard to do since there may literally be an infinite number of names and objects, not to mention the various languages, misspellings, and misnaming of objects and processes that would need to be accounted into the search process as well. the idea would be that instructables users could rack-up all their junk and save it as a list to their own digital library or, "inventory" of all the parts and tools they currently have and manufacturing processes they can do with said items. from there they could click "search by inventory" and include or exclude items from their total inventory to run a search based on that. for example i could select: -super old motherboard (or specific part number) -old motorcycle seat -some bolts (or specific sizes of bolts) search results would turn up projects based on the parts that i have selected, results would mention whether i am missing or have all of the tools or parts i searched for. imaginary examples might be stuff like: -strange computer motorcycle seat -cyborg motorcycle seat -a computer build from an old motorcycle seat -ride fast while computing fast -tune your old motorcycle with an old under-the-seat DIY ECU -etc. though, this sounds like a daunting task, especially with the numerous vague and sometimes seemingly useless projects people can come up with, instructables has already begun to specify categories and sub-categories (channels?) of project styles such as leather-work, CNC, electronics, wearables, etc. etc. and to add tags and specific names for parts, tools, and processes to a library would simply be a more detailed and concentrated addition to these categories. what i'm hoping we could maybe do is add an option to search by ingredients in a similar way to how myfridgefood.com searches for recipies (maybe we could start by adding a similar function to instructables' recipies category?). it's just an idea and i'm not sure how willing the developers of instructables are to allow this community to contribute to the redesign or addition of search options.  aside from searching by ingredients, it would be extra helpful to know if there are other instructable members in our local neighborhood who are willing to collectively use their junk to make a project together! combined inventories could lead to a world of possibilities for creations and networking! maybe one person doesn't have enough junk to make their own forge but a whole neighborhood would be willing to contribute their efforts to make a community forge? i know my dad isn't the only one in our neighborhood with a garage-full of junk, and i think with everyone's junk maybe we could send a project to the moon, or make a super awesome rat-rod, or make a community wind-turbine farm, and get all that legally approved by our local comminity! maybe as a neighborhood we could create something only large companies are currently capable of manufacturing!?!?!? and finally on a side note i think maybe there should be a filter between serious and non serious ("fun") projects. or at least a rating service so that readers can scale how serious they think a project is on a serious to fun scale with fun and serious being in the middle. that way everything stays positive and constructive; no negativity for being too serious or too fun! yeah that last idea is pretty crazy, but maybe we could start with my first small idea of searching by parts/ingredients? let me know your thoughts! thanks!!! (expecting answers along the lines of where to start, whether or not other instructable-type websites exist, i know for a fact this is possible and doable since myfridgefood.com basically has the format set up to do so.) i'm open to (negative) answers that completely tear apart my idea as long as they are educated and provide specific counter-reasons as to why it would not work. i'm fairly certain the first idea is possible, it's just a matter of convincing the developers to get on board and getting everyone to start labeling the parts, tools, and processes in their projects (they are already "tagged" maybe we could start there?)

Question by joombaloomba    |  last reply