What to do: suspected deception/fraud?

I really couldn't find a good spot to ask this question, but I am concerned about a user with possibly deceptive/fraudulent Instructable(s) and hyperlinks to external sites. What's proper protocol for reporting this to the Instructables staff so they can check it out and see if it's a real problem or not?

Topic by computer_freak_8 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Ads with fake "next" buttons

Allowing ads with fake "next" buttons makes for a bad user experience.

Topic by MatthewD9 4 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Uncharted 3 : Drake's Deception

Trailer - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DHHcM6aHPnE Gameplay - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsn4XDGbm60 Release Date - November 1st, 2011 aka 11/1/11 ... Who's getting it.

Topic by Owenmon 8 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


A Deceptive Thermal Question for PCB Layout? Answered

Alas ... I was never strong in thermodynamics. This is for you  Printed  Circuit  Wizards Here is my problem in a White LED  layout,  See first picture Trying to pass excess LED heat to back side copper through VIAs I know the larger the VIA Dia the lower the thermal impedance. Intuitively as the hole grows it will eventually make heat transfer much worse  What or how do I find the OPTIMUM VIA Diameter for Heat TRANSFER ??

Question by iceng 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


A short video on the subject of Asperger's

Just a bit about the syndrome and that appearances may be deceptive Sorry, I had meant for this to publish in the Asperger's group....

Topic by Goodhart 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Contest not for Poles?

Hi I think this is a question for administrators/organisers the Deceptive Desserts Contest but if anyone knows the answer please let me know: Why residents of Poland are excluded from taking part in this contest? I am Pole and I would like take part in the competition, apparently I can't, just don't understand why. Are there some legal regulations? Or maybe I am misunderstanding below?? THE CONTEST IS OPEN ONLY TO NATURAL PERSONS WHO, AT THE TIME OF ENTRY, ARE REGISTERED MEMBERS OF THE SITE, WHO ARE AT LEAST THIRTEEN (13) YEARS OLD (FIFTEEN [15] YEARS OLD FOR RESIDENTS OF NORWAY AND EIGHTEEN [18] YEARS OLD FOR RESIDENTS OF GERMANY), AND NOT RESIDENTS OF ANY COUNTRY SUBJECT TO A US TRADE EMBARGO (AS OF APRIL 2014 NORTH KOREA, SYRIA, SUDAN, CUBA AND IRAN) AS WELL AS: BRAZIL, ITALY, ARGENTINA, TURKEY, ROMANIA, POLAND, OR THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC, CANADA. Thank you in advance, Marta

Question by Ms Moneypenny 3 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


Microsoft Office for Linux

I heard last week that Microsoft will be porting their popular Office suite to Linux this year. As an avid Linux user, and a firm believer in the free software movement, I must say that this has a certain odor to it. Do we honestly think that a company that has used phrases like "a cancer that infects everything it touches," to describe Linux will just start waving the olive branch and cater to the "cancer" as a valued customer? This peace offering calls to mind a certain wooden horse I think we all know. "either the Greeks are hiding, shut inside those beams, or the horse is a battle-engine, geared to breach our walls, spy on our homes, come down on our city, overwhelm us- or some other deception's lurking deep inside it. Trojans, never trust that horse. Whatever it is, I fear the Greeks, especially bearing gifts." One thing is for sure, considering how Microsoft constantly violates the privacy of their customers, rest assured that this horse WILL spy on our homes.

Topic by romanyacik 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


A Non-Stop Patch Contest! (Temporarily closed)

I'm pinching an idea from Fungus Amongus... My second favourite form of poetry is the Haiku - a deceptively simple form, with nice simple rules. Three lines Five syllables in the first, seven in the second, five in the third. Preferably contains a subtle reference to seasons, nature or time. My favourite form of poetry is scifaiku - Haiku with a science-fiction theme. The rules are more flexible, but the aim is still to be minimalist, implying much more than is written down. So, here's the contest - write a Haiku, a scifaiku or even a DIY-ku. It's a non-stop contest - every time one takes my fancy, I will award a specially-designed patch. allons y! Inspirational update: Have a look at the work of Kobayashi Issa - you can even get random examples sent to your email address. UPDATE: I have just awarded my last patch - feel free to keep adding haiku, but I can't award patches at the moment.

Topic by Kiteman 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Hydraulic Shocks - how to get/install/use them...?

I recently obtained a nice massage table for my wife (she does massage, studying to be an aesthetician too)... and it has a very nice feature; beneath the head-end of the table, there is a little lever, when depressed it raises from flat to about 60 degrees; and stops at any point in between as soon as the lever is released. And it stays there, even with most of my weight (250 pounds or so) pushing down against it. As soon as you press the little lever, it can be moved up or down again. I looked it over, and much of the mechanism is hidden, but I can see it relies on a (deceptively small) gas shock or hydraulic shock, like what is used in many car trunks and 3rd/5th door lifts for SUVs and hatchbacks. Though, obviously much stronger than those devices. So my question is, where can I find one of these things, and how does it come to be controlled by a little lever so that it can stop at any given point and bear a load without moving until the level is once again depressed? The main reason for my query is that the massage table is too narrow by far, and I plan on making a bigger one for her, with a few nicer features; but that is one I have no idea how to duplicate at the moment! Thanks!

Topic by karossii 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


A challenge for you tinkerers

Well, I'm planning on picking up a Piranha PMI USP paintball pistol. One of the attractions was the full size internals, making it very mod-able. While surfing, a mysterious offer appeared on ebay, a USP with "custom speed-feed". Anyone who owns a mid/low range paintball pistol is familiar with the pains of reloading in combat.From what I understand, 9 round spring loaded tubes are used as magazines (I believe the seller made them from ten round tubes and a spring); so one can interchange them quickly without pouring in individual rounds. A total godsend. While it's pretty hard to get a grasp on the mechanics without holding the gun; it looks like the gun has just been modded to accept 10 round tubes. It seems deceptively simple.Thus, the challenge is creating the 9 round magazines correctly and finding out how they 'lock into' the marker. Man, I hope my gun doesn't get screwed up by trial and error.Unless someone gets it up and running first, I'll be sure to make an instructable; and credit whoever helps me out.Oh, the pictures the seller provided might prove useful, lol. And heres the manual for the USPhttp://www.paintballsolutions.com/pdf/manuals/PCS/USP_Manual.pdfIts has great detailed info.....about the bolt mechanism. :|

Topic by segundus2 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Help with capacitor basics? (the math part) [ANSWERED. Come here for the proof if you want it!] Answered

I understand the operation for capacitors, which make a lot of intuitive sense to me, and seems deceptively simple. I know that the derivative  of the voltage across a capacitor (the slew rate, if you will) is proportional to the current, for a given capacitance. So when the voltage is not changing much, like when it is connected across power supply rails, and the capacitor has little-to-no current flowing through it, and it appears as a high impedance. Fair enough. And when I am winding up the wick on the constant-voltage power supply, so that the slew rate is constant, and the voltage is changing at a constant rate, the current will be relative to how fast that voltage rising/falling. Again, that makes sense. I have proven that to myself time and time again. The technical math way of showing all that is this:          dV/dT * C = I or with units plugged in: d(volts)/d(seconds) * Farads = Amps (or something like that)   Likewise, I know that I can do things in reverse, and that forcing a controlled current through the capacitor, that the slew rate of the voltage across the capacitor will be proportional to that. In other words; the voltage will be integrated over time (as it steadily rises or falls). I do not like integrals in math (esp. when they require by parts or partial fractions!), but the concepts do come in handy in practical design! This is also my 2nd favorite way of imagining what an integral are! (My favorite is actually the water cup or well analogy, where a water faucet or hose is a function, and a the level of water in the cup, pool, well, etc. is the integrated result. That makes the function of integrals really clear and deceptively easy LOL!) So, I basicly have been trying to figure out how to take these simple, easy-to-understand relationships, and take ohms law, and have a super basic RC circuit, with 5V, 5 ohms, and 0.1F. I have so far figured out how to take ohms law, substitute I in the capacitor formula, and get a function. HOWEVER, this is where I get stuck. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Here is the circuit:            +5V---(V2)-----/\/\/\/\/\/----(V1)-----| |-------0v----(grd) So after having a bit of a think, I have figured out that I really need to account for 2 different V's. The 5V power supply, V2, and the voltage across the capacitor, V2. I know that the current flowing through everything in a series circuit is the same, so then I can easily figure out current by calculating the voltage drop across the resistor which is this:            I = (V2 - V1) / R  So now, lets plug that into the mysterious capacitor derivative thingy: (All I did was substitute the I in the capacitor formula with the that ohms law formula above.)           dV(1)/dT * C = (V(2) - V(1) ) / R. -------------------------------------------------- Now, I just plug in the values, and simplify as much as I can, to make it more friendly to my eyes. C = 0.1F, and R = 5 in my case, since I am using a 5 ohm resistor, 100mF capacitor, and I know V2 = 5V, since that is the output of a 7805 voltage reg.           d(V(1))/dT * 0.1F = (5V - V(1) ) / 5ohms. That dV/dT is a bit hard to look at, so I will use V prime, or V' to represent that instead:          V(1)' * 0.1 = (5 - V(1)) / 5 I do not know how to simplify that further though, to end up with that weird inverse exponential curve that is the time constant thingy, with that decaying charging curve. I have V on one side, and V' on the other side. :( So this is how far I got:        5 + (1/2 * V(1)') = V(1) EDIT: I HAVE ADDED THE PROOF HERE IF YOU WANT IT

Question by -max- 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


South By Southwest (SXSW) 2009 Interactive Review - It's a Party Masquerading as a Conference

It's no secret that SXSW is more about the parties than the conference, but when you have so many smart people who run interesting businesses together, it's a pretty significant lost opportunity that the conference isn't better. Christy and I attended the 2008 SXSW Interactive conference, and decided it wasn't worth coming back. However, Instructables was a finalist in the Web Awards "Classic" category at the 2009 SXSW Interactive conference, which netted us two free passes. So, we attended again this year. This is my review of the interactive portion of the conference.High level - I'm glad we didn't pay. If you go, admit that you're going for entertainment, not to learn something about the interactive industry. The keynotes were excellent -- even if I didn't come away from them with anything actionable to do --, while the rest of the panels and talks were terrible. Having the resources to get to Austin doesn't mean that most conference attendees will have done their homework -- otherwise interesting panels with smart people were nearly always hijacked by stupid questions, and unfortunately it was rare that a moderator would shut down the stupid questions and get back to anything engaging. For example, at How Safe is Your Domain Name? someone actually asked "What does ICANN stand for?" If you're the type of person who reads reviews, and tries to determine if a conference has value for your business, SXSW does not. It's a party masquerading as a conference. If you go, think of it as a vacation, enjoy the evening events and keynotes, and when you learn one or two interesting things by accident, you won't be disappointed. Longer Review:Plan B: Can an Ad Guy Bring Bike Sharing to America?The story of how an advertising agency exec. was able to start up a bicycle sharing venture. Worth checking out just to understand how Crispin Porter+Bogusky works, and to see how they keep their thinking fresh about advertising.Spying 2.0: Can America Compete With Web-Savvy Enemies?Quickly devolved into an I-use-Twitter-so-should-you panel. Yawn. Is Privacy Dead or Just Very Confused?Academics talking about websites they use, and privacy issues they think might apply. A discussion of "experiences"; nobody on the panel is actually doing anything real, nor do they have any insight into major players' privacy policies or how those policies affect users. How did they get a panel?Change v2Lawrence Lessig's non-keynote-scheduled keynote on how money reduces our faith in politics. Excellent. Find a video of this and watch it.Opening Remarks: Tony HsiehTony Hsieh has given this identical talk at other conferences, but the message is so good, it's worth seeing twice. Slides available here.Feed Me: Bite Size Info for a Hungry InternetThis had an interesting set of people on the panel, but it nonetheless turned into a why-Facebook's-new-homepage-sucks-because-it-copied-friendfeed fest. Then, the panelists started openly wondering why they hadn't invited anyone from Twitter to be on the panel.Collaborative Filters: The Evolution of Recommendation EnginesThis was one of the biggest disappointments. Anton Kast of Digg is clearly top notch, and has spent deep hours thinking about recommendations and the math behind them; and, the people making up the rest of the panel were no slouches either. Unfortunately, they spent more than half of the time describing in layman's terms how each of their websites work, and we never got to anything juicy. "On Digg, users rate up a story they find interesting by clicking the Digg button..."! Edupunk: Open Source EducationThe description of this panel really got me pumping: DIY teachers around the world are using open source course management systems, open access textbooks, and other open source tools to buck the chains and limitations of corporate education software. What the panel really turned out to be was a bunch of ineffectual academics having a cat fight over who was more ineffectual. They all tried to outdo one another with stories of how management at their university prevented them from having any impact, and the winner seemed to be the panelist who accomplished the least. Seriously.This was only topped by the first question from the audience, which opened with: "I've learned a new word at this conference, and I'm going to use it here: monetize..." Seriously? I now have a new rule for conferences: Stay away from all education topics. The ratio of people with opinions to people who can/are having impact is way too high. How to Create a Great Company CultureThis is a tough topic, and one in which there's no right answer or overarching theory. The only way to get data is to listen to anecdotes, and this session gave me a few more. Although to be fair, I probably could have spent the same hour reading blogs written by company founders and gotten more out of it. Sunday Keynote: Stephen Baker / Nate Silver InterviewInterviews with really passionate people are always a treat. Nate Silver fits the bill.From Flickr and Beyond: Lessons in Community ManagementI was baffled why Metafilter was invited to be on this panel. In a discussion of privacy policies, the director of operations from Metafilter said "We don't have one. We're not there yet." Despite obviously having the most to contribute, the representative from Youtube didn't share anything; his lawyer must have told him to keep his mouth shut. Overall this was let down.New Think for Old PublishersThis panel was deceptively described, and the audience was annoyed to find a group of publishers simply looking to scribble down suggestions rather than having a conversation about the industry. Fortunately, Clay Shirky was animated enough to heat things back up.Presenting Straight to the BrainRunning a panel on better ways to use slides and graphics where each panelist presents slides might seem a bit hubristic, not they pulled it off. Take home: Use your slides to tell a story.How to Protect Your Brand Without Being a Jerk!This powerhouse panel was interrupted a mere 15 minutes in by a self-described-artist-from-Europe who raised (and shook) his hand for 5 minutes until the moderator eventually gave in. His question: "Do I need to copyright my songs? No really, do I need to copyright each one?" This softball opened a pandora's box of stupid questions from audience members clearly unable to format their questions into that tricky search engine text box. Monday Keynote: Virginia Heffernan / James Powderly InterviewJames Powderly is a friend and deeply fascinating individual. I wish this interview had been longer so they could have gotten deeper into his motivations and experiences. Advertising is Entertaining - Who's Selling Out?I came out of this session thinking it was pretty good. However, on further reflection, since it was more conversation than lecture, and lots of people had the opportunity to speak their mind, I was just happy no one said anything particularly stupid. This should give you a sense of my expectations at this stage at SXSW.New Threats to New Media: Fair Use On TrialThis was an excellent panel, particularly because Jason Schultz ran a very tight ship, kept things moving, and prevented questions from derailing the session. In my opinion, all three videos shown were clear examples of fair use, and I would have appreciated one that was a little closer to the line, but the session overall was still both enjoyable and useful. Building Strong Online CommunitiesWhile too general to have any actionable items, this was still pretty good. It's also fun to hear Drew Curtis's irreverent opinion on community. Tuesday Keynote: Chris Anderson / Guy Kawasaki ConversationThis made me really look forward to Chris Anderson's coming book Free. Guy Kawasaki did a fantastic job moderating, especially with respect to mocking people who ask questions just to insert a pitch for themselves, and limiting meaningless follow-up "questions."Nom Nom Nom: The Secrets of Successful FoodbloggingGet a DSLR, all other rules of successful blogging apply.The parties and evening events were good. I enjoyed Dorkbot Austin and Plutopia, and still think often of the food at The Salt Lick. The Web Awards were surprisingly fun. We were up against some much bigger names, and Flickr won (which in my opinion, was the expected value; I use Flickr at least weekly, if not more). Baratunde Thurston emceed, and he kept it spirited and fast-paced. His interludes were funny, and when no one from Flickr showed up to claim their award, he claimed it for them. "I remember really wanting to share some photos online..." I've been to other conferences where the parties are fun, the talks are engaging, and you come away with a laundry list of actionable items that will make measurable improvements in your business (or life). The SXSW interactive conference has all the ingredients to make that happen, which is why it's so disappointing when it doesn't come together.

Topic by ewilhelm 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago