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Binder clip sphere

Really enjoying the latest Math Monday at MAKE blog that shows off this great sphere made with 60 binder clips. It was designed by Yang Enqi and looks fantastic. Math Monday

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


Is there a way to fix a binder ring that doesn't fully close? Answered

I think that we all have had to endure the annoyance of a ring on our binder that doesn't fully close. I am becoming quite impatient with the fact that every time I try to close my binder one of the rings is the slightest bit unclosed and my paper end getting very jumbled. PLEASE HELP!!!!                                

Question by happyjo    |  last reply


What type of binder is user for making activated carbon briquettes for water purification?

Hello everyone, I am trying to make a water purification device which needs to have compressed activated carbon filter. I am facing the problem of binding the charcoal dust together so that it does not come out when contacted with water. I tried making the briquettes with starch but it is water soluble. I have read some papers on binding the charcoal using extrusion process but could not find what exactly is the binder used. Here the binder should not cover the surface area of the carbon particles as well. I am looking to find here, what is the binder used and how is it used, i.e, ratios. I want to make something like this in the image which is water insoluble. 

Question by vin177    |  last reply


I tore the plastic cover stuff off my binder, how can i fix it?

So I got really mad and tore it off and I wanna fix it to make it look cool for school, so how can I?

Question by Cupcakes4lif    |  last reply


What material could I use to make a replacement cover for a ring binder?

I have a small ring binder that had the front cover torn off. The rings are still good, and there's plenty of paper, so I want to replace it. I use it to keep my geocaching notes in, so cardboard or fabric are not options. I'd like something with similar properties to the original vinyl-covered cardboard. It is held on by two rivets. Suggestions?

Question by CameronSS    |  last reply


Instructable publishing? Answered

I have published an instructable, but when I search for it, it doesn't come up?  Why?

Question by Goalie1    |  last reply


new idea Maker's Binder

I am planning on making a Ible about next Friday or so, so i will make a Makers binder it is going to be a 3 ring binder withe a notebook in it and some extra cool stuff like Graph paper for making graphs and diagrams, a electronics's symbol chart and many more cool gadgets and bells and whistles so look out for my Makers binder in a few days.

Topic by albylovesscience    |  last reply


My binder ring is stuck!!! is there a way to open it? It has my school work in it and I need to open my binder!!!!!!!!!? Answered

I really need to know!!! Becuase my school binder rings are stuck and I cant get them open :(

Question by awesomediy    |  last reply


Any ideas for making--sewing?--a BINDER or NOTEBOOK COVER for a middle school student?

I'm hoping you or someone can direct me to any instructables related to the idea of making--sewing, I assume, but maybe not--a binder for a middle school student. My kid likes the $20 (or so) binders/organizers that have a zippered cover, but they don't last; he's on his third this year. A more durable, home-made cover that slipped over a cheap, normal binder might do the trick. What those covers do--in theory--is (a) protect the binder, (b) they can be zipped closed and so seal the contents. I hate to be fussy, but my kid is, so it would be nice if the cover looked 'cool' (remember middle school?). An obvious home-made 'look' might be a deal-breaker. The store-bought versions have lots of bells and whistles: special pockets for this or that, but there are pencil-pouch thingies (that attach via the binder's rings) that come with the fancy store-bought versions, and they survive when the rest of the binder is destroyed--or can be bought separately. One of them might satisfy the need for cool pockets and misc. item storage. If it helps anyone thinking about this, I've replaced the actual 3-ring component of such binders by drilling out the rivets holding the 3-ring clasp thingy from a cheap binder then attached it with screws to a not-yet-destroyed organizer (only the rings of the latter were destroyed at that point), so if someone had ideas for a stronger material for the binder--instead of using a standard, off-the-shelf binder with cardboard inside a vinyl/plastic cover, attaching the rings would be very doable. As far as material for the cover, would it work to use one of those re-useable totebags they sell at grocery stores? I was thinking heavy canvas would be the way to go, but that might be hard to work with. If it was for me, I'd use an old pair of blue jeans, but that might not cut it in terms of the 'coolness' factor. I am planning on getting a sewing machine--but would/could borrow one now relatively easily--and have enough experience with such to 'get by': on a good day, if I'm careful, I can sew a sort-of straight line. I've put grommets in various items--maybe some way of lacing-up the cover or pulling it closed with a cinch-strap/string would be a better way to 'close' it? Seems like a zipper could be hard to attach/might be a weak spot. Thanks for any thoughts.

Question by schneb    |  last reply



knife

I made a knife out of a binder it is razor sharp should I post how to make it

Topic by Pat Sowers  


knife

I made a knife out of a binder it is razor sharp should I post how to make it

Topic by Pat Sowers    |  last reply


Aliens Power Loader, Homemade Kit Kat, Indestructable Binder

Aliens Power Loader Homemade Kit Kat Indestructible Binder Peach Bottle Cap Portrait Kenny Doorstop LED Zippo Flashlight NES Projects Simple Wedding Appetizers Jumping Bass Cake Clean Your Amp Controls Shop Tools Programmable Music Box Soda Can Rings Control TV With a Phone 1950s iPod Speaker

Topic by randofo  




Any suggestions for organizing recipes?

I have a recipe book that is full of recipes that are handwritten and torn from magazines, newspapers, etc. Any ideas for organizing these, and future recipes in a binder of some sort?

Question    |  last reply


What material can be used as a binder that would slowly dissolve in sea water?

