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Could you avoid being fired? (TV opportunity for UK teens)

Sir Alan Sugar is to put a group of 10 teenagers through their paces in a youth version of The Apprentice, the BBC has announced.Junior Apprentice will feature five girls and five boys aged 16 and 17, who will be set a variety of business tasks to test their entrepreneurial skills.The winner will win a prize worth up to 25,000GBP* and tailored to his or her individual career prospects.The set-up is very much like the original version - losing teams end up in the board room, and one member gets fired.You don't need to have business experience, you don't need to be an academic high-flyer, you just need the will, aptitude and the sheer gumption to go for it.Apply via the BBC website."Adult" Apprentice website.BBC story*Why does the site still play Billy Suggers with the sterling sign?

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Has anyone read the Rangers Apprentice books? Answered

 I was wondering if someone could submit an instructable about the Rangers in Rangers Apprentice. It is a brilliant series but i cant seem to find anything on them. Something like a costume or a "how to be a Ranger" thing.  Thanks :)

Question by Splicer02    |  last reply


My experience as an AIR

Wow! What an experience. Probably the most enjoyable, action packed, creativity-loaded 2 months of my life.  I have been tinkering in what I used to call shops; building, hacking, creating, for as long as I can remember but this... this was more than I had ever dreamed. The residency program at Instructables is a dream come true. Access to a state of the art shop, surrounded by creative, inspiring, fun people. What more could you ask for. Take one of the most creative, forward thinking, cutting edge areas of the United States (the Bay); the coolest city in that area (San Francisco); the prettiest/most unique part of that city (the Embarcadero) and slap the worlds best creative work shop on it, right over the water (Pier 9). Walking in the doors for the first time was surreal. From the swinging meeting table to the coolest kitchen I have ever seen; water jet to brand new Bridgeport; 3-D printers to industrial sewing machines, Instructables has done it. Within hours of being assigned a desk I was signing up for workshop classes and using Autodesk software to mock up some design ideas for the bicycle frame jig I spent most of my residency building. I later used this jig to build a bicycle frame.  Not only was I having a blast building what I wanted to build, I was building skills I hope to use professionally. I am hoping to start my own business building custom bicycle frames. The time to tinker and build at Instructables gave me a tremendous jump start. I wish it hadn't ended.

Topic by Tanner W    |  last reply


Does anyone know what shape the knives are in Ranger's Apprentice? Answered

I've loved this book series for so long and recently I have gotten into costuming. I (obviously) want to make a Ranger costume but I don't think the covers of the book are all that accurate (the cloaks are green while in the book they're mottled grey/brown/green).  A similar question I posted when I first signed up to this website returned the answer that the Saxe Knife looks like a Bowie knife, but I don't know if that quite fits...  Any suggestions would be helpful, also any tips for the rest of the costume would be appreciated.  Thanks in advance :) UPDATE: I'd like to rephrase this slightly. Does anyone know of a blade shape that couldsuit the saxe knife? It is a costume of a fictional item, not a re-creation so I figure a stylized shape would be better.  UPD

Question by Splicer02    |  last reply


I am a sculptor who needs helpers who can fabricate non ferrous metal and glass. Where are they?

Geometric sculptor seeks apprentice/helper(s) to fabricate bronze and glass sheets into openable demonstrations of nesting geometric polyhedrons.

Question    |  last reply


Swords

I recently have re-awoken a serious interest of mine: swordsmithing. I am in contact with a swordsmith and his apprentice,but they are both a bit far from me. If you have any expirience in bladesmithing, swordsmithing, blacksmithing, or are an apprentice, I would like to hear about your expirience and how you got started. Or if you are at least educated in this feild, I would like to hear about it, or get recomendations on what books to read. I have a basic outline about how the blades are made, but that's about it. Or, just converse among yourselves, there is a serious lack of REAL swords on instructables. I mean, I look up the word 'sword' and I get tips on how to make replicas and models. That's just fine, but I intend to be making a living offa these things. Among other things... Also, I am talking about the Japanese method of swordmaking. Not necessarily katanas, but the method seems to have great quality to it. *a side note* A quality blade is at least $200-up, and I'd be working with tamahagane. I would not buy one for any less.

Topic by Professor Tor Coolguy    |  last reply


Q: whats the cheapest way to strip the conductive film off bakelite (circuit boards)?

Hi, when i was apprentice 40 years ago we use bakelite a lot (before plastic etc became all the rage) - great stuff, nice to work with. when i dismantle old electronic gadgets i always keep the board, too. in some future applications, however, they need to be rendered non-conductive. we used acid to etch boards.... is there a very cheap and simple way to strip off the conductive layer - short of sanding it off, etc. cheers, and have a good one, but not too good either.

Topic by la xerra    |  last reply


Removable Mortar and Pestle help needed Answered

I would like to make an Alchemy Table (before I lose your attention please lemme explain) that has a removable Mortar and Pestle in the center.  I am planning either to have a removable M&P; or have one just built in (carved). I would prefer the first option. I have thought of just creating a hole with a slight bevel to keep it secure but I need help on how to know how big to make the hole.  If I can't get that done and need to make it built in then I would like to know how to make it structurally stable so it doesn't collapse under heavy grinding. (side note on the alchemy part: I am only an Alchemical Apprentice so I'm not ready to transmute anything yet. I'm only interested in it for medicinal purposes. This is going to be a summer project so I have some time to make sure I understand the principles or the practice.)

Question by Iridium7    |  last reply


Building a hair thin Mini hot tip (like soldering)

Building a hair thin Mini hot tip (like soldering) Building a hair thin Mini hot tip (like soldering) Well as you read it I am trying to build a very very small heat controllable mini hot tip (max 40 degrees C) And definitely I am sure you are such an expert in the area that the hair hot tipwill sound like a joke to you. What for? well, long story short I want to put bacteria samples on it & gradually increase the temperature and see how the populations die or survive, and most likely how long they last, to demonstarte if actual dishwashers do a good job. (maximum temp boiling point) I actually want to record the video given to the fact that the microscope I have access at school is wayyyy more powerful than the rest. I know I should use an LED or just heat but what prevents me from doing so is just blowing away the samples from the tip or changing the exposure too much with extra lights. I believe the principle is almost the same as with the coil inside electric bulbs or the same as in ironing clothes but not as hot (in orders of magnitude) I believe the trick is driving voltage and just making variations to it with a dial please help I really want to see those bacteria and film them . All help will be appreciated Thanx Micro Freak apprentice

Topic by dejabox    |  last reply


Is working with your hands better than just with your head?

I saw this on the BBC, and was so impressed I've reproduced the whole thing here: By Tom de Castella Journalist If the new year and inevitable return to work leaves you yearning for change, is working with your hands the answer? The time for reflection is nigh - a new year, a new you. But is that workstation you've slotted back into looking depressingly familiar? As millions of workers drag themselves back into the office to contemplate another 12 months of drudgery, many will be wondering if they are in the right job. Writer and mechanic Matthew Crawford thinks a lot of us would be better off trading in our mouse for a screwdriver. His recent book, The Case for Working With Your Hands, has been a huge hit in his native United States, praised by critics and politicians alike. Mr Crawford, who used to run a Washington think tank but now mends motorbikes, says it is no wonder people are miserable at work. Jobs have become so specialised and process driven that it is hard to see what difference you are making. And in those rare cases where one's impact is obvious, the result may seem pointless. Jealousy "A lot of us are plagued with a sense of uselessness," he says. "I've created a brand - what good is that? So I've persuaded people to buy something they didn't need." When running a think tank, he says he honestly could not see the rationale for being paid at all, and wondered what tangible goods or services he was providing to anyone. Then he opened a motorbike repair shop and was surprised to find he was not just happier, but more intellectually stimulated. The life of a tradesman is a varied existence, mixing practicality with logic and problem solving, he says. "Imagine you're an electrician, you're installing a conduit pipe and have to bend around the corners to make everything line up. It's the kind of work that requires improvisation and adaptation. It can never be reduced to following set procedures." Not only that, the earning potential for a tradesman is greater than in many office jobs. For instance, a skilled mechanic is likely to earn more than a sociology graduate working in publishing, he argues. Not everything about manual work is rosy. He warns that furniture making is not a good career move - Ikea can undercut you by employing workers in China for a fraction of the price. But a range of trades that need to be done on site cannot be outsourced to low wage economies. After new year introspection, January and February are traditionally one of the busiest periods for moving jobs. Mr Crawford believes doing a trade can make you happier. 'Middle-class paradox' "It offers small moments of confirmation, like when the bike you're mending starts up and runs. Small satisfactions like that can be elusive at a huge organisation with vast layers of management, where the criteria by which you're measured are ambiguous." The Times columnist Giles Coren recently tried working with his hands for the BBC Two show Giles and Sue Live the Good Life. Despite his on-screen schtick of appearing to hate everything the duo are asked to do, he fell in love with it. "I found chasing the chickens and weeding the allotment immensely satisfying," he says. "The pain... was making the television show." He agrees with Mr Crawford that modern life has been blighted by a series of alienating processes, often carried out on mobile phone, laptop and e-mail. In this way, his chosen career - journalism - has been stripped of its sense of adventure and human contact. "Even 15 years ago when I started as a reporter, you left the office to do a story. You went to investigate, visited people and used the cuttings library. Now I just sit... and Google. It's terrible, I wish I was a fireman." Despite his columnist's salary, he is jealous of those whose jobs have a clear purpose like the gardener and cleaner. "My gardener Brian comes in to do the garden every two weeks. He takes his shirt off in the summer and smokes a rollie. I can see him through the window, but I'm sitting indoors, staring at the screen to pay for this guy - it's the classic middle-class paradox." Rory Sutherland, vice-chairman of advertising firm Ogilvy UK, agrees that working with your hands does offer greater satisfaction in the short term. But manual workers lack something many of us crave - influence. Jobs like advertising where you "work with your head" may seem futile, but the ideas they come up with really do change the world, he says. "Five years ago someone worked out that you could have one size lid for the three different sizes of coffee cup that cafes have. Ok, it's emphatically not the cure for cancer, but it's through millions of little ideas like this that we get richer as a society." Perception of value Television dramas like Mad Men depict the office to be a place of invigorating competition, sexual tension and creativity. However stylised the portrayal, Mr Sutherland says there is a definite buzz to working around like-minded people - one that tradesmen miss out on. "People partly enjoy work because it's social, but working with your hands can be lonely." And he believes that experienced trades people are often economically undervalued due to the perverse way that consumers ascribe worth. He cites the behavioural economist Dan Ariely's story about a locksmith. As a young apprentice, the tradesman used to take half an hour to mend a lock, at which point he'd be thanked wholeheartedly and given a tip. When he became more experienced, the locksmith could fix a similar problem in a minute. He charged the same rate and completed the job much faster. But instead of being pleased at his speed, customers complained about his rates and refused to tip him. "It's about our perception of value." And in this respect the skilled tradesman will often struggle, he says. In the course of researching his book The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work, Alain de Botton concludes that we all want to make a difference in our job, however banal that change may be. "At the end of the working day we want to feel we've left the planet slightly healthier, tidier, saner than it was at the beginning," he says. "I'm not necessarily talking of huge changes - the difference might merely involve sanding a stair banister, removing the squeak on a door or reuniting someone with their lost luggage." And yet, it is a mistake to romanticise working with your hands, he warns. "At heart, what you're talking about is the charm of craft work. And it's my sense this can happen in places far removed from the workshop. If you're writing computer code you are in a sense displaying many of the same skills as a craftsperson, even if the finished product can't be held or touched." But following the financial crisis, Mr de Botton says attitudes to all types of work may be changing. He detects a move away from the middle-class idea that work lies "at the heart of our self-fulfillment", to the working-class view of employment as a means of feeding yourself and your family. So maybe job satisfaction is slipping down the list of what is important when it comes to work.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply