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Metal eyeglass arms have lost their coating, what to use to re-coat them?

Hi and thanks for reading my question. I wear reading glasses and have had some pretty good luck with a pair that I purchased at CVS approximately four years ago. The only thing that has went wrong is that the clear-coating, that used to cover the inside of the glass's "arms" has worn off, from the rubbing of the inside of the arms against my head as I put the glasses on and take the glasses off. Does anybody please have any suggestions about what I should use to re-coat the arms of my reading glasses? Thanks again for reading my question and thanks also to anybody that can please offer me any suggestion(s)! Dan

Question by iamuser1    |  last reply


Identify a Signet Ring? Answered

My grandmother gave me a signet ring a week ago, and I was wondering if anyone could help me identify the coat of arms on the front of the ring. I don't know what metal it is made from, and there is no visible hallmark that I can see...

Question by ObsidianBlush    |  last reply


Seeking advice: I'm building fake snow sculptures/figures and want your ideas please!!!

Hi all, (I had posted this question in a different forum but I think this one is the more appropriate one for such questions - thank you CAITLINSDAD for your response, included below) I'm making a series of life-sized figures for a show; they are meant to look like they have been carved from packed snow. The designer has purchased mannequins and would like me to sort out a way to make the clothing stay rigid and the final scenic paint coat to look like snow. I'm seeking your thoughts and ideas, here's what I have so far: 1) wrap blanket foam and chicken wire around the arms,legs and torso and then put the clothes on the mannequin, cover the clothes in epoxy resin or fiberglass. 2) same as above but use FGR Hydrocal 50 instead of resins. 3) expandable spray foam the body and then carve back to sculpt the clothes. 4) forget the mannequins and instead carve the whole figure out of foam blocks. 5) for the final texture coat use spray glue and flocking If you have better ideas, tricks or techniques I would love to hear them please! I'm attaching a reference image I found online - this is pretty much what I'm trying to achieve. Many thanks, Damian. ---------- FROM CAITLINSDAD: "I think you would be fine in creating any armature that would be structurally sound since it will be covered over, flocked or painted. Maybe try a drywall compound sprayer to coat the piece. You can experiment with the styrofoam texture "orange peel ceiling look " additives to give it the snowy icy look. Good luck."

Question by damianzuch  


Instructables Robot Costume: Any Suggestions?

Alright, this is going to play a major role in the making of my Halloween costume this year, which will be documented and an iBle will be made. And after thinking it over, I've decided to just go ahead an tell you what it is of, to ward off confusion. I will attempt to make the Instructables Robot! So, for my costume, I need to make a head, body, and wrap around pieces for the arms and legs. Here's what I plan to use: Head: Just a box, I'll paint the eyes and mouth on. A ball for the "ears", coat hanger for the antennae. Body: This is where I'm stuck at. I don't know how to make a body that will fit me and is the right shape. I've PMed a member, and he thought that I should form newspaper in a bathtub, and make it fairly thick. This sounds like a great idea, but I don't know if I could make it look like Robot. Then I thought of forming the paper over formed chicken wire, but I don't know if the wire would hold its shape. Any suggestions? Arms and legs: Haven't really paid much attention to these, but I would probably just form some newspaper. I'd paint and detail it all. I'd probably hook a bicycle helmet into the head, to secure it. I'd run some rope or cord to secure the body. I'd wear skates, but my neighborhood isn't one for skating, in the dark. Anyway, I'm the worst skater. I really appreciate your help!

Topic by Bran    |  last reply


(newsletter) Wi-Fi Bumper Sticker, Valentine's Tentacles, LED Photo Frame

Art | Craft | Food | Games | Green | Home | Kids | Life | Music | Offbeat | Outdoors | Pets | Photo | Ride | Science | Tech Wi-Fi Sensing EL Bumper Sticker 8-Bit Mario Blanket The Girlfriend Nightlight Roman Shade, Insulate a Window Cheap Analog Pressure Sensor LED Photo Frame Turkish Delight (Lokum) Recipe Make Valentine's Tentacles Kakawa Cocoa Beans feature fresh-roasted whole cocoa beans, coated with four different kinds of chocolate. A perfect Valentine's Gift! Taco Pockets Make a Miniature Electric Hub Motor Make a Toothbrush Bracelet Concentric Drilling w/ a Radial Arm Saw Make The Internet (The IT Crowd) PCB Prototyping with a Laser Cutter 10 Minute Dog Boots Domo Kun Night Lamp Guides USB 55 Gallon Drum Computer Recycling and Repurposing Instructables Robot Projects Instructables.com - 82 2nd St. - San Francisco, CA

Topic by fungus amungus  


What design features could be considered to make the laptop sit better on your legs, or that increases airflow when on a desk?

Asus, a sponsor of Instructables, has put together WePC where they are asking for input on their next generation laptops. As part of their sponsorship, they've asked my opinion on various aspects of laptops. Most recently What design features could be considered to make the laptop sit better on your legs (curved bottom), or that increases airflow when on a desk? In the next couple of weeks, I will be asking for your input on the final set of features for their community designed netbook. This is pretty exciting because feedback from users on Instructables will be directly incorporated in a consumer product that is scheduled to hit the shelves at the end of this year. For now, laptop stands:Instructables is full of laptop stands, and so I thought that the best way to answer this question would be to check out what lead users are already doing.A PVC laptop stand is one of the basic types, and it only requires cutting the PVC. The parts are held together with friction, and easily disassembled if necessary.PVC Laptop Standhttps://www.instructables.com/id/PVC-Laptop-Stand/An even more minimalist laptop stand can be fashioned from a metal coat hanger. Perhaps the Netbook should have flip-out legs to let users do this without an additional accessory?Ergonomic Laptop Stand Made From a Coat Hangerhttps://www.instructables.com/id/Ergonomic_Laptop_Stand_Made_From_a_Coat_Hanger/If you want to use your laptop in bed, the stand's legs needs to straddle you, like this laptop stand for bed.A better laptop stand for bedhttps://www.instructables.com/id/A-better-laptop-stand-for-bed/Since a laptop is essentially a monitor with a computer attached to it, an adjustable monitor arm can act as a laptop stand.Adjustable Vesa Arm Laptop Standhttps://www.instructables.com/id/Adjustable_Vesa_Arm_Laptop_Stand/Construction materials aren't only for insulating houses!Insulating Laptop Padhttps://www.instructables.com/id/Insulating-Laptop-Pad/Need to use your laptop outside? Try a tripod.Laptop Desk From Old Camera Tripodhttps://www.instructables.com/id/LAPTOP_DESK_FROM_OLD_CAMERA_TRIPOD/With the exception of the stands that are simple shelves, all of these stands have some sort of positive attachment point to the laptop in common. Like cameras, laptops should get a standardized bolt pattern allowing users to easily mount them in a variety of different ways. For more laptop stand ideas, see our Laptop Stands Guidehttps://www.instructables.com/id/Laptop_Stands/

Topic by ewilhelm    |  last reply


Multiple Ideas / Scholarship Submissions

My first two ideas pertain to the realm of sports. Luckily enough I have a city park for a backyard that is big enough for me to hit my low golfing irons. The only problem is having to chase after the balls myself thus consuming valuable time and energy. My proposal is to alter the irobot to retrieve the balls for me in one of two methods. Additionally I would also like to enable to robot to possibly record the location of where it retrieves the ball to help in my swing analysis method 1: Add a mechanical arm, cage and rake system a la the golf cart guy at your local range by sending the robot out on pre-programmed sweeping patterns. method 2: develop some sort of mechanical arm that can retrieve individual balls by locating them with an ir detector as the white of the ball contrasts with the green of the grass. This could also be modified by loading the golf balls with RIF chips and having the robot detect this symbol. The second idea is to turn the robot into a living assistant for my grandmother. Some of the various functions that I would look to add include some sort of panic button, or emergency button especially as it pertains to her falling down and being unable to get up, others functions would include picking things up off the floor as she has troubles bending, and assisting in the transportation of groceries and other items through the use of either hamper like structures attached to the robot or a coat tree like structure. Additionally I would program the robot to take advantage of pre-existing sensors so that it could follow my grandmother wherever she went and possibly provide a better platform for her cell phone as she never hears it and complains about carrying it and possibly add some pda like features.

Topic by bigtheo23  


Summer, sun and what to do with faded plastics

A lot of us have machine, bikes or such with plastic parts.And if you are in a country where a UV rating of 10 is a nice spring day already plastics seem to fade away and fail quicker.Over the years I experimented with a lot of things to either prevent this or to fix it.If you ever had your old farm basher parked next to the same but sun protect model you almost start crying LOLColors look like you painted a white haze over it, white plastics turn yelloish and clear plastic, like on the head lamps of your car go dull and yellow.You might know what I mean if have really nice and long summers...So what is the reason for this problem that only seems to affect things in hot and sunny countries?A lot of plastics are actually fully UV resistant and they won't be harmed or changed.Great but they still suffer! ?Not really, it is the softeners, fillers and pigments that suffer most.In the case of clear plastics it is usually polycarbonate mixes and the culprit is the scratch resistant coating applied on it.The hard UV rays promote the oxidisation and break down.So whatever is not resistant to UV will suffer in and mostly on the outside of the plastic.Problem is that UV penetrates quite deep and as a result we often find that UV protecting agents are added.Sometimes as a coating, sometimes as a mix throughout.Older cars often show peeling paint onthe roof or boot lid - the UV protecting in the coating has failed or was just bad.Back in the old days there was whiteners in washing powder, we had white sheets for the beds and other things and leaving them in the sun to dry actually made them whiter and kept them looking fresh - a positive use for UV bleeching ;)In terms of real prevention options are almsot fully limited to keeping the xposure as low and short as possible.There is no clear coating you can apply to keep the UV out that won't affect the looks of the paint job or plastic.And not all of these coating work on all plastics.One option though is to keep the plastic clean and shiny.A highly reflective surface will not scatter the sunlight as much throughout the plastic.Oxidisation is limited as well, especially if you add some polish every now and then.In a lot of cases though this is either no option or way too time consuming for us to keep it up.As a result we start to neglect the routing here and there andover they years the plastic ages faster than what it should.How to fix or restored faded plastic without paying an arm and a leg for specialised products?White is always nice and if you have a washing machine or fridge close enough to a window you might have noticed over the years that the plastic parts now appear a bit darker or slightly yellow, often just on one side of the thing...Old electronics, like Gameboys are doing this too.Red is my other favourite as like black it produces a white haze easy.Either way the solution is pretty much the same: reduce the oxidisation by oxidising it more ;)Whatever is really oxidised in a bad way changed the color instead of just breaking dow the pigments.UV does this...On the other hand hydrogen peroxide bleeches and breaks down stains....As long as parts are small enough it is quite easy to put them in a zip lock bag to submerge them for a few hours or over night in hydrogen peroxide.Otherwise use a suitable container and keep turning and moving the parts around every hour or so until all looks even again.In severe cases and if the plastic permits it you can also add a small amount of diluted hydrochloric acid.Talking diluted! So that means of a low concentration!In most cases though a day or two with just hydrogen peroxide will suffice.Do a little test first though as some plastics might just be caoted and either show no reaction at all or the coating has pigment that break down in the peroxide - I never had this happen to me but I have read reports of it and seen the pics of the results.When it comes to really big parts, like the spoiler on your car or plastic covers on your bike and boat it can be impossible to submerge them even partially.In most cases people try to fix these by polishing them until the faded areas are litterally removed.A much nicer and easier way to cheat is to use a simple car polish that is suitable for plastic parts.Means it should have no warning on it to keep away for plastic parts ;)Wearing proper gloves you can add some hydrogen peroxide to a small amount of the polish.And I mean polish, not the stuff to fix a dull or bad paint - what you would use on a new car...The trick is that the polishing cleans the surface while the peroxide works on the staining and fading.You just don't let the stuff dry after applying it and polish the dry stufff of, you keep going wet until your color comes back ;)After that give it a final polish the normal way with just the polishing compound and no peroxide.Clear plastic...If it is just yor headlamps or other smaller parts for a once off it might make sense to go to a auto shop and buy a head lamp polishing kit.Thing with clear plastics is that only too often they come in shapes or installations that make a full access impossible.Like your head lamps that you can only reach from the front as they are glued into the assembly.Another problem is that they are aslo almost always coated with some protective stuff.If hydrogen peroxide alone does not help here then polishing will always remove some of this coating or even all of it.If the coating happens to be the culprit of the fading and yellowing then you of course get it all nice and shiny by just polishing the coating off - but you also loose all benefits of the coating.Some car models have headlamps where just the coating discolors and once removed the plastic start to crack under the exposure from UV and through all the tiny damages it get when driving around.For things like clear covers over a little display there is the problem as access as you might not be able to remove the window pane, a replacement might be the best option.Hey! Why all the fuzz? I use just oil and it works perfectly!!You can find online videos and full tutorials where people show you that just a bit of some oil and polishing it off with a lint free cloth brings all you faded colors back out again.Don't be fooled just because it works so great!Take a frosted piece of glass and put some oil on it and it becomes clear enough to see through again.Even works with very thin paper...What the oil really deos is to coat all these microscopic imperfections.And with the light now having a very easy way to get through it won't scatter anymore and the fading appears to be gone.Once the oil is gone the plastic looks as bad as before, hence the need to use an oil that dries off.Worst thing is that these oil affect the softeners in the plastic.In some cases this might be benefitial in most it is really bad though.Like any other solvent the oil mixes with these softeners and over time they are removed from the plastic, the more you use oil to keep it shine the more brittle you plastic might get.Once you did that it is next to impossible to remove the oil from within the damaged plastic and only way out i to polish it off after sanding it.The benefit of seemingly protecting the plastic from dirt and water is short lived as well.Some old oil you got on it would just wipe off but with the added oil in the plastic it can now penetrate.And that little black dot becomes hard to get rid of...Last words of wisdom:Check the type of plastic before you decide on anything!Especially when it comes to the black plastic with fibre re-inforcements.Do a tiny spot test in an area that is not so important before going full scale!Trust me, nothing is worse than only realising too late you selecting of choice is actually removing the pigments from the plastic - hint: if your cloth tunrs into the same color as your plastic then something is wrong.Use PPE! Gloves and face shield or at least goggle are a must have when working with hydrogen peroxide or acids.Even at just 3% the peroxide will bleech your skin quickly and long exposure won't be better either.Once you got a drop of peroxide in your eye you will never forget the googles, so just wear them right away please ;)If the fading is due to the breakdown of pigments that give the color like a white haze on red or blue plastic you might still have to polish off that thinnest layer on the surface to remove the fully bleached out layer.This however is really quickly done and after that the smooth surface will last much longer.Work clean!! It is of no use to start before you actually fully cleaned the plastic!

Topic by Downunder35m  


casting a section of a large sphere in polyester resin

Hello, all.  I bought a nice pendant lamp for my house several months back from one of the local big box stores on clearance.  I only got around to putting it up recently, and when I opened it (yes, I already feel stupid for not having opened it right away to check on it...), the main glass lamp shade was completely shattered! Sadly, the lamp was on clearance because it had been discontinued, and none of the stores in Canada have any of them in stock anywhere, so getting replacement is impossible. I really like the lamp, though, as it matches several of the other lights that my wife and I have purchased, so I figured that I would try my hand at making a replacement shade!  The shade is shaped as follows: it is a section of a sphere 19.5" across (the diameter of the section, not the of the entire sphere), and 5" deep.  A little math (x^2 + y^2 = 2yr) lets me know that the radius of the sphere that this shade is a section of is 12". Here is my plan, and I would like to know if I am crazy or if anyone has a better suggestion.  I am going to try to cast a replacement shade from polyester resin, 1/4" to 3/8" thick.  I was going to make a 2-piece mould from plaster, and use my wood router suspended from a gimbal (on a 12" radius arm) to cut the outer mould.  Similarly, I would suspend a plaster blank from the gimbal over my router (on a 11 5/8" radius arm) to cut the inner mould.  Then I would simply coat the two halves with mould release and pour/pump the resin into the gap between the halves.  I'll tint the resin with some dye to get it the amber colour that I want, then lightly sand to get a smoky translucent finish. My only questions are: 1)  will I be able to get this mould apart without destroying the resin casting, and 2) will polyester resin be strong enough for this kind of casting?  Another option would be to make a wooden mould, but I thought that I might be able to chip away a plaster mould, whereas a wooden mould would be a lot harder to get off of a stuck casting! Thanks!   PS, of course, if this works, I'll post an instructable of it!

Topic by roboguy    |  last reply


Help on clay modeling/molding intricate parts

I had posted this on another forum asking for advice as well, but I haven't received a reply in days and I figured that the community there was more into the artistic craft sort of stuff. I like the engineering mindset of this community far better as I tour around here a lot looking at neat instructables, so maybe you guys can offer me some solid advice. I have a series of small metal parts with minute details on them, and I want to take them and create clay replicas of them. I want these clay replicas to essentially be spot-on accurate to the original and be durable; not brittle, heavy, and perhaps slightly flexible. Essentially, though it may sound strange, I'm working on a World War II movie project. I don't have the fire-arms necessary for it, and I don't have a reason to use real fire-arms, so I want to create dummy replicas that have believably working systems that of course are just made of clay and aren't capable of firing. I'm also of course going to create miscellaneous objects, such as papier mache helmets and whatnot. At the bottom are a few examples of what I need constructed. I don't know what type of clay would be the best for this; I can afford to have it be slightly flexible, but not rubbery. It would be handled and roughed around a lot and couldn't be brittle, lest it shatter. I also think that I would probably have to make a mold of the metal parts, but what material should I use? Some sort of molding latex, or clay? Would the clay stick to the metal, and if so, can I oil the metal to make it easy to remove, or would that interfere with the chemistry of the clay somehow? I've also considered maybe using papier mache to mold the parts, as I'm sure that it would be tough. Perhaps I could achieve this by carefully cutting the strips? I've considered that clay may not even be the best material for this, although it may certainly help with molds; tutorials on how to create molds for complex objects are also appreciated, since these have internal chambers and whatnot. Maybe I can eyeball it and cut the parts out of foam, and then coat it with some sort of hardening resin? I don't know, I'm certainly up for suggestions here. Thanks in advance! P.S. Oh, by the way, if any moderators feel that it would be better suited in the "Burning Questions" subforum feel free to move it there; I wasn't sure whether or not to post there since I simply want advice, not someone to make an instructable for me.

Topic by Phaethon    |  last reply


A bit of a painting project I've started (3rd UPDATE)

Me and my gf have decided to tackle a project recently out of curiosity and boredom. My Ariens YT12 could use a new painting. I had took the angle grinder to the a$$ end of the tractor and cleaned up the rusted parts and scraped up the painted areas. I had a fight with the angle grinder for a brief few seconds and messed up my arm a bit, so I decided not to do any more grinding with the wire cup. I've since put on a couple coats of black spray enamel paint, and I've even painted over other areas too not just the rust spots, I tried to wipe down the machine with a wet cloth the best that I could. I've given it a few coats but I might have to go around yet and touch up some other spots, I DO plan on doing more painting to the frame soon, but maybe when it's nicer out and not so windy. Heres the kicker, when my gf gets home, we've already cut out some really neat looking stencils and we plan on spray-painting the hood of the tractor, I'm not sure if I should rough up the surface first or just leave it be and clean it with a wet cloth before painting. It's going to be the coolest looking hood ever (I hope if it turns out how I'm hoping). Stay tuned I'll upload MOAR pictures soon! Update!!!! I've added some more pictures I just took them after peeling the stencil off my tractor's hood. I got more paint splatter than I would have liked, but overall I'm pleased with how it came out. I have MORE pictures to come as I finish the black stripe. 2nd Update: I just peeled the painters tape off and I like how clean-cut the stripe looks, however there was some seepage and I need to touch it up. 'Should still make the neighbors jealous though. 3rd Update: I've put the hood back ON the tractor, and I think it looks pretty damn snazzy if you ask me! Check out the last picture in the list to see what I'm talking about!

Topic by Punkguyta    |  last reply


Halloween Costumes

Halloween is coming! It may still be a little bit in the future, but a truly great costume requires some planning. To help you out with some ideas and techniques, here are some wonderful costume Instructables to check out.Make something awesome, document it, and be sure to enter it into our DIY Halloween Contest!Also see: Halloween Pumpkin Carving Halloween Decorations Halloween for Kids Halloween Makeup Halloween Party Halloween Masks Realistic Werewolf Costume by missmonster This costume won the grand prize in our Halloween contest and for good reason. It's a beautifully detailed costume that should scare any and all kids you see. Be a Ghostbuster for Halloween! by Honus Going as the Ghostbusters is one of the best group outfits out there (KISS would be good, too). Learn how to get your own gang of proton pack-wielding fighters of the paranormal going. Also check out other great costumes from Honus such as the Boba Fett costume, the MIB Costume, Han Solo and even making a great helmet out of cardboard. Yip Yip Costume by sliny Bring the Martian aliens from Sesame Street to life. Yip-yip-yip! Six-armed Hindu goddess Kali Costume by nicemag Become a multi-armed goddess with this detailed Instructable. Can be easily modified to help you get a spider outfit together as well. Mystic Lord costume: horns, armor, silk painting + more (oh my) by houseofdarkly Want to turn a favorite video games character into reality? Here's the lowdown on jumping into the deep end of cosplay. Build your own steampunk chicken-walker mech by Bug The idea here is pretty simple, but the effect is oh so satisfying. Convince people that you really are a mad scientist with this robotic costume. Halloween LED Jellyfish Costume by T0BY Attach some strings of LEDs and create a shimmery underwater world wherever you go. How to make a pair of Angel Wings by marc_alain You could make a pair of wings with fabric and wire, but why not go all out and use some real feathers for a better effect? how to add EL wire to a coat or other garment by enlighted Learn how to wire up your costume with EL wire and you'll be able to add a sweet finishing touch to any costume. Iron Man Helmet by pmaggot Let loose your inner Tony Stark with this custom Iron Man helmet. How to make an Iron Man Arc Reactor by msraynsford Complete the Iron Man look with an arc reactor. If the Iron Man helmet is too big of a project, you can also try mraynsford's Iron Man Mask.

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


a Blucky corpse

stage 1 ok, so i have begun.the Blucky i chose to work on is a bargain basement Blucky, literally. when i made the trek to the Spirit Store and Party City last October, i happened upon some marked down Bluckies. they were 10 bucks, and not guaranteed to not fall apart in the store, lol. so i got a buggy and picked up a couple of them. the cashier pointed out that they were defective, did i still want them? of course i did! 10 bucks instead of 12, for something that i'm going to probably screw up anyway...so the 1st order of business is to fix the defective joints. i decided to disassemble it, and fill the bones with spray foam insulation. then re-assemble. hoping this will meld the pieces together well, and add a little weight. nothing looks faker than a Blucky blowing in the wind!it is laid out on the counter at the shop. the customers kept giving me strange looks.. can't imagine why! so i figure the excess that is oozing out can easily be trimmed away. i do have a back-up plan in case the spray foam won't hold firmly enough. it involves hot glue. hopefully it won't come to that though... the panty hose i plan on applying next should bind things well.STAGE2so today i began stage 2 of the Blucky. cutting his arm and leg bones to more closely resemble an actual body. i used my Dremel, and a razor knife to trim them up. i made a HUGE mess, and had fun. i'm sure i didn't do such a great job on this, but it is my 1st time. STAGE3so today i tackled stage 3 of teh Blucky corpsefication, carving the skull and ribs.ummm. it is MUCH harder to do the ribs than the skull, let me tell you! the dremel tends to 'get away from you' on the long curves of teh ribs. my carpal tunnel didn't help matters any, either! it's kinda crappy looking in fact... i am rather disappointed with myself. luckily they wont all be visible after the pantyhose goes on! the teeth proved to be difficult too. Danny said it looked fine, though. i do have some pics somewhere...we went to Lowe's last night and got some carpet latex to coat it with. the girl in the flooring department thought we were crazy at first, then warmed up and was interested in our projects and plans. she wants us to bring some pics by in fact!here are some of the how-to's i'm using as inspiration:http://hauntforum.com/showthread.php?t=8659http://www.fulcrumsites.com/haunt/html/corpsification1.htmlhttp://skullandbone.com/tutorial_02.htmiam kinda mixing and matching techniques. i'll be using paper towels or toilet paper, pantyhose, cotton balls, great foam, maybe cheesecloth and various colors of stains/paints.the hair my Blucky will have is Grade A. i had my long hair cut off, and instead of donating it this time, i plan to utilize it. the hair dresser kept asking me if i was sure i wanted her to cut it, she said it was "beautiful and so healthy!" i imagine i'll have to distress it little so it will look like it belongs on a rotted corpse. LOL!!!!i'm wondering... does anyone ever put remnants of rotten clothing onto their Bluckies they corpsefy?STAGES 4 & 5ok. so i worked on Blucky today at work. first i taped up the arm and leg bones that i had cut out with the dremel. this is probably a useless step... but i think i was trying to stall actually getting going with the scary part- the latex.i used some masking tape i bought at wal mart in the paint department. then i applied the pantyhose. this part caused customers to stop what they were doing and come watch. Josh and I struggled with it until we got 1 set on the right way, and one set on upside down, covering the arms and head. we overlapped the torso with both sets.now came the scariest part. donning the gloves and applying the latex. it stinks! i put down a couple of trash bags and dove in... globbing and smearing until it was covered. i had to warn customers away from it, so Blucky wouldn't stick to them! one guy nearly bumped into it, just walking by. maybe i should have done this step in the back room, away from people. i hope he turns out ok... hair, stain and paint are the next steps, when he dries out. STAGE 6so i stained Blucky. i think i got a lil heavy handed with the stain... but he is my 1st ever, so it's all good! i bought MinWax mahogany gel stain and a large pack of cheap brushes (getting my Lowes connection price of course- dented can)i placed Blucky's feet into a large box. having stained my kitchen cabinets once, i expected a HUGE mess... but the gel is marvelous! NO DRIPS AT ALL!i did get a little splattered onto my left hand and forearm, but that is because i'm a slob, LOL.several customers wandered over to watch, and inquire about him... several seemed genuinely interested in our Halloween obsession! a couple of kids who were there were thrilled, and assured me he looked totally gross! only 1 customer questioned why we were working on Halloween in February. this is a far cry from last year when i was detailing the tombstones at the shop and had people looking at me as if i were crazy... maybe i'm rubbing off on them, or maybe they are used to my eccentrics by now, LOL!Josh and i left the shop at 6, and Danny stayed over a few minutes, (he's painting truck parts in the back room) he said when he walked back through the empty, half-lighted, locked shop he caught Blucky out of teh corner of his eye and it spooked him! a sure sign of a job well done! anyway, i suppose Stage 7 for Blucky will be eyes... or LED's. definitely an LED in the chest cavity. this will be up to Danny, as i don't do wiring (yet, lol) so the ball is in his court!my motto? the couple who haunts together, stays together!

Topic by susanfromhauntspace    |  last reply


Need help finding easy materials for Pyramid Head (Silent Hill 2/Movie) costume!

I know there are a few topics and instructables on how to make a Pyramid Head costume already, but mine's going to be a bit different. I'm going to sort of be mixing costume styles of the Pyramid Heads from the Silent Hill movie, and the second Silent Hill game where he made his debut. I have past experience with this costume, actually. In fact, it was the first costume I ever made myself. My mom and I originally made the helmet out of posterboard and duck tape, but it didn't hold up so well after a while, plus it had a problem where it would get somewhat lopsided, or if I turned my head, the helmet would stay in place. This is because there was nothing inside the helmet to support my head when I turned it, or to keep it to where it moved and stayed upright with my head. The robes I made out of a bloody labcoat/doctor's coat with ripped off sleeves, and a bloodied cook's apron. draped over it to conceal the buttons. Made it look kind of odd with the layering, but I worked with it. I used a pair of white female dress gloves with it, because they looked alot like his. Anyway, this year I was wanting to revamp the costume, and add in a bit more detail, change the style a little. I was wanting to make his helmet more like the Movieverse's helmet', with the sharper angle, and grating on the sides. But I wanted to keep the apron that he had from the second game, since I don't really have the figure for the really ripped PH from the movie. So I come to you all for help. :) I need suggestions for this.  I'm also working on a bit of a budget, and I'm not at all good at woodworking. So I can't use anything like fiberglass or actual metal, I don't believe. I want it to look good, look pretty authentic and recognizable, something people could come up to in conventions and say " Dude, that's awesome", but with easy to find and work with materials. I've never sewn in my life, either, so that's out. My first one I'd like is for his helmet. I already have a decent idea of how to make it. This time I'll probably be working with super glue instead of duck tape this year. Duck tape's a miracle tool, but there's only so far it can go in certain rare situations. Something like a helmet the size of a small child requires a certain amount more work. For the helmet, I'm probably going to be using window mesh like the kind used in certain windows or porch doors for the grating on the sides of the helmet. I got that as a suggestion from another instructable, and after a bit of testing how well I can see through it, I think I can work with it. I think assembling it will be easy. I may tape it together first just to see what it'd look like fully constructed before I glue it, though. My main issue with the helmet will probably be support. I need to be able to turn my head, have it move with me and my body when I'm turning around and navigating certain areas. Does anyone have any suggestions on a way to make it do that? Again, it can't be incredibly expensive. ( About more than 20-25 dollars in this case scenario.) A second bit of help I'd need is his skin. Now, my skin's naturally very pale, but there's the problem of hair. I could try applying some kind of makeup to it, but I imagine it'd smudge badly by the end of the day. If I did that, I'd probably have to wax my arms first. x.x The problem with that is that people would probably want to hug me throughout the day, and I'd be smudging makeup on their clothes. Another idea I had was trying to find a white leotard or something similarly tight-but-thin to use as his skin. I'd be able to dirty it up a bit to make it look like his. Only problem is, I don't know where to get one. There aren't any specialty stores around in a fifteen mile radius that I know of that would sell them, and I can't order online for specific reasons. Does anyone know of any widely known store that would possibly sell leotards, or something similar that I could use to cover my upper and lower body? I know white hose or thin white stockings would work for his legs, but it's the arms and upper body that are bugging me. The last bit of help I'd need is for the Great Knife, his BFS. I think I'll also be making it out of thick posterboard, possibly layered with cardboard as well, painted silver. But I wanted to know if there's a better way. I made a really ramshackle Great Knife before out of posterboard, but in retrospect, it resembled more of a giant paddle. XP It's not much diffirent from a buster sword, but most of the Buster Sword instructables I see here are only with wood. And again, horrible at woodwork.  For the handle of the blade, I was probably going to use the handle of a paintbrush or large cleaver. Anything better you all would suggest? Sorry this is such a long read, but I desperately need the help, and I wanted to get a head start on it before October (the date of the next convention in east TN, I think. And Halloween. ). Thank you in advance to anyone who can offer suggestions. Again, I'm working on a bit of a budget, though. The most I can spend per item is about 20-25 dollars. Shameful as it is to say, I normally get most of my material for costumes from thrift stores, surplus stores, and flea markets. I feel bad that I can't sew or do woodwork like the awesome cosplayers and craftsmen on the site.

Topic by Nickjackal  


The worst time of my life

If three years ago somebody had told me that I would be at Maker Faire, using my cyborg arms, watching Arc Attack playing the “Doctor Who” theme, and meeting Adam Savage from “Mythbusters”, I would have said that person is crazy or is mocking me. But I was there. With Instructables. It was awesome when Adam Savage, in the middle of his conference, yelled to me “Hey man! Nice borg!!”. “OH MY GOD!” I thought, “ADAM SAVAGE FROM THE MYTHBUSTERS TOLD ME I MADE A NICE BORG!!” But, beyond Adam Savage, the giant robots, the fire and electricity shows, the beautiful steampunk women, the good energy, the delicious food and the pictures with Daleks; the most beautiful, shocking, awesome and magical moment of the Maker Faire 2013 was when I had just arrived at the Autodesk booth. I saw the giant map of DIYers from around the world, and I realized my picture and profile were representing Colombia and I was one of the three leading makers of South America. I was paralyzed remembering all this journey, from being a complete loser without a future to that point in time and space when I felt absolutely happy, calm, and at peace with myself. It was worth it to keep fighting, just for that sublime moment. I felt like a Rock Star. Not because I was, but because Instructables and Autodesk made me feel like one. ……………………………………… When people ask me “Why do you love Instructables?” my answers are always the same: because the site is awesome, has amazing projects and great contests with cool prizes; because Instructables is the only one who has supported my DIY activities, especially in my country (Colombia) where science and technology aren’t priorities, and so on. But I never gave the complete answer. And now, after these fantastic five months as Artist in Residence, I want to tell the truth: I love Instructables because they were with me in the worst time of my life. ……………………………………… In 2009, I lost my job as Security Analyst in an important Colombian company. I thought I could subsist thanks to my junk projects and creating my own business, but almost nobody was interested on buying recycled crafts (besides, I wasn’t as good then as I am today.) And the only interested people wanted my works for free. It was not enough for a living, so after a few months I started looking for a job. Due to its economic situation, Colombia has high rates of unemployment and it’s very hard to find a job, and there’s no government subsidy for unemployed workers (sorry Colombia! One day, I will talk about all your beautiful and fantastic things, because you have a lot. But not today). Besides, when you are a former military officer the only civilian jobs you can apply for are in security because nobody thinks you can be creative; and if you are, nobody takes you seriously. Every two weeks I had an interview. Every interview ended with just another “we will call you.” It’s time to confess something to the world: at the same time, I was diagnosed with mild Borderline Personality Disorder and depression. It’s not something that “SHAZAM! You are nuts!”. No. I knew from years ago there was something wrong about me, but just in that moment I found out what I have. Just in case you ask: no, this condition doesn’t make me a bad employee, and I’m very competent in my work. No, I’m not some kind of evil psycho. Just a little bit creepy sometimes, but I always try my best to be a good person. And no, I’m not trying to look like a “dark and bizarre, Tim Burton style” character just because I want to look interesting. It may work for an artist or a teenager, but not for somebody trying to get a job in the security business or a stable relationship. I didn’t have any health insurance; I didn’t have money for any treatment and, in case I could afford it, there is a social stigma about persons with some kind of mental disorder, and no company would be interested in hiring a security manager with that kind of problem. So, I had to keep it to myself. I didn’t even tell it to my family. And my girlfriend broke up with me. So, my life was “complete.” I was without a job, love and almost without my sanity. Almost all of my “friends” were gone. I was drowning in debts. I didn’t have money even for basic things. I had to return to my mother’s house. I lost every goal, every dream, and every hope. The situation was so desperate that I seriously thought about giving up. But only two things stopped me from doing that. One was Carolina, the only friend I had in that moment. The other thing was Instructables. ……………………………………… I found the site several months after because I was looking for simple robots ideas. Then, I saw Instructables has contests, and I entered my first project (the “SPD Exoskeleton”) for the 2009 Halloween Contest. A lot of people made awesome comments about my project, and I received my first prize: the “Photojojo!” book and a Robot T-Shirt. “What? I just post pictures of my project on an internet site and they give me free stuff? Interesting!” Then, I made another project, the “Valentine’s RoboGrinch”. I was a finalist in the 2010 Valentine’s Day Contest. People around the world commented about my ideas, and my projects started to become popular being featured in other sites and blogs around the planet. When I got the First Prize on the Dead Computer Contest, I gave to my mother the netbook I won. It was the only present I could afford to give her in a long time. In my darkest moments, when I thought about giving up, I remembered I had some project on Instructables I didn’t finish or publish, and then I keep fighting just one or two days more, because I didn’t want to leave it uncompleted. When I finished it, I endured one week more, just for knowing if it was successful in a contest. Sometimes I won. Sometimes I lost. When I could get some money, I used it for buying tools or materials for the projects, instead of food or paying debts. Because I started to think that every project, every idea I was making, every instructable I was writing, was my little legacy to humanity. Probably one day I will die, but at least in some part of the Internet, it would be a proof that I made something good, something that could be appreciated by anybody, and my life was not in vain. And I started to win more contests. It felt good, because I thought “I’m a loser, but this loser is kicking butts!” With so many fantastic authors, the competition got tougher, so I had to improve my skills (and my English. Instructables was the only opportunity I had to improve and practice this language.) I became very good at making stuff with plastic trash and limited resources! Besides, without knowing anything about me and my personal situation, even without being on the same country, the Instructables staff and community were (and are) very special and kind with me. They always made me feel respected and loved. Instructables was the only escape I had from my reality. This site has thousands of users and still they had the time to talk to me, to care for me, to make me feel like part of a bunch of friends! They were the only people that didn’t see me or treat me like a loser or somebody who needed to be pitied. They were the only ones that made me feel I wasn’t completely alone on this planet. All of this situation lasted one year and two months. Instructables kept me fighting almost all of that time. ……………………………………… Finally, in September of 2010, I got a job. It wasn’t the best (honestly, it was horrible!), but at least I was working. Four months later, I got a better job as security manager of a business center, enough to start paying debts. On October 2010, I went to the Colombian equivalent of Comic-Con, using the Cyborg suit I built for the Instructables’ Dead Computer Contest. Thanks to this, a beautiful woman found me out of the crowd, because she loves robots. She became my biggest fan and we shared a big love. I never thought I could find a love like that. She was the girlfriend I got thanks to Instructables! She was the inspiration of my “Cyborg Heart in a Can”. And I gave it to her. And then Instructables interviewed me as Featured Author. I would be the first Colombian to be a Featured Author! That was awesome! In total, I have won twelve Instructables contests and two challenges. Thanks to Instructables, people of all the world know about my cyborgs and my Roboplanters. (The funny thing is I’m still feeling like the black sheep of the family!) ……………………………………… It was 2012. After one and a half year of relationship, my girlfriend and I broke up, for good (our respective problems were stronger than our love.) Besides, I was stuck at work and I couldn’t study something art or robotics related because the restrictive schedule of my job. So, the depression was returning… I was lying on the couch watching “Doctor Who” when a phrase get stuck in my mind: “All of time and space. Everywhere and anywhere. Every star that ever was. Where do you want to start?” And then I realized that nothing was tying me to Colombia and I could apply to the Instructables Artist in Residence Program. I wanted to know, at least for a few months, how it was to be in the most awesome company in this world. So I quit my job, I sold most of my belongings, I packed my Dremel, my trench coat and my sonic screwdriver, I said goodbye to my family and I traveled to San Francisco on February 27th of 2013. I didn’t come for the “American Dream”. I came for the “Instructables Dream”! ……………………………………… What can I say? How can I describe the most fantastic experience of my life, using just a few words? How can I summarize five months of happiness, learnings, DIY and good energy, when every day was an amazing adventure? I felt, after 35 years of life, I finally arrived in the place I belong. I met the faces behind the site I love and admire. You know who they are (sorry for breaking the magic but, please! Update the Instructables Team page! A lot of awesome people are not there!) I’m trying to not mention specific persons, because I shared awesome experiences with each one of you. Every one of you taught me something, every one of you made me feel appreciated, every one of you does a fantastic job keeping this site working. And I want nobody feels excluded of this post (Sherry always fights for sending out prizes on time, silently. Why nobody says “Thanks Sherry?”) Because Instructables is more than servers and computers and projects and internet. Instructables is the people. From the beginning, Instructables and the Autodesk Consumer Group made me feel like one of the team, like part of something bigger than myself. The Pizza Thursdays, the Marvelous Mondays, the Build Days, the Design Nights, became magical events for me. But it wasn’t only Instructables and Autodesk. This beautiful city of San Francisco taught me real lessons about tolerance, respect and being yourself. It doesn’t matter if you are radically different to the other people. Just be a nice person, do your job and respect the others, and everyone will respect you. I had never touched a CAD software, because I didn’t see any possible use for it in my life. And I thought it was something so complicated that only engineers and designers could use that kind of program. But then I went from 0 to 123D Design! I learned the basics in just two days and I fell in love with this awesome program, and it’s free! (But, seriously guys, try to fix that problem with the crashes. Everyone in the lab knew that when I screamed, it was because the program had a crash and I hadn’t saved the progress). And later, I learned how to use a 3D printer, a machine beyond my wildest dreams! I remember the infinite sadness the first time I went to the amazing Pier 9 (new installations of Instructables and the Autodesk Consumer Group) and thought I could never try that fantastic technology; and the happiness when Noah told me I could stay two months more! You have all the best freaking hi-tech tools in this freaking world, and you don’t need to be a NASA scientist or a millionaire to use them! This place is waiting for people of all the world, to come with their ideas! (It doesn’t matter how crazy they are). 3D printers, laser cutters, a water jet, a bunch of expensive machines I still don’t know the names of, an awesome test kitchen, metal and wood shops, even a sewing area! And all available for the DIY community! But, more than being on Pier 9 because the fantastic machines, I loved to stay here because Instructables.  My life has good things and bad things, successes and failures. But being part of Instructables and sharing moments with all of you has been the most memorable experience of my whole existence! ……………………………………… I want to say something to my dear friends of Instructables and Autodesk: if one day, for some inexplicable reason, you feel like your work is meaningless, you don’t like it’s Monday or simply you forgot what this is all about, just remember something: you will never know exactly how many lives Instructables has touched: how many persons found their true calling thanks to the projects, and how many persons found a hobby that makes their life happier. How many couples fell in love thanks to the delicious recipes and romantic crafts, and how many parents shared precious moments with their sons building something. But now you will always know, at least, Instructables and Autodesk saved one life. My life! ……………………………………… I wish to finish my post with some “Doctor Who” quote. I love “Doctor Who”, because is all about being awesome and optimistic and keep smiling even in the worst situations or despite you are feeling absolutely sad and alone. And the series has a lot of badass and beautiful quotes! But now, when I have to start packing my bags, when I have to return to my hometown where I have to pretend I’m a “normal” person and try to get a “normal” job again, when I have to say goodbye to my coworkers (that are at the same time most of the only real friends I have had in my life), and to the greatest organization I have had the honor of being part (where for first time in life I felt truly appreciated, respected and loved, and happy because it was Monday and I could go to work in a company that is making of this world a better place); there’s one, and only one phrase that I got stuck on my head; the last words of David Tennant as the Tenth Doctor when, standing alone after saying goodbye to his loved ones (and to the most awesome time of his life), his final moment comes: “I don’t want to go.” Mario Caicedo Langer Former Artist in Residence. Instructables

Topic by M.C. Langer    |  last reply