There is an on-going problem in the fishing industry concerning bait in the crab fishery. Bait is becoming almost as expensive as crab. At the same time, there are by products in the seafood industry that are just being wasted that would fulfill the required needs if it could be combined with a sea water soluble material that could be adjusted to dissolve within set periods of time such as 3, 5 or 7 days. Anyone have any ideas? No soap or any material that would disturb the natural balance of the environment would work. 

Question by Oregonbythesea    |  last reply


It's that time of year again...

Well, here we go again, school's starting up again and summer is coming to a close. I've modified my binder to show my tastes. What's the rest of the young Instructables community (and Kiteman) doing to get ready for school?

Topic by Firebert010    |  last reply


How to bind a notebook so that I can add/remove pages?

Has anyone any idea how can I bind a notebook's pages so that in the future I may remove/add them? I would prefer to do this without using binders because they are quite big and don't fit in my pocket... Thanks a lot, C.

Question by Zyborg23    |  last reply


Notebook with removable pages? Similar to Circa / Rollabind

I'm putting together a DIY planner, but I keep thinking that I want to have the ability to add and remove pages at will. Some DIY examples I have seen that allow this are the classic hipster PDA, which uses a binder clip, and other designs which use opening rings. I'm not a massive fan of either - the binder clip is a bit too I really like the Rollabind ( www.rollabind.com/ ) and Circa (www.levenger.com/PAGETEMPLATES/NAVIGATION/Products.asp) systems. They provide a set of disks, and specially punched paper, that allows you to snap in and out pages at any time. A major shortcoming of this system is that their proprietary paper needs to be used - the system relies on the right shaped holes. The do sell a punch to allow you to use your own paper, but its very expensive. Are there any other systems out there? I might try the rollabind/circa system, and see how feasible it is to cut the paper yourself by hand.

Topic by trialex    |  last reply


Pro membership help

Just a quick thing here. My knex binder got featured on the front page, and i got a 3 month pro membership for it. I have already redeemed, but i dont know if it has worked. My membership ending date has not changed, and i have not gained any more patches to give away. Is this right? Thanks for any help =)

Topic by Hiyadudez    |  last reply


What Would You Make With These?

I have a number of these rings. I was given some free fabric samples and these secured them all together, like binder rings but huge. They are 6" across, hinged on one side, with threaded closures along the straight section.  Does anyone have ideas about how to repurpose them? Not much comes to mind except charm necklaces. Maybe something for a Halloween costume?

Topic by starshipminivan    |  last reply


Top 10 Back-to-School Instructables

Thanks to an idea from Labot2001, we've put together a list of some of our favorite back-to-school Instructables. Whether you're getting set for another year of school or helping to prepare someone else, these Instructables will help you get back into the classroom mindset in true DIY style. Floppy Disk Bag by Imanalchemist Floppy disks are now rarely used to carry information, but they can effectively carry all of your stuff. If you like this project, also check out Imanalchemists's Floppy Tote and Floppy Binder.   Eraser Flash Drive by fungus amungus Stealthily conceal your flash drive in the guise of a standard pink eraser.   Nintendo Lunchbox by fluctifragus Is that a sandwich in your Nintendo or are you just happy to have an awesome lunchbox?   Homemade Whiteboard by ausable An erasable whiteboard can help you keep all of your assignments organized amidst a busy schedule.   Circuit Board Binder by killrsheep A PCB binder will show all of the other regular, non-creative binders who's boss.   Make Your Own Notebook by chebang Create a personal notebook with an album cover and some basic bookbinding techniques.   Mont Blanc Pen Hack by kingant Nobody wants to throw down lots of money for writing utensils; luckily, with this method, you can cheaply recreate an expensive pen on the cheap.   Neoprene Laptop Bag by saul Pieces of Neoprene, the squishy material often used in wetsuits, can be sewn together to create a functional and comfortable laptop case.   Better Videotape the School Play by westfw A great videotape will help you remember your child's performance and much more effectively embarrass them when they're older.   How to Do Laundry by linuxmom While you may disagree, your roommate knows that doing your laundry every once in a while is necessary for college students. For those who need to learn, don't worry: linuxmom is here to rescue you!   There are also some other great Instructables that could help you in school--comment and share those below. From one person going back to school to another, best of luck and have a good year!

Topic by joshf    |  last reply


Looking for an Instructable for book binding

I am looking for an instructable on how to make your own journal from the covers of an old book. I saw it a long time ago and I havent been able to find it again. the guy took an old book with pretty covers and used binder rings to make a homemade journal. If anyone knows what Im talking about please tell me where to find this instructable. thanks

Topic by adoriajean    |  last reply


How to water dextrin based printing ink water resistance?

I am trying to formulate water based rotogravure printing ink with dextrin as main binder inside, for printing on paper . Only problem I am facing  is  of water resistance. The dried ink (pigments) smudges when water is put over it. Please suggest the additive to over come this problem. Thanks. - Manish Patel (mtppl@yahoo.com)

Question by mtppl    |  last reply


can someone help me?

Can someone help me... i was wonderin while making stars.. i saw a video when ppl was making them an for red stars they used red gum and for blue stars they used red gum an parlon or pvc... now  their both used for a binder and fuel but parlon is also used for enhancing colors so couldn u jus give away wit the red gum an use parlon for both?

Question by chizzy20    |  last reply


Ashes stuck on my cubic charcoal briquette?

Hi, am making charcoal briquette using 6% starch as binder and 4% clay, I got a good briquette with no crack, and good density. But the problem is, the ashes stuck on my charcoal briquette, and I need to shake it hard to remove ashes, even I reduce clay to 1% and same problem. Anyone can advise me how to solve the ash problem?

Question by mahrammal    |  last reply


I want to make hard sugarfree liquorice bricks, what type of natural binder should I use? Thanks!

For my next artistic project I would like to build edible bricks in different shapes. Whereas I don't have a problem realising molds in differeny shapes and sizes, I don't kn ow where to start in order to have bricks that are hard enough, non sticky, possibly with a good fragrance/smell and that come with natural ingredients (not too many bad chemical things). Also, I was thinking about liquorice, but they can also be made out of beetroot, cocoa, fruit juice etc. They should last a good deal of days and possibly be eaten, although hard.

Question by studiofla    |  last reply


Is there a site I can get free (or very cheap) MSDSs? Answered

I have a small collection of chemicals in my work area, and not all of them are in containters that came in. As such, I was wanting to be proactive and get a small binder with all the MSD sheets in one spots (much like anywhere else). Only issue is, I can not seem to find a site that offers free MSD sheets. They either have an odd rule of "you can only look at five" or its a rather pricey paid subscription. Thanks in advance! 

Question by DoctorWoo    |  last reply


Homemade Ferrite - what updates do you seek most?

First a massive thank you for the interest in my project - I certainly was expecting this great response! Some might already know my first tutorial on how to make your own ferrite, here: https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-your-own-Ferrite-to-improve-magnetic-fields/ As the muber of followers grow and so the hits on the linked video I was wondering what updates you would most interested in! I want to make some custom pot cores for small HF transformers in the 2-20kHz region. So the question is what new recipe you would like to see... There are several options, all would include some mould making first: Clay as a binder Ceramic as a binder Using some non-hygroscopic salts to melt into the ferrit powder as a binder - all three would require to finnish the parts in a good oven 2K glue or fibreglass resin as a simple dry mix 2K glue or fibreglass resin with vacuum curing to remove all air - this might require special glue as in my experiments resin and glue start boiling long before total vacuum is reached, was thinking of casting resin istead as this would be rated for vacuum preparation From past experiments these are the most likely candidates to result in a good product, if you have other ideas and suggestions post them here. Being a guy that loves to keep things simple and prefering the use of scrap / easy to obtain parts I would obviously love to know where you struggled with your creation of ferrite. I still did not find a good source for rare earth materials in fine powder form to add to the mix but don't think it is an issue as for high performance there are always commercial cores available. Some people asked my what the best was is to make a big toroid core for Rodin coils and other unuasally big cores for transformers. If you are one of them, leave your feedback here as well as the size is only an issue in terms of avoiding cracks during the curing. Let's get the party started! :)

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


National Science Bowl teams used my Trebuchet for a competition

I received an awesome comment. A high school teacher used the plans for my Quick'n'Dirty Trebuchet as a lunchtime competition project for teams competing in the National Science Bowl. The teacher made up kits of the parts: masking tape, dowels (I used chopsticks), paperclips, toothpicks, string, a binder clip and a weight. The teams then had to assemble it and held a throwing competition. The winner averaged over 20'.This is why I make Instructables, and most specifically why I made this one. I wanted it to be easy and cheap, no special hard to find parts, work well, while still being a real Trebuchet. I loved the comment.Here it is:My school hosts a regional competition for the National Science Bowl for high school students every year with the winner going on to the national competition in Washington, DC. This year I was in charge of finding some sort of competitive project for the teams to build and compete with during the lunch break. I chose your quick and dirty trebuchet and made a kit for each team. I made a few changes to your plans. I used 12" long 1/4" cut dowels instead of chopsticks since I didn't have a cheap source of chopsticks. I did not give them rubber bands and instead they were to tape the paperclips on for the axle. They were given a 200 g weight with a loop of string taped to it for the weight. The projectile was a mini binder clip with a loop of string tied to it. The complete kit contained the 9 dowels, a roll of masking tape, 4 paper clips, the 200g weight with loop of string attached, mini binder clip with loop of string attached, your printed instructions as a guide and a sheet explaining the rules of the competition.It worked out quite well. The teams were given a copy of your plans as a guide and 20 minutes to build their device. The competition was they were to launch the projectile three times and it had to land inside a track 4 foot wide each time. The distances of the two best of the three throws were added together for their score with a foul (outside the lines) counting as zero distance. We had 12 teams participate and the winner had a score of about 44.5 feet. They all had fun and I think learned something too.

Topic by SFHandyman  


Does anyone know of a way to make a paper hole punch in different shapes? Answered

I would like to be able to make some paper hole punches (like a tool used to make holes for paper that will go in a binder), but in different shapes and sizes. I know they would have to be in metal in order to cut paper, but I'm not sure where to start. I understand one can buy paper punches in various shapes, but they are usually expensive and you're limited to what size and shape the manufacturers "think" you want. I also don't want to go with a custom built paper punch, as they are expensive. Any ideas on how to go about making one?

Question by canucksgirl    |  last reply


Maker Day: Special Build Day with LEDs

The San Rafael Intel Computer Clubhouse hosted a Maker Day after receiving the LED Build Night materials from Instructables.  We invited our youth members and their families to join us in making and playing with LEDs!   Some of our participants were new to circuits so we focused mainly on paper circuits.   However, in the spirit of exploration and experimentation, some members began building creatures with pipe cleaners, adding LED eyes and such.   And parents got inspired from a Makezine project and started making pipe cleaner jewelry with LEDs and binder clips! Check out how to make your own LED Pipe Cleaner Bracelet.

Topic by gitterbug23  


Back to School 2: More instructables to help you in class

School has started for most of you and to help you out joshf posted The Top 10 List for going Back to School. But school is complicated and we feel that students can use all the help they can get. So we're helping you out with 10 (+1) more Instructables. Good luck in school this year. Learning is awesome. Minimalistic Desk by arte.sano Planning on renting a room, decorating with a single mattress, and studying on the floor? Time to make your own desk and act like a grown-up. Your back will thank you. Moleskine Hipster PDA case by atman Be ready to take notes at any time and keep your life together, analog-style. Who says you only learn in classes? The world is your classroom, buddy. Make a $5.00 "Space Pen" for your wallet by doctor_wu Even if you forget your Moleskine Hipster PDA Case, with this tiny pen you'll always be sure that you can write those thoughts down if you can just find a scrap of paper. Laptop sleeve from a zippered three ring binder by cmrc Laptop bags can be crazy expensive for what is just some fabric and a zipper. Strip out a zippered binder instead and you're all set! Vinyl Pencil Case by splityarn Store your fancy mechanical pencils and fine point pens in style with this custom case for your binder. The one you didn't rip up for a laptop sleeve, that is. Collegiate meals by trebuchet03 You're on your own and your idea of cooking is boiling water for ramen? That's sad. This collection of easy recipes will keep you eating well without stress. That's good. Office supplies trebuchet by Scissorman We recommend that you work on your verbal sparring with classmates before you resort to violence, but if you do need to get some agression out this tiny medieval weapon will help you launch your assault. The Paper Catapult by Kiteman So you don't have any office supplies for a trebuchet? Then print up this file and you'll have a scaled-down war going on in no time. Lego USB Stick by ianhampton If you're worried about accidentally using your Pinky USB Drive and destroying your homework you can make a flash drive with a sturdier bit of LEGO plastic. Just don't lose it by burying it inside your model of Helm's Deep. How to "Steal" Your Textbook by TimAnderson OK, we don't think you should really steal any textbooks, but you can turn them into PDFs by destroying them. You lose the resale value, but you can now keep all your books on your laptop and only carry one item to classes! Wikipedia in your pocket by PKM Afraid of getting into an argument in the cafeteria without the Internet to back you up? Take it with you by cramming Wikipedia in your pocket!

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


Other media besides plastic?

So I recently started looking into some of the 3d printing stuff as a way to make a number of laboratory items that are not easily had other ways.  While 3D printing seems really promising, i'm noticing there's not alot of work being done on non-plastics. Are there resources out there for 3D printer enthusiasts who want to use metal or ceramics in there creation?  Off the top of my head, i can think of a few ways that they could be encorporated into an existing 3d printer (metal and ceramic powders in a wax binder that can zapped with a laser to fuze it into place), but I'm only just barely getting into this and i'm really not looking to reinvent the wheel simply because i didn't know that it's already been done.  If plastic went entirely by the wayside, pieces that could be cured in a conventional oven could be printed, but fully cured, ready to go products are sorta the point of a 3d printer. 

Topic by Qcks    |  last reply


School supply sword!

Well, I'm thinking of posting another I'ble. This time it will be a fully functioning sword ( well, it is low quality, but you can get it to work ) made from school supplies I found at the bookstore. This is sort of like Pat sower's binder knife I'ble, where you can turn a school item into a weapon. ( But unlike that, the blade will be that long, metal yardstick ( sharpened ) ). It turned out pretty cool, and is pretty good for a weapon I make with school supplies, and is actually the only weapon made from school supplies I kept with me and not throw away after use. I managed to slice a watermelon in two with this, and I thought: Hey, this ain't bad for a weapon you make at school! In fact it rules! So, is anybody interested in building a fully-functional sword out of school supplies? P.S: I know that it's low quality, but considering you can make it for about an hour or less with supplies that only cost you 5 $, this is pretty cool.

Topic by Camisado    |  last reply


Classroom Organization

Back to school is quickly approaching, which means teachers are heading back to set up their classrooms, unpack and reorganize books and supplies, and start planning for the new group of students. If you're like me, then you are also redesigning your whole classroom furniture layout. ;D Every teacher I know seems to have a system, so I thought it would be fun to share our favorite tips and tricks for keeping it all organized.Do you use baskets and bins or folders and binders? Paper calendar or all digital? How do your students turn in their work? Mailboxes, hand-made sorters, or letter trays for each class period?How do you show off student work? Do you use student portfolios, bulletin boards, a hanging space, or the classroom windows?What about: Lesson Plans The Class Library or Guided Reading Area Math Centers STEM Resources Classroom Jobs Substitute Teacher Plans Table CaddiesThis is also a great opportunity to get inspired and plan your project ideas for the Classroom Organization Challenge that starts August 5th. :D

Topic by WeTeachThemSTEM  


Non-toxic, natural, cheap and WATER-PROOF adhesive or glue, is this impossible?

