Articulating arm

I'm trying to find some solution for an articulating arm to go into an LED lamp project. I'd like either something cheap or something I can build, but so far I haven't had much luck. I could always dismantle an existing lamp, but it sort of defeats the purpose to buy a working lamp and take it apart to make another lamp. Any suggestions?

Topic by pfhorge   |  last reply


Where to find parts for building telescopic articulating arm?

I am not exactly sure where to ask this.  I have about a 3-4 foot articulating camera arm, which I use for a completely different purpose (medical related).  It is great at what it does, except it is very difficult to precisely adjust it.  I have not seen anything that will do exactly what I need, but it would look somewhat similar to that type of articulating arm.  It would need to have two telescopic sections plus one or two articulating joints.  I think I would need to find each of those sections separately and then put them together myself, because I have not seen arm with that precise configuration of sections, and that is as lightweight as what I need.  Where should I look for such kinds of parts?

Question by dmehling1   |  last reply


Articulating Wall Display

So maybe I just watched too many movies as a kid, but I thought this would be a neat wall display to have. It's based on those old shoot-em-up movies where the main guy would go to the giant room of guns in the fancy displays, expect this wouldn't be for guns (though that would be cool). I remember one movie where some pistols were on a display on the wall, and when the guy pressed a button the display moved out to a 45 degree angle. That's basically what I want to do. Not sure if I could really explain it, so I tried my best to draw my idea so far. There would be a base that's connected to a wall that doesn't move and the display which would move. The top of the display would be attached to slots in the top of base and could move up and down. The bottom of the base would be attached to the middle of the display and would push the display out. Sorry if I'm not making sense, can't find a good way to explain it. I don't know enough about electric motors and controllers to make this or it would be my first instructable, so if someone else wants to make it, please let me know how it's done. This would be fun to see in action. Cheers!

Topic by Echo86   |  last reply


I want to make an articulating telescoping boom or pole that will hold about 20lbs and be able to reach 50ft.

I would also like to control it from the ground. I wouldn't mind having to use manual controls but electronic would be ideal. I can't find anything online regarding using hydraulics. Any thoughts? Thanks.

Question by milkyway312   |  last reply


Articulating LCD mount arm

I've been searching for a diagram or and instructable that will help me build one of these things. It's really frustrating because I need one so bad, but buying one would cost me upwards of $100 and I dont want to spend that (unless I'm making one for myself).

Topic by milo126   |  last reply


Ideas for a Telescoping Arm for SpectrumLED V2.0 (LAMP)?

This is the project: https://www.instructables.com/id/SpectrumLED-V20-the-ULTIMATE-Variable-Spectrum-Lam/ I want to upgrade the telescoping arm mostly because I can, not because I must ;) I don't open/telescope it very often because right now it's too long at its shortest position. I adjust the swiveling "head" all the time, and when the rod is tightened so it's easy for me to telescope it, the head swivels which is annoying. I would like to separate them. I already have an idea which I think will be good for the swiveling head: http://woodgears.ca/tripod/head.html I've come up with the idea of making a scissor lamp, but I don't think that will be very simple to make, so I was wondering if anyone has a simpler and better idea for making something that telescopes (and locks). Add pictures ⋅⋅⋅ᴬᶰᵈ ᴱᴱ'ˢ, ᴵ'ᵐ ᵃʷᵃʳᵉ ᵒᶠ ᵗʰᵉ ᶠᵃᶜᵗ ᵗʰᵃᵗ ᴵ'ᵐ ᵖᵒʷᵉʳᶦᶰᵍ ᵗʰᵉˢᵉ ᴸᴱᴰ'ˢ ᶦᶰᶜᵒʳʳᵉᶜᵗᶫʸ ⁽ᴺᴼᵀ!⁾, ᵇᶦᵗ ᶦᶠ ʸᵒᵘ ˢᵗᶦᶫᶫ ʷᵃᶰᵗ ᵗᵒ ᶜᵒᵐᵐᵉᶰᵗ ᵗʰᵃᵗ, ᵖᶫᵉᵃˢᵉ ᵈᵒ ᶦᵗ ᶦᶰ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜᵒᵐᵐᵉᶰᵗˢ ˢᵉᶜᵗᶦᵒᶰ ᵒᶰ ᵗʰᵉ ᴵᶰˢᵗʳᵘᶜᵗᵃᵇᶫᵉ ᵗᵒ ᵏᵉᵉᵖ ᵗʰᵉ ᶜᵒᵐᵐᵉᶰᵗˢ ˢᵉᶜᵗᶦᵒᶰ ʰᵉʳᵉ ᵒʳᵍᵃᶰᶦᶻᵉᵈ, ᵗʰᵃᶰᵏˢ⋅ Any ideas would be really appreciated :)

Topic by Yonatan24   |  last reply


Articulated Wings: CAN YOU BUILD? (Instructables Link Included)

I am looking for someone to commission to create/ build the articulated wings found on the below YouTube video.  Instructables link is available in the video. If interested, what would be your fee and turnaround time? Thank you, Joye joyebmoore@gmail.com https://www.instructables.com/id/Articulated-Wing-Framework/

Topic by Joyebell   |  last reply


Seeking engineering advice on mounting heavy weight in concrete ceiling

Hi all, I am designing/building a prop ceiling-mounted surgical arm (see reference photos attached) into a 15" concrete slab ceiling for a hospital room set for a tv show. I'm also attaching two sketches of the two different arms I plan on making and I'm hoping some of you clever engineering-types may be able to identify flaws in my schematics before I go too far with the design. If you see something that could pose a danger to the actors or have and alternative suggestion I would be grateful!!! Here are my concerns: 1) what are acceptable stresses on all joints due to weight distribution and actors moving the parts around? 2) the heavy duty industrial casters that tapcon into the ceiling: would they get pried apart as weight is applied gravitationally? 3) can the concrete ceiling handle the live stresses of actors moving the arms? 4) can the horizontal PVC arms handle the weight or do they require a welded metal skeleton? --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Any feedback would be greatly appreciated; I'm in my research phase of this build now so please let me know your thoughts!!! Thanks, Damian

Question by damianzuch   |  last reply


How should I mount an articulating arm (for a flatscreen TV) to a travel trailer wall?

A travel trailor has thin walls and lighter construction, has anyone had to find a way to mount anything to these kinds of walls?

Question by GBeardedB   |  last reply


How to build an "endoskeleton" frame for a lifesize figure (without mannequins)

Anyone have any ideas or know-how on how to build a frame/skeleton for a lifesize body? I'm looking to build some lifesize human replicas, and would even like to articulate some of the major joints, like waist (rotation) and shoulders. And preferably without having to buy a mannequin, as the darned things are pretty expensive! (and probably wouldn't adhere well to an articulation implementation).

Topic by coldblackice   |  last reply


How to develop electronic differential for articulated rear drive e-trike using the steering angle in Matlab/Simulink?

One wheel at the front and two wheels at the rear,steering mechanism

Question by SachinK114   |  last reply


can anyone think of a way of making a automatic farm gate opener?

The gate must be practical for a working farm, the gate needs to be remote controlled but switched off at night this can be done  manual. a barrel would work but there are some electricity lines close to the gate. the gate needs to be wide enough for articulated lorries to maneuver.  

Question by willow20   |  last reply


Halloween: Spindly finger costume hands help

Hi! Looking for any ideas on an easy to do version of the gloves/hands in the attached pic. They don't have to have articulation, just be relatively sturdy. I have approximately zero cosplay/crafting experience so I'd appreciate detailed thoughts. If this isn't the right place, I apologize for my newbie-ness.

Topic by Dex1138   |  last reply


Prism Selection

I thought I posted this already but now I can't find it. wanting to build a pair of these for my dad http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/261411580635?ul_noapp=true&chn;=ps&lpid;=82 but with the lenses articulated so that he can move them wherever he wants. trying to find a prism that would work correctly without inverting the image (I want it to be disorienting, but......not that bad)

Topic by crapflinger   |  last reply


Magnifier lamp base broken - how to make replacement?

I have one of those handy articulated-arm magnifier lamps but the TOTALLY CHEAP INADEQUATE CRAPPY clamp base not only broke but gouged my desk as it did. I have beginner woodworking skills and tools; can someone make an Instructable on building a better replacement? The lamp and the arms and everything are fine, it was just the cheap plastic clamp that broke.

Topic by threeoutside   |  last reply


Building a (Terminator) T-1000 Endoskeleton arm. Help?

I want to make a (terminator) T-1000 endoskeleton arm. I'd like it to be as realistic as possible, and I also want to articulate it using either servos or hydraulics. What would be the best way of going about this? I have a passion for animatronics and I'm desperate to do this, but information on the net seems very thin!

Question by Davii   |  last reply


Transitional fossils -- a "walking seal"

From Science News:A fossilized skeleton of what researchers are calling a walking seal has been uncovered in the Canadian Arctic. The remains of this previously unknown mammal could shed light on the evolution of pinnipeds, the group that includes seals, sea lions and walruses, researchers report in the April 23 Nature.Read the whole article, which includes the re-articulated skeleton (about 65% complete!) as well as reconstructions of the land-dwelling pinniped's appearance.

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


Crawlspace Buddy

A robot to navigate crawlspaces and show video. A boon to pest control or plumbing estimators. Rather than dry suiting and taking pictures (homeowners usually have at least three estimates), one could show live video of pipe leaks, festerring sewage, carpenter ants, termites, racoons or mice nesting. Perhaps the robot could carry a stun gun to drive out raccons. It has to be able to navigate the "wild" underside of homes or buildings and be waterproof. It could have an articulated arm to mount the camera and poke holes to search for termites.

Topic by gypsy_fly   |  last reply


Vintage Dental Tools

I stopped by the White Elephant Sale in Oakland a few days ago and picked up a a really old set of dental equipment. At home dentistry has long been a dream of mine, and now I have the tools to make it a reality. Its got two different dental style flood lights on nice swing arms, the spittoon sink thing, a Mr. Thirsty, a belt driven articulated dental drill, the tray on the arm, the thing that fills up the little cup of water and the air/water gun that dentists like to use so much. The water and air connections are included, but not much of it currently works. The equipment is set up outside of my room in my shop, and to be honest, it kind of freaks me out every time I walk by it. If anyone has any ideas on how to repurpose any of this stuff besides making a renegade dentists office/torture device I would love to hear them. Also, if anyone knows anything about how to restore these kinds of things, it would be great to get some pointers. Its made by a company called Weber and its got to be from at least the 40's or 50's if not older.I'm most excited about the articulated belt driven drill - I have never seen anything quite like it!

Topic by noahw   |  last reply


Sculpting From Scratch: Class at the San Francisco Art Institute

For over one million years hominids have made and embellished tools. We make everything from fake flowers to 2,000 ft towers. However, in a world of Ikea and fast food, it is easy to forget the potential of our own hands. Sculpting from scratch combines engineering and play to make freestanding objects that entice the senses and provoke thought. Class projects will focus on learning how to use shop tools, repurposing refuse, articulating objects, illustrating intent, and the question of beauty. No prerequisite.Jesse Hensel is a contemporary artist whose work is informed by the Yup'ik woodcarving tradition. His rugged natural sculptures use an Alaskan frontier perspective to critique contemporary society. Recent San Francisco exhibitions include such venues as the de Young Museum and Mark Wolfe Contemporary. His team was honored with the Artist's Choice Award at the World Ice Art Multi-Block Classic in Fairbanks, Alaska. He received his BA in Liberal Arts at Sarah Lawrence College and his MFA in Sculpture from SFAI.Sculpting from ScratchInstructor: Jesse Hensel10 Sessions/Thursdays, June 4-August 6Time: 6:30-9:30pmLocation: Studio 105Number: SC1002Tuition: $400Apply: http://www.sfai.edu/Page.aspx?page=110&navID;=21&sectionID;=5

Topic by jesse.hensel 


Help! Please Donate More Common Sense!

It's not that I don't have common sense, It's because I think like this. I overthink things, when the answer is usually simple. Maybe I take things way too seriously. It probably took Brooklytonia about 20 seconds to read and figure this out... About a week ago, I uploaded an Instructable that I thought would be a HUGE hit. It wasn't. When my Instructable on Dimmable LED Workshop Lighting (Very High Efficiency) got featured in the Newsletter, it got 100K+ views. This is because it was at the top, and it was impossible to miss. When my Instructable on Insanely Bright LED Panel got featured in the newsletter, It got 40K+ views. It was at the bottom left on the email. I figured that it made sense. When my Instructable on Articulating 70W Spectrum-Balanced LED Panel got featured in the newsletter, it got ~10K views. This makes no sense! (I've changed the titles to what the staff changed them when they got featured in the newsletter. Not sure why I remember this...) Dimmable LED Workshop Lighting (Very High Efficiency) - Good title. Good thumbnail. Main Instructable - TONS of clicks - 3K views in less than 10 minutes Insanely Bright LED Panel - Okay title (not my fault!). Fairly good thumbnail. Located at the bottom left - Quite a bit of views Articulating 70W Spectrum-Balanced LED Panel - Good title. Good thumbnail*. Located in the middle. - Not a lot of clicks - 3K views in several hours. WHY? Of course there are several things that differ between Insanely Bright LED Panel and Articulating 70W Spectrum-Balanced LED Panel. But why such a difference? I mean-- I always compare the statistics of my I'bles, and try to make them better. It's usually hard to compare, and surprising. But why is there such a huge difference between two Instructables that are pretty similar? *I changed it a couple hours before it got featured in the newsletter, with the Instructables Pixlr editor. I know it turned ot a bit weird, but it was the best that I was able to do. The Pixlr site has better fonts, but the biggest on was still soooo small. Maybe I did something wrong. Images of before and after: 

Topic by Yonatan24   |  last reply


220v 3 wire to 220v 2 wire (USA to Philippines)

Hello all,  I'd like to purchase a welding machine in the USA and take it to the Philippines. My problem and hopefully solution is, USA use 2 legs of 110v for 220v appliances/machines. In the Philippines, voltage is 220v (single leg). So, If I have a single phase, 220v welder, can I cut the plug off, combine the two power legs and connect to the power in the Philippines? I hope I am able to articulate this question properly. Mig welders are not easily available over there. Thank you for anyone that can help

Question by TerryH74   |  last reply


How do you make an action figure or a model with plastic?

Http://media.herald-dispatch.com/blog/games/uploaded_images/BaldBullActionFigure-763214.jpgI and many others have ever wondered how to create those beautiful Third dimensional vessels of imagination without get a crumbly, inanimated or/and flaccid modelling clay and sigh at the creations of others or the lack of imagination of some commercial figures.Why, i in my frustration learned to create Plas-ti-li-ne, clay and paper figures with great detail and now i seek to learn (and im pretty sure im not alone in this) the way to create permanent models just like the one´s we see at toy stores, hobby´s shops and the internet. But some times for one or another reason we are unable to find someone in flesh and bone to teach us as in my case in wich i live in the middle of nowhere.If i just knew the way to create those models i would had a way to give great gifts, to teach others and see my toughts in form but i cant go at trial and error forever, so i beg you to teach how to create an articulated shape! /@_@/ what is the material to make figures?what is the secret to turn a piece of ductil and malleable material into hard beautiful soft feeling piece of plastic?The Pieces of an articulated figure (like a detailed humanoid shape) must be shaped all together and then dismantled ?the experience of shaping is similar of that of modelage?I wish i know!!!

Topic by Plastic-the blue   |  last reply


Random distance driving question

This is a question that has bugged me since I was a child.A fuel tanker holds about 7,000 gallons.An articulated lorry has a fuel consumption (when fully loaded) of roughly 8mpg.That equals something like 56,000 miles (or more than two circumnavigations of the world around the equator) if the tanker used the tank as a fuel supply.The little boy within me wants to know has anyone ever done this? (I suspect they haven't actually driven an artic all the way around the equator, but you know what I mean)If not, does anyone know of similar distance-driving challenges?We're down to our last four feet six inches of black stuff, sir

Topic by PKM   |  last reply


Acrylic on acrylic hinge - friction?

I'm building an articulated 'puppet' using 3mm acrylic sheet for the 'skeleton' My hinges will be simple sandwiches of two outer and one inner piece, held together with a snap-together nylon rivet. The flat contact area is about half a square inch (see attached image). The 'puppet' will be controlled by tendons attached to gloves, so will only have the force of single fingers to move them. I need to know how smooth a joint this will be, before I start ordering nylon washers. Anyone got experience of this sort of join? Will it be ok dry, or will a small amount of  lubrication help? (petroleum jelly? liquid silcone?). Or do I need to commit to washers. Needs to be as frictionless as possible!

Topic by Crispy75   |  last reply


18" Eric Draven The Crow NECA - $30 OBO

Check out this realistic version of Brandon Lee as Eric Draven! The tragic character, otherwise known as "The Crow," is shown here as a testament to Lee's legacy. The Crow stands 18" tall and comes with his trenchcoat and bird that can perch on his shoulder. Highly detailed with articulation at the neck, shoulders, forearms, wrists, waist, and ankles, The Crow also speaks 5 different phrases. He's been on display for about five years in a smoke free and dust free environment. He retails for 70 dollars on amazon, but I'm cleaning house and would like to see him get a new home. So thirty dollars and he's yours! Serious offers only. The figure is loose, no packaging and comes complete.

Topic by InvaderDig 


Peroxode or Boil this Mummy?

Hi, I found a mummified small animal (possum, little dog, raccoon) under a friend's house, when doing plumbing repairs. It is all there except maybe the feet. I cant really tell, because he is kinda twisted around, and I have not touched him yet. There is some skin, no fur - he is so dry that the live animals arent even iterested in smelling him. I would like to clean and maybe try to articulate him; if too many bones are missing I will just keep his skull. My question is - what is the best way to remove the dry skin? Instructions I have read are all about fresh skin. Should I boil him or just soak him in peroxide to remove his skin? Thank you!

Question by lgrotkin   |  last reply


Tips for Making Instructables Easier, Faster, & Better

*Typing...* It took me about a week to make my Instructable on my magnetic pegboard, and about a month to make my I'ble on SpectrumLED. Now I don't even want to know how much time it took chr to make his 8X8X8 LED Cube Instructable... 2 Weeks ago, I published an Instructable on my Articulating Lamp, I don't think it took me more than 3-4 hours... Other than the fact that I now have way more experience, I've thought of several tips that decrease the amount of time I have to sit in front of  the computer and type, by a HUGE amount. If making and I'ble is a lot of work, it'll feel like work, and I'll need to take a break... If it's fairly easy, I'll want to make more! I will leave some of the tips that I've come up with in the comments. If you have your own leave them in the comments below!

Topic by Yonatan24   |  last reply


Analog to Digital Conversion on PIC18f4520

Hello there! I am building a custom digital weighing scale. My issue is not about how to do A2D, but on how to use the least amount of power doing so.  So imagine you just placed an object on the scale, i want the microcontroller to notice a change in weight and perform a2d on the load cell voltage. Now i only want to perform this a2d once(or a few times to make sure it works), saving the value in the register, and then i want the microcontroller to go back to sleep. The microcontroller will keep sleeping unless the object is removed or the weight changed, where the A2D works again for a couple of times, notes the value, and then sleeps again. So my question is, does the A2D have to keep working to notice a change in the weight? or can that happen some other way?   I basically want to make my battery last a long time, and i want to do that by using the A2D only when needed. On another note, does a2d even use up alot of power? If i keep it running would it consume alot of my battery? If things are unclear please ask. I'm afraid i didn't articulate well. Thanks! 

Question by Chris414   |  last reply


Robot [Tee] Goes to the Magic Kingdom

Yes Kiteman, I know just a few weeks ago I said that I haven't visited Disney in a long long time... which, at the time was true....My parent's came up to visit and my family went to the Disney "not so scary Halloween" two weeks ago (oh, I do have a 6 year old sister :p)... They give out candy (good candy too :p), most of the rides are open and the best Disney parade Disney's ever done (according to the people that work there).In any case, I thought this phallic mickey head was hilarious - I wasn't the only one that thought so too :pIn any case, I found myself poking my head around props and such, looking at how things work rather than riding rides.... And talking with some workers... They started putting up Christmas lights weeks ago - they had a cherry picker that could reach the top of the castle...In any case, robot+mickey -- both of their heads likely have the same amount of articulation (except mickey's head sounds like a printer :p)

Topic by trebuchet03   |  last reply


Chemcial Question for Taxidermy Related Project

I am quite interested in the articulation of the bones of animals. I plan on using small game (squirrels, frogs) to begin with, and I will probably donate them to my Biology teacher, since she loves skeletons.The process of defleshing and whitening the bones of the animal is fairly straight forward - soak the carcass/skeleton in chemical baths and take it out when it's done. The chemicals needed for the process are what's going to be hard for me to obtain.I need a 0.3% solution of sodium carbonate. Sodium bicarb is extremely easy to come by, but I've never seen sodium carbonate. I've heard it is used to raise the pH in pools, so I'm guessing a pool store would carry it. But, would it be possible (practical) to make it? Is there a way, using household chemicals, to produce sodium carbonate? I don't need very much.Secondly, I need a 20% solution of hydrogen peroxide. I only have a 3% bottle. I've heard H2O2 is some pretty dangerous stuff. Again, is it possible for me to buy/make it? Would freeze-purifying it work?Thanks for any help, and if I get this to work out, of course it'll all be turned into an Instructable.

Topic by Bran   |  last reply


Attempting my first custom figure - Ferra/Torr

Hello, I've decided to finally try my hand at doing a custom figure. I want to try and make Ferra/Torr from Mortal Kombat X. Little guys riding on big guys is one of my favorite things for some reason. I figure it's probably best to start with Torr (the big guy). Right now I'm looking for ideas on what to use for the base body. I'm leaning towards a Marvel Select Ultimate Hulk as my base figure. I like his facial expression and his hand situation - one closed fist and one open hand with big grody fingernails. I have some concerns though, I've heard his articulation isn't as good as some other MS hulks. Does anyone have some insight into this? Would I be able to get him into a sort of hunched over pose? The little picture on the left shows the size relations between Ferra/Torr and a regular person. I was kind of thinking of going with a bigger scale and using real materials for the cloth and armor and whatnot. I work in a metal shop, so I could probably make the metal bits and bobs. Again, I have no idea if that would be a nightmare or not. Thanks, Me

Topic by DaveOfMutilation 


(newsletter) Business Card Catapult, Easter Prank, Handheld Tesla Coil...

Sign-up for this newsletter: We're now running FOUR awesome contests, so get to work on your Instructables! Earthjustice United States of Efficiency Contest - Create an energy-saving Instructable and you could win a MacBook Pro! Klutz Rubber Band-Powered Contest - Open to any rubber band-powered contraption. Win cool books from Klutz! Closes for entries on April 19!Burning Questions 7 - Answer our questions and win the love of thousands, or at least a spiffy new t-shirt! Epilog Challenge - Enter any awesome project with a green twist for the chance to win an Epilog Zing laser cutter or gift certificates from Ponoko! Closes for entries on April 19! The April Fools Contest and ThinkGeek Hacks Contest have closed for entries and are in the voting phase. Check them out and vote now! Make an Irretrievable Easter Egg The Business Card Catapult Power Glove 20th Anniversary Edition How to Make Kimchi / Kim Chee Closes for entries on April 19! Win a MacBook Pro! Make a Korg Kaossilator Guitar How to Thread Eyebrows Walking Papercraft Mech Warrior How to Make an Atari Game Featured questions from our new Answers section: How do you make a small but very strong electromagnet??? How can I make a hole in a glass bottle? Camera Light Ring Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day LCD Articulating Bracket for Cheap Quick and Dirty "Tesla Coil" Stretch, twist, and power something cool! Only the best for you Rubber-Band Powered Altoids Boat Hydroponic Food Factory Domo-Kun Backpack Add a Shower to your Toilet Sign-up for this newsletter:

Topic by fungus amungus 


1st time robot. Too ambitious?

Hello All, I have recently started an ambitious project. There will certainly be much learning along the way.  But it is too ambitious? The goal is to build a bot that can be controlled remotely, to aid in the detection, marking, and ultimate removal of unexploded ordinance in Cambodia (in this first application).  Though I have never built a robot of any type, I am quickly learning the basics, but would like ultimate beginner advice if anyone had any.  If anyone would like details on the project, PM me.  It's really a lot for a forum post... If there are any Veterans or military buffs out there, I could really use other first hand accounts of experiencing UEO. Through generous donation and aquisition, I have come cross an electric wheelchair, and many parts needed for a former "Battle-Bot".  Battle-bot turns peace-maker.  I love it!  The motors are Bosche, 24V and ~750watts.  Included were DC motor (high amp) speed controls, and 2x 12v 26A sealed lead-acid batteries.  Very very excited to really dig in.  I lack a quality track or model of a good track to use for traction, etc.  Anyone know of any good and sturdy RC tank tracks I could look at for design or actual construction? Though I began to construct my own track out of sheet metal and various materials available (it actually turned out kinda ok), I don't intend on reinventing the wheel, as it were.  3" took me almost 2 hours. Will also be incorporating a ~3'-4' rotating and articulating arm.  Trying to keep its weight to under ~30lbs.  The wheelchair frame is very strong and moddable, Ws thinking of using a lazy susan type bearing, but I'm not sure I could find one rated for that weight for an affordable price.  Any suggestions? Thanks for checking this out.  Again, if you want more details, I'm happy to share my plans.  Just PM me. This is being designed 100% open-source, and 100% documented with a video and written journal in order to be easily duplicated.   Constructive criticism is NOT personal criticism! Huck

Topic by huck alexander   |  last reply


Mac-o-Lanterns, Caveman Costume, Cotton Candy Machine...

Sign-up for our newsletter here. Nov. 1, 2007 Welcome back! Lots of news this week:Our DIY Halloween 2007 Contest ends this on Sunday night (11:59 pm PST). Win a trip to Maker Faire 2008 or many other fantastic prizes. Post your Instructable this weekend! Live near Boston? Check out the Show & Tell at MITERS tomorrow night, Nov. 2. The Howtoons book is now available in stores! Buy a copy or two for kids you know. Don't forget about the Mash-Up Contest or the Laser Cutter Contest - show us what you can make! Build Your Own Electric Guitar! With some woodworking skills and a love of music, you can make your own guitar just the way you want it.posted by gbuilder on Oct 31, 2007 Build an Amazing Tesla CD Turbine Watch your CDs spin at over 15,000 rpm using compressed air and some helpful advice from Mr. Tesla.posted by mrfixits on Oct 31, 2007 Mac-O-Lanterns Bring your old computers back from the dead and scare all the geeks in the neghborhood!posted by Fusebox on Oct 30, 2007 Win a free trip to Maker Faire 2008! Contest ends this Sunday! How to MAKE a Geico Caveman Costume De-evolutionize yourself with these handy mask-making instructions for $30!posted by BeerBellyJoe on Oct 29, 2007 Halo 3 Master Chief Halloween costume You can't just finish the fight in your daily threads. Follow these instructions to save the world in style, hero.posted by zogduke on Oct 28, 2007 Over $5,000 in prizes! Cotton Candy Machine Build your own machine to spin out yummy strands of hot sugar.posted by bangbang007 on Oct 28, 2007 How to get some revenge on the credit companies Show the credit card companies that their mass mailings aren't appreciated any more.posted by DangerArt on Oct 27, 2007 The Laser Cutter Contest is Back! Toddler Flintstone Car When the kids want to go out as Pebbles and Bambam the're absolutely going to need this car to complete the look.posted by lemaster63 on Oct 27, 2007 Articulated Wing Framework The perfect foundation for your bat, bird, angel or demon costume. Extend those wings and fly!posted by rachel on Oct 26, 2007 Gas Powered Shredder Shred those leaves for some quick composting with this modification of parts you probably already have in the garage. posted by robbtoberfest on Oct 26, 2007   The Halloween Costume Ball was a blast! Check out tons of photos of the costumes, food, and fun here and here.Now go build something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric

Topic by lebowski 


Giant Robot Architecture Talk by Greg Lynn in Berkeley

Here is an interesting talk from the Art, Technology, and Culture Colloquium of the Berkeley Center for New Media...Giant Robot ArchitectureGreg Lynn, UCLA & Angewandte, ViennaMonday, Feb 4, 7:30-9:00pm- Note Special Location: Berkeley Art Museum Theater- Enter on Dwight Ave: http://bampfa.berkeley.edu/visit/visitor- Lecture is free and open to the publicAbstractRobots. In my office, my staff keeps asking for more new machines, and every time I get a new machine, I fire two or three people. By extrapolation, in the next few years I will be sitting in an office by myself with a bunch of robots. We have is a very large CNC (computer numerically controlled) cutting machine, a laser cutter, a 3d printer, and soon we will have a robotic articulated arm. All of these things let us do studies of models, which are very important to architects, but what they also let us do is learn machine language. We spend more and more time talking to machines; speaking their language. It is very easy for us to go to any country that has an automobile industry or an aircraft industry and give their machines instructions and do things with these large machines at an architectural scale that is very perfunctory and affordable. The spread of machine language and programming is more significant than the Anglicization of the world. Learning to talk to robots is very important to my field of design.Speaker BioGreg Lynn is a leading pioneer at the intersection of computing, design, and architecture. His architectural designs have been exhibited in both architecture and art museums including the 2000 Venice Biennale of Architecture where he represented the United States in the American Pavilion. His work is in the permanent collections of CCA, SFMoMA, and MoMA and has been exhibited at the Pompidou, Beyeler, Cooper Hewitt, MAK, MoCA, NAI,Carnegie, ICA and Secession museums among others. In addition to his architectural work, his Alessi "Supple"Mocha Cups and his Vitra "Ravioli" Chair are in production and have been inducted into the Museum of Modern Art's Permanent Collection. He received the American Academy of Arts & Letters Architecture Award in 2003. In 2002, he left his position as the Professor of Spatial Conception and Exploration at the ETHZ (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich) and became an Ordentlicher University Professor at the University of Applied Arts in Vienna.He is studio professor of Architecture at UCLA and the Davenport Visiting Professor at Yale University. Greg Lynn holds degrees in architecture and philosophy and received an Honorary Doctorate degree from the Academy of Fine Arts &Design; in Bratislava. In 2001, Time Magazine named him one of 100 of the most innovative people in the world for the 21st century. In 2005, Forbes Magazine named him one of the ten most influential living architects.http://www.glform.comMore info on the colloquium here.

Topic by noahw 


An embarrassment of riches

I was an Artist in Residence at Instructables from September-December 2013, and words cannot express how wonderful it was.  Instructables has recently built out what I can only imagine is the world's greatest general use workshop, at Autodesk's Pier 9 facility.  You are probably aware of this shop if you're reading Artist in Residency posts, but if not, check out the overview here and the machine details here.  I tried to learn and do EVERYTHING in this shop!  I didn't quite succeed in that but I came close enough that I didn't totally finish any of my projects.  I'd planned to make an articulated model of an Escher drawing and an 8 foot tall steel dinosaur statue, both projects I could probably have spent all my time there on.  There was so much awesome to learn about and experiment with, though, that I kept getting distracted by side projects and what-if's that I might not have had opportunity to mess around with later on.  So what I actually ended up making was a series of acrylic jewelry, two small cardboard dinosaur models, MOST of the Escher drawing (I finished it later), some sheet metal walking-leg linkage experiments, half of a new Mustache Ride, part of a sixth Pulse of the City heart, tests of chemically-mediated etching on metal, a pair of 3d printed snowflake ornaments, and the beginnings of a pair of antler pants.  (I will definitely write instructables for the dinosaur and the pants, when they are complete.) I loved it all.  I loved it all so much, and so consistently, that I had to try everything and was hardly able to finish anything.  I cut metal on the waterjet, I printed many 3d things on the 3d printers, I lased like it was going out of style, I lathed like I didn't know what I was doing (Yay Learnings!), I cut and welded and drilled and screwed and printed and ground and sewed and soldered and blasted and glued.  I was like a kid in a candy shop who can't finish the fudge because the lollipops are so tasty and then whoa! peanut brittle! peppermints! gumdrops!  The only part of the shop I didn't use was the test kitchen because, well, I don't really cook. Three months was not enough.  Three years would not be enough.  I feel so fortunate to have been in there doing anything at all for any amount of time, though.  Things I can do now that I couldn't do last summer include: turn wood on a lathe cut metal, stone, cardboard, etc on a waterjet etch metal on a laser printer operate a small vacuum former print multiple materials on an Objet Connex run a jointer and planer operate a Shopbot TIG weld aluminum (to be sure, I'm lousy at this still, but I know How) operate a sand blaster bend steel tubes I'm an introverted anti-social nerd so it has taken me to the bottom of this post to talk about the people.  I absolutely need to say how great the people there are - everyone, no matter their job description, makes things.  Everyone just gets how it is to lose yourself in making some weird possibly useless object that you might have to get rid of when you're done anyway, but you just need to work on it to figure out That One Thing that you didn't quite understand but now you do!  It is a rare and wonderful set of people.  And some of the people, it is explicitly their JOB to teach me about all the equipment and help me with any problems I had with anything at all. If you're reading this you should definitely apply for this program.  You do not want to miss out on working in this shop.

Topic by rachel   |  last reply


Why?: Contest, Finalists, OAE, and... WHAT?

EDIT: This has turned out to be a really long post. Please see the top comment if you don't want to read everything, or if you aren't a scanner (seriously...). I did my best to stop my longforumtopicisitis disease... I don't really know how to write this "topic". I know I'm not the only one that's a bit upset about it. I'll do my best to keep it short, but if you might get pretty confused if you don't read (almost) everything. I would really like to hear your 100% HONEST opinion. I am looking for criticism. Don't worry if your response sounds harsh. Thank you. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Instructables member OAE has posted several forum topics about contest winners in the past months. I understand the fact that he is annoyed some Instructables that win in contests aren't original, aren't documented very well, and lack pictures. It does bug me a bit when these types of Instructables win, but I guess that there's normally a reason for that, since most contests don't lack entries... He also mentioned the fact that he was pretty annoyed about the fact that he doesn't win. I DO NOT want to insult him in any way, but even though his Instructables are fairly well documented, I wouldn't expect for one of his Instructables to be a finalist. Brooklyntonia wrote that "A paper airplane on a cutting mat doesn't scream click and vote.", and I agree. However, I seem to have the same (I think) problem with my Instructables, and I think that it has  just gotten a bit too much. I've won in 3 contest with 86 I'bles (think of that as 50, if you know what I mean...), which is why I feel a bit weird for "complaining". It's not that I publish Instructables just for winning in contests. Far from that. SOOOOOOOO MANY times in the past year, I have posted an Instructable that I was absolutely positive that would win in a contest, but it wasn't even a runner up! I have SO MANY! It would take me an hour to post half of them, but here are some: Articulating 70W Spectrum-Balanced LED Panel for the Lamps & Lighting Contest How to Make a Wooden 6" Bench-Vise for the Wood Contest The Flat-Pack Bandsaw for the Flat-Pack Contest (less than the others, though...) How to Build a Wooden Drill-Press Vise for the Hand-tools Only Contest 9 Unusual Tool Storage Methods for Your Workshop for the Living without Closets Contest Make Your Own Plywood Mallet! for the Plywood Contest World's Most Over-Engineered 14-in-1 Soldering Station! for the Leftovers Contest Please correct me if I'm wrong: These Instructable are featured, well documented, meet the contests requirements, contain well lit high quality photos, are original (90%, of course...). I "politely encourage" people to vote only in an Instructable that I think will win... I would understand not winning at all once or twice, but not even being a runner up even once? WHAT am I doing SO HORRIBLY WRONG? What discourages me even more is that even though I want to build something that I really need, I will wait for months until a contest opens, start making, spend a ton of time on the Instructable, and then I realise that I waited for so long, and my I'ble hasn't even won! Benne, however, even though we both publish somehow similar content, has mastered this somehow! If I make something, I have to type up the Instructable immediately, because my short term memory is pretty bad. I wrote about this a bit here. If I calm the excitement down, I might be able not to publish it right away, but that will just discourage me, since I will feel that I haven't accomplished anything (aka positive feedback, etc...). Then after waiting several months, I will publish the I'ble and still not win? Imagine your boss, at work, saying "Okay (your name), you've spent 10 hours working, but I'm going to pay you only next year. Oh, nevermind, we're having budget cuts. I'm not going to pay you at all" Wait, WHAT? WHY? I'm making this sound as if it's a bet, which is okay since you don't get "paid" from Instructables, but never getting anything at all is annoying. Also, publishing Instructables is not extremely addicting (A REAL one... ;)  I think I am following the contest guidelines, but not winning again, and again... Why? Is there something that I don't know? Thank you for reading!

Topic by Yonatan24   |  last reply


Oil Spill Water Cleanups As Fast As They Happen

We live and survive on oil today. That dependence won’t go away for at least a few more generations. Today’s technology allows us to drill oil just about anywhere in the world, and then move it to anywhere we want using behemoth water vessels. Unfortunately, there’s a dark side to all this and it happens when our technology fails us, as periodically demonstrated by mankind’s great oil spill disasters. The most recent being the Gulf Oil Spill of 2010. The amount of oil actually dumped upon our ecosphere and contaminating the environment was mind boggling. The numbing numbers are so large that we can’t even get our minds around it. And we all know that the responsible drilling company won’t fess up to how much was really spilled because even they don’t know, don’t want to know and furthermore want to forget about it. Is there some way to tackle this oil spill problem through the use of the very culprit that created it, namely technology? Of course there is, but it will cost the billions they used to clean up the mess they created in the first place.  We want to develop a technological process to be used worldwide that borrows from what we currently know, and clean up these oil spills almost as quickly as they happen upon our seascape. Did we finally clean up the Gulf oil spill?  Yes, maybe? But it took too long and we either didn’t use the right equipment or not enough prepared and available equipment to check the problem. Time is probably the most critical factor involved in mitigating oil spill disasters. While Nature obviously works to clean up ecological disasters, she takes perhaps a decade or more to make a region whole again. We need to help nature accelerate her time schedule to a few weeks not decades! Oil cleanup equipment exists that is too painstakingly slow and inefficient to get the job done quickly and effectively, and to recapture ~99% of the oil spilled. Today’s processes are makeshift, disjointed, and not organized nor designed to tackle today’s mega-proportion oil spill problems.  We need a cohesive mega-solution to handle mega-problem oil spills. A virtual army of specialists with proper equipment to attack, gather up and capture, then deliver the spilled oil to vessel staging platforms. These huge platforms will separate 99.9% of the captured oil/water, dumping the water back.  Oil tankers on standby then take this recaptured crude oil to refineries. This process must be set up with the proper equipment to dynamically proceed in real time. Only high sea states should be capable of halting its operation. The process of oil/water cleanup requires the serial use of various sequential operations where each performs a key stage of the operatic procedure. The orchestration starts with techniques that initially yield the biggest volumetric punch first, then refines this processing by using less volumetric cleaning ability but greater oil separation capability. All the while we have deployed an improved form of today’s containment apron, capable of hundreds of miles of coverage to prevent spreading the spilled oil slick to shore. Having researched today’s available oil spill removal systems, their usefulness has been categorized according to volumetric processing capability per time. Fast surface skimming techniques plus “huge”, constant flowing centrifugal separators clearly win, but are not 100% effective. Sponge-type, oil absorbent techniques then come to play as they are useful in nearly recapturing the remaining 0.1% oil from the water, but are slow and will be used solely on the remaining 99.99% pure water expelled from our centrifugal oil separators. Today we literally use these absorbers like sponges, dunking them into the oil slick, waiting awhile and pulling them out after they’ve absorbed some oil. Such prolonged processing times are unacceptable. Absorbers are to be used differently than today, their performance is vastly accelerated as they now act as 0.1% oil filters to process the pressurized water expelled from the centrifugal separators. The final residuals of perhaps 0.01% that the high pressure absorber filtration misses will require oil break down chemistry whose end products are environmentally friendly and allows Nature to restore balance. So the actual water dumped back will be better than 99.99% pure. Now let’s break this process down a bit and address the pieces of equipment involved. Our attack vessels are special, high speed catamarans that ferry cars between different ports today. They use water-jet propulsion, are extremely fast, maneuverable, and will be equipped with a special front-end water scoop to pick up the oil/water slick in real time while propelled forward. Their scoop or nozzle articulates, performing real time adjustments responding to oil slick depths thereby avoiding too much water pickup. Once their holding tanks are full, they reconnoiter with waiting intermediate-sized tankers to quickly dump their oil/water cargo. When these tankers are full, they deposit their load to one of the huge vessel platforms. These staging platforms use centrifugal systems to quickly and efficiently separate huge quantities of the oil and water, and dump the 99.9% cleaned water overboard (Nature effectively handles the remaining 0.1% of oil). When their tanks are full of oil, they start emptying themselves into the large standby oil tankers for delivery to refineries. QED. For you science fiction/fact fans, this concept requires enormous equipment, is on a huge scale and if viewed as one harmonious system may be the first Oil-Terra-Forming machine to be used on our planet.  

Topic by RT-101   |  last reply


From the Editor: Greetings and Salutations

Hello! Many of you already know me, so please bear with me as I introduce myself to all of those who don't. My name is Randy Sarafan and I am the Technology Editor here at Instructables. What led me to this point is not necessarily a straight trajectory, and I hope the tale I am about to tell may prove useful to someone. Contrary to popular belief, I did not wake up one morning as a child and say, "I want to be the Technology Editor at a user-submitted how-to website." In fact, as a child, I would normally tell anyone who was curious enough to inquire that I wanted to be a duck. I persisted telling people that I wanted to grow up into a duck until an alarmingly mature age. Anyhow… understanding that not everyone can grow up to be a duck, I developed a backup plan to become a 3D computer animator, and make special effects for movies. I fell in love with special effects after seeing Jurassic Park as a child. While my peers were playing sports, chasing girls, and doing recreational drugs, I spent my teenage years developing an animation portfolio. This largely translated into learning gestural figure drawing by sketching nude models with artistically inclined retirees at the local community art center. So, I got good at drawing naked people. As a teenage boy I thought this was a very useful skill to have. Unfortunately, when I finally went off to college to do 3D computer animation, I learned that 3D modeling is nothing like drawing naked people. At the dawn of this millennium, it turned out that creating a 3D animation was very unpleasant - a bit like getting a root canal. I spent many long hours in a dark, sweltering computer animation lab, literally sleeping on the keyboard. The rule was that if you left your computer for more than five minutes, anyone could stop your rendering job and lay claim to the workstation. This experience - like any professionally executed root canal - gave me a lot of time to sit still and think. I concluded that I was wasting my time creating and animating virtual worlds when there was already a perfectly good world to animate all around me - I wanted to animate real things. This sentiment may not sound very silly right now, but expressing these feelings in 2001 was pretty much crazy-talk. By that point, all of the things we now take for granted, like, smart devices, open-source technology, hackerspaces, the maker movement, online sharing, and personal fabrication were not even blips on the collective radar. In fact, I did not even begin to know where to take my desire to "animate the real world." It was only by accident that I chanced upon the Parsons Design and Technology program at a college portfolio day while attempting to transfer colleges. The admissions representative asked me what I wanted to study. I told him animation. He told me they didn't exactly have that as a major. I - in turn - asked what they did have. He responded with Design and Technology. I asked him what that was. He mumbled something about building websites and robots. "Robots?" "Yes. Robots." I was sold. When I enrolled, the Parsons Design and Technology program was in its infancy as an undergraduate major, but existed for about six years prior as a graduate major. What made my educational experience unique was that albeit I was an undergrad, I was largely taking graduate classes with some really phenomenal professors and graduate students. I cannot emphasize enough how influential and formative it was for me to work side-by-side with brilliant, and highly motivated graduate students for three years. I went into the experience with the vague goal of "animating the real world" and left with the conceptual education, technical foundation, and confidence to do it. This rightfully panicked my mother. It was now 2005, and there still was not a clear career path for someone with a degree and talent for "animating the real world." She thought I was doomed. To be honest, I too was a little fuzzy on the big "what next?" question. Albeit, I was a little less concerned. I could not articulate what I intended to do with my education, but I began to sense there were opportunities available. By this time Make Magazine had come into existence, Instructables blipped onto the radar screen, and the Eyebeam OpenLab was churning away as an idea incubator. I sensed we were on the cusp of some fundamental change, but it was still looming a little too far off on the horizon to see it clearly. Having no real path yet laid out before me, I followed my girlfriend to the west coast. I figured that perhaps a change of scenery would be nice. I ended up living in her parent's basement in the middle of the coldest and foggiest part of San Francisco. While doing a series of odd jobs, I began posting projects on Instructables primarily to keep myself sane. There is something powerful about going from a lone weirdo making things in your girlfriend's parent's basement, to be amongst a community of weirdos all making things in their basements and garages. Suddenly, what I had been doing on my own did not seem quite as strange. I may have just been some guy in a basement, but I felt like I was part of something larger. Instructables became a website that I visited religiously. One day while lurking on the site, I noticed that they were not only local, but hiring interns. I immediately applied, and almost as quickly was invited in for an interview. When I went for the interview, I was foremost surprised by the unconventional nature of the work environment (to say the least), that everyone I met knew me as "USB Apple Guy," and everyone seemed genuinely interested to meet the "USB Apple Guy." It turned out this was less of an interview than an informal screening process. Before I knew it, I was part of the Instructables team, with a vague job, and loose instructions. Over the six years that followed, I held a number of positions within the company before landing squarely upon Technology Editor. Of all of the different jobs that I have done for Instructables, I would be lying if I were to say that Technology Editor is not my favorite. I now make a living "animating the real world," sharing this knowledge with the Instructables community, and inspiring others to do the same. Even though I would have never guessed life would bring me here, I am very glad that is has. I look forward to helping this community grow and prosper.

Topic by randofo   |  last reply