The forums are retiring and are now closed for new topics and comments. The existing content will remain online and accessible through 2020 to provide everyone the opportunity to save any relevant information. In the spring of 2021, these Community forums will be taken offline.

Search for citizen science in Topics


Citizen Science contest

Hey! I have entered 1 of my instructable in the sci-starter contest. I wanted to know one thing that the contest states.It says - "Select one or more to solve or come up with your own creative solution to a challenge you face as a citizen scientist!" So, from it I perceived that if I have a problem as a citizen contest I can submit an instructable solving it. So, I submitted 2 of my instructables- https://www.instructables.com/id/HOW-TO-TEST-YOUR-TRANSISTORS-WITH-YOUR-MULTIMETERS/ https://www.instructables.com/id/HOW-TO-CALCULATE-RESISTOR-CERAMIC-CAPACITOR-VALU/ But I  got both of them rejected. As the other instructables in the contest include how to make a motor,how to make a carrot cannon,power your home with steam.etc. I do not think either of them is a solution to any problem. Thank you

Topic by pranjal12  


Citizen Science Contest Prize ?

I won a prize in the citizen scientest contest , I recieved my instructables prize pack but no sign of the rain gauge. Please help on this .

Question by Bot1398    |  last reply


Citizen Science Contest - SciStarter

Citizen Science Contest Millions of "regular" people are helping scientists discover galaxies, measure climate change, track species' migrations, monitor air and water pollution, and more through citizen science projects featured on SciStarter.com. Help make their experiences better by coming up with solutions to some real annoyances: stop critters from eating sunflowers planted to observe pollinating bees, help remind volunteers to reset rain gauges and report measurements, link activities to social experiences. Or, dream up your own home-based research project that involves public participation to advance a field of scientific research. The Challenges: To get you started, we've listed four specific--and very real--challenges sent to us by project organizers. These problems impact the experience of the participants, and/or the ability of the project to reach its full potential. Select one or more to solve or come up with your own creative solution to a challenge you face as a citizen scientist! - Create Inexpensive Hail Pads - Stop Critters from Eating Sunflowers - Help Participants Submit Their Data - Provide 1000 cheap, wireless climate data loggers Enter now! Contest closes January 21, 2013

Topic by scistarter  


citizen science contest -- I don't get it?

Looking at the citizen science contest  -- I have ideas for 1000 cheap climate sensors, I followed the link but there wasn't anything about climate sensors, something about bugs in my house, which is interesting too. Also -- I went to post at the bottom of the contest page, but there was not a spot to do so.  It took me a minute to find this forum... followed about us -> contact    Contest and website sound great  -- I would like to help solve a specific problem, but I think I'm missing something....I'll try to think of a better question...

Topic by marc.cryan    |  last reply


Create inexpensive hail pads - Citizen Science Contest

The SciStarter Citizen Science Contest is live! This is your opportunity to help millions of citizen scientists contribute to real scientific discovery. Make their experiences better by coming up with solutions to some real annoyances that hinder their participation. To get you started, here is a specific--and very real--challenge sent to us by project organizers. CREATE INEXPENSIVE HAIL PADS Background: The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail, and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) volunteers take and submit measurements of rain, hail, and snow precipitation. These observations are made available for use by the National Weather Service, meteorologists, emergency managers, and others. The Problem:  Hail pads are essential to CoCoRaHS's mission to measure, map, and study hail. Each pad consists of a 12" by 12" square of Styrofoam covered in Heavy Duty Aluminum foil. However, in recent years, these materials have tripled in cost, which has greatly reduced the number of hail pads that can be produced and distributed. The Challenge: Create a cheaper hail pad that can measure the number, size, and orientation of hail stones. Enter now! Contest closes January 21, 2013

Topic by scistarter    |  last reply


Help participants submit their data - Citizen Science Contest

The SciStarter Citizen Science Contest is live! This is your opportunity to help millions of citizen scientists contribute to real scientific discovery. Make their experiences better by coming up with solutions to some real annoyances that hinder their participation. To get you started, here is a specific--and very real--challenge sent to us by project organizers. HELP PARTICIPANTS SUBMIT THEIR DATA Background: Project BudBurst engages the public in making careful observations of phenophases, such as first leafing, first flower, and first fruit ripening. Scientists compare this valuable environmental information to historical records and learn about the prevailing climatic characteristics in a region over time. The Problem: Prospective and current volunteers are often unsure if they have correctly identified plants and phenophases. This may lead to them not submit the data they've collected. Other volunteers simply forget to add their data. The Challenge: Find a way to encourage and remind participants to submit data after making field observations. Enter now! Contest closes January 21, 2013

Topic by scistarter    |  last reply


Need a Science Fair!!

Well folks, it's that time of the year again, and I'm not talking about walrus mating season (You're welcome for the mental image though!)I am in need of a science fair project for the 30th!SO, being the good citizens that you are, get me a science fair!!!!Nah, I'll ask more politely:I'm in 10th grade. Could anyone recommend a science fair project? I mean, the whole deal, an instructable detailing the whole thing. (I won first prize for the beetlebot last year)So....help plz.I eagerly await Mr. Kiteford's response.

Topic by Keith-Kid    |  last reply


Stop critters from eating sunflowers - Citizen Science Contest

The SciStarter Citizen Science Contest is live! This is your opportunity to help millions of citizen scientists contribute to real scientific discovery. Make their experiences better by coming up with solutions to some real annoyances that hinder their participation. To get you started, here is a specific--and very real--challenge sent to us by project organizers. STOP CRITTERS FROM EATING SUNFLOWERS Background: The Great Sunflower Project uses data collected by citizen scientists to create an online map of bee populations. Participants grow sunflowers, observe how many bees visit those flowers, and then submit their observations. The Problem: Critters, like mice and birds, often eat the sunflower seedlings before the bees are able to visit. As a result, some volunteers are unable to collect and submit data. The Challenge: Create a safe, simple way to ensure the sunflowers are protected from critters and reach maturation. Enter now! Contest closes January 21, 2013

Topic by scistarter    |  last reply


I need your help! Writers and bored people! Citizen Science: Pens vs. Computers!

I'm conducting a research, and I require all ye's cooperation in this! (Indeed, this is citizen science) If you would like to participate in this tiny research, then would ye lassies and lads care to follow the below instructions? I'll write a high school-level research paper on this once there's so much data, that I'd be swimming in the stuff. If you feel like you can't do it, please do smother the link around liberally, so that other people that can answer it, will answer it! Do your part for science! =========================== Directions: You will need the ff.: > a coin > pen/pencil and paper > a stopwatch of any sort > a word processor (a word count is useful) > an internet connection (for posting the results here, of course!) Then do this: 1) Flip a coin. If heads, you'll be using plain ol' pen-and-paper (well, you could use a pencil, too), but if tails, you'll be doing the WPM's on a word processor. 2) Choose one topic below: > A > My zombie apocalypse survival plan. > B > Windows vs. Linux vs. Mac; which is better and why. > C > Why Am I Even Writing This? (dump your thoughts here) > D > Why I like my favourite movie/novel/whateverart genre. 3) Get your stopwatch, start timing and start writing (in essay form) on your prescribed writing medium (see step 1). There is no time or word limit here, however it is better if something more substantial is to be written. 4) Once you feel that you've completed your thoughts on your written piece, stop the timer and count the number of words you've written. Record the two pieces of info somewhere (I need the time in hh:mm:ss format). . . WAIT: It is recommended that you do the above steps first before proceeding to read and fill out the form in step 5. If you read the form in step 5 first, you will jeopardize the information that the form in step 5 seeks. . . . SERIOUSLY: Do steps 1-4 first, then come back down here. This is science we're talking about here. Well, if you're done with them, then sure, you may pass. . . 5) Copy-paste and fill out the following form (i.e. everything in-between the pluses, including the pluses) and post it in this forum (and delete the stuff in brackets ("[ ]", "< >"), including the brackets themselves), and no, you don't need to post your essays here: ++++++++++ ==|| FORM START ||== Topic chosen: Writing medium: Word count: Time: a) Where do you prefer writing (paper or computer)? If mixed preference, elaborate. b) In what environment did you write in? [i.e. your room, library, outdoors (if indoors, indicate if there was any sun shining through any visible windows or if it was nighttime)] c) How cluttered was your working environment (how messy)? [rate from 1-10 (decimals are accepted); describe how bad/wonderful your working environment was] d) What did you feel while you were writing on your word processor/paper? [how comfortable were you; general emotions] e) Did you encounter any difficulty in sorting out your ideas whilst writing? Please elaborate. f) Did you read this form before you started writing? If yes, why? Tell me. If no, very good! g) Did you fully understand all of the instructions? Don't be shy. kkAATCGx1 ==|| FORM END ||== ++++++++++ Congratulations! You've contributed to science! If you have any suggestions or inquiries (I really feel like I've missed something here), feel free to PM me about it! (I'd really much better prefer PM's over forum posts so as not to clutter up the semi-ultra-subjective data here). All data that is to be posted down here shall be considered open and free to anyone. If you would like to draw your own conclusions, then feel free to grab the data, but make sure to link (or cite) back here! ======================================= Also, despite intending to write a high school-level research paper on this, it's not actually for any research subject. I'm just really bored... and curious. Additionally, is this topic even in the right category? Oh, and belated Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to y'all!

Topic by nutsandbolts_64  


Provide 1000 cheap, wireless climate data loggers - Citizen Science Contest

The SciStarter Citizen Science Contest is live! This is your opportunity to help millions of citizen scientists contribute to real scientific discovery. Make their experiences better by coming up with solutions to some real annoyances that hinder their participation. To get you started, here is a specific--and very real--challenge sent to us by project organizers. PROVIDE 1000 CHEAP WIRELESS CLIMATE DATA LOGGERS Background: Wildlife of Our Homes provides an opportunity for citizen scientists to help researchers study the species that live alongside us everyday - bacteria, fungi, and insects. By using a sampling kit and answering a few questions, volunteers help researchers create an atlas of microbial diversity in homes across the country. The Problem: Project organizers would love to collect climate data in each of the 1000 homes where volunteers are sampling microbes from 4 common surfaces. Unfortunately, climate sensors are expensive, and more importantly, project organizers don't have an easy way to transfer data from those home sensors (temperature, humidity, etc) to an online database. Currently, they must physically retrieve and download the data. The Challenge: Find a way to log climate data and wirelessly transmit the data to the project organizers. Enter now! Contest closes January 21, 2013

Topic by scistarter    |  last reply


"The more science you know, the less worried you are about climate"

"Americans with higher levels of scientific and mathematical knowledge are more skeptical regarding the dangers of climate change than their more poorly educated fellow citizens, a U.S. National Science Foundation-funded study has found." See link here: http://www.kurzweilai.net/the-more-science-you-know-the-less-worried-you-are-about-climate What do you believe?

Topic by mikey77    |  last reply


Calling British Amateur Scientists!

From the BBC: Snail "GPS", Facebook psychology and crowd dynamics at music gigs: these were just some of the ideas submitted during last year's search for "citizen science" projects. Now, Radio 4 is launching its search for the next BBC Amateur Scientist of the year. A panel of judges, chaired by Nobel Prize-winning geneticist Sir Paul Nurse, will select four finalists. The shortlisted entrants will then have their ideas turned into real experiments, with the help of a professional scientist. Last year, 70-year-old gardener Ruth Brooks won the award for her research into the homing distance of garden snails. She found that Helix aspersa, the common garden snail, can find its way home from up to 30m away. But for gardeners to be sure that their snails will not come back, they should be moved over 100m. Do you have a cool idea that could be turned into a proper piece of scientific research? The judges for So You Want to Be a Scientist? will be talking about what they'll be looking for in this year experiments on Material World, Thursday 29th September at 4.30pm, Radio 4. Entry is open to anyone over 16, who is a resident in the UK and applications can be submitted online until 31 October.    

Topic by Kiteman  


Instructable Contest Entry Not Accepted Yet? Answered

I have send a entry in the citizen science contest and it hasent been accepted yet the entry was sent on 19 - 1-13 but it hasent been accepted wven when the contest has been closed for entries I also got an email saying that the entry was recieved .  Please help on this.

Question by Bot1398    |  last reply


What is the axial orientation of Polaris with respect to the Earth? Answered

So... I know the Earth's axis of rotation currently points (roughly) at Polaris, the North Star. (which, of course, is why we can navigate by it here on Terra Firma).  I also know that Polaris is about ~500 ly from us,  has a rotational period (hence an axis), that it's a transitional Cepheid (sp) (a star that varies between a larger, brighter state and a smaller, denser one) , that it has at least two l known, low-output companion stars, and that since the ~1940s it has undergone visible changes in its rotational period and its output. My excuse and reason  for asking... First, I did google it. Either no one has asked the question(doubtful), it can't really be determined with our present level of science (could be, idk), or I just didn't use the right search  terms to find the answer (the usual culprit ime) , but in any case, after an off and on search that's spanned the past ~year, I think it's time I ask. Secondly, the inspiration. I enjoy amateur astronomy.  However, time and equipment and location often limit my grand delusions for the next "Citizen challenges Hubble with stunning new photo of Zeta p3044-a!" award hahahaha.  But the real problem is most often because of my mid-level scope's somewhat limited ability (in comparison to a German equatorial mount) to track consistently and smoothly, and as a result, Polaris becomes an easy target when I get frustrated with the scopes performance on a given night (sometimes it does track brilliantly... for a stepper-driven alt-z, but only sometimes and even then only to the limits of the steps) because the only thing the scope has to track when pointed at the North Star is rotation, which it seems to handle better than both directions of movement (probably needs a new gear or the motor is wearing or my expectations are simply higher than that of my equipment ...). Of course, I also quite often choose to shoot Polaris when conditions are such that it's the only viable target (for instance, when I'm stuck imaging from my backyard, I have a postage stamp size hole that happens to point at Polaris... which of course basically "doesn't move", pretty much everything else is shrouded by century old, 8-100 ft tall forest during the warmer months, and when I can't drive out to a more suitable location, it's a lucky night when everything is "right", I can even align the mount (it uses a goto controller that requires a 3 star alignment for tracking with any accuracy). So Polaris is a no-brainer, (take some images for arts sake, fine tune the in-situ collimation, data-reduction test sets, etc.) . Either that or do something else...  Anyway, as a result of all of this, I'm found myself enjoying the simplicity of shooting the North Star and the area around it, and having fun with image processing and even optical train modifications to further the artistic side. And I've read a few articles about it's variability and the ~relatively significant changes in its behavior that have been occurring during the past 50 years that got me to thinking What I'm wondering is that when I image Polaris, am I looking at it "on its side?", "on axis?", or at some other viewing angle? Not that I'm going to be able to literally "view it on its side" or something, since optically imaging the star beyond that roughly of a point-source isn't practical, but just to know, since the darned question won't get out of my head. (been asking it for the past year quietly to myself and google. I hate to think how many cumulative hours I've spent at it...) thanks!

Question by seandogue    |  last reply


Finalists Selection

Hi! I recently entered one of my i'bles(the sunflower one) in the citizen science contest. So, I have a few questions which I hope someone to answer. First, that if I have posted an i'ble which lets say got 50 votes and another i'ble posted by XYZ(someone else)  which got 100 votes, But the former is more relevant than the former. Now, at the time of the finalists selection which one will be selected? Second, it is not exactly a question rather a problem.And it is that, whenever I post in the forum topic "The Clinic" for some suggestions and tips on my i'ble I do not get any reply at all (Only got a reply 1-2 times).So, what shall I do? Hope someone  will reply. Pranjal

Topic by pranjal12    |  last reply


ISEE-3 Is Alive!

As reported in Science Magazine online today: A group of citizen scientists has commandeered a NASA spacecraft that was launched in 1978 and had gone unused since 1997. Today the group made first contact with the International Sun-Earth Explorer-3 (ISEE-3) when the spacecraft acknowledged receiving a signal from the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico, says Keith Cowing, co-director of the ISEE-3 Reboot Project, a group of about 20 volunteer space buffs. “We knew we could do this—it’s a vindication,” he says. “It’s sort of like reaching back in time to grab something that otherwise would have been lost.” Making contact isn't all the group plans to do. Next month, they plan to instigate a burn with the remaining fuel and move the spacecraft into a new orbit. The group is doing this with no direct funding from NASA:  they raised nearly $160k needed for for software development, access to NASA archives, and Arecibo and other telescope time via the RocketHub crowdfunding site.

Topic by kelseymh    |  last reply


2008 IgNobel Prizes announced!

The IgNobel Prizes are awarded annually for research which "cannot, or should not, be reproduced"; achievements that "first make people laugh, and then make them think". The prizes are meant in good humour, and many winner pay their own way to attend the ceremonies. Past winners have been known to return to ceremonies in later years to show off their achievements to a receptive audience (this year it was a sword-swallowing doctor).The Japanese team that showed slime moulds can solve mazes sang their acceptance speech.The Winners:NUTRITION PRIZE.Massimiliano Zampini of the University of Trento, Italy and Charles Spence of Oxford University, UK, for electronically modifying the sound of a potato chip to make the person chewing the chip believe it to be crisper and fresher than it really is. They also showed that playing the sound of bacon frying can make ice-cream taste bacony.PEACE PRIZE.The Swiss Federal Ethics Committee on Non-Human Biotechnology (ECNH) and the citizens of Switzerland for adopting the legal principle that plants have dignity.ARCHAEOLOGY PRIZE.Astolfo G. Mello Araujo and Jose Carlos Marcelino of Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil, for measuring how the course of history, or at least the contents of an archaeological dig site, can be scrambled by the actions of a live armadillo.BIOLOGY PRIZE.Marie-Christine Cadiergues, Christel Joubert, and Michel Franc of Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Toulouse, France for discovering that the fleas that live on a dog can jump higher than the fleas that live on a cat.MEDICINE PRIZE.Dan Ariely of Duke University, USA, for demonstrating that high-priced fake medicine is more effective than low-priced fake medicine.COGNITIVE SCIENCE PRIZE.Toshiyuki Nakagaki of Hokkaido University, Japan, Hiroyasu Yamada of Nagoya, Japan, Ryo Kobayashi of Hiroshima University, Atsushi Tero of Presto JST, Akio Ishiguro of Tohoku University, and Agota Toth of the University of Szeged, Hungary, for discovering that slime molds can solve puzzles.ECONOMICS PRIZE.Geoffrey Miller, Joshua Tybur and Brent Jordan of the University of New Mexico, USA, for discovering that a professional lap dancer's ovulatory cycle affects her tip earnings.PHYSICS PRIZE.Dorian Raymer of the Ocean Observatories Initiative at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA, and Douglas Smith of the University of California, San Diego, USA, for proving mathematically that heaps of string or hair or almost anything else will inevitably tangle themselves up in knots. Their paper has one of the best genuine research titles I have seen for a long time: Spontaneous Knotting of an Agitated String.JOINT CHEMISTRY PRIZE.Sharee A. Umpierre of the University of Puerto Rico, Joseph A. Hill of The Fertility Centers of New England (USA), Deborah J. Anderson of Boston University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School (USA), for discovering that Coca-Cola is an effective spermicideJOINT CHEMISTRY PRIZE.Chuang-Ye Hong of Taipei Medical University (Taiwan), C.C. Shieh, P. Wu, and B.N. Chiang (all of Taiwan) for discovering that Coca-Cola is not an effective spermicide.LITERATURE PRIZE.David Sims of Cass Business School. London, UK, for his lovingly written study "You Bastard: A Narrative Exploration of the Experience of Indignation within Organizations."Journal of Improbable ResearchThe site will be hosting video of the ceremony in the next few days.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Hydrophobic music, dubstep windchimes, Smash Smash Revolution and etc @ Knox Makers Build Night w/ MaKey MaKey!

Wow, what a month at Knox Makers! We were absolutely invaded by MaKey MaKeys at our hackerspace all throughout January. To start us off, we released a freebie project a little early to help out members and guests get some ideas, to drum up local support for our events, and to offer a fun + easy starter project for the other spaces participating: Oversized Music Chest This ended up getting featured in Electronics! It leaves a lot of room to add extra components and tote the MaKey MaKey around, and we turned ours into a musical advertisement for our first Build Night, a mystery hack night about music. Mystery Hack Night: Music! What a blast! Talk about a weird time.. One family brought a theremin and a circuit bending kit for kids; another group brought an amp and speakers, a suitcase of effect pedals and circuit bent instruments, and a 4 channel mixer; we had a random component table for open hacking; an acoustic and broken ukulele was converted into an electronic instrument; we had painters painting music instrument for the MaKey MaKey with conductive paint; there was a table with our hydrophobic drum pad, bananas, an eggplant, flowers, and a grappling hook all controlling a set of browser based drums through the MaKey MaKey; we had members hooking up tactile buttons and levers to MaKey MaKeys; and we closed with the weirdest jam session this side of Alpha Centauri with all the things playing all the sounds at the same time. Mystery Hack Night: Video Game Controllers! This was a fun night, and we had a few new people show up. We tinkered with a platformer adventure game called Fancy Pants Adventure, where we assigned each person one button. At one point, the whole table was controlling the game's protagonist. Somehow, we made it pretty far into the game, considering. A few people commented that this type of exercise seemed like a really useful team building exercise, so we might look at creating some tutorials with this in mind. We also had individuals and small groups testing out their own inventions and games, again revisiting concepts like conductive ink or simple conductive objects. A two person team tinkered around with some simple fighting games that only use one button for each player, there were people playing Tetris and other games with their inventions, and we again offered a random hack table with an assortment of items and components to rummage through. MaKey MaKey Build Night I: When MaKeys Attack.. We had a nice turnout for this event. This was an introduction to the basic concept behind MaKey MaKey, how to remap the beta v1.2 boards using the web remapper, different applications that make a MaKey MaKey naturally awesome to use, and a few sample projects. We opened up the floor to open hacking, and that day our Adafruit group buy had just come in. We were able to add to the random hack table some awesome components, such as: male/male and female/female jumper wires, various diffused LEDs, slow and fast cycling LEDs, conductive thread, flat LED panels, sewable LEDs, tactile buttons, and other items. We wrapped up and one of our newest members stayed late to craft a thin copper wire into a flat copper instrument using a mallet. He ended up using a breadboard with the MaKey MaKey and Wolfram software to write his own music program. As with our other Build Night events this month, we also had people working on side projects in the background which added to the creative energy of the room. For this event, one of our members tested out a Gocupi that managed to draw Rear Admiral Grace Hopper and Albert Einstein on the whiteboard in dry erase marker using continuous lines. MaKey MaKey Build Night II: Big Projects! We had a decent turnout for this event, but mostly the attendees were there for their own big projects unrelated to MaKey MaKey. We got a few MaKey MaKey projects in around good company, though. We had members working on a large geodesic Airolite boat, someone showed up to work on their 3D printer and print out their first scale model of a scanned person, our Facilities Director was able to get some critical inventory done, a couple members mounted new shelves that had been donated that day, and one member's daughter wanted to play around with hydrophobics. We also were able to get electronic musical wind chimes made that work very nicely with the MaKey MaKey, and the same member who tinkered with Wolfram software at the prior event made more progress on some of his own MaKey MaKey ideas. MaKey MaKey Build Night III: Advanced Reprogramming! This was one of the build nights I was most excited about, and we had a nice turnout. We walked members through reprogramming the older MaKey MaKeys using the MaKey MaKey sketch for Arduino IDE. We bested Windows and its infernal resistance to unsigned 3rd party drivers, and we advanced onward. We looked at basic reprogramming of the settings.h key bindings, and we also looked at other Arduino programming such as delay, Keyboard.print, Keyboard.press, Keyboard.release, and some other concepts. A father team duo that are also involved in a local high school robotics club showed up and schooled us a little on Arduino with some tricks they had up their sleeves, another father son duo showed up to experience the MaKey MaKey for the first time together and it seemed to blow their minds, and we talked about the new web remapping tool for the beta v1.2 boards. Mad Science Bingo For one of our educational outreach events, we attended hijacked bingo night at a local senior citizen community center. We let everyone have their bingo fun without interruption, but as bingo concluded we invaded with a MaKey MaKey, our hydrophobic drum pad, fruits and veggies, and some flowers. The senior citizens loved it and have invited us back. At one point, we had three participants record themselves singing into a Scratch program that we mapped to the flowers. The room erupted with laughter when the community center manager went to touch the flowers and they sang at her in her patrons' voices. She even lent her voice to be recorded, which sent the room into mad howls. We also made a chain of about dozen people between ground and the triggers. We didn't really invent anything unique here, but it was a fun bonus event for the community center patrons. We ended up tinkering around a little with hydrophobics and electronics. So far after all our events, we ended up with a few more Build Night projects: Hydrophobic Drum Pad (featured in Science and then Homepaged!) annoy friends with this party game: Wonky Pong Smash Smash Revolution ... black acrylic, conductive paint, and conductive thread Electronic Windchimes sewable Cardboard Feet DDR (featured in Video Games!) We've also set out our MaKey MaKey kits for space use now that our January Build Nights are over with. We have a few members with projects they are still working on at the space, a few projects that are still being documented to upload to Instructables, and a few people batting around their own ideas. If we come up with anything else, we'll be sure and update. A couple "lessons learned" here: Random hack tables are awesome. But.. if they are too chaotic and without the right presentation, these can be intimidating to beginners that may want more direction. Multiple Build Nights rule! But.. it is probably best not to hijack every Saturday of a shared workspace like a hackerspace. This could have been orchestrated a little better (my fault). Overall, this was a blast to participate in. Thanks to Joylabz and Instructables! PS.. with two features and one homepage, that gave us 1 and a half years of Pro. One got used, but we're giving away the remaining year of Pro and 3 months of Pro. The bounty: quick connect projects for MaKey MaKey. Ends 3/1 EST. You know what to do..

Topic by smalltortoise