Search for cyborg in Topics


Cleaning a Saitek Cyborg Keyboard? Answered

I spilled a root beer float in my Saitek cyborg keyboard, which resulted in sticky keys everywhere. I rinsed it under water once and now all the keys work fine, except the '2' and 'X' keys. How can I clean these two without risking damage to my keyboard?

Question by The Daft    |  last reply


When will robotics be advanced enough for me to build a terminator? Answered

Since reenacting ALIEN was a bust, this should be better.

Question by Squoobmonger    |  last reply


How do I understand what the heck a cyborg is?

I'm not a cyborg myself... and I'm making an article about them. Can someone point me in the right direction (DIY bone conduction implants might work, or IR HUD) and I'm talking mostly about a mental fusion of man and machine, which I am sure I and most of Western society are. But  on a more fundamental level. Also, I wrote a few shorts on deaf people, some of whom were cyborgs, so I'd be glad to publish them on t'Internet somehow.

Question by j4jackj    |  last reply


Eyeborg: Filmaker plans to install camera in prosthetic eyeball

"Take a one eyed film maker, an unemployed engineer, and a vision for something that's never been done before and you have yourself the EyeBorg Project. Rob Spence and Kosta Grammatis are trying to make history by embedding a video camera and a transmitter in a prosthetic eye. That eye is going in Robs eye socket, and will record the world from a perspective that's never been seen before."I'm hoping that the eyeball video camera will pave the way for more prosthetic eye hacks. I've want to embed a laser diode into a prosthetic eye for some time now, and just haven't had a candidate who will volunteer their eye. Common Instructables community - how many of you with one eye out there will let me help you become Cyclops!?!Filmmaker plans "Eyeborg" eye-socket camera | ReutersEye Spy: Filmmaker Plans to Install Camera in His Eye Socket | WIREDMore at eyeborgblog.com.via benjaneer

Topic by noahw    |  last reply


Another step towards human cyborgs - the finger drive.

A Finnish computer programmer who lost one of his fingers in a motorcycle accident has made himself a prosthetic replacement with a USB drive attached.Jerry Jalava uses the 2GB memory stick, accessed by peeling back the "nail", to store photos, movies and programmes.The finger is not permanently attached to his hand, so it can be easily left plugged into a computer when in use.Mr Jalava says he is already thinking about upgrading the finger to include more storage and wireless technology."I'm planning to use another prosthetic as a shell for the next version, which will have removable fingertip and RFID tag," he wrote on his blog, ProtoBlogr.net.Half of Mr Jalava's left ring finger had to be amputated last summer after he crashed into a deer while riding his motorbike near Helsinki.He says he was inspired to create the unique storage device when doctors treating him joked that he should have a USB "finger drive" after finding out that he was a software developer. More is apparently available on the inventor's blog, but it keeps timing out for me.BBC story

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Wild & Wicked Weapons

Popsci has an awesome compilation of some ridiculous weapons developed by the military. Some of them are old and discontinued, like the Gay bomb (yes, they were considering developing a bomb that turns you gay). And others that are pretty cutting edge, like the railgun that fires a 7 pound shell at 7 times the speed of sound and some remote controlled cyborg spy moths.Here's a link, check it out:Worlds Spookiest Weaponsvia: hack-a-day

Topic by lamedust    |  last reply


need a driver for gameport to usb adapter?

I have a Gravis Blackhawk Digital joystick that plugs in via gameport. I want to use it on my Compaq Presario c500 to play a game that I need two joysticks for. The other joystick that I am using is a usb Cyborg Graphite joystick. it works just fine. I used to have the Blackhawk  working when I ran windows vista on this computer but it hasn't worked since I upgraded to windows 8. I connect the controller using a gameport to usb adapter that I got cheap off of ebay a while back. I have been searching the internet for a couple days now and cant find anything that will make it run. I cant even get an xp machine to recognize it when it is plugged in with this adapter. can someone please provide me with a solution of some kind or a driver. thanks

Question by tvsamuel    |  last reply


Thanks Instructables!!!!!!!

Hi Friends!!!!!! When I saw the Dead Computer Contest, my first thought was "This netbook will be mine!!!! MUAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!", and started with the Cyborg project. It was a week working, and the last two nights without sleep. And finally happened! When I was waiting for my netbook, I dreamed carrying the computer everywhere in my backpack... SWEEEEEET!! But, when I opened the box, I saw love at first sight between the netbook and my mother, who had a big smile in her eyes when saw the beautiful computer. As my mother never had a brand new computer for her (she always had to depend of my old notebook or my brother's new one), I gift it to her. If you could have seen the happiness in her eyes eyes when I did that... I only have words of gratitude and respect for you, for all the Instructables team. Thanks Eric (ewilhelm), Randy (Randofo), Fungus Amungus, Stumpchunkman, Noah (noahw), Instructables Robot, THANKS TO ALL!!!!!! You made my mom happy, and made me happier!!! As I always say, being part of this community and wear the Robot T-shirt is a privilege, an honor and a pride for me, and I hope to make a lot of important contributions for all the members of this, the World's greatest DIY page!! And I want to thanks to all my friends and comrades who voted for me in the contest. THANK YOU!!! And Randy, your book is AWESOME. IT'S A MASTERPIECE!!!!! Thank you people!!! Cordially (from my old but working and happy notebook!!) Mario Caicedo Langer A.K.A. M.C. Langer (The artist formerly known as Poyecto_gir) Bogota, Colombia

Topic by M.C. Langer    |  last reply


Myths and Truths of the 3D Printing

Yesterday I readed a very interesting article on wired.com, named "An Insider’s View of the Myths and Truths of the 3-D Printing ‘Phenomenon’", by Carl Bass, CEO of Autodesk. "But Mario!" - you (one of the only four persons who read my forum topics) will say - "What happened to you? It was supposed you were one of us, one of the last sexy hammer-in-hand/sweat-in-the-forehead makers, who build everything with bolts and nuts and screwdrivers, Yes, it's a little bit annoying that 99% of your projects are vibrobots, planters and cyborgs. But at least, you only used the computer for checking your e-mail and looking for stuff that would horrify your mother. Now you only talk about 3D printers and CAD and support material. YOU SOLD YOUR SOUL THE TIME YOU DOWNLOADED 123D DESIGN!". And my answer is "... maaaayyyybe. Can you repeat the question? No hablo inglés". But this is a cool article that demystifies a lot of ideas we have about 3D printing. Thanks to the media, we think everything will be 3D printed, the handtools will become museum pieces and metallurgy and craftsmanship will have the same fate of the alchemy. Or we think 3D printers are magical boxes that immediately fulfill all of our design desires, no matter how dark they are (Do you want to become a criminal and lead a rebellion? SHAZAM! Homemade one-shot 3D printed non-always-exploding guns for everyone!). Ok, enough blablabla. Read the article. It was written for somebody who knows. And believe it or not, Carl Bass is another "hammer-in-hand/sweat-in-the-forehead" maker. Enjoy! http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/05/an-insiders-view-of-the-hype-and-realities-of-3-d-printing/

Topic by M.C. Langer    |  last reply


Advanced Helmet

Advanced Helmet By: Arseny Ratnikov I want to create a helmet that looks like a sci fi helmet (mass effect, titanfall, halo, etc.) and that; **Want to make cool helmet, need help with having multiple camera feed output to multiple screens** * Protects my head (able to decrease force from impact by significant degree) * Can filter the air I breath (does not need to be super extreme filter, just filter out general junk, the better the filter the more pleased I am, but if it becomes too bulky/expensive then it is unnecessary)(Optional/Most Likely) * Has a HUD with my vitals on it. I would wear some sensors, such as HR monitor to have some cool biofeedback, maybe also include other information.(option) * Maybe even have it be a digital display where there are cameras on the front and maye back of the helmet that then are displayed on the interior screen, where I have voice commands setup for some different things. * Have the helmet be as sound proof as possible and have microphones where my ears would be, then inside the helmet speakers, so that I can modify the noise around me to be how I want it to be. I understand this would be rather difficult (at least including all of the bullets) and that it could even be a touch silly. Yet, I find this a rather intriguing pursuit and think it will help contribute to becoming a cyborg. Any tips would be greatly appreciated as I don't really know where to start for this. I can imagine a lot of the work might be done on an arduino, but I simply don't know the feasibility of modifying noises of the world around you and having the cameras on the helmet. So here's a little prioritization sheet I worked out, it is not exactly in order, and maybe you all have some suggestions on what might be more critical to design and functionality. Prioritization 1. Functionality a. Head protection a1. Padding/Inertia dampener a2. Sturdy/solid b. Control of phone through bluetooth b1. In helmet speakers b2. In helmet microphone b3. Voice control c. Control of other systems such as screens c1. Voice control of screens c2. Screen modification c3. Screen HUD and other functions (maybe GPS map, time, etc.) d. Camera view d1. Camera live to screen with little to no latency d1a. 360 degree view compressed to 180 degree screen (maybe) d2. Computer control of camera feed d2a. Visuals, different HUDs e. Sound modulation e1. Sound cancelling e2. Sound reproduction at low to no latency e3. Sound modification e3a. Changing pitch e3b. Change decibel levels e3c. Change relative level of external sounds f. The HUD f1. Display of vitals f1a. Heart rate, oxygenation, etc. (Requires some monitor) f2. Display of time and other running interests f3. Display of current location on google maps/GPS system g. Air Filtration g1. Filtration of air, relatively high quality g2. Seal on head or seal over mouth and nose or full body suit that connects to helmet h. Extra Features 2. Style a. Look good b. Look like popular sci-fi media c. Does not interfere with functionality and accents functionality How should I do this? I am planning on using some old phone screens if I can for the screen part and multiple cameras. I plan on using a raspberry computing system (might need multiple) to modulate the output from the cameras. How could I make multiple camera outputs lay onto multiple screens that looks good at three to five inches from the eyes? Also how can I make the raspberry pi control my phone and computer via voice, or at least change a screens properties? Thanks

Topic by ArsenyR    |  last reply


The worst time of my life

If three years ago somebody had told me that I would be at Maker Faire, using my cyborg arms, watching Arc Attack playing the “Doctor Who” theme, and meeting Adam Savage from “Mythbusters”, I would have said that person is crazy or is mocking me. But I was there. With Instructables. It was awesome when Adam Savage, in the middle of his conference, yelled to me “Hey man! Nice borg!!”. “OH MY GOD!” I thought, “ADAM SAVAGE FROM THE MYTHBUSTERS TOLD ME I MADE A NICE BORG!!” But, beyond Adam Savage, the giant robots, the fire and electricity shows, the beautiful steampunk women, the good energy, the delicious food and the pictures with Daleks; the most beautiful, shocking, awesome and magical moment of the Maker Faire 2013 was when I had just arrived at the Autodesk booth. I saw the giant map of DIYers from around the world, and I realized my picture and profile were representing Colombia and I was one of the three leading makers of South America. I was paralyzed remembering all this journey, from being a complete loser without a future to that point in time and space when I felt absolutely happy, calm, and at peace with myself. It was worth it to keep fighting, just for that sublime moment. I felt like a Rock Star. Not because I was, but because Instructables and Autodesk made me feel like one. ……………………………………… When people ask me “Why do you love Instructables?” my answers are always the same: because the site is awesome, has amazing projects and great contests with cool prizes; because Instructables is the only one who has supported my DIY activities, especially in my country (Colombia) where science and technology aren’t priorities, and so on. But I never gave the complete answer. And now, after these fantastic five months as Artist in Residence, I want to tell the truth: I love Instructables because they were with me in the worst time of my life. ……………………………………… In 2009, I lost my job as Security Analyst in an important Colombian company. I thought I could subsist thanks to my junk projects and creating my own business, but almost nobody was interested on buying recycled crafts (besides, I wasn’t as good then as I am today.) And the only interested people wanted my works for free. It was not enough for a living, so after a few months I started looking for a job. Due to its economic situation, Colombia has high rates of unemployment and it’s very hard to find a job, and there’s no government subsidy for unemployed workers (sorry Colombia! One day, I will talk about all your beautiful and fantastic things, because you have a lot. But not today). Besides, when you are a former military officer the only civilian jobs you can apply for are in security because nobody thinks you can be creative; and if you are, nobody takes you seriously. Every two weeks I had an interview. Every interview ended with just another “we will call you.” It’s time to confess something to the world: at the same time, I was diagnosed with mild Borderline Personality Disorder and depression. It’s not something that “SHAZAM! You are nuts!”. No. I knew from years ago there was something wrong about me, but just in that moment I found out what I have. Just in case you ask: no, this condition doesn’t make me a bad employee, and I’m very competent in my work. No, I’m not some kind of evil psycho. Just a little bit creepy sometimes, but I always try my best to be a good person. And no, I’m not trying to look like a “dark and bizarre, Tim Burton style” character just because I want to look interesting. It may work for an artist or a teenager, but not for somebody trying to get a job in the security business or a stable relationship. I didn’t have any health insurance; I didn’t have money for any treatment and, in case I could afford it, there is a social stigma about persons with some kind of mental disorder, and no company would be interested in hiring a security manager with that kind of problem. So, I had to keep it to myself. I didn’t even tell it to my family. And my girlfriend broke up with me. So, my life was “complete.” I was without a job, love and almost without my sanity. Almost all of my “friends” were gone. I was drowning in debts. I didn’t have money even for basic things. I had to return to my mother’s house. I lost every goal, every dream, and every hope. The situation was so desperate that I seriously thought about giving up. But only two things stopped me from doing that. One was Carolina, the only friend I had in that moment. The other thing was Instructables. ……………………………………… I found the site several months after because I was looking for simple robots ideas. Then, I saw Instructables has contests, and I entered my first project (the “SPD Exoskeleton”) for the 2009 Halloween Contest. A lot of people made awesome comments about my project, and I received my first prize: the “Photojojo!” book and a Robot T-Shirt. “What? I just post pictures of my project on an internet site and they give me free stuff? Interesting!” Then, I made another project, the “Valentine’s RoboGrinch”. I was a finalist in the 2010 Valentine’s Day Contest. People around the world commented about my ideas, and my projects started to become popular being featured in other sites and blogs around the planet. When I got the First Prize on the Dead Computer Contest, I gave to my mother the netbook I won. It was the only present I could afford to give her in a long time. In my darkest moments, when I thought about giving up, I remembered I had some project on Instructables I didn’t finish or publish, and then I keep fighting just one or two days more, because I didn’t want to leave it uncompleted. When I finished it, I endured one week more, just for knowing if it was successful in a contest. Sometimes I won. Sometimes I lost. When I could get some money, I used it for buying tools or materials for the projects, instead of food or paying debts. Because I started to think that every project, every idea I was making, every instructable I was writing, was my little legacy to humanity. Probably one day I will die, but at least in some part of the Internet, it would be a proof that I made something good, something that could be appreciated by anybody, and my life was not in vain. And I started to win more contests. It felt good, because I thought “I’m a loser, but this loser is kicking butts!” With so many fantastic authors, the competition got tougher, so I had to improve my skills (and my English. Instructables was the only opportunity I had to improve and practice this language.) I became very good at making stuff with plastic trash and limited resources! Besides, without knowing anything about me and my personal situation, even without being on the same country, the Instructables staff and community were (and are) very special and kind with me. They always made me feel respected and loved. Instructables was the only escape I had from my reality. This site has thousands of users and still they had the time to talk to me, to care for me, to make me feel like part of a bunch of friends! They were the only people that didn’t see me or treat me like a loser or somebody who needed to be pitied. They were the only ones that made me feel I wasn’t completely alone on this planet. All of this situation lasted one year and two months. Instructables kept me fighting almost all of that time. ……………………………………… Finally, in September of 2010, I got a job. It wasn’t the best (honestly, it was horrible!), but at least I was working. Four months later, I got a better job as security manager of a business center, enough to start paying debts. On October 2010, I went to the Colombian equivalent of Comic-Con, using the Cyborg suit I built for the Instructables’ Dead Computer Contest. Thanks to this, a beautiful woman found me out of the crowd, because she loves robots. She became my biggest fan and we shared a big love. I never thought I could find a love like that. She was the girlfriend I got thanks to Instructables! She was the inspiration of my “Cyborg Heart in a Can”. And I gave it to her. And then Instructables interviewed me as Featured Author. I would be the first Colombian to be a Featured Author! That was awesome! In total, I have won twelve Instructables contests and two challenges. Thanks to Instructables, people of all the world know about my cyborgs and my Roboplanters. (The funny thing is I’m still feeling like the black sheep of the family!) ……………………………………… It was 2012. After one and a half year of relationship, my girlfriend and I broke up, for good (our respective problems were stronger than our love.) Besides, I was stuck at work and I couldn’t study something art or robotics related because the restrictive schedule of my job. So, the depression was returning… I was lying on the couch watching “Doctor Who” when a phrase get stuck in my mind: “All of time and space. Everywhere and anywhere. Every star that ever was. Where do you want to start?” And then I realized that nothing was tying me to Colombia and I could apply to the Instructables Artist in Residence Program. I wanted to know, at least for a few months, how it was to be in the most awesome company in this world. So I quit my job, I sold most of my belongings, I packed my Dremel, my trench coat and my sonic screwdriver, I said goodbye to my family and I traveled to San Francisco on February 27th of 2013. I didn’t come for the “American Dream”. I came for the “Instructables Dream”! ……………………………………… What can I say? How can I describe the most fantastic experience of my life, using just a few words? How can I summarize five months of happiness, learnings, DIY and good energy, when every day was an amazing adventure? I felt, after 35 years of life, I finally arrived in the place I belong. I met the faces behind the site I love and admire. You know who they are (sorry for breaking the magic but, please! Update the Instructables Team page! A lot of awesome people are not there!) I’m trying to not mention specific persons, because I shared awesome experiences with each one of you. Every one of you taught me something, every one of you made me feel appreciated, every one of you does a fantastic job keeping this site working. And I want nobody feels excluded of this post (Sherry always fights for sending out prizes on time, silently. Why nobody says “Thanks Sherry?”) Because Instructables is more than servers and computers and projects and internet. Instructables is the people. From the beginning, Instructables and the Autodesk Consumer Group made me feel like one of the team, like part of something bigger than myself. The Pizza Thursdays, the Marvelous Mondays, the Build Days, the Design Nights, became magical events for me. But it wasn’t only Instructables and Autodesk. This beautiful city of San Francisco taught me real lessons about tolerance, respect and being yourself. It doesn’t matter if you are radically different to the other people. Just be a nice person, do your job and respect the others, and everyone will respect you. I had never touched a CAD software, because I didn’t see any possible use for it in my life. And I thought it was something so complicated that only engineers and designers could use that kind of program. But then I went from 0 to 123D Design! I learned the basics in just two days and I fell in love with this awesome program, and it’s free! (But, seriously guys, try to fix that problem with the crashes. Everyone in the lab knew that when I screamed, it was because the program had a crash and I hadn’t saved the progress). And later, I learned how to use a 3D printer, a machine beyond my wildest dreams! I remember the infinite sadness the first time I went to the amazing Pier 9 (new installations of Instructables and the Autodesk Consumer Group) and thought I could never try that fantastic technology; and the happiness when Noah told me I could stay two months more! You have all the best freaking hi-tech tools in this freaking world, and you don’t need to be a NASA scientist or a millionaire to use them! This place is waiting for people of all the world, to come with their ideas! (It doesn’t matter how crazy they are). 3D printers, laser cutters, a water jet, a bunch of expensive machines I still don’t know the names of, an awesome test kitchen, metal and wood shops, even a sewing area! And all available for the DIY community! But, more than being on Pier 9 because the fantastic machines, I loved to stay here because Instructables.  My life has good things and bad things, successes and failures. But being part of Instructables and sharing moments with all of you has been the most memorable experience of my whole existence! ……………………………………… I want to say something to my dear friends of Instructables and Autodesk: if one day, for some inexplicable reason, you feel like your work is meaningless, you don’t like it’s Monday or simply you forgot what this is all about, just remember something: you will never know exactly how many lives Instructables has touched: how many persons found their true calling thanks to the projects, and how many persons found a hobby that makes their life happier. How many couples fell in love thanks to the delicious recipes and romantic crafts, and how many parents shared precious moments with their sons building something. But now you will always know, at least, Instructables and Autodesk saved one life. My life! ……………………………………… I wish to finish my post with some “Doctor Who” quote. I love “Doctor Who”, because is all about being awesome and optimistic and keep smiling even in the worst situations or despite you are feeling absolutely sad and alone. And the series has a lot of badass and beautiful quotes! But now, when I have to start packing my bags, when I have to return to my hometown where I have to pretend I’m a “normal” person and try to get a “normal” job again, when I have to say goodbye to my coworkers (that are at the same time most of the only real friends I have had in my life), and to the greatest organization I have had the honor of being part (where for first time in life I felt truly appreciated, respected and loved, and happy because it was Monday and I could go to work in a company that is making of this world a better place); there’s one, and only one phrase that I got stuck on my head; the last words of David Tennant as the Tenth Doctor when, standing alone after saying goodbye to his loved ones (and to the most awesome time of his life), his final moment comes: “I don’t want to go.” Mario Caicedo Langer Former Artist in Residence. Instructables

Topic by M.C. Langer    |  last reply


Redesign instructables to make searching easier and more practical!?!?!?

I'm fairly new to instructables. i've only read about 100 or so and not made any myself. for the most part i can rarely find an instructable that is of high enough quality end-product or end-result for me to commit to making it instead of starting from scratch and designing my own thing, or buying something that has already been produced for a more affordable and higher quality end-product. but there is one huge reason i remain committed and interested in instructables as a website and a community! my dad has a garage full of high-potential junk! now if only there were an easy way for me to search instructables for projects based on my plethora of ingredients (inventory) rather than typing finished project titles or end-result names of creations into the search bar. i understand that this may be extremely hard to do since there may literally be an infinite number of names and objects, not to mention the various languages, misspellings, and misnaming of objects and processes that would need to be accounted into the search process as well. the idea would be that instructables users could rack-up all their junk and save it as a list to their own digital library or, "inventory" of all the parts and tools they currently have and manufacturing processes they can do with said items. from there they could click "search by inventory" and include or exclude items from their total inventory to run a search based on that. for example i could select: -super old motherboard (or specific part number) -old motorcycle seat -some bolts (or specific sizes of bolts) search results would turn up projects based on the parts that i have selected, results would mention whether i am missing or have all of the tools or parts i searched for. imaginary examples might be stuff like: -strange computer motorcycle seat -cyborg motorcycle seat -a computer build from an old motorcycle seat -ride fast while computing fast -tune your old motorcycle with an old under-the-seat DIY ECU -etc. though, this sounds like a daunting task, especially with the numerous vague and sometimes seemingly useless projects people can come up with, instructables has already begun to specify categories and sub-categories (channels?) of project styles such as leather-work, CNC, electronics, wearables, etc. etc. and to add tags and specific names for parts, tools, and processes to a library would simply be a more detailed and concentrated addition to these categories. what i'm hoping we could maybe do is add an option to search by ingredients in a similar way to how myfridgefood.com searches for recipies (maybe we could start by adding a similar function to instructables' recipies category?). it's just an idea and i'm not sure how willing the developers of instructables are to allow this community to contribute to the redesign or addition of search options.  aside from searching by ingredients, it would be extra helpful to know if there are other instructable members in our local neighborhood who are willing to collectively use their junk to make a project together! combined inventories could lead to a world of possibilities for creations and networking! maybe one person doesn't have enough junk to make their own forge but a whole neighborhood would be willing to contribute their efforts to make a community forge? i know my dad isn't the only one in our neighborhood with a garage-full of junk, and i think with everyone's junk maybe we could send a project to the moon, or make a super awesome rat-rod, or make a community wind-turbine farm, and get all that legally approved by our local comminity! maybe as a neighborhood we could create something only large companies are currently capable of manufacturing!?!?!? and finally on a side note i think maybe there should be a filter between serious and non serious ("fun") projects. or at least a rating service so that readers can scale how serious they think a project is on a serious to fun scale with fun and serious being in the middle. that way everything stays positive and constructive; no negativity for being too serious or too fun! yeah that last idea is pretty crazy, but maybe we could start with my first small idea of searching by parts/ingredients? let me know your thoughts! thanks!!! (expecting answers along the lines of where to start, whether or not other instructable-type websites exist, i know for a fact this is possible and doable since myfridgefood.com basically has the format set up to do so.) i'm open to (negative) answers that completely tear apart my idea as long as they are educated and provide specific counter-reasons as to why it would not work. i'm fairly certain the first idea is possible, it's just a matter of convincing the developers to get on board and getting everyone to start labeling the parts, tools, and processes in their projects (they are already "tagged" maybe we could start there?)

Question by joombaloomba    |  last reply