Search for bucket well in Topics


Old water wells

I was wondering if anyone could give me information or specs on an old style water well/ bucket well. Specifically on what the crank is and what it is called.

Topic by scratchy_joe    |  last reply


Flipping bucket help

Hi all , I need some help with an Instructable . I have a very slow stream of water near my house I want to use for irrigating my garden (~10liters / hour) and I want it to fill a container (bucket) and flip over to another container when it gets filled . The bottom bucket will connect to my droping irrigation hose. If I connect it directly only some plants get water all the time . I need it to build up and then water them all periodically . I hope I explained myself well . they have this kind of mechanism in water parks .. How do I design the flipping bucket ? where do i put the hinges ? Thanks.

Topic by moris_zen    |  last reply


How to Clean Silt from Dug Round Water Wells Used by 3-4 Billion People on Planet?

This is a clam shell bucket, from an old toy crane. I am taking this to a machine shop, welder, had having them make it 18 inches wide. It would be used only with rope, no block and tackle.  Problem: As best I can surmise, about 1-10 percent of hand dug, round water wells used by around 4 billion people on the planet are full of silt, dirty, and old plastic jugs used to pull the water up from well. As the silt rises in the well, the wells slowly become too dirty, or the locals need to pull the water out in buckets, then allow the silt water to settle. It is way to expensive for people who earn 10 USD per day to pay people with pumps to drain the wells. I want to create a 1-2 man powered clamshell bucket system to clean these wells.  What is the best way to make a method to clean a dug well? How much would the steel, rebar cost? Labor is 10 dollars per day in central American, South America, Africa etc. Thanks for help, I will take the finished bucket to Lome, Togo West Africa to test, and modify, iterate. Andy Lee Graham of HoboTraveler.com https://www.hobotraveler.com/blogger.html

Topic by hobotraveler    |  last reply


Advice for a hand crank ice cream maker please? Answered

I'm thinking of making a hand crank ice cream maker using an old hand drill I had and mounting that on a plastic bucket that'll be my ice bucket, then using some copper pipe I have lying around and soldering a dasher with some oak scrapers for the side. The main hurdle I'm hitting is where to find a canister for the actual ice cream. I'm wondering if I could safely use galvanized ducting, I'm planning to make sherbet on this as well, so will the acids react with it at all or is there some other hazard I should know about using ducting for this?

Question by sugarworm    |  last reply


Tips to mod a single basin kitchen sink into a double-basin?

Greetings All, I have a largish single basin sink in my kitchen. I don't have a dishwasher, and I find that its easiest to do dishes with two basins - one for washing, the other for rinsing. I beleve this is also an efficient use of water and energy (to heat the water). Since I rent, I can't replace the sink itself, which is the most direct solution. I have tried using various tubs and buckets in the sink. To date I haven't found any that work well. Usually the geometry is all wrong. The bucket is either too small to be useful, or too big to fit in the sink. Or, the shape of the bucket or tub makes an awkward fit, and won't lie flat, etc etc. My dream solution would be to make a custom tub whose outer dimensions match exactly one half of the existing basin. Ideally out of pliable silicone. Is this feasible? THanks!

Topic by gionwhorphin    |  last reply


Stopper thermowell for DS18B20 temp sensors?

Does anyone know of a thermowell stopper that would fit a DS18B20 temp sensor? The ones I've come across look to have an inner diameter of .25 inch, and the DS18B20 probe diameter says .24 inch. Are there any other thermwell stoppers out there with a wider inner diameter? I'd like to go with a thermowell stopper so I can use it on buckets and maybe carboys as well.

Question by DELETED_MakiY2    |  last reply


A different water wheel design?

I posted this idea on the makezine forums recently and got 1 answer but it seems I did not explain what I meant too well so I thought I would try here to see what you think. See the diagram at http://www.nelliott.co.uk/maker/water-wheel.jpg Would this produce more power than a conventional water wheel? My theory is as follows: In the case of a normal wheel each bucket/segment when full of water has the turning power equal to weight of water x length of horizontal line such as the yellow one in the diagram. That is it's weight exerts a force to turn the wheel according to it's horizontal distance from the centre of the wheel. If instead of the normal wheel the 3 blue circles represent 3 sprockets.There would be a whole series of buckets attached to the red lines ( which represent a chain ).Water would pour into the buckets as shown, so it would simply propel the buckets vertically down.The turning power of each one of these would be equal to to weight of water x radius of large wheel. So each would have the turning power of the best one such as the line from H to the center of the wheel. As far as I can see this would mean a large increase in torque over conventional which I hope would easily offset the losses due to the chain drive. What do you think?

Question by buteman    |  last reply


Unable to Edit Collections

Well, long story short, I can't edit my collections at all. I get this 'error, something happened' screen and it doesn't matter what device or browser I use. I know this issue has been brought up before but it hasn't been worked on since. Hopefully a few more drops in the bucket will convince the techs to look into it or at least respond with 'we're working on it'.

Topic by thousand-man    |  last reply


Should I build a new outhouse next to the old outhouse?

The cabin came with an outhouse when we bought it, but now, 8 years later, we have to do something soon. I've looked into composting toilets, but I'm not convinced that $1,000+ later that the mechanisms will be easy to maintain. We want it to be as no-fuss as possible. We leave no heat on in the winter, and our water is a long distance down 4+ flights of stairs and to the back of the property. We pump it up (recent) or hand carry it in buckets. Can we assume that if the current outhouse is working well with the soil that a new outhouse about 6 feet to the right of it will work well, too?

Question by cabingal    |  last reply


tearing down roof advice

I plan on tearing down my roof with a gas torch cutter, i have included the link to my photo bucket gallery for community advice and input; http://s1120.photobucket.com/albums/l490/handgun12345/ how does asphalt and concrete react to a high temp torch cutter? will i be cutting through metal plates as well? Edit: thanks all great responses, since i shouldn't be cutting huge amounts of concrete just the paste binding the shingles together it should be feasible?

Question by tom.selleck    |  last reply


Help to make a self watering drip irrigation system (using an air well+gravity pressure drip irrigation)

Hello, lately I have become interested in DIY drip irrigation systems and have begun building one myself. The I started thinking:" wouldn't it be great if I didn't have to manually fill up the tank?" and remembered that there was already a very low tech way to get water: the air well!! Well, why not put the two things together? The air well collects the water and then this is distributed to the plants through the drip irrigation system. Obviously people have already thought about this (here's a link to a great project http://www.bustler.net/index.php/article/airdrop_irrigation_wins_first_prize_at_2011_james_dyson_awards/), but I was thinking if there was a way to build something even less technological, i.e. with no pump (I would rather use gravity instead) and no special condenser, but rather something made from recycled/easy to get parts. After all I don't live in a desert, so a less efficient system would do just fine. It's just so that I don't have to carry heavy buckets of water to quench the thirst of my synergic garden. Cheers

Topic by wilson14  


DIY dehumidifier design?

This is my first real foray into DIY so help me out here. My original design, which didn't work very well, was to fill some coiled-up tubing with the gel from that blue ice stuff you use to keep lunchboxes cool, then mount that  near the top of a bucket and keep a fan running over it to blow moist air onto the cold tubing and, theoretically, it would condense out. When I left in the morning it was definitely getting lots of condensation, and I even saw a bit dripping off into the bucket, but by the time I got back in the afternoon the whole thing was bone dry. Is there any way to make this freezer-gel-tubing idea work? I think part of the problem was that I used rubber tubing, not thinking about how it acts as an insulator, and I also suspect that keeping a fan on it did as much harm as good what with the whole evaporation thing, but I thought real dehumidifiers used fans too... Ideas?

Question by TheJenx    |  last reply


need help and ideas

Didn't know where to post my request for ideas regarding a Sony 27 inch tv that has bit the bucket. Seems that the tube is failing. Would appreciate any and all input: Question is what can i do with this tv other than toss it? Hack it for ??? make it into a ??? you get the idea.Can you post this where it will be seen by multiple beings to suggest ideas of what i can do. Thanks alot for your help. Feel free to post this on other sites as well. Steve

Topic by bukuballs  


Help to make a self watering drip irrigation system (using an air well+gravity pressure drip irrigation)

Hello, lately I have become interested in DIY drip irrigation systems and have begun building one myself. The I started thinking:" wouldn't it be great if I didn't have to manually fill up the tank?" and remembered that there was already a very low tech way to get water: the air well!! Well, why not put the two things together? The air well collects the water and then this is distributed to the plants through the drip irrigation system. Obviously people have already thought about this (here's a link to a great project http://www.bustler.net/index.php/article/airdrop_irrigation_wins_first_prize_at_2011_james_dyson_awards/), but I was thinking if there was a way to build something even less technological, i.e. with no pump (I would rather use gravity instead) and no special condenser, but rather something made from recycled/easy to get parts. After all I don't live in a desert, so a less efficient system would do just fine. It's just so that I don't have to carry heavy buckets of water to quench the thirst of my synergic garden. Cheers Another cool thing to make would be a poor man's version of this http://www.groasis.com/en

Topic by wilson14    |  last reply


Will this float switch idea work?

I'm messing around with cheap-o solar pumping project wherein I want to pump water 75-100' from a stream (or really a shallow well next to a stream) to barrel near my fruit trees. I wanted to install a float switch in said barrel to turn off the pump when the barrel is full, but was trying to avoid having to run wire all the way from the pump/controller/battery set-up at the stream to the barrel. I had this idea that if I pumped water first into a 5-gal bucket mounted on a tree near the pump and raised it up above the barrel, Not only would I make the most of my pump's feeble lift (by reducing the friction it must overcome and allowing gravity to do the work), but it would also allow me to put a float switch on the bucket itself, rather than in the barrel, thus reducing the wire run significantly. Here's a picture (not all system components represented).  Will it work?  I'm wondering if there's a physical/practical consideration that I'm missing... Thanks for having a look!

Topic by Sam_NY    |  last reply


Back-up power

Hey there folks! Looking for some advise again. NH just went through the worst power outage in years (maybe history). 6 days without power has me thinking again. I have means of heat (wood stove) and means of cooking (propane) and lighting (candles and my LED projects), but the well pump is a problem. The need of water to flush the toilets came from the stream nearby, all well and good as it was, washing our bodies from buckets has to go. I have learned that my 220vac well pump actually draws it's power from 2 110 vac circuits. If I have this right (which is my first question, is this even possible) I only need a 110vac converter to run this off my batteries. Now, if I'm correct here (second question) a 4amp 220vac pump is 880 watts, then the draw from the 12vdc battery should be 74amps (give a few for losses maybe 80 amps). I only have 2 160AH deep cell batteries running currently. Am I looking at a reality of 2 hrs (half the draw) or 4 hrs use (full draw)? Or, is it even less.... Yup, that was a third question! I just bought a 2500 (5000 max) watt inverter intended for the shop and thought I would use this as my back-up for the winter. Am i even close here?

Topic by olddawg    |  last reply


How to build a space capsule for instructing children

Hi, I teach space science and I want to show students a model space capsule that looks similar to the apollo capsule (image attached.)I want a shell made of some material, in which they can place styrofoam blocks that represent the various components (drawing attached). I'm planning three tiers inside the capsule for the students to place the components as well as a window and a hatch. At first, I was thinking of buying a tapered container (bucket) and working on it. However, I cannot find any containers with the required shape. Can you suggest any other material/technique?

Question by ilavenil    |  last reply


Pcb charger question?

Hi All Am new to this, I just build a set of LED bike lights (kinda ugly but they are the portotype..lol) and am in the middle of figuring out how to build the batteries. I am a bit confussed about the PCB, found this one on Ebay and it says it is a charger as well, so......... if I build a battery up with this board can I just charge it with any power source (I work with computers so have buckets of laptop chargers, as well as Li-ion batteries). I am now charging two batteries at a time and running the lights in a 8 battery case, only run for 2-2.5hrs so they are not going below 2.5v. Heres a pic of my EVIL lights. http://www.ebay.com/itm/PCB-Charger-4-Packs-3-7V-Li-ion-Li-Lithium-18650-Battery-Rechargeable-2-3A-/260855721168?_trksid=p2045573.m2042&_trkparms=aid%3D111000%26algo%3DREC.CURRENT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D27%26meid%3D2785617145070280447%26pid%3D100033%26prg%3D1011%26rk%3D2%26sd%3D260858719737%26

Question by vallka    |  last reply


Any good floatation buoyancy ideas for a shantyboat/boat (or dock)?

I have a few designs for recycled material and/or ultra-small shantyboats in my new book, as well as a few on the drawing board- as I plan to make a small shantyboat this summer....but flotation-wise, using recycled materials- any ideas (I've included a few in my designs already- 55 gallon plastic drums, 5 gallon buckets with silicone sealed lids, long runs of recycled pvc (with both ends sealed), screened in blocks of capped soda bottles, etc).... I'm sure there are a ton of different ideas and methods out there.... -Deek http://www.relaxshacks.com My BOOK is NOW OUT "Humble Homes, Simple Shacks, Cozy Cottages, Ramshackle Retreats, Funky Forts (And Whatever The Heck Else We Could Squeeze In Here!)"

Topic by Deek D    |  last reply


Is it possible to make modern looking, cubby style storage out of cat litter pails? Perhaps modular? Answered

Depending on the brand of cat litter, the pails seem very well-suited for being made into stacked, modular storage.  They are so sturdy but cannot be recycled in most areas. It would be ideal not to have to cut off anything, but the edge where the pail is intially sealed prevents the pail from laying level.  Could something as simple as  2" x 4"s help stabilize them?  But would that necessitate an overall structure or lattice holding all the pails together? (Disclaimer: I don't use clay cat litters because of environmental concerns).  And, if the lids could be included in a design, it would be a great way to store all kinds of supplies without dust getting inside.

Question by crawdad-prince    |  last reply


Repurpose Bluetooth Chip from Wireless Headphones?

I've got a pair of Bluetooth headphones that I'm pretty sure is about to kick the bucket; they don't hold a charge properly and they seems to be falling apart.  Kinda what I get for being cheap I guess. I don't feel like spending money on getting a new LiPo battery to attempt to fix anything (especially considering shipping, etc. repairs will probably cost more than the headphones themselves), and so I was wondering if I could take out the Bluetooth chip inside and repurpose it for some other project with an Arduino or Raspberry Pi, probably for transmitting data from a sensor. A side note, if there are any ways I can refurbish the headphones themselves in a way that's worth the time, money, and effort, I'd like to hear about that, as well. Thank you!

Question by DoctorN1    |  last reply


Rock Chicks!

The Barbican's Curve Gallery has an exhibit that makes me smile, even though I haven't seen it in the flesh.  Or feathers; You walk in to a narrow, high-ceilinged white room filled with exotic Zebra Finches. They have lovely little cherry-red beaks and speckled feathers in all sorts of designs. Instead of bird tables, the room is furnished with electric guitars, basses and cymbals. Which the birds play. Yes, that’s right. They bounce around from one instrument to the next, in search of seed or fun. Birds playing a rock gig. I thought I’d died and gone to heaven. The zebra finch giving Slash a run for his money Photo: PA Everyone in there is smiling like they’ve just smoked a bucket of marijuana. You can’t not. Standing inches away from these birds playing Les Paul guitars by Gibson is so completely surreal – well, I’m going back this weekend. Anybody fancy recreating it in their own aviary?  

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Tidy Cat Boxes/Container-What should I do

I was hoping to get some of the awesome minds working on a project of mine. I keep reusing my Tidy Cat buckets. I want to find a better, maybe modular furniture way of using them. Currently they are just storage, unfortunately, I haven't gotten really good at labeling so I just wind up opening one box after another. I've tossed around wine rack, some sort of yarn or craft holder, etc. I would like to paint them, which would be neat. The label is painted on and is not tape, so if I do use plastic paint, the words may still show thru. I haven't been able to buy the litter in a bag because I am not able to get the large bag of litter to work correctly with the automated litter box because it doesn't clump well. If you could look at the image and make some suggestions, it would be great.

Topic by silkensoytofu    |  last reply


Coin a phrase, or one liner

Have you ever wonder were, phrases come from like  " That's what she said " or  "See you later.......not if I see you first" or "Well, there's your problem!" I think i may of coined a phrase, but of course I can't prove it  " Its funny cause its true"   I even heard it on TV the other night, I have been saying that for years. Anyways today after a student made a mess I gave him a mop and bucket and told him to clean it up. After 20 minutes I came back and he had managed to make the mess about 100 times worse. I was very annoyed with him and I was inspired to say  "Never send an idiot to do a job a monkey could do" Anyway there is, If it takes off I will now have proof that i said it first on 20 april 2016 So whats your favorite phrase or one liner?  Maybe you could come up with the next "That's what she said!"

Topic by liquidhandwash    |  last reply


Farming - I need some help

NEW QUESTION: Should I grow food, or food and commodities (IE wheat, cotton, etc) Well, I grew vegetables last year, and the crop was a failure. Don't ask me why, since there were at least 20 things I did wrong, and on top of that, mother nature was pissed off at me. Well, I already have some ideas on how I'm going to make my farming more eco-friendly, but I'd like some more, some ideas I have are: No fertilizer (I grew organics last year too) collecting rainwater in buckets to use to water on drier days (I'm going to make a small shed which I can store the water for just such an occasion) Allowing bugs into my garden Also, I plan to compost all the plant waste (I also use my dog's "Waste" for fertilizer... weird, I know, but it works, and it means I don't have to use up plastic bags, or pick the stuff up. Plus, it's better in the ground being broken up than in the landfill taking up space) And some things I worry about are: Moving sand into the area. I hear that sand is better for beats and carrots, but I wonder if it would be a bad environmental change to move sand into the area. It's not a large area of land, but still. Please excuse me if I didn't make too much sense, I'm really confused right now... school is getting to me :(

Topic by A good name    |  last reply


How to compete with neighbors' lush lawns and catch toads?

I am in the process of attracting and catching a toad for an Instructable. There's a few problems with that, but none so big as this: Toads like moist environments. It's a fact. My yard - dry as the Sahara. Well, maybe not that dry, but compared to my neighbors' lawns, it is. My neighbors have nearly constant sprinklers, pools, buckets of water (or as I like to call them, mosquito farms), and always-on exterior lights. In case you don't know, that's nearly heaven for a toad/frog. I go out at twilight/dark to find a toad, and I hear them everywhere - except in my yard. I'd go get one from my neighbor's lawn, but that'd be trespassing, and for a dumb reason. Do any of y'all know of a way that I could turn the toads' attention from my neighbors' lawns to mine? I can't do anything major, like building a pond, but any little things to bring them closer to my home would be good. Thanks, and if I can get a toad, expect to see an iBle coming from me! (Note: substitute frog for toad if you want - it's just that toads are more terrestrial and would in theory be easier to catch.)

Topic by Bran    |  last reply


Larger scale self-watering raised bed garden

Last year was the first time I did any gardening.  It was a result of an argument with my 3 year old where he steadfastly insisted that vegetables came from Kroger, not plants. As a result I started small with 6 pepper plants.  I used this instructable for a self-watering earth box.  It worked really well.  This year, I moved to 8 bucket fulls of vegetables. I've now maxed out what my porch can hold and want to move into my yard next year.  I have an idea for a larger scale self-watering raised bed system that I wanted to get some feedback on before I started building. I'm going to get a few of the small, hard plastic kiddie pools like these, approx 5' across.  I'm going to bury those and build on top of it a raised bed with a wooden floor.  In the floor I will cut holes and install several of the pond baskets referred to in the above instructable. My theory is this will work similar to how the earth box did but on a larger scale (approx 6x6 raised bed). Would love feedback and direction on this project.  I feel like it will work, but am a complete newbie and would love a bit of help on it.  Thanks!

Topic by Tim Grahl    |  last reply


Vertical Vivarium

Hello,  About two months ago I finished building my first vivarium. It's a monster at 5'wX2'hX2'd. It has a false-bottom, live plants, anoles, homemade irrigation system, appears cordless, made of 1/8th inch plexiglass and silicone sealed. Recently, it began to leak. The water pooled underneath the bottom panel and remained hidden until it seeped through the plywood it was resting on. I now have a series of buckets collecting constant drips underneath this thing. If I'm going to go through the trouble of emptying the tank and fixing the seal I might as well redesign it so this problem doesn't happen again.  I'd like to make more of a vertical vivarium since I am housing green anoles and they love having height. I'm thinking of recycling as much wood and plexiglass as possible; however, I'd like to avoid as much DIY sealing as possible. I'd like to have either sliding plexiglass doors, plexiglass doors on hinges, or a plexiglass panel held in place by magnets on the front. To fill the vertical space I'd like to have a living wall type plan. If anyone has any tips, guides, or advice for: the front doors, living walls, improving the bottom, or improving the false-bottom, it would be much appreciated.

Topic by Seaninja    |  last reply


Life changes, New Boots! Not to mention a suit...

Well I finally went clothes shopping, a rare occurrence for me. Mainly I was looking for new boots, my old ones have holes worn right through them in the soles, which are detaching from the rest of them slowly, the metal spines fell out long ago via the holes... My new boots are 14 eyelet NPS, they're great, though breaking them in is a little rough on it, along with that they're the most expensive boots I've ever had, £105! the last ones were around £30 and so were most of my previous ones, though I did once make a pair of £10 boots last two years, by stapling the soles back on with a high power staple gun eventually. The suit's a good thing too! we were in TK Maxx, a cheapish store full of loads of stuff, I've gotten some interesting shoes from their random buckets before, so they were first port of call while returning jeans I'd been given that wouldn't fit me... I came off with a two piece suit instead, despite owning many vintage jackets and a couple of pairs of trousers I've never owned a suit, or a new suit jacket for that matter, which is cool... Last one, on sale perfect fit on me, well the jacket's only a 38" chest so it makes it a tight fit but not uncomfortable since it has a little play in it. The boots are good and very solid but I'm having to get used to the big soles on them since most of mine have been smaller than that, they look taller than they are on the outside though so it's not too bad. I'm proud of myself for making a decision on things in a day, it's not likely me to buy clothes unless they're impractical or over the top, well the boots may be a little... Also I've decided to quit smoking, went to doctors office on friday having set that date and the fool told me to go on through the weekend and wait until monday, saying that can be my date... I wasn't amused, however I have one left and it shall be my last... Along with this I've got a few job interviews lined up, it's hard getting a chance at jobs in these times but it's a start... My quitting smoking is directly related to 'ibles - I want money to fund projects, and I want money to socialize etc. Next week I shall have a project that's been long awaited by many if I get the metal working done in tech... Speaking of tech all is well there too, course is brilliant and I've been doing loads of interesting stuff. It's seems a bit odd to be posting all this stuff but many an 'ibler has given me abuse about smoking, though it was far beyond their rights to criticize me personally or make irrelevant comments I do think it's about time I quit, 5 years wasting money. Anybody else any life changes?Notable lack of lovelife rubbish, it's too topsy turvy to get in to without a ten thousand word essay...

Topic by killerjackalope    |  last reply


"Sonic" drilling or cutting

If we look up sonic drills today we usually get some fancy machines driving pipes in the ground, preferably softer ground.But the term includes all types of machines that use sonic vibrations to advance through a media.With the ancient and claimed to have never existed technologies in mind I did some digging...In the food industry vibrating knifes are quite common, same for "air knifes" on softer food.Even in the meat industry they find more and more uses now.Ultrasonic cutting or welding is the same thing and included in "sonic".Same for some experimental sub sonic drilling methods currently being tested.The general idea might be as old as using vibrating equippment to compact stuff, like concrete, bricks and so on.What you can compact by vibration you can also make "fluid" by vibration.Industrial feeder systems utilise this to the extreme by even making light and fine particles like flour move like water without causing any dusting.What all the techniques have in common that a suitable tool or tool head is used and that it is attempted to use the most suitable vibration frequency for the job.Anyone operating an ultrasonic welder knows the pain of finetuning for a new electrode or just new part to be welded.What does that tell us now that makes the understanding easier?Take a bottle of ketchup, preferably one that is still quite full.Turn it upside down and noothing comes out.Shake it a bit and you are either lucky or drowned in red.But hold it at an angle and start tapping it and the red sauce flows out easily.What it true for most newtonian fluids is in some way also true for non-newtonian fluids.Ever mixed corn starch and water to make these funny experiments with it?Hit it hard and it reacts really hard and is not sticky at all.Leave your hand resting on it and in sinks in and sticks to it.Stirring it very slowly is easy, go faster and you get stuck.You can do similar things with by using an external source for vibrations.For example a vibration speaker mounted to a smal cup of the goo.If you place sand on a sloped piece of plastic or sheet metal then at a low angle it will pile up easy and stay.Start vibrating the plate and the sand will start to flow off.Works fine with a vibration source mounted to a piece of steel bar or rod and a bucket of sand too.Trying to press it into the sand requires a lot of force, especially once you are a bit deeper.Let it vibrate properly and it slides rights down.If we can do the simple stuff as well as really complicated stuff in the industry then what about other materials?So far we use vibrations to make things move out of the way, compact things, transport them or to heat them up for welding plus some cutting applications.Considering the variety one might wonder why no one tries it for "difficult" materials.Machined surface can be found throughout ancient history.Finding "machined things" were vibrations was clearly used is a bit harder.The great walls are not a perfect example here as the views differ quite a bit on how they could have been created.But if we leave things melting them or a secret concret like recipe for creating for example granite then vibrations start to make some sense.You find some interesting videos on youtube where people use speakers, wires and rocks to confirm you can actually "machine" them by vibrations.Especially granite has some quite musical properties, big boulders as well as smaller ones produce destinct sounds when you hit them hard.Tests and measurements were made on granite and other hard rocks to check how fast sound travels in them , how it is refeclted and where the sound comes out or affects the surface the most.Lets just say every sample gave different results.Shape, density and dimensions affect not just the resonant frequency but also where and how the sound travels in the rock.What if??We can use a simple speaker, a plate and some rice to see how patterns form under various frequencies.Works with sand or other granules as well.The interesting patterns are the so called harmoncis.Here we see clear and destinct patters, sometimes with extremely fine lines and areas of softly vibrating granules.Some people say these harmonic frequencies have all special meanings and uses.We mainly used them to avoid problems.Imagine your new TV would not have a housing tested to be stable with all frequencies the speakers can produce.All of a sudden your back of the TV might start to rattle ;)Same for car engines.Harmonic vibrations are eliminated wherever possible.Otherwise they could multiply and affect other things in the engine or around it.Simply put it means we have various options to detect and measure vibrations on a surface or in a system.Back in the day every half decent backup generator had a mechanical indicator for the frequency of the supplied electricity.A set of tiny forks with the desired on painted red and several on either side of it.These forks were designed to get into harmonic and therfor quite intense vibrations at their set frequency.If the one for 50Hz looked blurry then all was good ;)The same principle god be applied on a big boulder of granite.Place the "vibration meter" at the desired spot and start moving around the vibration source on the surface until you find a spot that causes maximum response on the meter.Best thing here is that if you then place that surface area onto another peice of fixed in place granite both pieces will start to loose substance if vibrations are applied.The fine sediment forming is then usable as an indicator where to move the vibration source to continue once the effect literally wears off.Is it feasable?Well, if we trust mainstream science then the answer is no.A huge amount of vibration energy would be required for such a hard material, despite ancient proof that says otherwise.Semi industrial test also seemed to confirm the theory as only with very high amplitudes (loudness) and while automatically adjusting for the resonant frequency changes a measurable amount of material was removed.I struggle a bit with that as for the testing tool heads made from hardened steel or carbide were used.And that with little or no regards on how the head and tool itself affects the output.I mean in terms of having the max possible movement happening right t the tool contact surface!There is a huge difference between applying a vibration to a tool and using a system, tool and tool head DESIGNED to work at the desired frequency!Otherwise we wouldn't need a computer to design and test a horn for welding purposes or shade a knife spefically so that the vibration go along the right axis and in the right direction.You not break a hard thing with a very soft thing unless it travels fast enough to become harder as the target!This complicated explanation basically just confirms that if you hit water at a too high speed then it will just break you into pieces instead of offering a soft splashPlease do not jump of bridges or such to confirm this yourself!!If that is really true and science says it is, then how about the other way around?Works fine too, or we wouldn't have pressure washers or water cutters.Now for the part where I hope some really smart people leave helpful comments:If we can cut steel with just a stream of water, then I ask:Isn't for example copper much harder than water?Steel is much harder than copper but water cuts through it.The answer here it simple or complicated, depending on how you want to expain how it works.Comes down to speed and pressure plus the right nozzle shape to prevent a beam expansion.But then water is indeed "harder than steel".Questions:Lets say we would use a copper pipe that in lenght, thickness, hardness and diameter is optimised to transmit a frequency so the pipe end sees the max vibration like a feed horn for ultrasonic welding.Not to hard to calculate these days :)Now imagine said "main frequency" would be optimised for the pipe but also be a harmonic frequency of the rock to be worked on.The pipe end would deform quickly, abrasion does the rest and it fails before even making a decent sratch that is not copper metal on granite.No matter how hard we press nothing good enough will ever happen.BUT: If we would add more hormainc frequencies to feed our pipe we can multiply the amplitude quite easy!Just try with a sound generator from your app store, needs 2 or more channels to be usable.Pick for example 400hZ on one and 800Hz on another, then finetune around these number to hear how the tone changes ;)My theory goes like this:If all "working frequencies" would just harmonics of the resonant frequency of the granite, then they can be tuned so the effect on the pipe end is minimised.The overlaying frequencies however should result in the same effect a water cutter has: The pipe becomes ultra hard.The better the match and the more you have to get it right the harder the pipe will be.Adding now a "drilling frequency" or multiple could be used to drive these harmonics slightly out of phase.Like with the sound generator on your phone we end up with a pulsating sound, or vibration.While the pipe still vibrates at the same "hardening" mix the drilling frequency creates a peak like a jackhammer.Try it by using the heaphone output on a small speaker and placing some light and tiny things into the cone.The will violently jump around during these pulsing tones.For a drilling system the output can be mechanically maximised by utilising a pitchfork design.A head holds the vibration speakers and the tynes are tuned good enough to the frequency of the speakers.Always two would have to operate in sync though as otherwise the pitchfork movement that transfers the sound down the center bar won't work.This head could then be desgined to act as a holder for a quick change of work out pipes that are no longer long enough for tuning.I guesstimate that a well tuned design would result in a copper pipe being able to drill at least 10 to 15cm into solid granite before it wears off too much.And we are talking here about just a few mm to get the thing out of tune!But would dare to desing such a thing just to confirm a theory that no one ever really dared to test? ;)And if friction welding works as good as ultrasonic welding, then what would happen if we try this with the right frequencies and vibrations instead of wasting tons of energy?

Topic by Downunder35m  


Waterglass or Liquid Glass

Back when I was a kid I had a little chimistry set and part of it were instructions on how to create your own chmical garden in a jar.The metal salts only "grow" in the areas with lots of water while being cured into somthing more solid when it contacts the waterglass.Quite nice trick for kids of all ages.Another and commercail use is as a binder for refractory uses.On a home level you can just crush up some vermiculite and perlite to create solid and light weight fire bricks or plate - with just waterglass as the binder.Although for this purpose you want a higher amount of cat litter in your mix.Cat litter???Yes, cat litter is the same as silica beads but it dissolves much easier in the reaction with sodium hydroxide, or drain cleaner.60g of crystal cat litter, 80g of sodium hydroxide, 100ml of water.Mix it carefully and without getting too much sodium hydroxide in the mix to quickly and you have a jar of watergalls - easy...But there is other uses too, like you could see in my Ible about making your own ferrite.In some areas it is still used as a flame retardant or to fireproof materials that otherwise would combust too quickly.Wood that was vacuum treated with waterglass and fully dried turns into a rock like substance that looks beautiful once polished.And it has a really hard time burning...As it cures like glass with just little heat it was used in Fukushima by injecting it into the soil to form a barrier for the radioactive water.The heat from the radiactive water helped curing the mix...You can even use it to repair your cracked potter and glassware..Holes or leaks in your exhaust system? What a pain if you are too short on money to replace the parts.So a lot of us pay quite a bit of money for repair putties and bandages to seal the lak at least for long enough to consider a real fix.Did you know that all these putties and such are nothing but waterglass, glass fibres and filler material?The later often just very fine sand.Easy to make you own in bucket loads for less than what the repair kit costs LOLA total pain in the behind is if your old car gets a water leak.Usually it is a seal on the pump, a hole in the radiator or a tiny crack.One to to fix it for a while is to add an egg white to your cold radiator water or coolant.Then go for a drive and the egg white will boil off and dry where it comes into contact with air - outside you problem.Works remarkably well and won't harm any part of your engine either.Only downside is that it usually only lasts for a few days, being a natural product and such.Some people though claim they got weeks or even months out of such a cheap fix.A btter and more permanent way to seal such tiny leaks is to use waterglass mixed into the cooling system.It will form a lasting glass like seal that has no issiues under high heat or pressure.It even fixes your leaking head gasket if the water goes not get into the oil jet.Oil getting into the water might still still be fixable with waterglass.Water in the oil means the waterglass could enter the oil and if that happens you end with glass in your moving engine bits.A sure way to kill every engine and used to properly destroy them for recyling purposes by law in some countries.Waterglass is added to the engine oil and then it runs until hot enough for the water to evaporate.At this point the engine and all bearings just permantly seize.Waterglass added to cement provides a good barrier for oil and other liquids, making a spill cleanup much easier as the spill can't really penetrate the concrete.My personal favourite though is to use it for the easy removal of unwanted paint gretings on walls and such.You know how some kids think that a spray can with paint and a clean wall make artwork...If said wall is "painted" with a a mix of waterglass and sugar the spray paint will stick as good as before.But then you come with a pressure washer and clean it off in a few minutes and without any traces left on the wall.Sadly you need to re-apply the protective coating before the kid with the spray can comes back next night...What are your uses for liquid glass?

Topic by Downunder35m  


The risks of DIY carpet cleaning and how save a buck or two....

I am writing this partly because of bed experiences with rental angents/landlords and as a general help.Here in Australia as well as other parts of the world it is common pratise that a real estate agent goes through your rented home multiple times a year to check if you keep it clean and undamaged.In most cases these visits go without any hickup until you move out.At this point agents often try to make your life a misery.Some expect you get the house back to the state it was 10 years ago when you moved - an impossible task.Carpet cleaning is usually done with a rented machine.This mean you pay a deposit for the machine and "rent" is made by the highly overpriced cleaning fluid you have to use with the machine.But more and more people see that a $100 machine from the discounter is a "money saver".So lets start with the main differences between a rented, commercial grade machine and those you find at the discounter to buy.The later comes quite small and in plastic, the commercial one is usually all metal and has huge water and waste tank.And lets be honest here, if a good vacuum cleaner sets you back more than twice what your new floor cleaning machine costs.....For me the real difference is in the sucktion.If you start with 10 liters in a commercail machine then you should expect to get over 8 liters back in the waste tank.The added waste often makes it seem much more though ;)The cheap discounter vesion however often struggles to get half of the water back out of your carpet that it drained into it!This is not only due to the weaker vacuum created but also due to the general design and lack of sealing the area that is sucked up.But during a hot summer week this makes no vital difference as it dries off anyway, or does it?Dryness and contamination....If you wash your clothes than you let them fully dry before you wear them.With a freshly cleaned carpet we often don't have that luxury and if the weather won't play nice you might end with a moist carpet for weeks.A proper wash of the carpet would require that water is actually flowing through the fabric.This is achieved by designing water outlets and sucktion areas to be in close proximity.However, most carpets these days are thin and flimsy, the underlay brings the comfort and often the required insulation from the cold floor.Fun fact: Most quality carpets in the EU come with a rubber or foam like backing which prevents that little spills go through and also leave the carpet basically dry after a cleaning.If the amount of water your machine collects does not get very close to what you filled into the tank then you end with a quite wet carpet and underlay.Cold from underneath and with basically no airflow through it.And if you ever removed an old carpet that was cleaned every few years you do know why you wear a protective suit, gloves and a filter mask on your face....It is simply impossible with a handheld machine to prevent water and contaminants from getting into the foam underlay of US and AU style carpet assemblies.Once fully dry there is little chance for anything to grow, but every time you clean the carpet you add the water required...I had it in two rentals that when I cleaned the carpets with a really good machine that stains from within the underlay came back up into the carpet.A job planned for a day then turned into three days of using heater fans and living in a sauna while washing carpets :(The same is true if you end up with fresh dirt or such on the carpet while it is still moist underneat - it gets worked ino the carpet and becomes even harder to clean.Is a commercial cleaning the better option?Sadly I have to say this highly depends on your agent/landlord and how much time and money you have.In some areas agents simply ignore the law and demand from you that the carpet looks at least as good as when you moved in.And if old stains you did not know about come from the filthy underlay a rented machine can come close to the cost of getting a commercail team in to do the job once you vacated.Either way you get an invoice for the service and a statement about the condition of the carpets before and after the cleaning.These guys come with a big van and before it fires up with water only the vacuum is used.Imagine a monster sized vacuum cleaner head on steroids that connects to an industrial sized evacuation fan in the van.It literally lifts your carpet from the underlay and leaves nothing loose behind.The actual cleaning and sanitation works the same way only with the big difference that the water is sprayed with pressure through the carpet and into the underlay.Final round is done dry and with vacuum only, means the carpets are dry enough to walk on them without getting wet feet.A complete dry state is usually reached within 2 days during the summer unlike rented machines that keep the humidity in your house up and high for about 2 weeks until back to normal.Main benefit of a commercail cleaning is that you won't get any issues with your agent/landlord unless you damaged the carpets or made them impossible to clean - ever dropped an ink jet printer refill kit? ;)If I do it myself with a reasonably good machine or a rented one : Do I have options for the cleaning solution used?Trust me, I had to figure that one out quickly when I moved into my first rental down here.4 bedrooms, entire house with carpet except for the kitchen and wet areas.They appeared reasonably clean at a first look but when I used a UV flashlight at night the story was shocking....In what must have a room for a baby the carpet looked like a psychedlic art impression under the UV light.The living room was not much better.As a result the rented machine ran out of cleaning fluid quickly.Bought 2 bottles that were supposed to be suffient for the house size but if you need several rounds per room.I "finnished" the former baby room and was one bottle down already.Called it a day and in the dark the UV light showed a slithly fades art impression but nowhere clean :(The shop had a heavy duty cleaning solution but I did not consider it with a price twice as high.Instead I wondered what would make my carpet different from my clothes in my washing machine....So I got a canister of Oxy-cleaner - sometimes called nappy soaking powder, or similar.Just make sure you get one that does not foam up too much.I used a bucket to dissolve a good amount of the powder before filling it into the machine - at about 40°C.What ended in the waste tank when using this cheap alternative looked digusting to say the least!With that encouragement I decided to make a new bucket with some added washing powder, just a tablespoon worth or just over.Washing powder for front loader does not foam up much, unlike the stuff for top loader, so choose wisely.That was, all counted, the forth cleaning round for the former baby room but after this the UV light showed a clean carpet that also had nice spring fresh smell thanks to the washing powder.Using the same appraoch of lots of oxy cleaner and a bit of washing machine powder in semi hot water made cleaning the rest of the house a breeze!When going slow with the machine it was like mowing the lawn, it left a clean path behind.Not all carpets might tolerate oxy cleaners though, especially if they are quite colorful, so do a spot check first if you never used the stuff to clean up a little spill of red wine before.And please keep some of the commercial cleaning fluid at hand to give the machine a quick wash through with it, otherwise the shop might ask you if you used non approved cleaning stuff with it ;)Tips for adjustable cleaning machines....Some of the rented machines come with several possible adjustments you can make.In the most basic form you can adjust the amount water used and how strong the machine sucks.Keep the sucktion as high as possible unless you actually want to pre soak the carpet.The amount of water should be adjusted to the type of carpet not to how dirty it is!You want just enough water to soak the carpet without going into the underlay too much.A clear sign of using too much water is if you waste tank is only half full when the water tank is empty.A few of the really good machines let you adjust the distance between the water outlet and sucktion area.In most cases there pre-set to what, from experience is the most commonly type of carpet in the area.Your might be different though...A greater distance means more time for the cleaning solution to do its job.This works especially well for thicker carpets with amount of water turned down to below 50%.For thin carpets a short distance is better as the water does not have to go deep into the fabric.Here you can even increase the water flow for very dirty areas without risking to soak the underlay too much.In either case you should check the machine before taking it home and if adjustable have the options explained to you in the store.Anything for really bad areas?The entrance area is often subject to whatever our shoes collected outside, especially if you have kids or playful dogs.A bit of oil from the road, some sticky residue of something, dust, small gravel and sand....Vacuum out what comes out first, then use a suitable, not too stiff brush if your vacuum cleaner does not have a rotating brush in the head.Use a spray bottle and prepare a solution of warm water with a bit of washing machine powder and a shot glass worth of methylated spirit.Slightly wet the soiled area with the spray bottle without saturating it.Use the brush to agitate the carpet fibres - preferably directional and with even strokes.If they are not wet in the deeper areas spray a bit more.Again: you don't want to soak it you want to wet it.Give it about 20 minutes on a warm day a bit longer if the insede temps are below 25°C.Check with your hand if the area is still wet, the alcohol should speed up the evaporation here.Before it dries up repeat the process and check with a paper towel if it picks up the stains already.If so then run over the area with cleaning machine.Best results are achieved if you manage to get the fibres wet all the way down with the brush and won't let the area fully dry off again after the spraying.How can I speed up the drying time?The only way to speed things up is heat and airflow.If outside humidty is quite high then you will struggle.Even in the summer times the humidity levels over night can get well into or even over the 80% region.Opening doors and windows then to get the carpet dry won't really help you.Best time to clean your carpets is actually at night because by the time you are done the sun is out and the humity levels much lower.On a good day below 30%.This is true even for the winter times.Put a few fans up and make sure the temperatures are well above the 20°C mark.If in doubt you have to turn the heater on.Once the humidity inside is sky high you open up all windows and doors to have an exchange of air.A few minutes suffice here unless there is wind at all.If it is a hot summer day you can of course just let it all open until the sun goes down again.During colder times pay special attention to cold areas, like your toilet, bathroom or in general areas that won't warm up properly.Even if the room was not cleaned the moisture can accumulate here and cause mold and mildew.If in doubt make sure the ENTIRE house is warm enough until your carpets are fully dry again.A humidity sensor or gauge certainly helps, two are better so you can check inside and outside at the same time.

Topic by Downunder35m  


Tap water often quite dark and with a strong chemical smell - what to do?

I don't ask for much help but this time I am reaching the end of my knowledge and patience with landlord and water authorities.That's the story so far:When I moved in I did the usual checks and tests but of course did not pay too much attention to what comes out of my taps.After a few weeks I noticed that the drain in bathroom sink seems to rust on the enamel....Easy wipe with some cleaner fixed it but since the actual drain is made of brass I started to wonder what caused the discoloration in the first place.A bit later I had my niece here and while she had a shower I realised that I only get very little hot water from any other tap in the house.Landlord stated that no one would need hot water from two outlets at one and refused to have it checked out - WTF??Paid for plumber myself and the result was not good.The hot water system is connected "open" was his answer after half an hour of messing around.For the lame man it means that whenever there is a pressure difference between hot and cold water it will go through the hot water system.Did not fully get this so he showed me in the laundry.Open the hot water a bit and it runs out fine, open the seperate cold water tap and the hot water stops.This even worked when turning on the cold water in the kitchen.The water is able to go back into the hot water system through the outlet much easier than through the inlet side.And to top it off, the current install basically turns the hot water system into a giant bypass valve :(Paid a few bucks extra so I would get that same explanation in writing for my landlord a few days later.The next and growing problem is the chemical smell.If highly chlorinated then my aquarium test kit would show this and recommend to use a water conditioner when using tap water to top the tank up.And it does not really smell like any chlorinated water I know.Definately a chemical cleaning or sanitation smell though.The plumber could not do more than basic tests so I contacted my water supplier.To my surprise they were happy to send someone out for free.Of course they only cared about their product and all tests were limited to the tap right next to the water meter.Pressure ok.Water clearity ok.Chlorine levels next to zero."Harmful substances test" came back negative as well.It was recommended that I have the plumbing under the house inspected for the water color changes and smells/bad taste.And I had to admit that what came out of the front tap really looked and smelled fine.Work slowed me down for a while and the problem only came back to my mind when I came back from a weekend trip.Needed something to drink quickly so I filled a glass from the tap.It came out like from a rusty bucket.Definately of brownish color and the chemical smell worse then ever.Had to let the water run for about 15 minutes to get something out I dared to drink.Installed a water filter a few days later and though all is good now.Pre-filter, 0.5 micron filter and then a cartridge with activate carbon.Am a single and the unit was meant to be for a busy family.Should have been good for well over 5000 liters of water.I don't really use much in the kitchen for drinking and cooking purposes so I guesstimated I need new filters every 12 to 18 months at worst.They lasted less than 4 weeks before the water came out in drops instead or running....Cutting the fliters open revealed that both pre- and fine filter were fully blocked and brown.Provided all documents and evidence to my landlord but again was told there is no issue and the house is just old :(As a last resort I tried to get under house yesterday to check the pipes itself.Couldn't get all the way in due to all the pipes from the ducted heating system.But I found a bad mess of literally all bad plumbing skills.From the water meter a just finger thick copper pipe goes under the house.This goes into some 1/2" galvanised steel pipe and it look the main way of sealing the connection was some glue or resin around the screw fitting.The same old gal but thinner pipes go close to where the connections for water go.There the "plumber" again used screw on press fittings and glue to connect to thin copper pipes.Hot water is designed the same way, one big gal pipe straight through and then thin copper pipes connected to it.I am not a plumbing expert but I do know that copper and steel won't mix if water is involved.Assuming the hot water system is affected in the same way then this giant battery is eating away the thick gal pipes while supplying me with all the byproducts of this galvanic reaction.The landlord won't budge unless I take legal action and around here you would want to do this as a tennant.Right now I have a long garden hose from the front tap going through my kitchen window :(At least I get usable drinking and cooking water this way, my fish no loger suffer losses after the topping up the water from this hose either...But this can't go on like this.Once the gal pipes start to leak the landlord is required to act but not before that.And chances are these thick pipes will last a few more years before failing :(If i wouldn't know better then I would say at some stage the ducted heating was replaced and to have more room all but the main gal pipes were removed.All copper pipes are the flexible ones and are bend to follow the floor and wooden beams.What are my real life options to fix this water problem?A set of filters ever 4 or 6 weeks sets me back close to 120 bucks each time, hence the garden hose :(What sort of tests can I make to determine what is actually created in my water that causes the smell, taste and discoloration?By the way: a simple rust test available to check for corroded steel pipes only shows traces of rust even if the water is of a slight brownish color.Replacing the piping myself is not just far over my budget but also not allowed for a tenant.And somehow I still wonder if there is more hiding in the walls but could not get close enough to see if the opper pipes actually connect to the taps or just another piece of old steel pipe.Apart from the obvious, what are the dangers of having steel and copper pipes mixed like this for my health?

Question by Downunder35m    |  last reply


My Grand Tournament Entry TDAP (new* Official TDAP)

Alright for lack of a better name for now this is just TheDunkis' Assault Pistol. It's a compact pistol made specifically for war. I did make a video but I can't upload it using my mom's computer so...yeah. Anyways they're three things that make this the almost ideal war weapon.1. It's compact. Usually no wider than the average person at the age of...I don't know I'm skinny so probably a 12 year old lol so it should be easy enough to carry around as a secondary weapon.2. High Cap magazine. It holds I think around 25 green rods. I know green rods aren't the best rounds but typical wars happen in homes where distance doesn't count as much and for bigger battles it would be more of a secondary weapon.3. Removable magazine. It's based off of Zak's from KI. It clips in and out really easily but it's really sturdy so it should never fall out even if you're shaking it around.Alright so as I figured the gun wasn't enough to make it through. I still wanted my own assault pistol that works though (I'm hoping that we shift over from side arms to these as they'll be easier to make original). This is based off of the original in some design like the handle. It uses what I believe to be the first slanted and open magazine for blue rods. Why slanted? Simple three reasons. 1. It looks kind of cool. 2. It acts as a hand guard. 3. It's keeps it compact so it's not sticking out but it also feeds ammo towards the front more so that it gets more power. That's the main reason anyways. I have plans for this gun if I keep it around anyways. This is the simplest design with no special details or anything but I'm hoping to make a smaller and larger version with extra features. For example the larger will most likely shoot yellows possibly with a removable magazine and a stock. The smaller will use white rods maybe with a slide and maybe with the magazine in the handle (although with a similar open mag style. I figured it out I just need to figure out how to connect them).Here's what I rate this new version compared to the old one. *newer version1. Size Efficient. 4/5 It's compact but not as small as it can be. *4/5 It's pretty much as compact as it will get but you could make it ultimately smaller.2. Power and Range efficiency. 3/5 At the moment it's about average but I havn't really perfected the firing system. Sometimes it doesn't even fire well at all so I have some work to do. * 4/5 It's a whole lot better now. It's decently powerful for its size but obviously not a sniper or anything.3. Accuracy. 3/5 I haven't honestly tested it a lot yet only enough to know that it fires but by the time I'm done hopefully this should updated to be a 4 even though it's more of a CQC gun. * 4/5 I tested it a couple of times and it hits very close with the sight I'm using. Still not perfect.4. Easy, fast loading. 5/5 With removable magazine that is super easy to put in and pull out this is one of those "as good as it gets" in the fast loading department. * 3/5 Ugh this is where it fails. The good news is that it's still pretty to load. All you need to do is push blue rods through the barrel. No need to be precocked nor do you need to hold the pusher down just push the blue rods in and down. Should hold about 10 blue rods maybe more.5. Handling. 4/5 pretty standard I guess. The handle ain't bad and the trigger is smooth enough. So far the gun doesn't work the way it should but that will be fixed before I'm done obviously. The magazine area makes for a good forehandle when not using the shroud. * 4/5 Still pretty standard expect I traded around a couple things. The angled magazine does not make for a good foregrip. It works but I don't care for it. The handle is the same but the back was changed to be a little more comfortable. The trigger works better.6. Cocking. 3/5 Not super bad and not super good. I'm not sure if I should put a slide on or not. * 3/5 same old same old.7. Looks. This is another one of those love it or hate it things but I think it looks good all but the support on the bottom which I put on for more of function than looks but I do think the gun looks better with it. * I'm not sure which I like better. I struggled with the looks on this one for awhile and tried adding a lot of pieces. I finally ended up getting rid of pieces instead until I finally got what I wanted. I think this version looks better good.8. Reliability 2/5 So far I'm not going to lie the gun isn't the best but like I said it ain't working right by the time I'm done I'll make sure it's working 99.9% 5/5 The only problem so far is that sometimes two shots try to go at once and they just fall out from the friction. It only happens if you don't load the ammo right. Edit: Fixed updated design doesn't jam anymore.9. Other features. +1 (judged on about how good the extra features are. Anything that doesn't fit above will be included in the score which will add the amount of points as a bonus into the final score) It has a simple rail nothing to special and a simple mock silencer shroud for the barrel with a forehandle. I think it makes it look better but bigger. * +1 this version doesn't have anything super special. The best is the open magazine which I figure deserves a +1 on it's own considering how useful they are.God any other ideas for my newer gun? I'll probably want to post but I also want to work on a Master Sword V2 really soon and I need all my pieces for it. I might go out and buy another bucket soon but if I don't then this might go by by. I'll try getting a video as soon as I find what I need for the camera>computer hook up for videos. How do you think it would compare to the BBKWG and Spiff (along with the other APs those are just the most popular)?

Topic by TheDunkis    |  last reply


McMADSAT make and do, show and tell. Scotland's first Maker Event 2009. Full report

Report of the McMADSAT event 14th March 2009, at the Glasgow Science CentreWe had a fantastic day. Outside it was a grey gale of a day, but inside was a riot of colour and activity. The aim was to enthuse the public with the fun of making things from a variety of technologies. Anyone who wanted to, could join in, make something and take it away with them, and all for free. Hundreds of people of all ages came along and had a great time. A general video of the event can be seen at https://www.instructables.com/community/Mc_MADSAT/ (Thanks to Les Oates for making this excellent film for us).I am happy to discuss further with anyone planning their own event, and you can see more about it and the process by which I got the event going, at http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com/ExhibitorsStar Guest, all the way from London, was Professor Maelstromme (AKA Amanda Scrivener), who brought her beautiful creationsWhat can you make from a dead umbrella? Display of the possibilities for reusing the fabric and structure of dead umbrellas.The Tea Party. 1950s style tea party made from a combination of hand made fabric and edible pieces.Cardboard structures from the students of the department of Architecture at the University of Strathclyde.Greensteam's steampunkery, 101 uses for a dead keyboard and other examples of her work as shown on Instructables.The Offline Mechanical Blog – a very old manual typewriter with continuous paper available for the public to type their messages and thoughts on for all to shareLemonie (another Instructables enthusiast, who travelled up from York especially) brought his amazing conversion of a VHS player-into-toaster that makes toast with VHS imprinted in it. He also brought his nice LEGO USB stick, a lantern made out of a tin-can & glass. and his *untested* wind-turbine, made from VHS player parts.On the Young Makers stand we had a display of virtuoso Lego constructions and an extensive collection of home made Steampunkery.The self-replicating machine from the department of Design Manufacture and Engineering Management at the University of Strathclyde, the Reprap, was on display and moving but sadly not reproducing on the day.ActivitiesThe public were offered a wide range of free hands-on activities, which ran continuously all day, to 'Make and Take'Soldering - make a solar theremin (or a robot). 16 of these were made and all worked first time. Some were taken for a trial run in the sun and a video of this can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzUZMon3vpA The Stemnet ambassadors helped visitors to make their own Musical Straw Oboes.One of the most popular activities – especially with children – the Stemnet ambassadors supervised the making of many handsfull of Gloop.The Stemnet ambassadors used the plastic Polymorph for visitors to make a fingerprint keyring to take away.Fishy things - Busy Bees Art studio provided painting and collage fishes to make, particularly for our very young visitors.The Glasgow Crocheted Coral Reef invited visitors to try their hands at crocheting and contribute to the growing coral reef, all made from wool and even strips of plastic bag. Many total novices not only tried their hands but actually completed a piece of coral to contribute to the reef. This workshop area was very busy throughout, with visitors typically spending 30 minutes or more participating. Many thanks to my civil engineer pal who ran this.House of Cards - visitors could make and take their own set of the design classic 'Eames cards', which slot together to form fantastical structures. Ideal for recycling old greetings cards.Cable necklets, keyboard bracelets and keyboard film wallets. All made from recycled/repurposed materials from dead keyboards. Popular with adults and children alike.Risk assessments were provided to the Glasgow science centre, for all the activities. There were no injuries and the 'emergency first aid bucket of water' was not needed as there were no soldering or gluegun burns.Participant Presenters30 people were involved on the day, either as exhibitors or as workshop facilitators. An essential component of the team was the group of11 Stemnet ambassadors, most of whom were there all day. It would have been impossible to run so many activities without them. Another group in the team was the members of the Glasgow Electron Club who, with some friends and a Stemnet ambassador, ran the soldering workshops continuously all day. We were particularly fortunate to have two exhibitors travel up specially to take part. Several exhibitors were entrepreneurs who gave their time for nothing, even though the venue rules meant they could not sell anything, nor charge for the activities being provided. This was especially generous given the harsh financial climate just now. Everyone said they had lots of fun.PublicOver 1,000 people visited the Glasgow Science Centre on the day. The BSA/NSEW assessment forms collected only represent <10% of the visitors to the McMADSAT area. Stallholders and workshop facilitators estimated a total of about 425 active participants (people who did an activity, or asked questions and generally interacted with the displays) by 1530 (GSC shuts at 1700). However, even these only represent a proportion of the people visiting the event which, although not recorded, probably amount to about double that, since most of the activities were taken up by children accompanied by other family members. The numbers at any given time were variable, depending upon the GSC's own activities/talks etc. I would estimate that the McMADSAT area was visited by at least 700-800 during the day. From the few assessment forms returned, and from chatting to the public, it was clear that most had come simply because they were coming to the GSC anyway, but some (mainly young adults) had come as a result of internet and email information or because of the Metro article. The GSC visitors seem to be mainly families with children of primary school age. The University of Glasgow Steampunk Society had come especially to make contact with the steampunk element, as featured in the Metro article. We also collected some contact details for future events. BudgetThe total budget for the event was the £500 grant provided from NSEW Scotland scheme. This had to cover all the exhibitors' costs and the costs for the free make and take activities, plus all publicity etc.In-Kind Sponsors:The Glasgow Science Centre provided free space, tables, cloths, technical assistance, without which the event would not have been possible at all.The publishers of Make and Craft magazines, O'Reilly's, did not feel able to sponsor us in the same extent as they did for the much larger event in Newcastle on the same day, but did send boxes of back issues of their magazines to give away, which probably amounted to an equivalent of about £300 at UK newsstand prices.Clockworkrobot.com provided more theremin kits than contracted for, which were themselves at cost price.Madlabs provided free batteries for all the kits they supplied at cost.Instructables.com assisted with publicity and allowed the use of their logo.VenueNone of this would have been possible at all, particularly on this minimal budget, without the kindness of the Glasgow Science Centre. The Director agreed immediately to offer us the space free, plus the use of tables and technical help to enable this event to take place. We were able to partially set up the night before which was very helpful in avoiding a scramble on the day. We were able to get the loan of 4 GSC soldering irons which avoided us having to get personal ones PAT tested. This was the ideal venue for us as it meant we really didn’t have to do a great deal of publicity as we could be sure of an audience from the GSC's normal throughput.PublicityThe event was listed in the NSEW diary and in the university of Strathclyde's NSEW information. Posters were distributed around venues in Glasgow and information posted on relevant websites. A blogspace http://mcmadsat.blogspot.com was set up as a temporary web presence to refer people to. The Metro published a small piece which was a wonderful boost.Lessons for the futureNeeded more helpers and more exhibitors. Outdoor displays would have been impossible as the weather was dreadful, but it is still necessary to have some more dramatic displays as well as the hands on activities. Successful soldering for novices really needs 1:1 or 1:2 supervision. The budget only worked because minimal publicity was done at low cost and all the participant presenters were generous with their time and resources. Anything more ambitious than what was done on this occasion would need a larger organising team and significant sponsorship.

Topic by greensteam    |  last reply


Hydrogen Peroxide at home and in the Garden

Although the topic is quite old for some of us and mostly because I am too lazy today to make an Instructable: Hydrogen Peroxide ! Back in the day Hydrogen Peroxide was mainly known for the ability to bleech your hair, later it replaced chlorine based products for the preparation of paper and organic fibres. For me it is a good opportunity to go back in time and to pull out some of the remedies my grandparents already used. Who knows, there might be something that helps you or you might know other good uses that I failed to mention here, so feel free to comment. First off: What actually is hydrogen peroxide? We could check Wikipedia but I think it is enough to say that it basically water with an added oxgen mulecule which turn the stuff into a quite powerfull oxidizer. When hydrogen peroxide reacts the added oxygen is released and the normal water remains. Precausions and health risks. In the normal supermarket form hydrogen peroxide comes at a strenght of just 3%. This is just enough for wound treatment or cleaning off a fresh and small stain. The stuff you can buy at your hair dresser comes in concentrations of 5-15%, above that it is of little use to them. Pool grade peroxide however can come as high as 50%. It often requires a permit of at least leaving a copy of your drivers license to buy such high concentration but well worth it price wise. The downside of anything above 5% is a risk for your skin, eyes and airways. So when handling hydrogen peroxide you should waer long sleeve rubber gloves, safety or better swimming goggles and make sure that you don't create vapour by spraying it against the wind direction. Having water at hand to dilute and spillage on your skin is always good. What happens to me if things go wrong? Well, if handled correctly nothing should go wrong but of cause the worst would be eye contact. Getting concentrated hydrogen peroxide in your eyes means extreme pain and even with rinsing it out asap eye damage is more than just possible. Again: wear proper eye protection and if spraying use a filter mask, the paper type is enough!!! Nothing immediate happens on sking contact but a few minutes after contact the skin will turn slightly brown or goes white. This is caused by the oxygen release into your skin cells, if washed off quickly after noticing the discoloration will fade after a few hours. Prolonged exposure of the skin can cause skin cells to fully discolor and living cells might get damaged - a burning sensation is usually the sign that you need to wash the area now ;) Enough bad stuff said, let's see what we can do in the garden.... Fungal infection of your old roses or on your fruit trees? Sometimes the weather does not like our plants and by the time we discover a fungal infestation it is usually pruning time. There are commercial producta available that work quite well but especially the copper based ones tend to do more harm than good in th long run. An alternative is a solution of 10-20% hydrogen peroxide. Spray generously over all affected parts of the plant, leaves, twigs, stem and all. Make sure everything is properly wet! In some cases the fungus can act as a water replellent and it seems impossible to get any of the solution to wet these areas - a drop of dish washing liquid into the bottle will fix this! Watever runs off can be left as it only helps to get oxygen into the soil but of course you should not soak the area... Leave it on for about an hour, around 20 minutes if it quite warm. Rinse all off with clear water and repeat every 2 days for 5 treatments all up. After this time wait 2 or 3 weeks and check if the fungus still gows in some hard to reach areas. If so then repeat the treatment there until satisfied but wait another 2 weeks every 5 single treatments. In some areas of the world certain types of fungus on roses are refered to as "rust". ----- Moved into a new home and the garden beds smell really bad? The last house I moved into had a previous occupant with a big dog but no time to clean after his pet. The garden beds looked dead and I mean so dead that I could not even find weeds in them. And the smell was a distinct mix of old dog poo with lots of fresh cat poo mixed in it - the perfect outdoor pet toilet :( Trying to dig it all under made me recover that the top soil was more §$&*# than soil. I had to get rid of the bacteria of all the poo and somehow neutralize a lot of the unwanted "nutrients". The solution was to first loosen all the soil as deep as I could go. Then I added rice straw (but anything straw like or dry grass will do) to mix it through. At this stage I wished I had a gas mask LOL All up the contaminated garden beds covered about 20square meters. I got a 10 liter canister of pool grade hydrogen peroxide, from this I diluted down with 20 liters of water and a few drops of dishwashing liquid to help with the soil wetting. All was applied as evenly as I good with a watering can and then the area was covered with some tarp to try keeping as much oxygen on and in the soil as possible. A day later the tarp was removed and all beds watered with hose to drowning point. This watering was repeated every 3 days for 3 weeks to drive out all the excess and unwanted nutrients from the poo. The smell was already gone except for some cat urine residue which disappeared after some rounds of watering. Three months after the initial treatment I did some soil tests, added nutrients were required and the next season I had vegetables growing :) ----- Planting? Whether from seeds or seedlings, give hydrogen peroxide a try! I use a 5% solution to soak the potting mix I use before putting my seeds in it. Not only does it kill a few of the unwanted things that might still be in there but it adds a lot of oxygen into the soil, which gives the seeds a much better start. For seeds I use a 5% solution as well but only leave them in for about an hour before placing them between some wet paper towels until they start germinating. This way I can be sure all harmful bacteria and fungal spores are dead and I can use a sterile seed to keep going. Might just be my opinion but I think the germination rate is better and seedling in comparison start growing faster and stronger. Home uses.... As we learned before hydrogen peroxide, at least in higher concentrations is a powerful way to remove fungus. In our bathrooms we often have the problem that the ceiling starts to develop black spots as in the colder times water condenses here and takes a long time to dry off. If you now go to your favorite hardware store they will recommend the use of a chlorine based product, basically bleach... And although it does the job it also means your house will stink for days and if you scrub the ceiling you will get it on your sking and stink too. Hydrogen peroxide at 20% or higher concentrations can be sprayed onto the cleiling :) Of course you will need good protection for this and all things color should be removed, like towels or floor mats. By protection I mean a minimum of swimming goggles, a tyvek suit or similar to cover all exposed skin areas and at least a paper dust mask, better a filtered respirator like you use for spray painting or using insecticides. If you have a spray bottle with an adjustable nozzle then a stream is far better than a spray mist!! Not only is your exposure far lower but it much easier to wet the ceiling quickly. Wet all affected areas, then leave and the room, close the door and take off all clothes you used t protect you. The clothes can be left out to dry but double check that you had no soaked spot where your sking might have been in contact - if so rinse the skin with plenty of water! It will take some time to work and then dry, so best to do this in the summer time or if during the colder times you need to make sure the room is porperly heated and aired out to dry! Repeat until all black spots are gone, really bad areas will leave a permanent discoloration looking like a slight brwonish color is the ligh it right otherwise you won't see it. Once fully dry it is best to scrape off all lose paint and then to use a acrylic based sealer before giving the ceiling a fresh coat of white. The sealer will prevent the water to penetrate more than the paint level and if you get the fungus back on the paint it is far easier to clean ;) ----- Carpet cleaning.... When moving into a new rental with carpet on the floor you often are left with areas indicating the carpet might be "clean" but the underlay certainly is not. You can fix the underlay but you certainly can make sure all harmful stuff is gone from the carpet. Carpet cleaning machines can be hired but often much cheaper if you buy the "recommended" cleaning product with it. Rent is usually based on a daily base and price depends on how much cleaner you need. If you only want to desinfect the carpet which otherwise looks mostly fine than go for the smallest pack available and use it to spot clean areas you want cleaner first. For the desinfecting part I recommend to test how high you can go with the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide before using it on a big scale - keep in mind the carpet will never be fully dry and the remaining peroxide will continue to act! Test a 10% solution first before you go higher as you don't want to buy 30 liters or more of pool grade peroxide - just trust me on that one and only try to buy this much you do want to get into trouble a few days later! If 10 percent solution left on the carpet does not cause any bleaching of the fabric (unwanted bleaching that is) you can try higher for spot cleaning in demanding areas. A good spot to try the solution is under the cover or duct outlets, under these joining bars where carpet changes to tiles (if you can lift them off) or in wardrobes if the carpet goes inside. There are two way to treat your carpet once the general cleaning is done. a) use a garden sprayer or similar to wet the carpet This is good for single room treatment like for the baby room but especially on thicker carpets it requires a lot of solution and can become costly. Once wet leave for at least 30 minutes so the peroxide can do its thing, then use the machine with either the solution filled or just to dry off the carpet. I recommend to use the peroxide solution in the machine as it allows for better penetration and it will remove more soiled solution this way. If your catching container starts bubbling like mad it means you have a lot of §$%&#+ in the carpet and it might be best to first clean it all with the normal carpet cleaning agent before using the peroxide again - again tesing on smaller areas can help wasting the peroxide. If you need to store prepared solutions than it is best in a cold place. It will take several hours on an otherwise clean carpet for the peroxide to fully disappear so it best to use shoes and prevent skin contact during that time - especially if a baby crawls around ;) ----- Toilet.... We don't want to talk about it but everyone needs to clean their toilet sooner or later. For most things in there using the toilet brush when it happens will keep things clean and healthy. But what if someone in the house is sick or with a weak immune system? You could use all sorts of commercial cleaners and desinfectants but a wipe with wet towel or cloth soaked in a 10% solution of hydrogen peroxide will quickly eliminate all harmfull things on your seat, lid or bowl, including the buttons to press and the door handles ;) Just wipe and leave it wet for a minute or two then wipe again and ry - done! Personal use I always pack a small bottle of supermarket grade peroxide when going off road or camping trips. Although we now have modern desinfectants that won't stink or otherwise harm you I still prefer the old stuff ;) If you are far from civilisation than the last thing you want to need is medical attention for something that started as small as a scratch or graze.... Out in the unkown wilderness you will never know if the rockk you just crash landed on was used as a urinal by a fox the night before... A bit of gravel left in your skin might contain harmful bacteria... A cut with your own knife?? - What did you all cut since the last proper cleaning of the blade? You see where I am going here, a small thing might turn into something really nasty a day or two later. If you clean a freash and minor wound properly and then rinsie it with hydrogen perodixe most if not all harmful leftovers will be killed by the releasing oxygen. Of course this pretty much useless on bleeding wounds or where it is obvious that you won't be able to remove all debris from the wound - here it means you trip is still over in favour for proper medical treatment. The thing is that hydrogen peroxide was basically abandoned for all wound treatment once the modern "cleaning aids" became available as the peroxide will not only attack harmful things but also living tissue. The claims goes as far as causing bad scar tissue, damage to blood vessels and even "burning" of the tissue. One big problem I have with all these claims is that they were never really mentioned until the new meds came out. IMHO exposure time and how you use it it the key - common sense if you ask me. Noone should ever soak a wound in peroxide, if it is that big that you need to soak it you need medical attention anyway. And as said you should rinse the wound, that means all remaining liquid should be allowed to flow off - this will only leave a minor amount of peroxide in the wound and the exposure time will end with once all oxygen is released. For minor wounds I only use a paper tissue or cotton bud soaked in peroxide and wipe the wound.... ----- Smelly feet? Ok, maybe not the best way to start a conversation but we all know what sneakers do to our feet in the summer... Insoles with copper and activated carbon will help a lot and at least "cure" your sneakers while they are off your feet and have time to dry. But the smell is actually cause by bacteria growing from everywherey in your sneaker to your sking, actuall starting at your sking... If you wear your sneakers for long periods of time time or even whenever possible and also suffer from a bad smell hydrogen peroxide might be able to help you. Most sneakers will tolerate a machine wash and should come out germ free, if that is no option pack them in a sealed back and leaven them in the freezer over night - this will kill all bacteria and remove the smell. Now to break the endless cycle you need to remove the bacteria from inside your skin. So daily sock changes, freezing shoes and washing feet is a must! Your feet will really benefit from a foot bath in a 5% solution of hydrogen peroxide. To keep costs at a minimum use a container that is just the right size for your feet and prepare the solution from pool grade peroxide. I an ideal case you should not need more than 2 liters but all used product can be stored cool and re-used the next day, after that you need to make a new batch. Keep your feet submerged for at least 10 minutes. This will allow a deep penetration of the skin but might result in some white spots that will disappear after a few hours. Consenquent foot baths can be reduced to 5 minutes. After about a week you should notice that wearing your sneakes no longer causes and bad smell and you can stop the treatment. Freezing the sneakers over night, dialy (or more) sock changes and daily, proper cleaning of your feet should prevent any further bad smells :) ----- Bleaching your hair Althoug it was done for many years I really can't recommend using hydron peroxide for this purpose! Any concentration strong enough to have a proper effect in a reasonable time will at least cuase skin irritation. Back in the days they said your burning scalp is what you need to endure to get blonde hair :( And as said already you really don't want to get that stuff into your eyes... General uses If you have a fruit based stain then cahnces are hydrogen peroxide will remove it, especially if fresh. Even at supermarket concentration repeated application and proper drying off with a paper towel or similar will remove even red wine or beetroot stains. ------ Blood... On you skin blood is easy removed with cold water, same on other surfaces but washing off is no option a wet cloth or cotton piece will work fine. Hydrogen peroxide is good if things need to go fst or if the surface is porous, here the releasing oxigen will drive out the blood with the bubbles. ----- Fish tanks... If you love your tank then you really hate to medicate or even worse have a bad algea infestion, especially the stuff of the black kind. A change to activated carbon filter material is always recommended after a medical treatment to remove all leftovers from the system. However, certain medication simply won't be affected by a carbon filter and stay in the system until fully used or broken down otherwise. Especially in bigger tanks a partial water change is often out of the question as it would cause too much additional stress to the fish and plants. Hydrogen peroxide can help to break down most if not all remains of the used medication while at the same time adding more oxygen to the water. To be sensitive and safe in all enviroments I recomment to calculate the concentration based on the volume of your tank and to add the required amount of peroxide very slowly into the outgoing water stream from your pump. By slowly I mean in terms of a slow drip if using solutions over 10% to be added to the tank. If in doubt remove a suitable amount of tank water into a bucket and add the concentrated peroxide to reach the final tank limit. I strongly recommend to stay below 2% in favour over additional treatments a few days later if required. That means the diluted solution you add should be entered into the tank slowly if in doubt add a glass full every few minutes. For the treatment of the dreaded black algea you do the same 2% solution but be prepared that it will take several treatment until you see them die off. If you can then it is best relocate the fish for a few days so you can use a stronger solution of 5-8% just with the plants left in the tank. When transporting fish in a bag it can pay off to add a little bit of 3% peroxide to the bag to give additional oxygen for transport. I do this maually for every fish I buy from a store so I can be sure all fungus and bacteris is killed of before I introduce it to my tank. Really helps to prevent loosing a lot of fish just because you added one or two more to your tank ;) For the normal sized transport bags I use a good shot glass full of 3% peroxide in case you wondered. ----- Fridge and freezer Be it after long use or because you bought one second hand - once empty and warm some of our colling gadget just smell bad. A good clean with a hot water and your favourite cleaning agent is a good start, no need for aggressive stuff ;) If clean but still smelly, like after a power failure with fish in it you might want to go one step further. Best option is to use a spray bottle and a peroxide solution of at least 15% here. Use proper protection as mentioned above and spray all surface with the solution until soaked. What you can take out you take you take out, clean properly and then wipe or brush with the same peroxide solution. Bare aluminium should be handled with caution as in some cases it can oxidise badly, leaving a white and not removable crust behind. Here it is best to wipe and then wipe again with a cloth soaked in clear water to limit exposure time. No need to dry out - wipe out and check if it still smells, if so repeat and wiped off all areas as good as you can with a solution soaked cloth. Once the smell is gone dry out and enjoy smell free use from now on :) ----- Fruit and vegetables Unless you know exactly what happened to it you might want to clean your vegies and fruits properly before using them. Pesticides, herbicites, fungicites.... Not mention normal fungus and bacteria on the product.... On a commercial base hydron peroxide baths are often used to clean products for sensible people, hospital use or long term storage. For a personal use this only makes sense if you have free and unlimited access to the peroxide. An alternative are ozone bubblers. Expensive models can eb bought in shops or online, complete with timers or even a gauge showing the concentration in a room. On a hobby level for the kitchen sink we can use an ozone generator, air pump and bubble stone from the aquarium store ;) Let the pump bubble out the ozone for a minute or two, fill the sink with the fruit and veggies and move them around every few minutes. Best of course with an open window to limit you exposure to the ozone! Rule of thumb: If you can smell it is already too much in the air! The ozone in the water does the same as the peroxide: It breaks down harmful things with pure oxygen. The downside is that it is very harmful for your airways and body in general, so against all what youtube can offer I actually prefer to treat my fruit and veggie in a sealed bag. Place them inside, push out as much air as you can and then fill up with the ozone from the generator. Once the bag is full leave for about 30 minutes then wash and use or place the things in the fridge.

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


The more natural way of cleaning things...

At my workplace we basically have a specific cleaner or cleaning product for every task you can think of. From glass over stainless to plastics and desinfectants for lots of different surfaces. After a quick look into my cleaining cabinet at home I started to wonder if I am doing something wrong as I only have a few cleaning things for my use. Asking my friends also showed they have a big bunch of cleaning chemicals, plus the bottle of bleach that everyone down here has. So I though: Your grandma only had a few cleaning products and you learned most of things you need to clean from her. Considering I grew up healthy I guess she must have done something right.... Let's clean up with the cleaning myths, shall we? 1. What cleaning chemicals do you have? For quite a few people the list would start something like this: Dishwashing liquid, window, cleaner, bathroom cleaner, soap scum remover, floor cleaner, oven cleaner, several desinfectants.... If that is true for you too than we might be on to something already. 2. What cleaning chemicals do I really need? This is a good question as everyone is a bit different but I assume a healthy household here. Of course we need certain things to clean our various surfaces properly but it is far less than waht you have been told by the TV commercials.... These days we like to think if there is a special cleaner for something then of course we have to use it to clean properly. Unless you have trades people walking through with their wet dogs several times a day and see dust storms at least twice a week you really only need a few things. So let's get to the basics: 3. Old style cleaning and what you need for it - really the only stuff required to keep all clean and sanitised. a) Methylated spirit b) Clear ammonia - cloudy ammonia works too but be aware that the added soap can be a problem that leaves streakes c) Hydrogen peroxide - pool grade to be cheap in the long run d) Orange oil - citrus oil works great too if you prefer a different smell e) Soap - just basic soap, these stinky, slightly yellow and hard bricks - no fancy smelly soap ;) f) Several cleaning brushes but you should already have those g) Windows cleaning tools - the basic microfibre cloth and squeegee will do h) Several microfibre cloths - bigger ones for floors and walls, smaller for windows and the rest I) Yesterdays newspaper j) Baking soda With those few things we have everything to clean whatever comes up and if bought in bulk comes down to a few cents per bottle compared to a few dollars when you buy all the stuff you don't need. Lets figure out what the stuff does and how to use it: 4. Mixing and what to use it for.... The alcohol is a really good remover for everything greasy and also desinfects the surfaces. A quick spray and wipe on your bench is all that you need to remove oily residue or the mess from the kids. Mixed with a bit of soap and water (about 50-50) also removes sticky stuff like jam or syrup. If we use about 50ml of alcohol, 50ml of clear ammonia and 900ml of water we get one liter of really good window cleaner. The modern way is to use microfibre for the cleaning and a squeegee to get it dry, the old way just uses a cloth and then the window is "polished" with some old newspaper. The black ink reacts with the alcohol and form a mild abrasive while the paper soaks up the moisture, the result is a prefectly clean window in under 3 minutes. Orange oil is not only a powerful degreaser but also lifts old dirt or even glue residue. Used directly it will get rid of the remains from sticky tape, stickers and everything that other cleaners fails to get off - smoth surface and non soaking of course. 50ml of it with 50ml of ammonia and 100ml of alcohol per bucket makes a good florr cleaner and your house smells nice when done. Works best if you can use a microfibre cloth or floor wiper to dry the surface with it. In the kitchen we can find a lot of surfaces that are greasy and we already covered that bit, so lets get to the though stuff. The kitchen sink can become dull looking although it is not scratched. This is due to hard water, food residue, soap and other things. Best is of course to wipe it and dry it after use but who really does this every day? A pot scrubbing pad with some baking soda on it does the trick here. Make the pad nly moist and sprinkle the baking soda on it. Rub over the stainless and if too dry add a few drops of water. Once done rinse off and enjoy the difference. For hard to clean or badly turtured sinks you can try a ball of aluminium foil and coke - use it like a polish. The oven is often our worst nightmare. The cooktop is not far behind. But even here we can have a chance to clean without too much hard work or bad chemicals. Of course the best way is to prevent these spills and boil overs ;) For the cooktop some hot water and baking soda will soften the baked on stuff. Simply remove what you can with the hot water and then sprinkle the surface with baking soda. Cover all with the paper towels and if not wet enough add a bit more hot water so all shets are soaked. Leave ove night and wipe clean the next day. The oven is a bit of a problem once the side and back wall are filthy. If baking soda with a pot scrubber won't do the trick get some of these steel pads with soap in it. The soap in them is special in terms that you only need a little bit of water to remove almost anything with them - and they won't scrath enamelled surfaces. On the bottom we often have badly burnt in things that are next to impossible to fully remove. I suggest to cover the same way as the cooktop but also to add some orange oil. Just make a thick paste of baking soda and orange oil and wrok it into the soiled surface. Cover with wet paper towels and leave over night. Now you don't want to flood your oven, so that means you need to use a sponge or thick cloth that is big enough to wipe off the surfaces you soaked the day before. As the orange oil really is oil it pays off to use some alcohol in the cleaning water to get rid of the oil and grease a bit easier. Don't expect to see a clean and shiny surface after one treatment if the oven was badly misused, you might have to repeat the procedure a few times. If in doubt use the soapy steel pads for last clean and before soaking over night again. Three to four treatments are usually enough to clean even the worst disaster that can happen in an oven unless you baked it in for months... 5. Desinfecting and mouldy spots.... As said, the methylated spirit is basically just pure alcohol and kill almost anything that might harm you. But sometimes that just is not enough. And who really wants to spend an hour or longer to clean some mouldy spots in the shower or try to cover the smell by spraying room freshener? As a lst resort for everything I use Hydrogen Peroxide. The supermarket grade is only 3% and usually badly overpriced, so I suggest to get a small canister of pool grade peroxide. Do yourself a favour and ask them to install a tap on it - you don't want to do it yourself unless you already know how bad pool grade peroxide is! For your own safety when handling it I strongly recommend wearing long rubber gloves, nitrile is better but please no latex as it could start to burn when getting in contact with the peroxide. For high grade desinfecting or the removal of mouldy areas I recommend to dilute 1:5, one part of peroxide to 5 parts of water. Only for the mould removal on tiled, plastic, glass or metal surfaces you can use the peroxide pure from the container - but please add face protection when cleaning! Some spray bottles work with peroxide some just start leaking badly, if you want try an old bottle of chlorine based cleaner after really flushing everything out. The peroxide breaks down any organic material it comes into contact with, so not just the mould you want to remove but also your skin or eyes if you allow contact. On the skin you see white areas after contact and they won't go away until all the oxygen in the skin is gone that was left by the peroxide. If you act too late it means you might loose some skin flakes. The sure sign of overlook exposure on your skin is a burning sensation in the area - this only happens when the amount was big enough or your clothes got soaked. On your surfaces to clean you will notice bubbles forming quite quickly - this mean the peroxide is reacting with something, usually organic material. Let it bubble... Once it stops bubbling the surface is either sterile or the peroxide is used up, if it bubbles when adding fresh peroxide onto it then there is still crap left ;) It really helps to brush off the surface after each treatment as a lot of loose material will be flushed out when rinsing off. Once it looks and smells clean again it usually means it is clean :) 6. Special case: Wood... Be it wooden floorboards, furniture or just your chopping board - always try what the manufacturer recommends first! Untreated wood should never be cleaned with anything wet! Sealed wood, like floorboards or things with varnish on it to make it water proof can be cleaned the same way as mentioned above - but I would leave out the ammonia as some wood treatments simply won't tolerate it and might go dull instead of returning nice and shiny - spot testing required if you think you have to use ammonia as well! Orange oil itself makes a great furniture cleaner if the surface is smooth and sealed, but if it is not it means the oil soaks into the wood together with the stuff you want to clean off! It also takes off several paints and types of varnish if you work it hard enough and give it some time, so avoid this and be quick instead of forgetting to finnish the job ;) Always try to wet the surface as little as possible and wipe fully dry as soon as possible! Ok, good start but what is the real benefit? For me the actual benefit is that I know what I am using and exposing myself to. Just reading what is in most cleaning products we find at the supermarket makes me want to clean again after using them, just to remove their residues... I admit it might take some time to get used to mixing and just having a few ingredients for the cleaning but it does work great. Especially if you or your kids are already sensitive to certain chemicals or just of poor health in general you might see the benefit quite quickly. Some people really don't like the smell of ammonia but unless you are sensitive to it there is nothing to worry when using the household grade as we always dilute it down massively anyway. A good way to avoid the worst stink is by mixing it outside with the wind from behind. I won't say that certain commercial products are bad, harmful or not good enough for the job. Some are actually worth to have in some cases but I just say it is better to only have a hand full of chemicals that are not too bad instead of an endless list of things were we don't even know what's inside. For me the best is your surprise when it actually works better than you expected and report your findings here.

Topic by Downunder35m