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Vulcan Flies!

The last air-worthy Avro Vulcan Bomber is flying again!After seven million GBP, and countless hours of work, XH558 is again in the air, and has completed weeks of tests and trials, and her crew are anxiously waiting for the permit to fly.This is wonderful news, and genuinely emotional. Vulcan is an absolutely beautiful aircraft, and I was privileged to be present at almost her last flight near Manchester well over a decade ago.I have no idea what preceded Vulcan in the airshow, because all the time the preceding act was show, Vulcan was flying in a holding pattern over the Pennine hills. Whatever was flying in front of me, all I and many of the crowd had eyes for was this shark-like presence circling on the horizon, like a predator haunting a reef.When she came closer for her actual show, it was one of the few times I have gotten genuinely emotional over a machine. Her grace, power, lines...I'm even getting a lump in my throat as I type.It is one of the highlights of my life to have been there when the Vulcan crew, believing she was about to be pensioned off forever, broke air-show rules and flew over the crowd, at low altitude, with full afterburners on.It was the loudest sound I have ever heard, explosions included. My ears actually shut down. As she went over, I screamed and shouted with sheer joy, and I could not hear a noise I made!After she passed, as hearing slowly returned, I realised that it was still noisy - every single car alarm was sounding, triggered by the noise of Vulcan's passing. There were a lot of cars.It's been years since then, and it still stands clear in an otherwise patchy memory.I am literally bouncing at the idea that I might get to see her in the air again.UnfortunatelyBut there's a hitch. They've spent millions already, but they need more. Simple day-to-day maintenance costs, plus the rising price of fuel, mean that it will cost upwards of 50,000GBP per month to keep XH558 in the air. That's a lot.I don't normally do things like this, it's close to genuine spam, but I'm asking you all a favour. As Makers, lovers of the art of machinery, I'm asking you to contribute.Donations should be sent to VTST, Bruntingthorpe Airfield, Lutterworth, Leicestershire, LE17 5QS, United Kingdom, or by ‘phone to (44)116 247 8145, or online at http://www.vulcantothesky.com .If you don't fancy sending cash, you could buy something from their shop.Donation web pageThat's it, folks - begging over.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


what rc bomber can i use for paintball? Answered

I wanted to know what interferance free type of paintball bomber that is remote controled,can do at least 20 drops with paint greandes like the tippman big boy, that can be shot down with a paintball gun,repaired easily after shot down, can be used to view through the personal computer or tv to fly with sights to aim and costs the cheapest yet still has perfect of  quality, durblity and proformence.i also need to it to be very quiet

Question by 35Timmy    |  last reply


Mad Bomber! In case you missed it...

I'm not sure that many people have seen rollingstock's video Thomas Tank Mad Bomber? It's a great piece of animation, if you'd like to see that familiar train getting blown-up there you go. Associated video instructables are on rollingstock's page.

Topic by lemonie  


Paper Airplane Contest 2 (Closed)

In hopes of seeing more paper airplanes and innovative designers on Instructables.com, I have decided to host a second mini-contest. My goal is to stimulate the paper airplane channel and encourage more paper airplane builders to post their innovative designs. Requirements: 1. Aircraft Requirements: • Stability at all operation speeds • A minimum glide range of 30 feet (9.144 meters) • Durability to fly 30 feet or more after 15 flights • Use of less than 15 inches (0.381 meters) of tape in construction • Use of less than 5 pieces of 8.5 by 11 inch (A4) paper in construction • Ability to carry at least 6×100mg toothpicks • Provisions for landing gear and/or skids 2. Instructables Requirements: • 1 page strictly devoted to materials required in construction • 1 page explaining how to fly the aircraft • The instructable's license must be: "Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike (by-nc-sa)" • The sentence and link (see below) publicly indicating the instructable’s acceptance into this contest The sentence which must be displayed on your intro page: “This instructable is an entry in Paper Airplane Contest 2 (Instructable URL).” Prizes: For this contest I will award the publishers of the top 5 performing paper airplanes* one patch each. The first place winner will also recieve a 3 month Pro membership. By default, these patches will be medals (1st place, Patch with Gold Medal image and 3 month Pro membership; 2nd Place, Patch with Silver Medal image; 3rd Place, Patch with Bronze Medal Image; 4th Place, Patch with 4th Place lettering; 5th Place, Patch with 5th Place lettering). If the winners of the patches would like a different image, there will be a 24 hour period between the announcement of the winners and the awarding of the patches. During this time, the user would need to send me a private message with their desired picture. *Multiple entries are allowed. To keep the distribution of patches wide however, each entrant can only win one prize. How To Enter: To enter this contest, you must send me a private message entitled “My Paper Airplane [Member Name Here]” with your instructable's URL included. I will then put the link and author's name onto a list on this topic under "Current Entries". Judging: For this contest, I have decided that I will judge all the planes myself based on abilities. I have decided this way because I believe judging on performance rather than shape is a more objective approach. The contest begins Friday, January 14, 2011 and ends Monday, February 14, 2011. Entries must be published before Friday, February 11, 2011. From February 11 to February 14, I will be judging all entries. I will announce the winners of the contest on Tuesday, February 15, 2011 and issue them their prizes Wednesday, February 16, 2011. Current Entries:

Topic by OrigamiAirEnforcer    |  last reply


Nerdman's Ships: Round 2

Hello! It's been awhile since I was here (was working on other things), but I've finally gotten around to making screenshots and renders, along with a bunch of new sketches (3D). I apologize for the amount Short List: (In order) - Assault Destroyer - Barracuda Class Frigate - Knife's Edge (now with new features) - Barracuda Class Frigate - Sky Razor (Sister ship of the above) - Falcon Class Heavy Cruiser - Hieroglyph Class Multi-role Fighter - Manta Class Bomber - Dolphin Class Artillery Frigate ::WIP:: - Mark XII - Light Torpeto Link to better images- http://s1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb441/nerdman234/ Minor side note: Thank you ibles for having an multi-uploader.  This is much easier than the other site I post on. :D - Nerdman  ------------------------------------------------ Expanded List:: ------------------------------------------------ - Assault Destroyer - Armed With 7 Medium Rail Guns - Designed for both direct assault and defense of large vessels against smaller ships (Frigates, bombers, etc.) - Barracuda Class Frigate - Knife's Edge (now with new features) - Designed for both exo-atmosphere and in-atmosphere operations - Armed with 4 light torpedo tubes, 3 triple AA turrets, and 2 solid mounted railguns in the nose - Barracuda Class Frigate - Sky Razor (Sister ship of the above) - Designed more as a heavy fighter than a support frigate, this can both keep up with standard fighters but even out maneuver them due to it's massive engines - Armed with 2 triple AA turrets, 6 light torpedo tubes, 2 solid mounted and 2 partially mobile railguns in the nose - Falcon Class Heavy Cruiser - Designed as fast attack ship, the falcon can reach incredible speeds while still being able to turn very sharply - The falcon is primarily armed with 512 packs of multi purpose launcher tubes, it can hold up to almost a thousand missiles or nearly 6,200 un-guided rockets. - Hieroglyph Class Multi-role Fighter - Carries two multipurpose modules (similar to the Heron) which hold quite literally anything that fits inside the power, weight, and computing restrictions. - Designed using spare Heron frames which were useless due to constant space combat. - Armed with a triple AA turret (rear), all other weapons/ offensive abilities come from the pods. - Manta Class Bomber - The Manta Class Bomber, created about the same time as the Hieroglyph, was made from XUAP hulls which were useless in space and were unused because of it. - Armed with 6 light torpedo (single use tubes), 3 triple AA turrets, and a minor ECM package, this bomber can hold it's own against even heavy fighters. - Dolphin Class Artillery Frigate ::WIP:: - The Dolphin Class of frigate was created when the fail "General Frigate" was unable to meet expectations. - Armed with 2 heavy plasma cannons capable of shots up to 400km away. - The Dolphin is also nimble enough to avoid long range missiles, but is unable to enter atmosphere and is unable to avoid fighters. - Mark XII - Light Torpeto - The Mark XII was created strictly for bombers, but soon showed extreme success in both heavier fighters, and light frigates. Being powerful for it's size, it was also reasonably light and nearly as maneuverable as some missiles. 