I'm a quality engineer working for a company in Turkey, the company collects the coaldust ( powder form of the coal )  from all the cities of Turkey and makes them briquettes by pressing with very powerful machines. Of course we use some adhesives for mechanical strength of the briquettes. We use CMC (a kind of cellulose) and this material is soluable in water. So our briquettes are not very durable under rain or moisture. Now I have to change the binder or adhesive materials in order to produce waterproof briquettes. I dont know how it's possible. I have to use nontoxic natural materials, and cheap as well. Last week I tried to do something but we were unlucky maybe. I tried to use Technical Gelatin and Alum (Al. Sulphate ) together, the briquettes seemed very good after production but they were not durable when I left them in a cup of water. So I have to find a solution now. Can you help me about that? I'd be very pleased. Thanks.

Question by enisdogru    |  last reply


Caffeinated mint candies

Okay so my latest project is making caffeinated hard mint candies. I finished the first batch the other day (pictured below). I worked out a safe and easy way to remove the binders and fillers from the caffeine tablets I picked up, and the stuff tastes pretty good too. The candies apparently work pretty well too; they kept me awake through two early morning chemistry classes on Friday. Unfortunately, there's a couple of problems I'm having that I'd appreciate a bit of help with, if there are any candy-makers out there. First, the mint and vanilla extracts I'm using seem to vaporize out of the candy too quickly, and the blue colouring decomposes when the candy gets to the correct temperature. Does anyone know if it would work to take the pot off the stove and leave it a few minutes before adding flavourings and colour? Second, to make the actual candy pieces, I stretched the candy mass into a long rod and chopped pieces off with a cleaver, but the pieces vary wildly in size (and therefore caffeine dosage). Does anyone know of a way to make more uniform pieces, or do I just need more practice? Thanks, with any luck, I'll be able to make an instructable of the second batch.

Topic by Ro]x[as    |  last reply


3d printer/ rapid prototyping machine guts... motherboard, hd, controllers, etc

I had to decommission a working Z Corp Z 406 printer today, here are some parts that are left over:-Main board: has motherboard, hard drive, 5v/12v ps, 24v ps, and a couple of controller boardshttp://rsjparts.com/chris/ebay/zcorp406/photo06.jpg-24v motor with an encoder, and a belted cog gearhttp://rsjparts.com/chris/ebay/zcorp406/photo13.jpg-the complete, multi-colored head with Y motor assembly. This is where the magic happens. And by magic, I mean this is where the color jets and binder liquid are dispensed.http://rsjparts.com/chris/ebay/zcorp406/photo16.jpgI'm not super familiar with the workings of the Z corp machine, but these would make great spares or the beginning of a great project! The machine was a runner before it was disassembled and I have booted the mobo/hd/ps here on my desk to check. There are wiring pigtails includedfor all the mobo/ controller connections. There are more pics here: http://rsjparts.com/chris/ebay/zcorp406/I should be able to find suitable packaging for this soon, I will put it on ebay after I do. Since I have been lurking on this site for about 4 months now, I think you folks need first crack... ;)The parts for these machines are wildly expensive from the MFR, but I'm thinking $100+ shipping for the lot. That is where I'll start the auction as well.

Topic by vortexblue    |  last reply


Anyone savvy with Air Electrodes??? Thanks! =)

I'm posting this after having googled, of course...I work with DIY fuel cells using off the wall fuels. By far, the most expensive component of my FCs is the Air Electrode which I purchase from Electric Fuel Ltd. in Israel. The material was invented in 2008 (as far as I know) and EF were the ones who bought the patent (according to the inventor himself...sorry but his name eludes me). Anyhow, I was wondering if anyone knows how to make good air electrodes. Something that would give me at least a vold in reference to the SHE (V=0) and a current density of up to a few hundred mA/aq cm...The stuff is basically this, from the electrolyte side to the air side: Separator paper, Carbon powder with Manganese or Cobalt catalyst mixed in (and a binder of some sort, I suppose), a Nickel mesh (current collector) and a bit more Carbon+catalyst then a microporous Teflon(r) sheet (permeable to gases but not to liquids). I cant find nickel mesh where I live but the other stuff I could get--the Teflon(r) being replaceable with oil paper??? Any help would be greatly appreciated. N.B: I am Not trying to infringe on a patent, just trying to make some "homebrew" air electrodes for R&D; since I am still (steam comes out of ears) self-funded and low on funding...lol. Thanks a lot!!! =)

Question by gizander    |  last reply


Mini Weapons of Mass Destruction 2

Toy inventor John Austin released Mini Weapons of Mass Destruction 2 (Chicago Review Press) this past October. This awesome sequel to the Mini Weapons series includes over 30 new mini weapons with which to terrorize your office with. Here's an excerpt from the press release: "All the projects in Mini Weapons of Mass Destruction 2 are built from inexpensive, commonly kept items: binder clips, playing cards, rubber bands, markers, clothespins and discarded packaging materials. The projects - modeled after real-life gadgetry - range from "sidearms" and "weapons in disguise" to "villain mini weapons" and "surveillance and intel" and cost mere pennies to assemble. This easy-to-follow primer also features plans to construct periscopes, bionic ears, grappling hooks and code wheels. plus, each project includes a supply and tool list, italicized safety tips and step-by-step instructions supplemented by clearly marked, illustrative diagrams" I managed to get my hands on a copy and made the Grappling Hook Gun; the project was easy to follow and my project came together in under 30 minutes (including the time it took to snap a few pictures). My grappling hook went about 20 feet and I'm sure it could travel further with a few minor tweaks! So if you're reading this while sitting bored at your desk, take a look around you. If you're surrounded by un-used rubber bands, pen caps, and markers, perhaps it's time for you to assemble your own office supply arsenal! For Authors outside Canada, USA, UK and Australia The first 3 comments left here with a picture of your own version of an office supplies mini weapon of any type will receive a free copy of this book! All books have been claimed!

Topic by mikeasaurus    |  last reply


Waterglass or Liquid Glass

Back when I was a kid I had a little chimistry set and part of it were instructions on how to create your own chmical garden in a jar.The metal salts only "grow" in the areas with lots of water while being cured into somthing more solid when it contacts the waterglass.Quite nice trick for kids of all ages.Another and commercail use is as a binder for refractory uses.On a home level you can just crush up some vermiculite and perlite to create solid and light weight fire bricks or plate - with just waterglass as the binder.Although for this purpose you want a higher amount of cat litter in your mix.Cat litter???Yes, cat litter is the same as silica beads but it dissolves much easier in the reaction with sodium hydroxide, or drain cleaner.60g of crystal cat litter, 80g of sodium hydroxide, 100ml of water.Mix it carefully and without getting too much sodium hydroxide in the mix to quickly and you have a jar of watergalls - easy...But there is other uses too, like you could see in my Ible about making your own ferrite.In some areas it is still used as a flame retardant or to fireproof materials that otherwise would combust too quickly.Wood that was vacuum treated with waterglass and fully dried turns into a rock like substance that looks beautiful once polished.And it has a really hard time burning...As it cures like glass with just little heat it was used in Fukushima by injecting it into the soil to form a barrier for the radioactive water.The heat from the radiactive water helped curing the mix...You can even use it to repair your cracked potter and glassware..Holes or leaks in your exhaust system? What a pain if you are too short on money to replace the parts.So a lot of us pay quite a bit of money for repair putties and bandages to seal the lak at least for long enough to consider a real fix.Did you know that all these putties and such are nothing but waterglass, glass fibres and filler material?The later often just very fine sand.Easy to make you own in bucket loads for less than what the repair kit costs LOLA total pain in the behind is if your old car gets a water leak.Usually it is a seal on the pump, a hole in the radiator or a tiny crack.One to to fix it for a while is to add an egg white to your cold radiator water or coolant.Then go for a drive and the egg white will boil off and dry where it comes into contact with air - outside you problem.Works remarkably well and won't harm any part of your engine either.Only downside is that it usually only lasts for a few days, being a natural product and such.Some people though claim they got weeks or even months out of such a cheap fix.A btter and more permanent way to seal such tiny leaks is to use waterglass mixed into the cooling system.It will form a lasting glass like seal that has no issiues under high heat or pressure.It even fixes your leaking head gasket if the water goes not get into the oil jet.Oil getting into the water might still still be fixable with waterglass.Water in the oil means the waterglass could enter the oil and if that happens you end with glass in your moving engine bits.A sure way to kill every engine and used to properly destroy them for recyling purposes by law in some countries.Waterglass is added to the engine oil and then it runs until hot enough for the water to evaporate.At this point the engine and all bearings just permantly seize.Waterglass added to cement provides a good barrier for oil and other liquids, making a spill cleanup much easier as the spill can't really penetrate the concrete.My personal favourite though is to use it for the easy removal of unwanted paint gretings on walls and such.You know how some kids think that a spray can with paint and a clean wall make artwork...If said wall is "painted" with a a mix of waterglass and sugar the spray paint will stick as good as before.But then you come with a pressure washer and clean it off in a few minutes and without any traces left on the wall.Sadly you need to re-apply the protective coating before the kid with the spray can comes back next night...What are your uses for liquid glass?

Topic by Downunder35m  


Top Secret Behind-the-Scenes Photos from Big Name Fashion Shoot

Last week I was away from Instructables HQ to work on a catalog shoot for a Major Fashion Line. I work periodically as their tailor, altering the clothes to perfectly fit the models.(That's why they never look the same when you wear them!)I'm not really authorized to go into detail about the company or the shoot (since it's for their upcoming Fall Catalog), but I thought it would be interesting to share a few quirky details, and some photos I surreptitiously shot with my phone.As previously stated, all of the clothes are altered to fit the models. Sometimes this means taking things almost entirely apart and putting them back together in a smaller (or bigger!) size.Also we do things like sew pockets shut so they won't disrupt the line of the garment. Did I mention we do all of this work out of a motor home?If the clothes still look weird when the model's in a certain position, they'll use big binder clips to secretly adjust the clothes to look right.And all of the clothes have big slashes in the them or are stamped with the word SAMPLE so no one will want to try and steal them. All of this stuff is corrected on computers before the pictures go out.We call it "fixing in post." I'm a big fan of "fixing in post."Here's something I definitely shouldn't tell you.On the first two days of shooting, it was raining like all get out. We waited and waited for it to let up to get our outside shots, but it just didn't!So everyone braved up and we assembled the whole crew under tents and umbrellas and shot in the rain. The pictures looked gorgeous!But as a result of this, the rest of the week had to be shot as "rain shots." Of course, for the next week it was sunny and warm. So they hired someone to come and make it look like it was raining!Doing these shoots is a lot of fun. I love going on location and having to deal with whatever elements arise. (There are usually a lot of police involved for various reasons too. . . )Hope you've enjoyed this top secret behind-the-scenes look!

Topic by scoochmaroo    |  last reply


December 2014 Build Night with Chibitronics

#BUILDNIGHT 20 SPACES AVAILABLE Deadline to sign up: Monday, November 10. Accepted spaces will be notified by Tuesday, November 11. Read our FAQ to learn more about the Build Night program rules and how to make the most out of this event for your space. DECEMBER BUILD NIGHT We are partnering with Chibitronics, peel-and-stick electronics for crafting circuits, for our December 2014 build night. Sign up to participate in the build night and we will ship you a package that includes the following from the Chibitronics Shop: 1 Tray of LED Stickers (108 stickers total) 5 Sensors and Microcontroller sets 5 Effects sets 20 batteries 20 binder clips 10 rolls of copper tape 2 z-tape swatches, so stickers can be reusable HOW TO PARTICIPATE: Host a Build Night: pick a time in December to host a project build night using the Chibitronics materials. You can host multiple build nights during December to work on your projects. Post 3 Instructables: post 3 Instructables using the Chibitronics Materials. Not posting these Instructables will affect your chances to participate in future build nights. Brownie Points (not required): after the build night post a forum topic on Instructables about your event. Include pictures, stories, etc... Here are two examples from past build nights: Noisebridge and Makers Local 256. We may even feature your photos on the homepage. REWARDS: If your submitted Instructable for this event gets featured by one of our editors we will send you an Instructables Prize Pack which includes: Instructables t-shirt, stickers, and patches. This forum post has guidelines for posting feature worthy projects. Be sure to let people at your event know so they can win a prize pack! Limit 3 per makerspace. RESOURCES: Chibitronics Tutorials Instructables App (for documentation during the build night): iOS and Android REACH OUT TO US ON SOCIAL MEDIA tag your posts with #BUILDNIGHT #INSTRUCTABLES Twitter: @Instructables, @chibitronics Instagram: @Instructables https://www.facebook.com/circuitstickers https://www.facebook.com/instructables SIGN UP: Fill out this form

Topic by Carleyy    |  last reply


Creating copper nano particles

Be it conductive ink, decorations or just a special pigment for your paint project, Copper is nice.Only problem is grinding this soft metal fine enough to be of any good use.A not so well documented feature of food additives is that they often have "unwanted" side effects.In our case E300, Ascorbic Acid or just Vitamin C.So how to make copper nano particles with it you might wonder?Prepare a well saturated solution of Copper Sulphate, you find the blue crystals in the gardening section together with fertilisers.It is best to use destilled water and not plain tap water, if in doubt go at least with the demineralised stuff for batteries.Adding E300 either dissolved in water or directly as crystals will start a nice reaction.The copper solphate is reduced back to metallic copper.There are a few problems though...For best results you need a saturation copper sulphate solution, low temperatures and a magnetic stirrer.This produced the finest particles for me at around 5°C.But even warm or at room temp the constant sirring is beneficial for even particle sizes.The ascorbic acid is used up in the process as well.You can start with a little and see how much you end up with in terms of a layer of copper particles at the bottom.Adding more E300 will cause a "rain" of fine copper particles - once this no longer happens you know the copper sulphate is used up as well.A dark greenish color of the solution will indicate this as well.Getting the copper out of the glass...Keep in mind the copper is extreme fine!As long as it stays in the solution it won't oxidize or otherwise react.Once out and in contact with just water and air oxidation happens quickly, after all it is pure copper...I found removing the watery solution and then adding destilled water to repeat the process is a good start.The waste from the first round can still be usefull though...In the final round I try to remove as much water as I can and then add methyled spirit to prevent the reactions.You can use oil as well or do a quick vacuum drying and store it in a sealed and oxygen free container.What to do with it?As a condictive paint with the right binder it only needs some rubbing with a smooth tool to create a conductive cover with a low resistance.In a clear paint or resin it provides some stunning color effects.You can even dust the dry powder onto a freshly painted surface to get a copper look.Leave without a top coat and you quickly get an old copper or even green look.If you ever wanted extreme fine metal particles you will come up with more ideas...Like shielding or sintering....

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


How to Create Art: TIps

INTROThere don't seem to be any good instructables on how to draw (or create art), so I decided to make one. Here are some tips I've learned in art class.You may be disappointed with the lack of pictures, but remember; this is about YOUR art, not mine. So, happy art-ing!*This was supposed to be an Instructable, but the evil robot jerk thingy deleted it. So here it is, forum-format.*STEP ONE: DRAWING1. Stay LOOSE. Use your whole arm. A good way to warm up is to do gesture drawings; they're fun and they look cool. (Gesture drawings are drawings done with one line. The idea is to capture the movement of the object, and the inside, not just the edges; it's hard to explain.)2. Draw lots. Doodle. Write with funky letters. Honestly, practicing will improve your art tenfold.3. For still lives (drawing things that you can see), draw the object you see, not the object you think you see. For example, if you're drawing a teapot, don't draw what a teapot looks like (or what you think a teapot looks like), draw the teapot in front of you. Draw the bumps and the shadows, the drips down the spout, the angle, etc.4. DON'T SMUDGE. Don't. You can get the same affect with shading, and it looks WAY better. Trust me.5. Draw real things. Don't just draw things from your imagination, draw the things in front of you.STEP TWO: PHOTOGRAPHYLots of people make the mistake of thinking that if their drawing is (to them) craptastic, then their art is. It's no true. You don't have to draw to make art; go grab a camera and take some photos. You'll be amazed at the number of cool designs you can find in your house -- the way the blanket on your bed ripples, the pattern your computer cables make, etc. Take photos of everything: the sky, your room, your walls, your face, your friends, your plants, your cat, everything. And finally, take lots and lots of photos. This is where a digital camera comes in handy. I guarantee that if you take 150 photos (it's not hard -- 150 should take you an hour) at least 25 will be decent. 10 will be good. And at least one or two will be spectacular.So get out there and take some photos! MATERIALSDrawing:Pencils:- Use a good, sharp HB or 4B pencil. Analogue, not mechanical.- Get a good eraser; the best are the rectangular white ones- For pencil crayons, I suggest a well-known brand; Crayola or Laurentien are my two main choicesPaper:- Get good, thick paper. The worst thing you can do is draw something spectacular on a piece of lined paper, so I suggest you carry some blank pages with you, in a binder or sketchbook.Pens:- I suggest Crayola Sketch pens (the ones with the thick tips), or SharpiesPainting:- NO PUCK-PAINTS. Don't use anything that comes dry. If it isn't in a tube, tub, or bottle, don't use it. Liquids have better colour -- they don't look as faint.Brushes:- Shell out for the good ones. Get ones with wooden handles, and tips that look like real hair. No plastic, synthetic-tipped garbage.- Take care of them: wash all the paint off of them when you're finished, and dry them off. Place them brush-ends up, so that the bristles don't get squashed and look like Calvin's head. And finally, mess around with crayons a bit (go Crayola) most people think they're for toddlers, but they're fun, and you can do some really cool stuff with them.

Topic by threecheersfornick    |  last reply


Ultrasonic cavitation as way to create impossible alloys?

I played around with ultrasonics now for a while and noticed that when it comes to certain things then logic seems no longer to apply.In the normal household you might find some ultrasonic cleaner and that's about it.A few people might have some distance measuring device or sensor array somewhere.As far as the normal human is concerned that is more than enough ;)Playing with certain metals like Bismuth or Gallium is not only but also a nice way to create nice alloys that you can play with even more.Take a portable and simple hydrogen supply as an example.Just make an alloy with lots of aluminium and a small amount of gallium.Cut it into strips, blocks or grind into a powder if you dare.Either way you just add water in a sealed container and get lots of pure hydrogen.The waste product is aluminium oxide, which has additional uses.The gallium itself is not affected by the reaction and can be reused many times.However, with some metals things are just different.As you might know it is hard to impossible to create certain alloys and other wouldn't make any sense.For example an alloy made from Calcium and iron...One of the big problems with alloys is that you need to have both metals in a molten form, then mix them properly and hope it turns out as planned.And well, if the metals in question just on't want to combine we cheat by using slats as a flux for example or by blowing hydrogen through the molten mix to act as a sacrificial binder until the metal cools down.Through ultrasonic cavitation we can not only clean surface, the same effect also destroys cells as the power from the implosion and the intense heat is more than what a cell can handle.There are even tests now to determine how safe and effective it would be to sterilise hospital equippment.A few seconds in an ultrasonic bath would safe the hours in the autoclave...On an industrial scale ultrasonic vibrations are used to weld plastic parts - like the head and tail lights on modern cars or just sealed plastic housings of any kind.With all this in mind my experiments with ultrasonic soldering made me wonder...Science papers state that that for example ceramics are not actually soldered.Appearently it is again hydrogen bonds provided by the ceramic or trapped air inside that provide the means to stick permantly.There is also an effect based on the implosion of the cavitation bubble.Here the solder literally is shot at well aboce ultrsonic speeds onto the surface of the ceramic.Together with the vacuum effect the solder is then pushed into the tiniest of cracks and cavities.Surface tension and other effects finally prevent the solder from just flowing off like it would do if we use just heat.What it means is that there is no real soldering at all happening.In reality it is like millions of big hydraulic presses would push the molten metal onto the surface.Going back to the fun of Gallium with Aluminium....Aluminium does not really go to well with steel.And gallium does not that good with steel either.Melting an Aluminium-gallium alloy is quite simple.With an excess of Gallium in the mix it should be possible to add fine steel powder (steel, not iron!).Of course it would neither mix well nor really melt at these low temperatures.With ultrasoic cavitation however we could force the stuff to not only mix but also create the same effect as used by ultrasonic soldering.The additional metals and minerals in a steel alloy should hopefully prevent any unwanted reactions in the final step...If the steel powder is ine enough then the assimilation of the steel into the aluminium-gallium mix would result in the breakdown of the steel.Once cooled and hard again the big question what would happen if we let water attack it?In theory all aluminium would react to form aluminium oxide and aluminium hydroxide.The gallium again would not be affected and as it is also bound to the steel should form a nice gallium-steel alloy.But what hapens to the voids where the aluminium was???The alloy would either be only affected on the surface or through cavitation and time all aluminium would be transformed.In the best scenario we would get a steel-gallium sponge where the voids are filled with alumium oxide.Forging such a mix could result in a ceramic steel..... !?? ;)Imagine a safe...There is always forceful ways to get in.Like drilling or using a big angle grinder.The pro might use a magnesium torch rod though....The common approach to improve penetration resistance is by filling a space between the outside and inside walls of a safe.Whatever you can imagine that is nightmare for your tools can be used, like thick glass plates, hardened steel bits, carbide studs, concrete with glass fibres....But even diamond tipped tools would already struggle if the steel itself would contain high amounts of a hard ceramic like aluminium oxide.The remaining gallium would also cause very high friction and through this heat - which these tools really can't stand unless you can provide water cooling as well.With the right balance of aluminium and gallium most of the original properties the steel had can be preserved.Just and idea though....

Topic by Downunder35m