Acetone Peroxide

I've just been wondering, does anyone know if there is any way to stabalize acetone peroxide and make it at least a little "safer".

Topic by IlluminatedAntichrist   |  last reply


Staining leather with acetone?

I want to put a motif on my old black leather wallet I'm too lazy to go full screenprinting on it, and by the state of the wallet, it isn't really worth it either I've read something about acetone making stains on dyed leather, and thought of just using acetone to "paint" my design on the wallet The design is simple, so I'm thinking of just making a stencil. My only concern is: How do I make sure that the acetone doesn't "leak" beyond the borders of the stencil when painting? Will normal duct tape do?

Topic by Seidenfisch   |  last reply


best material for molding polystyrene

I'm melting Styrofoam w/ acetone and wanting to put the goop in a gear mold; however I'm not sure what material I should be using for the mold.  I was originally going to do it in ABS plastic, but wasn't sure if the polystyrene would glue itself to the mold as the acetone evaporates.  So I was thinking of aluminum or possibly stainless steel.  Your thoughts?

Topic by Spaceman Spiff   |  last reply



How to heat a metallic bowl containing a liquid, which must be evaporated, using peltier element?

Hello everyone, I'm Georgios and thank you for your time My goal is to create a mechanism which will be able, using peltier element, to heat a metallic bowl (metallic because of its heat conductivity). In the bowl I will put acetone and I want to evaporate this liquid. Also I want to control the temperature of the bowl. The evaporated acetone will be kept in a closed box. Then, using second peltier element I want to cool the acetone, to liquidity it? Do you know if this is possible? And in general do you think that it is a good idea to use peltier element for heating and cooling, only with electricity, acetone? My goal is also to heat in a fast way. The temperature must be 80 C for evaporation.

Question by GeorgiosG1   |  last reply


Where can I find colored styrofoam?

I'm trying to make my own plastic using acetone and styrofoam; however I would like to create colors other than white.  Is there anywhere I can find black styrofoam, or any other color besides white?  Also, if anyone knows a method for creating colored plastic using the traditional white styrofoam, and some other ingredient(s) that would be great as well. Edit:  Meat trays/plates come in colored varieties; where can I find these?

Question by Spaceman Spiff   |  last reply


Which burns at a lower temperature Isopropyl alcohol or acetone?

I have in my possession 99.9% Isopropyl alcohol and some relatively pure acetone which burns at a lower temperature and for how long?

Question by ravebot   |  last reply


What is a good material for engraving? Answered

Hi creative people! I want to engrave a delicate pattern into a flat piece of material. The material needs to be sturdy and it needs to be acetone resistant. I tried using plaster of paris, but it's not sturdy enough. I can either engrave the material by hand, or with a Dremel. After the piece is engraved, I plan on pressing acetone liquefied ABS plastic with a rolling pin into it. That's why it needs to be unaffected by acetone, and also why it needs to withstand some pressure. Once the ABS had time to harden I want to pull it out of the engraved "mold". Thanks for any ideas!

Question by Morgantao   |  last reply


Cheap Pcb? Answered

Is it possible to create a pcb with cheap common household items and if true what can i use? I already have blank pcb but i was wonder can i substitute the etcher and acetone with other materials. 

Question by Kante Tech   |  last reply


chemicals that expand when mixed

Can you guys give me a list of some chemicals that expand when mixed? the reaction's can't be combustion reactions though. that's the only limiting factor.

Topic by mexx.admin   |  last reply


How to evaporate/liquify acetone using peltier element?

Hello, I’m Georgios Grigoriadis and I’m trying to build a machine which could evaporate acetone and the liquify it. I want to use the Peltier element. My questions are: 1/ Is it possible to heat a metallic bowl, using the Peltier element, in order to to evaporate the liquid inside it (acetone) ? 2/ After having evaporate the liquid ( in my situation is acetone) I want to take the vapor from a tube to a metallic closed container, on which ( from the outside side) will be stuck a Peltier modules. Is it possible, using the Peltier module to freeze the container in order to liquify the (acetone) vapor? I also want control the temperature of the Peltier element but also how many time the Peltier module will work. Do you think that it is possible to use the Peltier modules in order to do that I want? If not what do you propose me ? Thank you very much for your interest and for any help. (I’m sorry if my English isn’t perfect ;), if something is very difficult to understand, don’t hesitate to tell me)

Question by GeorgiosG1   |  last reply


Acetone Vapor fogger project - Ultrasonic atomizer component

Greetings!I'm halfway through making MechEngineerMike's acetone vapor fogger (see attached pics) and noted that the ultrasonic atomizer componenet shown in the Instructable article is a metal encased unit. The one that I found in the same host product I purchased appears to be silicone-encased. https://www.instructables.com/id/Ultrasonic-Mistin...Q: Has anyone else built one of these and do you have any insight as to whether the silicone encased ultrasonic atomizer will work for this application?Thank you for your time in reading this inquiry.Corey

Question by Coreyflash   |  last reply


using the acetone method , what type of container , can i make and store the melted styrofoam in?

reading a couple posts about reducing styrofoam using acetone.  i happened to come across a lot of pieces and need to reduce it, but am not ready to use it yet. what containers ahere good for this , acetone comes in metal cans, many of the instructables say to do the melting in glass, i have seen some say metal,but no specifics. i dont have a glass open top bottle handy yet, but i may if i have an idea of the ratio of plastic to expanded.  i thought i saw a video on you tube of a guy using a plastic bucket and storing it in a zip lock bag.I would need to verify that method and the type of plastic first. since  most instructables use glass and metal pots. Off to break it up

Topic by escapefromyonkers   |  last reply


ABS Recycler for 3-D Printer Filament

Many inexpensive 3-D Printers use ABS filament as feedstock. This filament is not cheap and being a plastic, it is a substance that demands recycling efforts. Imagine a small 3-D printer that you use to produce useful household items with. Here is an example Instructable illustrating what I am talking about. Now imagine that you no longer need an item that you have made. You toss it into the hopper of the machine that I have in mind and it is ground into small pieces. These pieces are then melted with acetone and extruded anew into ABS filament for your 3-D printer! It may be possible to recover the acetone during the extrusion process since the acetone evaporates to restore the ABS.

Topic by Exocetid   |  last reply


Capsacin?

I have a bag of dried cayenne peppers lying around here somewhere. Is there any way i can extract the oils to make a kind of spicy fire liquid? What solvents (isopropyl? denatured alcohol? acetone?) would dissolve the oils? Thanks.

Topic by John Smith   |  last reply


Stop sign clean up? Answered

What is the best solvent for removing spray paint from stop signs?  Would mineral spirits or acetone work? Would a quick coat of car wax help prevent future spray from sticking?

Question by mole1   |  last reply


ZnSe lens cleaning

At work we have a ZING laser knockoff and SOMEbody "accidentally" walked off aaaand it caught on fire. Almost everything has been tried to clean it, even putting it in acetone in the ultrasonic cleaner, and the lens is still crap. Short of buying a £75 replacement lens what inexpensive methods could be used to return it to a near-original state?

Topic by The Ideanator   |  last reply


I want to build a heatpipe to move heat (30 watts/hr) from the interior of my refrigerator to the exterior of my house

during the winter. I am considering using a 1/2 copper tube capped filled with ethanol, water or acetone. I plan on Adding the fluid (how much?)to the open tube heating one end with a torch and soldering on the second cap to seal the tube and create a vacuum. any ideas would be appreciated.?

Question by bmake   |  last reply


Making a mini branding iron? Answered

I am considering making a mini branding iron (about 3/4" square) out of brass with my initial to brand my work.  I have some brass which I hope to transfer my initial on and then cut with a rotary tool. First I have to transfer the pattern,and thinking of using my ink jet printer and some acetone, and then proceeding to cut away with my rotary tool. Do anyone have any suggestions or tips?   Thanks

Question by WazIt   |  last reply


How'd I get permanent marker off polycarbonate? Answered

I was using permanent marker to mark the fold lines for my front panel on my cnc machine. It comes off easily with methylated spirits on an earbud, but not after heat has been applied during the folding process. I've tried acetone, 2K thinners, spirits, rubbing alcohol and even PlastiX (used for renewing the yellowing on old headlight lenses) with no success. The irking factor is high and needless to say black duct tape on the back just wont do it for me. Any other ideas?

Question by petercd   |  last reply


Removing toner? Answered

When trying to make a pcb I messed up on the toner transfer... I have grayish traces on the pcb, and some of them didnt even transfer.  I know you can supposedly get toner off with lacquer thinner, but i couldnt find any. Will paint thinner work? The pcb is fine, it has some white paper on it though too.. I have acetone too :) Also, when ironing with photo paper, something melted and is all over the iron. Is this potentially hazardous? Probably not good to breath in.. Any ideas on how to clean that off and to prevent it from happening?  Thanks!

Question by astroboy907   |  last reply


What can I use to dissolve inkjet ink that won't harm mylar? Answered

I have a stock of large sheets of translucent mylar that I want to use as tracing medium. The trouble is that I got them from an engineering shop, so they have plans printed on them. I've had some success "erasing" the drawings using either alcohol hand sanitizer or acetone, but both require some elbow grease and some kind of abrasive, which leaves the surface mottled. Is there a solvent that will dissolve the ink and leave the surface of the mylar more-or-less undamaged? My research suggests that the ink was laid down by an inkjet printer, though I can't be entirely certain.

Question by yoyology   |  last reply


Essential oil/Alchohol/Solvent purification and separation

Hi,I have a lot of impure essential oil that has a lot of water in it and was thinking about ways to get some of the water out. Would salting out with Epsom salts work? I've seen an Instructable where a nonpolar solvent is used to extract nepecatalone https://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Kitty-Crack%3a--ultra-potent-catnip-extract/ would one be able to use a solvent that is immiscible (I swear that's a word) in water to get the constituents that are not water soluble out of the water?Also can common solvents (I'm thinking alcohol, acetone, and toulene) be salted out to increase the concentration? Would this work with dilute hydrochloric acid?-mitch

Topic by fearofsquirrels   |  last reply


Anyone know or sujest a way to clean out the paint inside a cfl bulb?

I want to clean out the inside glass of a CFL bulb to make a bubblier. Using a small tube to pump air & water threw the glass bulb.I've tried waiting a day, soaking in soapy water, I tried using a pipe cleaner, (broke the glass), I tried pulling a string with tissue paper, (broke again). Is there a chemical I can use to brake up the paint in the bulb, so I can clean it out with running water later. At the moment I'm trying soaking in peroxide or rubbing alcohol. If that doson't work I'm going for acetone next. After that I'm out of ideas.

Question by elkaddalek   |  last reply


Where to get MEK? Answered

Hey all,A few years ago I used to see MEK (Methyl Ethyl Keytone) in local hardware stores all the time. Don't know what happened, whether OSHA, or EPA, or some other .gov busybody is responsible, but now it's nowhere to be found... and I've finally run out.Any leads on where I could purchase a jug of it for a good price?P.S. In case anybody is wondering, I have some dried-out liquid electrical tape that uses MEK as the solvent. I am hoping to resurrect it. I suppose I could try acetone, but I'm afraid if it goes wrong it could permanently wreck my mix. :P

Question by PS118   |  last reply


Sourcing solvents in michigan

Ok, so I'm having some trouble finding solvents in quantities of under 5 gallons (5 is too much, and  for this project 1 gallon is too) that arent acetone, MEK, or xylene (home depot and lowes carry those). Specifically I need Perchloroethylene because thats the solvent that E6000 glue is made with and is the glue I want to thin out. The datasheet indicates that  1,1,1-Trichloroethane, Cyclohexane, Methylene chloride, Chlorothane NU, Chevron solvent 1100, gasoline, Propyl acetate, or Toluene will also dissolve it, but I'd really like to stick with its manufactured solvent.  I presume it would have some sort of pricey hazmat shipping charges or the necessity of some sort of licence and I would rather pick it up, so where (or who) can I order some from in the Detroit area?

Question by The Ideanator   |  last reply


What methods allow wood glue to seep into basswood better?

Hi Everyone! I am currently working on a Basswood bridge project and my initial testing came to conclude that failure of my bridge was due to break joints! i took a look at the joints and the glue and these locations had barely seeped into the wood enough that it eventually broke off from weakness! I am aiming for my bridge to break within the sections and NOT at the joints. Are there metods like baking? soaking? the wood and glue so that the glue can seep in better? Specifics too please! I have seen people soak it, or "damp" i should say. But I have no clue how much to damp it or any of that! Acetone came up too.... not to sure though, how does this even work?! -Thanks noobie

Question by noobiefied   |  last reply


Small antique motor running rough, lubricant? suggestions as to a product Answered

I have a small antique desk fan that I am refinishing the art deco base on.  Now keep in mind, in another life I was an antique dealer.  I know messing with it drops the value, however the base was all ready badly corroded.  The motor runs, though rough.  I think it is most likely bearings, and or possible winding's could have a small short, though that is doubtful.  Lubricant for the bearings?   And keep in mind cleaning it with aggressive chemicals like acetone could melt the varnish off the winding's, then I'm really hooped.  Now the obvious would just be to replace the motor, but pieces like this were built not to ever be opened again, at least without hope of putting them back together the same way.  Thanks

Question by iminthebathroom   |  last reply


How to grow a crystals with gypsum and other materials?

Dear: Instructables Just to let you know I am limited to materials in my house. I want to grow a crystal with plaster like plaster of Paris but I am running into a few problems. I know that Gypsum or plaster of Paris is already a crystal but it doesn't have the necessary hardness I want. I want It to have a hardness of a minimum of 6 on the Mohs's scale. I also am limited to chemistry knowledge. I've been trying all day to design a crystal with the specifications I want but I've been having trouble trying to draw a Lewis dot diagram for plaster of Paris. I am not that good at drawing Lewis dot diagrams unfortunately. Here are some materials in my house I think I could use to incorporate with the homemade crystals. Acetone Potassium Chloride Sugar Baking Soda Potassium Nitrate and more... Can I have some help please? Thank you. From: Noah

Topic by nschreiber0813   |  last reply


Chemicals people would want to make?

Basically I want to know what lab chemicals you want to make, if you know how to make any useful chemicals. please post, I am not responsible for and injury's, fatality's, or "bad things" of any sort that come from this thread, all things posted here are to assumed for informational purposes only.

Topic by mr.space   |  last reply


Gluing PVC sheet: Can you identify 'this' glue? Answered

I am gluing black pvc sheet - I presume its pvc, although not 100% certain, it has that distinctive 'new beach ball' smell to it.  I'm prototyping right now, and I want to do more stuff like this - and will likely post an instructable - trouble is it walks a fine line of 'family friendly'/sfw. Either way; I used Lepage Flexible Plastic adhesive.  It worked quite well, and has proven to be quite strong and flexible so far...Works like a contact cement, but stays very flexible.  No mention on the packaging exactly what type of glue it is though.  My question:  What type of glue is this?  Characteristic acetone volatile smell, works like contact cement.  Package says apply, let dry to touch ~10-30 minutes then close surfaces.  I find it's dry to the touch within a minute or three. (extremely dry climate + warm room I was working in). Rationale:  It's expensive, 4 bucks for 30mL, and I'd rather have a can-container to dip a brush in.  At the hardware store they have plain-ol contact cement, but the transparent/flexible aspect of this is must. Thanks in advance!

Question by frollard   |  last reply


Help (advice) with building a braiding machine?

I've been working with braiding plastic shopping bag strips into rope, and by hand it's a slow and tedious process.  I know that braiding machines have been around for ages, so the patent on many of them has to have elapsed.  I've Google'd and Bing'd and Yahoo'd my heart out looking for how to build a simple one to no avail.  The only thing that comes back is Chinese sellers of a commercial braiding machine. All I want is something that I can build, a hand crank mechanical kind, that can braid 7-10 strands into a larger rope. It doesn't even have to go fast, in fact I'm fine with it being slow. Can anyone provide plans for one? UPDATE: Ok so I think I have plans, but now I could use some advice with how to go about fabricating the sprockets.  One idea is to purchase a premade sprocket and modify it, then use it as a master for a mold to create more.  I was thinking of either doing the whole dissolving styrofoam with Acetone then pouring the plastic in the mold thing, or possibly adapt the Oogoo instructable.  Thoughts?? Update 2:  My latest brainstorm leaves me thinking that I could use a bicycle sprocket (gear) as a master and then make a mold from it, then make duplicates from the mold.  Thoughts???

Topic by DrPeper   |  last reply


Problem removing a glued on bearing from glass

I am a bit stuck and usually this does not happen too often :(Got a lazy Susan with two glass plates and the bearing sitting in two aluminium disks.The thing still works fine but the plates were never really centered properly.Starts to drive me nuts that it is always "wobbling"...My first attempt was to figure out if the glue might just be hot glue, so I gently heated it all up.Was a not go but didn't expect it to be that simple.Next try was to use some clay around the aluminum disk and then fill the dam with acetone to dissolve the glue.It did not even soften it a bit :(To make it complete I also tried it with Methye Ethyl Ketone as it never failed me but it seems the glue used is chemical resistant.In terms of echanic tried with a thin bladed tool but can't get it into the non existing gap between glass and aluminium.And even braided fishing line seems to fail as after about 20 minutes of trying to get in the glue I got nowhere.My last resort would now be to put it in the oven and slowly heat it up until the glue fails.Problem is that I highly doubt the Lazy Susan is meant to tolerate this and that it will crack.There is also the bearing and possible grease to consider as I have no clue yet whether or not I can take the disks apart to get to the bearing.Is there any good idea or tip that I missed that I can try before risking to heat it up?In case you wonder: The disk is about 5mm out of center...

Question by Downunder35m   |  last reply


where can i get a spray can-like spray nozzle made from metal?

Hi, im currently doing a project which uses a high volume, low pressure water motor and needs to spray a mist, using little pressure. Essentially what im after is something with the same specs as a regular aerosol can spray nozzle, except it needs to be straight, and made of metal, so it wont dissolve in the petroleum oil, or slip . ive tried using a normal spray nozzle but the pressure is too great and no matter how i go about binding the tube to the nozzle it always pops out, either because it grows soft and warps from the petroleum oil in the spray mix, or from the overal lubricating effects. either way, using spray can spray nozzles is bad. For another project ill be doing at the same time, which is for watering my plants, i still also need a straight spray head, prefferbly made of metal, as this one will have a bit more pressure behind it, and i need to be able to absolutely permanently attach the nozzle to a pvc plastic hose. I dont want to vary at all from my design, or compromise with a plastic version. What im after is a straight spray nozzle, aka, not bent, that sprays a mist of roughly more or less the same size and directionality, and angle as a earosol spray canister. for all intents and purposes, my water motor will be putting out perhaps 2/3rds of the pressure of your typical spray can, a normal spray nozzle works fine, so all im after is a metal equivalent, or anything that wont dissolve in petroleum oils, acetone or paint laquer. does anyone know where i can find such a thing? thanks

Question by oldmanbeefjerky   |  last reply


Nylon and substitutes on a cold bed

It's been some time and I made progress with Nylon. Aldi had some cheap craft glue with methanol as the solvent - this stuff works great for PLA, ABS AND Nylon. The common problem with nylon is that it has no real adhesion to anything, except cardboard and bakelite. Cardboard makes a clean up nightmare and bakelite is not always easy to find, especially not the right type. So I tried various glues, paints and primers but none was really suited for all printing needs. And the cleanup of the bed is imoprtant too as I did not want to spend hours scrubbing with acetone or similar nasty solvents. After the first great succes with the clear Aldi craft glue I checked the local 2$ shops and carft stores and found similar glueswith methanol as a solvent. Since not everyone is lucky enough to get these specials I will tell you what to look out for if you try clear craft glue: Don't buy anything that can be cleaned up with water - you want methanol or ethanol as the solvent in the glue! Do a test with the glue on something that usually does not bind well to cheap glue, like glass and blister packs. Let the glue dry and peel it off - it should be a clear film that is quite strong and barely streches when you pull it. It almost feels like hard paper. All good so far? Check if the nylon, pla or abs really sticks to it: Spread a very thin layer on a piece of cardboard and let dry. Add another, thicker layer and let dry again. Now hold it under your nozzle and extrude a bit of filament while moving the cardboard around. Let cool and check how good it sticks. In a perfect world the cool plastic should peel the papaer off with the glue. Time to prepare your print bed the same way and to start printing ;) Just use a very thin first layer and for the first layer much lower speeds than usual. I print nylon with 60mm/s and the first layer at just 25mm/s, any faster and the first layer does not look right. ABS and PLA are much more forgiving here.

Topic by Downunder35m 


Solvent that 100% dissolves gorilla glue? need castable material to chemically to "burn out" for a ceramic shell casting Answered

Hello. I am working on doing an aluminium lost foam casting of a small part. I read although hazardous, some had gotten successful results from using polyurethane foam (great stuff) in a mold, and proceeding as usual. I don't normally use great stuff, so I mixed gorilla glue with 1/3 water, stirred till I had small bubbles, poured into a silicone mold, and got a pretty good few castings that were VERY dense and hardly burned at all. In fact it was practically fire resistant. I threw it on hot coals and it took a long time to shrivel into a hard little mass So next time, I used dollar store foam board next, a la Grant Thompson, but with terrible failures. It seemed the foam board didn't burn very well either. A foam board riser had actually melted off and looked like it floated away in a bubble, although a regular styrofoam block I had cut to shape cast perfectly, but was too thick and the texture was too poor as the foam was so much less dense. It was mentioned in this blog post that someone used acetone to burnout a tricky patten for a lost foam casting, so I figure I have to do the same. My pattern is curing at the moment. But my silicone molds are far more precise and more detailed than my 2d representation I made with a wire cutter. So my question is there another material that is castable but water resistant, like styrofoam, that I could use a solvent to melt out. I can't really do  lost wax because I don't have the equipment and live in an apartment and have to do this stuff out on the beach. Also due to family reasons I can't be away from home for the time it takes to do burnouts, 6 hours for a full flask, but that's also the reason why I am doing the shell casting because I can't spend too much time away from the fam. Thanks for your time, sorry if I rambled. And thanks for all here and elsewhere who teach and inspire, even if they don't know they are doing it.

Question by sk8er6   |  last reply


3D printing filament recycling guide

If you print a lot then you also have a lot of plastic to waste.Support structures, brims, failed parts....At some stage you start to wonder if it makes sense to invest into a filament extruder.A filament extruder is a simple way to make you own filament.A 25kg bag of granules in ABS cost only a few bucks and it will last like forever.It also the prefered choice for a plastic extruder of any sort - fresh, new and clean material!I do collect a lot of leftover plastic from my projects, is it worth getting a machine to recycle it?Trust the advertisements of the commercially available models you buy one right away - if you can afford it...But there is always a catch!What are the basic requirements when collecting you already used filament?It would be easier to state what you should avoid at all costs, so let me start with the most forgiving filament types - ABS and PLA....Both will require that you keep your filament clean at all costs.You want dust removed before the filament even enters you print head and same for all that you want to recycle.Conatminents are the biggest deal breaker when you recycle filament!!!That means parts of dissimilar materials,like when printing with two heads are just rubbish and go in the recycling bin outside.The difference between ABS and PLS for recycling comes with the material properties.ABS, if not printed too hot does not change too much, PLA on the other side usually ends up to be more brittle than new filament.ABS should not be heated too high, same for PLA when you recycle.But when PLA gets too hot it not only becomes really runny but also deteriotes very quickly.Run a bit of PLA through print head like when changing filament or cleaning the head.Do one run at normal temperatur, one run at 240°C and compare how the extruded and colled string reacts ;)PLA is also prone to oxidisation and burning, espcially the black type is tricky here as you won't be able to see it, so avoid black if possible.If it happens then you end up with rock hard piece, the size depends and can be tiny or bigger than a grain of sand.A total nightmare if you did not spot that black spot in the filament and let the recycled stuff run through your printer.A total block of the nozzle is the result.Nylon I can't really recommend for recycling, too complext to handle it properly.Same for filled filament like the wood or metal types.With them it is really easy to accumulate a lump of filler that does the same block to your nozzle.To wash or not to wash....No matter what you try there will be always some contaminents that end in your collected material.ABS can be washed with water and does not require too much fancy drying.If in doubt you can even try your dishwasher or with a good bag your washing machine - both require proper rinsing several times and the last run with some added alcohol to demineralised or destilled water.I use a box with a flyscreen cover and let it dry outside in the sun for a while.PLA does not go too well with water especially with added soaps or detergents.On the other hand it has no big problems tolerate things like Acetone.Downside such solvents also dissolve a lot of contaminats which mean even though you can recycle your washing Acetone many, many time you always need fresh Acetone for the rinsing.If you can try too keep all as clean as possible to eliminate the need for washing.Can I get better results from my cheap filament maker or the one I build for some online instructions?I find that there is always room to improve on things.Before you even think about extruding your home made filament think about how to get your failed print into the thing ! ;)The most vital part comes before you even heat the machine unless it is a really fancy one with a build in and big enough shredder.That is right you need a shredder of sorts to be able to get your recycled material fine enough for the filament maker.Some models you might quickly find as tutorials to build your own use basically a big wood drill for the mechanical part to simulate a meat grinder for plastic.Even the better ones for real money often use this basic system in one way or another.The problem is that you need to get all air out the material before it ends up to be the outgoing string you roll up.Any bubbles in filament will certainly have consequences if the bubble appears during the printing of visible areas.Imagine printing in vase mode and hitting a bubble during the last 20 minutes of a 3 hour print...Unless it is dirt simple hobby built there will some mechanism to deal with the air.However if what goes in is already very fine material it melts easier and air has it a lot easier to find a way out.A good shredder will produce quite small granules but not strips or blocks.The have their limits for intake size though.The best way to get through bigger builds is a band saw, if have a clean table you can even recycle the "saw dust".I prefer to heat bigger parts in the oven at moderate temps and then to use a hammer or press to flatten it first.No shredder or no money to add one to the list? No problem!If your filament maker does not have a pre-heated feeding area of sorts it makes sense to add one with aheating mantle and external temperature controller.Trust me, if you have odd stuff to push in it is way easier if the material softens already before it enter the extruder drive part.As the extruder will get quite warm anyway it can be as simple as adding a short pipe section with the heating mantle between the extruder inlet and feeding funnel or hopper.the temperature in theis areas should of course be will below melting point and slightly above the temp when the material start to become plyable.Hence the external temp controller here.With this heating in the fedding area you really need to get your recycled material into a suitable size and shape to allow the material to be transported easy into the extruder.Ok, I got it working, sort of...You will need some time to find the prefect temperatures for per-heating, extruder temps and coooling, so take it!If your filament comes out with bubbles or fine (hard and unwanted) particles it makes sense to cheat.Most filament makers include a filter before the melted material enters the nozzle and really hot part.In some cases this filter can be as simple as a steel mesh.If none find ways to add one ;)Said filter screen should be quite fine, preferably even finer that what you find in your faucet that airates thewater for the sink.As a rule of thumb the mesh size should at least 15% finer than the nozzle size you intent to use.Anything that makes it through will only be a problem for your nozzle if a lot of crap comes through and that you should be able to spot right away when the cooled filament comes out.If despite this you still get too many bubbles check first if your temps are not going too high so the plastic start to boil in an area.Too much speed can also cause a failure to expell all air in time, reducing the speed (watch the temps!!) can often resolve this nagging air problem.It it really worth it then?On a hobby level only if you print a lot and know you will keep going like this.Otherwise you really need to be able to source or build your filament maker as cheap as possible.Someone with a little print shop and three machines running 24/7 will certainly have a good benefit over time.Especially if the recycling is part of the overall printing process.Recycled material could be used in a dedicated head and extruder for supports, infills and so on.For example in the printer dedicated to produce the biggest parts as these usually have bigger nozzle sizes anyway.In a commercial sense however it must be considered what the material is worth in terms of normal recycling and the added hours and electricity cost for making your own filament.Unless even the cheapest commercailly available filament still costs much more than what you need to invest to the machines and electricity over the time the man hours are the biggest killer.If you need someone to monitor the filament maker and keep feeding it while making sure the spools wind up correctly then your own spools might end up quite costly.So decide carefully before you invest or use you oven and a mold to make you own recyled plastic bricks for your garden beds and such.

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply


Cleaning the oil for a vacuum pump

Was too lazy to do an Instructable about it and think a lot of pics or even videos won't help much if you know what I mean ;) Some of us use rotary vane pumps not for the purpose of evacuating refrigeration systems but for all sorts of fun and experiments. This means quite soon or often we face the problem of the oil taking in a lot of water or even worse particles and solvent fumes. I don't know about you but I was getting sick and tired of replacing the expensive oil every few weeks or sometimes even days if something got too wrong. There are many different blends of compressor oil out there that will work very well in our rotary vane pumps. The main difference is whyt the oil is designed for. Some are perfect for aircon systems, others for the work with solvent fumes and there are even those special oils that bind moisture. Unless you really need to evacuted special gases or solvents basically any low viscosity oil will do us just fine! So instead of paying 20 bucks for special compressor or even vacuum pump oil we can select the cheap everyday oil. Well, not exactly... We also want to be able to recycle our oil to save even more money. That means we don't want an oil that binds to water to keep it out of harms way. We also don't want any oil that has special coating abilities for example these oils claiming to reduce wear and tear on your engine. But any other low viscosity mineral oil or if you prefer synthetic oil will do - just stay away from silicone based oils!! If you have not used your pump for a few days you can often see a slude at the bottom of the viewing glass. If the rest of the oil is clear you can simply drain this worst bit and top up with fresh oil if required. This simple procedure saves you a lot of oil already, at least if your pump has some rest every now and then. Once your oil looks wasted it is time for the recycling and cleaning: Release the oil into a high glass jar or these facy spaghetti glasses. Fill with fresh oil and give it a short run. Release this oil as well and wait for it to properly drain. You now have the inside of your pump nice and clean again, time to fill one last time with fresh oil to keep using the pump. The filthy oil we now have in our jar should be covered with some fine cloth or filter paper and placed somewhere warm. After a week or two the oil, filth and water will have seperated and you pump, drain or siphon out the now clean oil for further use. Don't be too exact here trying to get all the oil out, just remove what you can without risking to suck in the filth from the bottom. Simply leave the rest in the jar and add the next oil change to it for the same recycling process. Solvents.... In some cases we will work with solvents and that means the oil might bind to them. Acetone for example is quite nasty here and can change the oil itself by breaking down certain components. In most cases it means the viscosity will be reduced, which is not really too bad for us. What is bad however is the fact that these solvents often refuse to fully seperate or evaporate. Once the oil looks clean do a smell test and if it smells like solvent then for sure there is solvent in it. Next step to confirm is to do a lube test. Simply place on some smooth metal or glass and smear it with your finger - a drop is enough here. If it feels sticky on the surface, gives you a rubber like feeling when sliding over the surface or is far less "slippery" than the fresh oil you also have a problem. I found that filling this contaminated oil into a proper container and applying a strong vacuum will remove all solvent residue in a very short time. Downside is that the oil in the pump is contaminated again, so it pays off to collect solvent contaminated oil seperately and once you got enough for several refills use the pump to get rid of the solvent. When done do another smear and smell test, if still smelly repeat if no longer smelly but still the same bad feeling on the surface: Discard as the oil might be broken down by the solvent.

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply


Soldering/brazing/welding steel, bicycle chains?

Hi, i am working on a project (in Vienna, Austria), and a part of that process will be that i would have to clean a bunch of used bicycle chains and create other, rather smaller objects out of them. they dont have to hold a lot of weight, they vary from 4 to 6 chainlinks or so. At the end I think I will have between 50 and 100 maybe 200 pieces, so it's not an industrial amount but not a single few pieces either. FYI: bicycle chains are made from steel, they are not stainless steel, usually its chromed, there is nickel in it, so when its used they surfaces are often damaged, so it has rust on the surface as well. it has really small hidden parts where grease, dirt and rust stays hidden and stuck too. For the cleaning: I have been cleaning chains to create prototypes and individualised pieces so far with Terpentine and experimented with other types of Degreasers, Soaps, with toothbrush method:) and rags, also other kinds of paint thinners (terpentine doesnt smell so bad, but still removed a fair amount of grease dirt and rust) Degreasers are not very effective, soap and toothbrush and rags take a lot of time. Soaking in terpentine helps but its still time consuming. I havent tried aceton yet. Vinegar and stuff like this dont seem to be so effective either... For assembling/connecting: I have used for individual pieces chain tools (putting a small pressure on the chain link pins, so they are not flexible anymore (as chains supposed to be normally) and then forced bending them in the position they should be in. This is stable enough for the stuff I want to do (they are only decorational) but it's a lot of work, takes a really long time. I did welding too (MIG), but the plates are individual pieces, it doesnt weld so nicely, or its not so easy, and I dont have my own welding machine in my workshop space, I have one in a different place i can use, but i dont want to invest and buy one just for this, and it would be nice if I could do the whole project in my own space, and i wouldnt have to transport so much stuff all the time back and forth... and it's not necessary to have it that strong as i can actually get it with welding, because it doesnt have to be that resistant, doesnt have to hold so much weight, as they are going to be only smaller decorational objects anyway. Ideas and tips that came up, havent been tried yet though, or didnt really work yet: - soldering: with gas flame (torch) and simple solder. i tried shortly, didnt really work though, didnt connect, maybe i give it a try again, not sure what i did wrong though, maybe its just not the right method? - using screw glue (not sure if thats the right name in english:) rather smaller amounts or transparent ones, applying it at the inside points, so it still looks nice. - i havent tried epoxy and i am not a huge fan of the idea, but i dont know enough about the costs, process and the environmental effects of it... - it is an option also to use some temporarily working, not very great but cheap and fast method for assembly as preparation and then just quickly fill holes by welding, i thought about trying soldering or screw glue before welding and just zack, zack zack weld them one bye one, it would be easier if they are somehow already fixed in the position they should be in (as they are small and very flexible pieces of metal otherwise), problem is though that whatever i use as preparation, will be quickly burned by welding, which is in terms of environmental effects not so great, but also has aestetical consequences i guess. - i just read about brazing, i am not sure yet what i would need for it, for smaller stuff, what is the difference between brazing and soldering exactly and how well it would work, what are the costs of investment etc. - for cleaning: one idea i havent tried, just read about it is sandblasting. I would probably have to ask some company to do that, as i really cant afford to invest much more money in equipment right now, not sure if i even have the right space for that, and it seems anyway for 50 or 100 pieces disproportionate somehow. I would like to use a method that is not too bad in terms on enviromental-friendlyness or how to say, not very damaging or too bad chemically etc. it would be important that whatever i do, the endresult: - holds more or less - looks nice, either invisible the parts or things, materials i add so it holds, or it has the same colour/material like some kind of metal. it can be that i will paint it over with some metal silver colour at the end if necessary, for having a consistent colour surface, or to prevent from rusting afterwards. - should be cheap during the process, so low running costs and more or less environmental friendly, and preferably some method to use tools that are cheap or i have access to, not very expensive to invest. - i prefer to do things by myself and not outsource the process to companies unless it has big advantages (like for example if it turns out sandblasting is cheap and really environmental friendly i would consider it actually:))) i am really happy for any tips on these things, before i spend more money on stuff just to try it out and find out it's stupid, or not what i need, not what i am looking for:)

Question by bikese_xual   |  last reply


PVC pipes and winding Tesla coils....

There are still people out there playing with high voltage.And one big problem when it comes to Tesla coils is winding the secondary coil.Now, I won't go into the details and options of the actual winding part, instead I would like to share some tricks that might make things easier for your project.Whether you wind fully by hand or make use of some mechanical winder, magnet wire is a very slippery thing on PVC.For that reason and some others we usually wind as tight and close as possible.Any leftover spaces that you find after the winding is finnished will severly compromise the overall tension of the wire in this region if fixed.Next problem is what many call aging.No matter how good you coat your coil with varnish or paint it will start to degrade over time.I found a simple fix for these problems :)Well, not really that simple but I am too lazy today to make a full Instructable for just an addition that everyone can make in a few minutes....Let me start with idea behind it all:I noticed that no matter how thick the pipe or wire is that there is little to no chance at all to get any of the coating material through the wire and all the way down to the PVC.One coil failed after I abused it so I did some cuts and had a close look with a magnifying glass.The coil itself was really good covered but it was like a sleeve that sits on the PVC with nothing on the underside of the wire except for a few single spots.Some people will now say to just a much thinner mix for the coating to allow the stuff to sweep through but that does not always work.One big issue I noticed is that not all paints or varnishes actually stick to PVC.Especially those non smelling eco friendly ones most places now sell.This means when the coil expands due to the vibrations and heat the wire can simply rattle off the varnish or the coating itself can crack under the stress.So I thought there must be a way to fix this right at the winding stage....PVC is a good insulator too!So why not use PVC instead of messing with other things?My first attempt here works quite well with thin wire and goes like this:Go outside with your winding rig and have a bottle of PVC primer and a little brush or sponge ready as well as some gloves.If you have use a friend, if you have none make a small rig to hold the sponge right in front of your winding area.The key is to keep the sponge wet with the primer so it will wet the pipe properly.Best is to have the speed and distance set so the surface just starts to dry off under the wire.The primer will cause the PVC to soften, so the wire slightly sinks into the surface.An automatic winding rig is best here as it allows for consistency.There is no too much or too little here is nothing drips terribly and your wire sticks without fully sinking in.Once done you can cover the winding with your prefered coating.For thicker wire, lets say 0.3mm or thicker, I now use a similar way but with more preperations:Using some very rough sandpaper on a belt or vibrating sander I create a small pile of PVC dust.If you prefer some fancy color you can use ABS plasic here too and it dissolves in a similar way.The resulting mix should be free of lumps and of even color, if in doubt use more primer.Consistency should be a bit thinner than honey, if yours is too thin you can add more ABS/PVC or let the primer evaporate off while stirring it every now and then.To get a good start I do a few turns dry first with quite a big spacing.When approaching the actual start of the winding area I use some stick tape to make the last alignment and start to apply the mix onto the first bit of the winding area.Some lint free cloth with a bit of primer is used to wipe off any excess towards the still uncovered part of the pipe.Every time the mix on the pipe dries out too fast a brush with some primer is use to wet it.Every time the excess runs out a bit more mix is applied onto the wound area.The key is to only have a small area in front of the winding covered with mix with the most is on the winding and "cleaned" off towards the empty area.This way the entire wire is covered by PVC all around.To finnish off you simply use a brush and paint the mix onto the rotating coil until you have an even finnish.What are the downsides?The primer stinks and is certainly not healthy to breathe in. So good ventilation is a must have and it works better in colder temeratures as it gives you more time.It might require some test runs with braided fishing line or similar to get a feeling for how much mix or primer you need to apply and how much max tesion you can use to preven the wire from sinking in.Any benefits?IMHO using this method makes it possible to get a proper bond between the PVC pipe and the wire.And by using PVC or ABS as the coating there is little to no change material properties.This in return gives far less chances for vibrations or wire expansions that result in failing insulations.The whole thing just is one piece of PVC with the wire embedded in it instead of having a wire on top of the PVC with some coating above. ;)Are there alternatives to the PVC primer?If Acetone is much cheaper than you can use it but the same safety measures apply and the mix might dry a bit quicker.What if I need a break or stop the winding for one reason or another?Simply wipe off all access and stop with just enough tension on the wire so you can star again with no problems.Then start by wetting and applying the mix and continue winding as before.

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply


Heated print beds - are they overrated gimmicks?

For years now I use my old, trusty Mega Prusa with the bare basics in terms of hardware. But basically every new printer out there comes with heated print beds and most users "upgrade" to one to get better quality prints. So I started to to check the reprap forums and other websites to find out why a heated would be a "must have". Quite a simple task you might think, but not so for someone who prints every material on a cold bed with success... What are the official pro statements for a heated bed? 1. Better bed adhesion of course. 2. Less warping of parts. 3. Far less problems with layer seperation. 4. Better print results. And of course there are a few more but not worth listing them. Why do I think most of the four statements are actually unrelated to using a heated bed? Bed adhesion is a matter of print material and surface of the bed / bed preperation, like tape, glue and such. If you filament peels off a cold bed with no adhesion at all it simply means the surface is either unclean or unsuited for the print material. Warping of parts happens because the material shrinks when it cools down, a heated bed is only able to keep a certain height of the print warm. Higher prints won't have any benefit in terms of better layer adhesion with a heated bed. Same goes for seperating layers. Unlike the common believe a heated bed does not fix this problem - it only masks it! Layers seperate because there is not enough bonging between them. This can be due to insuffient extrusion width, too high print layers, wrong print temperature and of course wrong z-axis stepping and wrong extrusion multiplicator. And how good a print comes out of your printer depends on a good calibration and proper print settings - again a heated bed only masks problems ;) Ok, so heated beds are nonsense, right? Well, wrong again ;) They take a lot of worry out of the daily print life to start with. Especially prints with big foot print will benefit, although PLA should never be a problem on a cold bed. If you print long parts in ABS or even Nylon you can have a hard time forcing the plastic to stay on the bed all around the print. A heated bed, with the right settings of course, can make sure your print keeps the shape until it is high enough so the bottom part won't be affected by shrinking anymore. My opinion on how to get the best results... Manage to print on a cold bed first! Smaller parts don't need a heated bed anyway, so use them to improve on your skills of finding the perfect bed material / coating! You will find that once you have really optimised your printer and settings most parts won't need a heated bed anymore. Once you are really happy with the result of smaller prints on a cold bed try something bigger and pay close attention to any problems on the way. For example a big print might start out perfectly but after about 5-10mm of print height you see the part starts to warp and slowly peels of the print bed - especially long parts or thin areas are affected. The infill also affects how a parts reacts during the cooling, so try the same problem print with solid infill as well as only 15% infill to compare - you can stop the print once the problem is identified, don't waste filament. Now comes the magic of the heated bed... You want the temp as low as possible but still high enough to prevent the warping! Why go low if high would help more?? Simply said: If the bed is too hot the part stays soft for a long time, which can badly affect layer bonding and shape. Imagine you squish the plastic on an already "hard" layer - the plastic is pressed flat to be within the set specs. Now if the the layer is still too hot and soft the plastic will push the lower layer in - which of course will expand outwards. So the layer can actually end up to be lower than it should be - layer will still peel ;) Start with around 50° C for ABS and turn the heat down gradually every 10 layers or 25 if you print really thin layers. If the part still prefers to warp go 10 degrees higher. But again: If the stuff would not stick properly on a cold bed work on that first! How do I print on a cold bed and claim it works fine? To be honest, with a lot of time spent on trying, calibrating and finding the right "magic" to put on the glass to make things stick. Nylon, if the part is big, can still be a frustrating task unless cardboard or Bakelite is used but I still prefer the glass bed. I no longer bother with tapes as it can be costly and I hate changing the entire setup just because I use a different material ;) As said, the main key is a proper calibration of hard- and software! If your prints look messy and you spend as much time cleaning your parts as printing them you know what I mean ;) At the moment my "bed magic" is a clear craft glue with methanol as a solvent, mine is from Aldi but similar products can be found in every craft store. The bed is sanded with 600 grid diamond blocks to be as flat as possible and to provide a bigger surface area for the glue. When mostly printing Nylon is first clean the bed with alcohol and put a layer of plastic primer on it before re-applying the glue. With the right temp settings this glue surface can be reused several times with increasing bond to the part. Once the glue start peeling off the bed it cut the area clean and apply another coat just in the spot. A single bottle of craft glue, diluted down by 20%, lasted now about 3 rolls of filament - not too bad for a 2$ investment LOL Seriously though, squeeky clean your glass bed using alcohol and / or acetone and play with different types of craft glue. You want the stuff that is clear and uses either methanol or ethanol as the solvent, don't bother with water based glues! If the glue sticks well to your part but peels off the bed easily try a layer of plastic primer on the bed first - do this outside! However, if your printer is only capable of using PLA anyway you might not want to bother at all and stick to tape ;)

Topic by Downunder35m