Topic by ry25920    |  last reply


Paper Airplane Contest (Closed)

In hopes of seeing more paper airplanes and innovative designers on Instructables.com, I have decided to host a mini-contest. My goal is to stimulate the paper airplane channel and encourage more paper airplane builders to post their innovative designs.  Performance Requirements: Entered paper airplanes must meet or exceed these requirements: Stability at all operation speeds A minimum range of 30 feet Durability to fly 30 feet or more after 15 flights Use of less than 15 pieces of tape in construction Use of less than 5 pieces of 8.5 by 11 inch (A4) paper in construction Prizes: For this contest I will award the publishers of the top 3 paper airplanes* one patch each. By default, these patches will be medals (1st place, Patch with Gold Medal image; 2nd Place, Patch with Silver Medal image; 3rd Place, Patch with Bronze Medal Image). If the winners of the patches would like a different image, there will be a 24 hour period between the announcement of the winners and the awarding of the patches. During this time, the user would need to send me a private message with their desired picture. *Multiple entries are allowed. To keep the distribution of patches wide, each entrant can only win one prize. How To Enter: To enter this contest, you must send me a private message with your instructable's URL included. I will then put the link and author's name onto a list on this topic as "Entries". Judging: For this contest, I have decided that I will judge all the planes myself based on abilities. I have decided this way because I believe judging on performance rather than shape is a more objective approach. The contest begins Friday, December 10, 2010 and end Monday, January 10, 2011. Entries must be published before Tuesday, January 4, 2011. From January 4 to January 10, I will be judging all entries. I will announce the winners of the contest on Tuesday, January 11, 2011 and issue them their prizes Wednesday, January 12, 2011. Entries:   wat.: "Hammerhead Glider" (https://www.instructables.com/id/Hammerhead-Glider/) legoman111: "Blizzard" (https://www.instructables.com/id/the-blizzard-paper-airplane/)

Topic by OrigamiAirEnforcer    |  last reply


The ultimate urban downhill board

I was wondering if its possible to mount some mountain board brakes to some mountainboard trucks with normal wheels. Hell, you could even use some randall trucks. The reason I'm bringing this up is that in urban conditions you may have a rally nice hill.... that leads right into an intersection. I would love to add these to my latest bomber. Also, can you mount normal wheels on 15" mountain board trucks?Let me know what you guys think.-Butt

Topic by Kobl    |  last reply


Get ready! The MacGyver Contest is starting soon.

MacGyverism - The use of objects in ways not initially intended to solve seemingly impossible problems. Too young to remember MacGyver? Check out the wikipedia page. :D Now is the time to feather your mullet and put on your thinking cap made from bottle caps, yarn, aluminum foil, and chewing gum. We'd like to see you solve a real problem with what you've got on hand. Remember, MacGyver made stuff out of necessity, not just because he could. We're looking for the most ingenious solutions to problems you face in your everyday life. Contest will be open March 18th through April 29th - we can't wait to see your clever solutions! You could win an Ultimate MacGyver Escape Pack - and you know you want some sweet sunglasses and a bomber jacket. Click here to see the contest page and learn more about it. Make sure not to publish your entries before the 18th - if you do they'll be ineligible.

Topic by jessyratfink    |  last reply


So long and thanks for all the arduinos

Adios, everyone! Tomorrow is my last day here at Instructables and even that will mostly be clearing out my desk and distributing materials for future projects. First and foremost, I love you all. If you're here reading this then you're someone who has chosen to dig into the world and learn much more than most of the people out there. That's a cool thing. An amazing thing. Cherish it and make that grow within everyone else you know. More is more here. Also thank you to everyone for sharing your ideas. One of the biggest things I've learned is that you should share your ideas with others. There will always be more ideas and it's more fun this way. I wish I had a couple more lifetimes for the ideas that I'd like to work on. It is way worse to live a life keeping an idea secret for fear of someone else stealing it and never seeing it develop. OK, going into debt to patent it would probably be worse. Is this a graduation speech? No? Fine, here's some unsolicited advice anyway: run into new areas. Don't give yourself a chance to think about it and go back to doing what you've already been doing. Mental ruts are comforting, but oh so boring. Listen to music you don't know, watch movies you know nothing about, just shake it up once in a while. No, shake it up all the time. The world is full of new ideas you've been depriving yourself of enjoying. Then when your brain is thoroughly jumbled, start mashing up all the ideas. Combine all the things! One idea I want to work on is to make a UAV candy bomber. Attach candy to parachutes and drop them from quadcopters as they fly around in the sky. It would be a modern version of the candy bombers from WWII. It's not about anyone getting the reference, that's for wikipedia. It's about moving faster. Worrying about originality is for people who don't do stuff. And that's the long version of saying that I'll be gone from here, but you should all keep the party going. Then again, you were going to do that anyway and that's why I love you. For me the future is a little uncertain. There are a couple of VERY COOL THINGS that might happen, but it's not definite yet. In the meantime, I'm wrapping up my kickstarter calendar project. If you haven't looked at it yet, please do. The calendar is awesome and I want more of them out there in the world. Other than that you can find me on twitter as @edabot.  Now stretch your arms out wide and then give yourself a hug. Pat yourself on the back if you want. You're the future if you want to be. Take it, it's right there. Love you all. Ed

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


Derby Mini Maker Faire Photos

The Derby Mini Maker Faire has now finished. I took a *lot* of photos, and this is a selection, in a pretty random order - can you spot anybody you know? I think we all (Gmjhowe, Rainbow Han, Jayfuu, PKM, Kitewife, Conker-X, Roger-X, and myself) thoroughly enjoyed it.  The atmosphere was really good, lots of friendly faces, lots of new friends (big shout out to Phenoptix, who was an event sponsor), and more members of Hackspaces than I have ever seen in one place.  I didn't see any sad faces, of any age - it's a sign of the times that there seemed to be a greater proportion of the visitors who had some idea what Making is all about, and loved the idea of Instructables. The organisers did a very good job, looked after us all very well (I enjoyed the behind-the-scenes tour of the museum itself, and loved the pint of local beer we were treated to).  I hope they do another one - I'll be there like a shot.  I think we were all inspired with ideas for new projects. One particular shout goes to "Pics to Knits", who have created a tool to turn digital images into knitting patterns.  Kitewife is already planning a project using their tools. If you were there, and took any photos or videos, please add them in the comments... Update: Blog entry by the yarn-bombers from Angel Eden, with some nice photos and a knitting pattern to boot: LINK. I found these videos on YouTube  

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


My Sketch Up Ships

     I started working with sketch up about 3 months ago, since then, I've been converting my 2 designs into 3D models. www.conceptships.org/viewtopic.php  This the link to Concept Ships.com, where I have my 2D and some of my 3D designs posted. Other link: www.conceptships.org/viewtopic.php  . List: -- 1.) Convoy front isometric -- 2.) Convoy close one- General Frigate -- 3.) Convoy close two- Heron II with container -- 4.)  Convoy close three- side -- 5.) Convoy rear -- 6.) Heron Front iso (the thing below is the container) -- 7.) Heron Back iso -- 8.) Heron front -- 9.) Transport front iso -- 10.) Transport back iso -- 11.) Transport bottom -- 12.) Transport turret -- 13.) Dropship front -- 14.) Dropship Weaponry -- 15.)  Dropship rear -- 16.) Life support pod front -- 17.) Life Support pod back -- 18.) OH SANP!!! Instructables HQ is under attack!!! Ship explainations:: -- CCM-21b "Heron II" - UH-60 of this faction - Can be used as a gunship, APC, fighter - bomber, transport, or ECM/ Support, depending on the module. - The cargo module (below craft) can be load with anything from missles, to bombs, to twin 30mm gating guns (personal favorite). - Carries two (pilot, co-pilot/ gunner). - VTOL - Basically my spin on the Pelican from Halo (hopefully it doesn't get shot down as much) LSPS II "Messiah" (life Support pod) - This is the generic life support pod. Similar to halo, but no re-entry... we all saw how reliable that was. - Holds 6 people (pilot, 5 auxillery) - supports 6 for up to 2.5 weeks. - Has a powerful SOS beacon. - Used by military and civilian. - Launch method: launched from ship by air rushing from the pod's chamber and conventional thrust (Fuel + oxidizer). All ships were designed and 3D- ified by me... google earth was used in the ibles HQ screenshot

Topic by ry25920    |  last reply


TARC (Team America Rocketry Challenge) 2008

TARC (Team America Rocketry Challenge) is the world's largest rocketry competition. Teams must design, simulate, build, and fly a rocket capable of carrying two raw eggs to 750 feet (no more, no less). The eggs must stay aloft, under a parachute, for precisely 45 seconds. About 700 high school teams compete each year, and the top 100 teams are invited to the finals in Washington DC. My team (#6081) was invited this year. We are a first year team and we finished 13th out of 643 teams. Here' what happened: We woke up bright and early on Saturday to prep the rocket. We put it on the launch pad and declared that it was ready to fly. The rocket zoomed up to 742 feet and stayed aloft for about 41.5 seconds (the goals are 750ft (no more, no less) and 45 seconds (again; no more, no less)). Both raw eggs survived the journey and we were awarded a score of 15.02 (the lower the better). We watched nervously as the other 99 teams launched their rockets. By around 1:30, nearly every team had launched and we were in 7th place! The top 18 teams are required to fly again (the average of the two scores is used to determine the rankings). As we were preparing the rocket, the Stealth B2 Bomber flew overhead - it was spectacular! With the B2 safely out of the way, launching resumed. Our rocket (because the winds suddenly died) flew higher than expected to an altitude of 783 feet and stayed aloft for 44 seconds, giving us a score of around 35. Unfortunately, this score demoted us to 13th place. After the initial disappointment, we were thrilled - our first-year rocketry team had beaten 643 other teams from around the country - we were in the top 2% of rocketry teams all over the United States of America! In addition, because we were one of the top 18 teams, we were invited to attend the NASA Student Launch Initiative (SLI). SLI offers a stipend for a teacher to attend a week long program with NASA focusing on how to integrate hands-on aerospace projects into math and science classrooms. After completion of the program, student rocketry team members are invited to submit a proposal to NASA for a rocket designed to fly one mile high with a scientific payload. If approved by NASA engineers, NASA hires us to build - and fly - our proposed rocket. The entire team is thrilled to have this opportunity! I thought many students who browse this forum might benefit from this post. TARC is an amazing opportunity, and with so many ingenious people on Instructables, the veteran teams will have to fight hard next year!

Topic by icinnamon    |  last reply


Core Wars: The battle of the programmers.

Okay, brace yourself for a lengthy background story: In the 1960's and 70's, computers were much too expensive for a normal person to have one all to themselves. Before the invention of the Personal Computer (PC), computer systems were mainly employed in large universities, able to be used by students. However, there came a danger with all this: Back then, there was no such thing as protected memory, meaning that someone with minor hacking skills and some knowledge of assembly could easily wreak havoc on other people's data and programs. One such urban legend is that of a major business firm's main computer system, which a mischievous employee had installed his own assembly program called creeper, who's only purpose was to create copies of itself whenever it was run. This soon became a problem, as the creeper virus began eating up precious space in the memory and began corrupting other people's data and programs. After a while, another more brightly-hatted programmer created a program called reaper, which would make numerous copies of itself and destroy any creeper virii it could find and then self-destruct. Soon enough, things were back to normal. After hearing this story, a programmer named A.K. Dewdney got the idea for a game which he called "Core Wars". In this game, people would write computer programs called "warriors" in an assembly language called Redcode. Redcode had instructions not out of the ordinary of any assembly language. These programs were then run simultaneously in a simulated computer called MARS. The aim of the game was to make the opposing program crash by forcing it to execute an illegal command in the computer's shared memory. The surviving program was declared the winner. The absolute simplest warrior was called imp, and was written by Dewdney: MOV 0, 1 The MOV command moves copies a command from one place to another, in a position relative to the MOV command. Because of this, the imp would fill up the entire memory with MOV commands in a relatively short amount of time. Because the memory loops around (So, if the size of the memory is 8000 commands, then command 8001 would be executed as command 0) then it meant imp would always hit it's target eventually if it wasn't hit first. Another program which was written by Dewdney is called Dwarf: bomb      DAT 0,0 Dwarf     ADD #4,-1                 MOV bomb,@bomb                JMP Dwarf End Dwarf This is the first example of a "bomber" program. This program would drop DAT 0,0 (An illegal command) at every fourth slot in the memory in the hopes that the other program would accidentally execute it (cookie if you can figure out how it works). There are far other types of examples, like scanners, which try to scan the commands around it to see if they are illegal. Some programs can even repair themselves mid-battle. So, does anyone else still partake in this ancient game? I recently just got into it, writing my first warrior program a few days ago. Have no idea if it works, but it sounds pretty cool. It's based off of Dewdneys Dwarf but with a few modifications (I named it MindSplitter): bomb      SPL 1                 JMP -1                 DAT 0,0 Split        ADD #5,-1                 MOV bomb,@bomb                JMP Split End Split First off, this plants bombs at every fifth command instead of fourth, which I hope will help it spread out. Second, the bomb it uses is my personal invention that I call the Splitter bomb. In Redcode, the SPL command will jump execution to the specified command, while at the same time continue executing the commands after it. The idea is that the SPL will split to the jump command while the normal execution goes to the jump command, and both of them jump back to the SPL, therefore filling up all of the enemy programs processes. If the enemy program somehow manages to escape the loop, there is a deadly DAT after it. I haven't tried this out yet and I'm not sure how it would do in battle. If someone with a MARS emulator and a warrior of their own would like to put it to the test, I'd would absolutely love to hear how it turns out :).

Topic by dungeon runner    |  last reply