Jewelry Box Kits

I'm looking for feedback from the DIY crafting/woodworking community. I'd like to know what you all think of our artisan designed jewelry box kits. I've looked around and what I've seen in this market is pretty slim pickin's. Our kits don't require a shop full of tools, just what the average homeowner might have in his/her tool chest. There is also a short list of supplies. The kits require no cutting or power tools at all. The things that are required are self confidence, a sense of excellence and attention to detail. Our company is called Ready To Build. I have designed every box and we make absolutely everything in-house. It would be great if you would check out the website and give us any feedback or ask questions. Thanks!

Topic by aunt alice   |  last reply


8/10/25mm Construction Kit

I would like to propose a standard for the design of an "Erector Set" type construction kit based on a standard 10mm thick by 25mm wide rail with 8mm holes spaced 25mm apart.  The metric sizing would insure a global participation in the design process.  The main construction rails could be built from any smooth grained hardwood such as hard maple in North America or several other species I have seen used in Europe or ABS plastic, Aluminum, etc. Alternatively, a 5/15 - 3/8 - 1 inch format might find greater acceptance in the US which would allow for use of many standard components such as skate board wheels which use a 5/16 shaft for bearings, etc. Given a standard hole size, thickness, and spacing, a variety of 3D printed components could be designed by the community as add-ons to the basic kit.  Ideally such designs would be done in Autodesk Inventor based on PARAMETRIC MODELS that could be adjusted for say both a mm and inch standard. Laser cutting at TechShops, 3D printing, and other simple home shop built components for connectors, etc., as well as suggestions for utilizing other standard building components such as say plastic tubing for spacers, and other standard hardware components, would greatly expand the features of the construction kit. Ideally Makers, TechShop members, home woodworkers, etc. would produce kits and make them available to "young inventors and engineers" in our school systems as a community project. While I have suggested the above mentioned dimensions, these and other basic considerations should be vetted in a crowd sourced forum before any standards are set.

Topic by astroyny 


Crowdfunding

We love seeing our authors transform their ideas into a reality, and we want to help in whatever ways we can. Below are some of the campaigns our authors are working to get funded. We'll do our best to keep this list current, so please check out their projects, and help fellow makers in our community find success!  Current Campaigns i-mimic the animation made easy, Device capturing human motion directly in 3D animation software in real-time & without plugins. by Instructabler nawres102 Open Source DIY Automatic Tail Light, A fun and easy to assemble light sensor kit.  By Instructabler Solarcycle Tiq probe, it defines a new category of electronic debug & test tools for makers & professionals - filling the gap between DMMs & 'scopes. By Instructabler markhen57 If you have a project you're trying to get funded, let us know!  Completed Campaigns  Doughnut Safe, Turn your spare tire into a strong box.  By Instructabler Mrballeng The fumeFan, The fume Fan is a soldering fume extractor, work lamp, helping hands tool and a project organiser for hobbyists, makers and creators.  By Instructabler hertzgamma SOLARPAD Open Source 5 Watt Smart Phone Solar USB Charger, Strap this water-resistant solar panel and battery to backpacks or mount it to tripods for camping, hiking, and cycling.  By Instructabler Solarcycle Fish Bone, A no knots cord tightener specifically designed for paracord by author Mrballeng - Funded by almost 9000% of goal! Would you Woodwork, a funny and informational woodworking webseries by author Few Bits - Funded by 100% of goal!  Zero to Maker, a re-skilling guide for new makers by David Lang - Funded by almost 2000% of goal! Arabic Alphabet Fun Flashcards, cute and kid friendly learning tool by author acraftyarab - Funded and met goal! PIXEL: Interactive LED Art, an interactive LED-based display for retro pixel art by author alinke - Funded by over 600% of goal! Blinky Fish, a tiny fish-shaped board that fits on an Arduino to help teach, by author marc.cryan - Funded by almost 600% of goal! Chipper, the ATtiny Programming and Prototyping Shield, by author Hammock Boy - funded by over 1000% of goal! Piranha, a follow-up knotless gear tie for paracord, by author Mrballeng - funded by over 1400% of goal! The Question Block Lamp, a Mario-inspired, interactive lamp for your inner geek, gamer and child, by author bduxbury - funded by almost 150% of goal! Out of Time - A patina weathered I-Beam with moving gears by Instructabler hack818 Maker Kase - Universal Maker cabinet. Perfect for 3D printers, model makers, small CNC machines and open frame Bitcoin Miners by Instructabler bmc.loughlin Have you started your own Kickstarter or Indiegogo to help fund your project? Let us know! Please leave the link in the comments, along with a brief description. We'll add your project to our up-to-date campaign list above, and promote it across our channels. If you have any questions, or want to add any additional info, please email me at khoward@instructables.com Thanks!

Topic by kazmataz   |  last reply


Longest Comment on Instructables (Possibly)

Https://www.instructables.com/answers/What-essential-tools-should-I-include-in-my-dorm-r/The longest comment on this site is one by Guardian Fox on the "What survival tools should I keep in my dorm room tool box?" If anyone can find a longer one, please PM me the link.Keep in mind, he typed this with his own fingers, not by holding down the paste command for a day. If that's what you want, then go to https://www.instructables.com/community/the_forum_for_spam/ Source: Guardian FoxFor the dorm room, you only need a few tools. You're not going to be renovating, and you're not going to be doing much woodworking. You aren't allowed to do anything at all to the room beyond hanging pictures (if that), and most dorms forbid power-tools in the rooms no matter what you're use them for. Here's my take on what you'll need for the dorm. I've included a lot of things that seem unnecessary, and you can probably live without some of it... but the kit will get you through nearly any problems you'll encounter at school or in an apartment:-At least one decent multi-bit screwdriver. Look for something with a comfortable grip and sturdy construction. Avoid gimmicks like built in flashlights. I recommend the Piquiq brand which comes in a few different sizes and can be found in many hardware stores in North America. You can usually get their three-piece set for less than $20.-A set of jeweler's screwdrivers. Get a cheap set because these little things WILL get lost. Look for something with at least a few unusual bits as well as the usuals. Get a 30ish-piece set for less than $20. Most handy if you've got a thing for messing with your electronics, but also great for changing a watch battery, fixing glasses, etc.-A basic hammer. Nothing fancy needed here, and I've always preferred an ordinary wooden-handled hammer anyway. Go for a smaller hammer if you only plan on hanging pictures, get a regular-sized hammer if you plan on using it to do real work later on. Stanley is a good brand with decent prices, but there are lots of good budget-priced hammers out there. Drop by a hardware store and pick one that feels good in your hand. Less than $20 for a brand name. $10 or less for a bargain hammer. Make sure the head of the hammer is securely attached to the handle, no matter what brand you pick but a little tiny wiggle is ok. Hang a picture or tap a few finishing nails into a small project. Very handy, even when you use it wrong.-Two utility knives with snap-off blades. One with the small size, and the other with the larger size. There are hundreds of brands of these on the market, and a lot of them are junk so spring for an Olfa (the best i.m.o.) if you can find it. Richard is a decent low-cost brand which is often found in paint stores. Again, avoid gimmicks. The most important thing you need to know is if the locking mechanism works well or not, as a utility knife can become dangerous if the blade is going to slide around while you're using it. Good knives can be around $10-20 each. Cheap, "disposable" knives can be found for less than a dollar, but be sure to buy something that seems sturdy. Add a self-healing cutting mat from the dollar store, and while you're there get a metal ruler for cutting straight lines. Smaller utility knives are good for light-duty applications like trimming photographs or opening packages. Larger utility knives are good for harder work like cutting lots of cardboard-A measuring tape. You probably already have a ruler for school, but a measuring tape is much more useful for around the house. Get a 16' tape for good versatility. Choose one that has a sturdy housing and a tape that slides in and out easily. Bennett is a good budget brand you can find for less than $10 and I recommend theirs over any of the name-brand tapes out there. If you can't find that brand, go to the building supplies store and ask what brand the clerks and outside staff use around the shop. You could skip this one during college, but you'll need it one day and it's the kind of thing you can make uses for.-Pliers. For around the house and crafting I find a pair of long-nose pliers more handy than a pair of linesman's pliers, but both tools have their place. Locking pliers (aka vice grips) are also super-handy. Get one or a set, but avoid the bargain brands. Look to spend at least $7 each for basic pliers, and at least $12 for a good pair of locking pliers. -An adjustable wrench (aka thumb-wrench). Pick a smaller-sized model for your toolbox. Most of the nuts and bolts in the house will be small anyway. Go for something that opens up to 1" or 1 1/2" Brand isn't an issue, but make sure it operates smoothly and won't jam or work loose. Spend less than $10. -Scissors. A usable, general purpose pair of scissors can be found at the dollar stores or in an office supply store. Make sure they open and close smoothly and that the blades don't wiggle. Look for one with a metal screw at the pivot so you can tighten it if it works loose. If you're using it routinely for cutting fabric or any other specific task, spend some extra money and get the right kind for the job or at least a good pair of general purpose ones. Less than $5 for cheap ones, $20+ for quality ones.-Sewing notions; A pack of needles, a roll of white thread, a roll of black thread, and a roll of transparent thread, a few safety pins and any spare buttons you find. That should get you through any wardrobe fixes you may need. Each item in the kit should be a dollar or less, and you can save money by starting with a pre-made kit from a dollar store and adding a few of your own extras. Also highly recommended is this, http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.1352 , but keep in mind it is cheap for a reason and needs constant attention.-A soldering iron if it's allowed in your room, and only if you're working with or fixing electronics or jewelry. Get a scrap piece of plywood or something to use as a work surface. $15 for a basic 30w iron. Another $10 for a safer stand.-A toolbox that holds everything. I like the ones that double as a step-stool, which you can find for $20-$30 if you look hard enough (mastercraft and rubbermaid brands). You might like something different, but small plastic toolboxes and even small plain steel ones are all quite cheap so go look and see what you like. You can even use your imagination and just use a plastic tote, a tacklebox, a backpack/messenger bag, shoebox, etc. Just pack your tools in it neatly and avoid putting the heavy or sharp ones on top of the ones that might break.-A plunger. If your dorm room has a bathroom, this is a must even if you never have to use it. It's an insurance policy against one hell of a mess. $10-$15.Anyway, that's all I can think of for tools. Craftier folks need more gear, and less DIY-prone folks need less. Use your best judgment and buy only what you can afford and might actually use. Pick up a few fasteners and adhesives too, usually as needed. Here's what you should probably keep on hand.-A package of assorted picture-hangers and hooks (if hanging pictures is allowed in your dorm). Buy a pack at the dollar store. A few extra finishing nails and small screws would be a good addition to this as well.-Thumbtacks. Buy a pack at the dollar store or office supply store.-Scotch tape, packing tape, duct tape (or Gorilla tape).-Twist ties. Get a bunch from a pack of trash bags.-A package of superglue. Rather than one large tube, get the pack with several tiny tubes so you don't lose your entire supply when one dries up.-Craft wire. Use it wherever you might use a twist tie, but also can be bent into whatever shape you need to become a tool or a piece of art. Dollar stores carry rolls of it often at 2/$1

Topic by DELETED_M4industries   |  last reply