Radio Shack Bankrupt? How will it affect Instructables users?

Recently Radio Shack has declared bankruptcy. I know that tons of projects here on Instructables rely on Radio Shack, and some have even been sponsored by them. How is this going to affect our ability to find and buy electronic components? http://finance.yahoo.com/news/radioshack-files-ch-11-bankruptcy-222534944.html

Topic by gravityisweak 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Sattelite radio

I have a satellite radio. Got it from World space satellite radio inc. Since it got bankrupt in India , i cant avail any service. 1.Can i reuse it by subscribing to other company 2.Can i use it for some other technology eg. use it as local receiver. say something compatible with the frequencies that satellite radio use.

Topic by jagmeetsinghsaluja 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


UAV from scratch and radioshack?

I see that Radioshack is going bankrupt and is closing its stores so they are having a closing sale. So i was wondering is it possible to build a UAV from parts bought at radioshack to take advantage of its sale? Can someone point me to a guide or instructable or 'how to' to build a uav from radioshack parts?

Topic by acadena2 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


Nickel sponge+Soldering tip cleaner

Hello, I am a computer engineer and interested on making instructables ! Since i bought my soldering iron like 2 weeks ago i am on the making of one soldering station (with helping hands and such),I bought a sponge but i didn't noticed that wasn't copper (it writes nickel on it). Should be oki for my soldering iron (I mean to keep my tip clean)? Greetings from the sunny and bankrupted Greece ! Xristos.

Topic by Deithomen 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Japan Day 2

I woke up around 8 or 9 and took a shower. Sarah and Seba had already left, the Czech couple was still around, but they were gone by the time I got out of the bathroom.I got dressed, threw on my backpack since I did not know if I was coming back, and headed over to a bike store I had seen the day before. I wanted to buy a cheap folding bike, so I could ride between the closer cities. I practiced my Japanese on the guy, who was really polite and helpful, and found out that he had two folding bikes. One was used for about 5,600 Yen, but it was pretty crummy, the other was new and very nice, but about 35,000 yen. I had about 23,000 yen left over from the money I exchanged at the airport, but I was wary about making any large purchases before I knew if my credit/debit card worked, so I said sumimasen and left.Wandered around the burbs of Nagoya for a bit before I stopped off in a chain mini-mart to test if I could get cash from an ATM, I couldn't. Took the subway to downtown, got off at the wrong stop, got back on, and ended up in Central Park, right underneath the large TV tower. I was trying to find something cool to do using my lonely planet guide, and eventually decided the robot museum sounded like fun. After wandering around for a good hour looking for it I gave up (I later found out that it went bankrupt and shut down). I was very disappointed, especially since I was wearing my robot shirt, and had a pocketful of robot stickers. After losing all hope of finding the robots, I went into a large mall (mostly because it was air conditioned) and rode the escalators for a bit. That got boring, so I decided to head over to Nagoya Station. During the long walk, I stopped off in every 7/11, Lawsons, Family Mart, and Circle K I could find, but I could not get money from any of the atms in them, which got me kind of worried.Got to the station and took some pictures. Decided to check out Noritake Garden sine it was not too far away. Got to the garden and relaxed for a while, before heading back towards central park. On the way back I walked through a really colorful open air market. Got to central park, and relaxed for a bit. Much relaxing is required when traveling with a extremely heavy backpack, and it is a gabillion degrees out.While sitting in the park, I looked down to see about 20 mosquitoes feasting on my legs. Those bites are damn itchy. Got on the subway and headed back to Changmi's house. Fell asleep.Japan Day 3

Topic by Tetranitrate 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


How do I actually PROGRAM a z80, 8088, 8035, or their predecessors? (schematic, code, assemblers, UVeproms?)? Answered

I have a z80, apparently, with supporting ICs, on a PCB waiting to be salvaged. All I could find online for z80 programming was this guy who was making a whole computer out of it. And a lame "z80 world" site that doesn't help me. Also, on a separate board, I have a couple of Toshiba TMP8035P (with UVeprom nearby), whose online "datasheet" says that it's instruction set and pin compatible with the intel 8048.see:http://www.atarihq.com/danb/files/8048.txtand:http://download.theicstock.com/TMP/359/TMP8035P_1541359.pdfI have programmed microcontrollers before, so I know a tiny bit of what is needed for programming them. (Note: modern microcontrollers, in basic-esque languages, notably picaxes and basic stamps)My problem is in how to actually make the program on my computer, press the download button, and the chip run the program. I have no idea how to do assembly, (or find the right assembler). I am also clueless as to hook the computer up to the chip. (I suspect it requires a parallel port, but I think I only have DB9-pin serial easily available. I do have a single parallel port in a win98 computer, but it would be a pain in the butt.)In addition, I don't have a UVeprom eraser light. (I have an uncle who does, but I only meet him every now and then. Maybe he would let me borrow it?)Another problem is, I'm on a time limit. It does not have to be done tommorrow, but if I do not clear the garage of my currently un-programmable outdated microcontrollers soon, I will be too busy with college this fall of 2009 to work on those things, and my parents will force me to throw them away.As for the 8035's my uncle also needs room in his garage, and if I can't program mine soon, then he will throw away his remaining stash of them. (No sense in holding on to equipment your nephew can't program in a timely fashion)By the way, the same uncle dumped a CMX controller on me, with a weird keyboard, huge scroll wheel mouse, and the big box with computer-like guts inside, and a gazillion I/O ports on the back. He said it could be programmed, but Wikipedia said the company that made this video-editing machine went bankrupt or something. If I had the "instruction set", I assume assembly, in addition to a download circuit, then I can use this thing for controlling lots of cool things.Oh, and my uncle is very nice to me, so don't think I don't like him just because his hobby is dumping old junk on me.PS: I'm just whining, but it seems all these old microcontrollers, equipment and whatnot assume I grew up with these. I didn't, so anything beyond plugging in a basic program to a picaxe is rocket science to me. (No, I'm not Russian)

Question by Unit042 9 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


August 28th, 1963

On this day, a Baptist minister from Atlanta Georgia stood up in front of a quarter of a million people, and said this: I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity. But 100 years later, we must face the tragic fact that the Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land.And so we've come here today to dramatize an appalling condition. In a sense we've come to our nation's capital to cash a cheque. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of "Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness."It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of colour are concerned. Instead of honouring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad cheque which has come back marked "insufficient funds." But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we've come to cash this cheque - a cheque that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children.It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. 1963 is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual.There will be neither rest nor tranquillity in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.But there is something that I must say to my people, who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice: in the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.The marvellous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. They have come to realise that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone. And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights: "When will you be satisfied?" We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro's basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their selfhood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating "For Whites Only". We cannot be satisfied and we will not be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.Let us not wallow in the valley of despair. I say to you today, my friends, that in spite of the difficulties and frustrations of the moment, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed - we hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave-owners will be able to sit down together at a table of brotherhood.I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state, sweltering with the heat of injustice and oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character.I have a dream today!I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama little black boys and little black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.I have a dream today!I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.This is our hope. This is the faith that I will go back to the South with. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope.With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.This will be the day, this will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with a new meaning: "My country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring." And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true.And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado.Let freedom ring from the curvaceous peaks of California.But not only that.Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.Let freedom ring from every hill and every molehill of Mississippi, from every mountainside, let freedom ring!And when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual: "Free at last! Free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!"

Topic by Kiteman 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago