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dirt bike bogging?

I have this crf150rb and i will let it idle for about ten minutes to warm it up then try to give it a fast throttle wile its in nutrule but it will bog out and sometimes kill the bike but if i rev it slow then i stop reving it it will idle really high like it is still being reved. so me and my dad took out the carboratour and cleaned the jets and the jets were clean so we replaced the lean and ritch screw because we relized the top was broken on it so wee adjusted the leann/rich screw and we put the carb back on and nothing changed so we have no idea what is going on can anybody please help im desperate!!!!!

Question by ElliotL5    |  last reply


Dirt bike handlebars

Hey everyone, i have a 2003 XR100 four stroke Honda dirt bike and I am on a quest to transform it into a beast hair scrambler trail bike. So far I have decided to add bark busters, one of those bendable hinge shifters, a back sprocket with one less tooth (will be 49), a new front sprocket because the teeth are bent, I need to sharpen the foot pegs and brake peg, a new back tire because the one it has now is bald, and shorten the handlebars. The reason i posted this forum is because i am wondering if anyone can tell me what the best way to shorten the handlebars is. I figure i am going to loosen everything, take it off, measure 4 or 5 inches with a permanent marker, then grind it off, but i dont know how to get the grips off. will i need to buy new ones? any way, if anybody can tell me how to shorten the handlebars, i would be very thankful. also, if anyone thinks i need anything else, could you please mention that too? thanks!

Topic by A.C.E.  


w00t NEW DIRT BIKE

I got a new dirt bike 5 days ago (justs posting today). It's awesome. My dad had five when he was like 18 (most two at a time), so he got us one. We got gloves and helmets for both of us too (me and my brother). I'm gonna go ride it some more.Does anyone else have a dirt bike?CLICKY

Topic by Aeshir    |  last reply



Why is my dirt bike Bogging????

I have a panterra 50 cc And it is having an awful bogging problem. why is it doing this? i bought used and this is how it came

Question by Whitedude0728    |  last reply


Can u Turn a Pair of dirt bike wheels into bicycle wheels?

Is it Possible to change a pair of dirt bike wheels from dirtbike to bicycle wheels so as to make it support more weight (lbs.), namely mine.

Question by Gator1070    |  last reply


Why is my dirt bike unable to start?

I have a 2004 yamaha ttr-225. If i let it sit for a week or longer, it wont start unless i put gas in the cylinder. I have fresh gas. do you think it is the carbeurator, or fuel lines? jeesh another yamaha of mine that is being diffucult.

Question by Acepilot42    |  last reply



Wat is the best way to fix / improve a boggy 4 stroke dirt bike my means of cleaning it or buying new parts? Answered

I have a 4 stroke 50 cc panterra dirt bike and the engine bog if you turn the throtle too quickly insteadof slowly twisting it . how can i improve the throtle response by means of cleaning it or buying H.P. parts

Question by Whitedude0728    |  last reply


What kind of clutch can I use on a Home-built motorized bike? Answered

I'm converting an old mountain bike into a motorized dirt bike kind of thing using a small lawnmower engine. I want to know how to make a clutch that is simple and efficient.  Also I'm curious as to what kind of throttle will work on a lawn mower engine?

Question by zilcho    |  last reply


Need some good color combinations

Got some new wheels for my bike that were dirt cheap..Only problem is I need some good colors that will make the bike look amazing. The rims are yellow and the spokes are black. Help me out. Be creative.

Question by lieks2bhugged    |  last reply


Electric bike motor help!

Helli guys.. after a long time racing motocross, I would like to experiment into doing an electric dirt bike for myself.. My plan is to find an 85 or 125cc frame with no engine, and build from that.. the biggest question is, what motor could I use that is no less than 15kw, and on the affordable side? I was looking at the Turnigy Rotomax 150cc eqiv. And it has a max power output at 9000 something watts, would that be any good for a motocross bike? Would it burn out quickly since its pretty small? Notes: i am strictly looking for powerful bikes, a 2kw bike is not for me since I am used to overpowered 250cc two stroke hell-born suicide machines, thanks..

Topic by dsirotic    |  last reply


Small Household Containers to hold gas? Answered

I need a small container to hold extra gas for my dirt bike.

Question by Keltonthebeast    |  last reply


what is the best way i can clean my motorbike at a reasonable price?

I have a yamaha xvs dragstar, this is my first bike and it would be very helpfull if someone could tell me the basics for cleaning my bike. the best way to describe my bike is a crome armchair (just to give you an idea of what kinda cleaning i need to be doing) i have a "buffering/polishing towle" i'v read that hosing the bike down to remove excess dirt is a good idea...am i right in thinking so? am i ok using soapy water or should i fork out and get some foam/gunge/spray? any help is much appreciated thanks

Question by dubpunkdub    |  last reply


Bike conversion ideas for a semi-noob

Having just rescued my nice GT from my parents' place, my old junker bike is now surplus to requirements. (I like to have a "spare" bike, but now I have three bikes it's literally a fifth wheel. And sixth.)I've wanted to build an electric bike or a recumbent for a long time, but despite fiddling with bikes for a while I'm still just a competent novice. A competent novice with very limited tools, in fact. Therefore I'm looking for a project like this uber-simple electric-assist (incomplete) or the no-weld recumbent. If anyone knows of any other projects like these, I'd like to see them.Pictures of the bike to follow- it's a fairly generic short-frame mountain bike, probably intended for dirt jumping as it's got a short geometry, thick downtube and a low seat/short seat tube. The front fork is a "suspension" fork with about 1" of travel and too much preload to be any use on roads, everything else is standard.

Topic by PKM  


how to build halo 3 armor out of paper?

how can i make a helmet from the game halo 3 it looks like a dirt bike helmet with a fiberglass visor and a helmet with a led light

Question by builder28    |  last reply


odd potato tree

While traveling it israel i came across this strange tree and i just began called it a potato tree because it seemed to have green potatoes growing on it. so i have but one question for you all; What the hell is this!?!

Topic by imrobot    |  last reply


how do u make a magneto? or how does it work? and does it send out pules or is it constant? Answered

I'm working on my dirt bike and I am not getting any juice to the plug or anything else and I want to find out as much info as I can

Question by darkmickey    |  last reply


Can you run a 50CC dirtbike motor with the clutch bell open??? Answered

I am trying to fix a dirt bike motor but don't know much about them I want to know if you can run the motor just to test it without putting the springs back on the arms of the clutch bell and without the cover and gearing installed. 

Question by camping crazy    |  last reply


First Motorcycle, budget

Hi. I've recently been hooked on motorcycles. I'd love to get one and start riding and working on one. There are a few problems. First off, I'm only 13 years old, but I'm 5'11" and 160 lbs. I know that it's illegal for me to ride a motorcycle, and I'm not even sure if I can take a mfs course at this age. I wouldn't be riding on any big roads, and would barely even ride it, besides riding it to my best friends house (he'd help me work on it, his dad is into bikes, and he only lives a few miles away), and around a few back roads in my neighborhood. My dad has been riding motorcycles for before I was born, and has multiple types and sizes of bikes (he has a touring Harvey, I believe it's a VRSC, a ninja 600, and a dirt bike which I don't know the model of). He could teach me and show me how to properly ride a motorcycle. Also, I don't know what kind of bike to get. I've heard dual purpose bikes are good for starters, but I really have no idea where to start. I'd appreciate input. Preferably it'd be a bike that I could work on and modify/upgrade as I go along. Thirdly, is price. I don't really know my exact budget, but it'd be around $600-$700. I know it's barely anything, but I'd have to pay for the bike myself, and that's all I have. If it's even possible to purchase a bike at this price point, it doesn't even have to run, I'd love your input. Ideally I'd like to keep everything to the absolute bare minimum, as cheap as possible. My dad already has safety gear, and I could borrow it if I rode my bike.  Again, thanks for your input, and any and all suggestions will be greatly appreciated. 

Topic by IvanT3    |  last reply


Compare the older posts of Magnet generators "instructable-type" to the current posts - Is this way still competitive?

I love you guys - keep it up!  I am the Hippie often referred to, according to my little brother, Dirt. (I'm older than Dirt...) Over a year ago I studied this fellow while recovering from being run down on my bike by a hit and run car doing 65MPH. The thing that keeps coming back to me is that I always see a multitude of ceiling fans for practically free. Also he addresses the over speed topic very well too. HTTP://www.youtube.com/user/muddymuddymuddmann?feature=watch

Question by miscexpert    |  last reply


Comber greenway opening.

Saturday 8th November the Comber greenway will be officially opened in Belfast, which is kind of odd I've been riding it for nearly a year since they paved it and a few years when it was an assortment of dirt tracks and swamps. A Community Carnival cycle to celebrate the opening of the Comber Greenway has been organised on Saturday 8th November starting at 9:30am at Walkway Community Centre, Finvoy Street, East Belfast. Full details of the days activities are available below.Carnival program9.30am - Welcome and Wobble Activities at Walkway.Porridge for Pedal Power!Tree PlantingBicycle Obstacle RaceSlow Bike Race10.30am - Ribbon Cutting Ceremony: The Comber Greenway is Open.Community Carnival Cycle to Comber with Paddy Bloomer artist, inventor, explorer and plumber the most exciting mobile spectacle since Mickey Marley's roundabout!Tullycarnet Tuck Stop12.45pm - Eats at the Enler River (provided)1.15pm - Carnival Cycle Continues2.00pm - Pedal Parade into Comber - Refreshments2.45pm - Homewards for the Holywood Arches to arrive by 4:30pmChildren under 16 must be accompanied by an adult and wear a helmet. Information taken from Sustrans.org.ukMore information on the greenway at Comber greenway.tkI'll have updates on this and more late saturday or sunday, it's a big thing for many cyclists and I here in Northern Ireland since it's been threatened by a high speed bus route, the track used to be a railway and it's a lovely ride, though calmer than my usual...

Topic by killerjackalope  


[newsletter] Flux Capacitor, Bike Blender, Grow a Pineapple...

Sign-up for our newsletter here. June 5, 2008 Welcome back! We launched our Lonely Planet Travel Tips Contest. Share a great travel tip and win some fantastic photo books as well as guidebooks, phrasebooks, and t-shirts! The Discover Green Science Fair for a Better Planet Contest closes for entries this weekend! Submit your Instructable soon to win the Celestron SkyScout. The voting has closed for Park Tool Bike Month. Check back later today to see who won! Check out these cool Instructables! DIY Flux Capacitor Get ready to go back... to the future! 1.21 gigawatts not required. posted by sponges on Jun 3, 2008 How to create a bike blender for less than $25 When the love of biking and the love of smoothies come together it can be a beautiful, and tasty, thing to behold. posted by I_bike on Jun 1, 2008 The Conetenna - a wi-fi antenna The quest for improved wi-fi continues with this massive cone variation of the cantenna. posted by Shadetree Engineer on Jun 1, 2008 How to Grow Pineapples Pineapples are easier to grow than you think. Get a pineapple and some dirt and you're most of the way there! posted by woofboy111 on May 30, 2008 Japanese lamp from recycled materials A cheap but attractive paper "shoji" style lamp that uses mostly recycled parts and is easy to put together. posted by PKM on May 29, 2008 How to make an Iron Man Mask Whether you're stuck in a cave or have some time at home to build, these instructions will help you get that superhero look. posted by msraynsford on May 30, 2008 Repainting an Old Bicycle Want to keep your old frame looking good as times and styles move on? A new paint job is likely in your future. posted by Dr.Paj on Jun 1, 2008 Etching brass plates Adding some brass adds a bit of class to your project. Learn to etch and you can include a sweet custom finishing touch. posted by gotang on May 27, 2008 Win amazing LED POV kits! What have you done for robots lately? Closes for entries this weekend! Handy Bike Mods and Projects This collection of things to do to and with bicycles will provide plenty of ideas for your next two-wheel project. posted by TimAnderson on May 30, 2008 Illuminated Keyboard Hack Turn your ordinary keyboard into an illuminated one for under $5. This is an easy keyboard mod that takes about a half hour to do. posted by Kipkay on May 30, 2008 Bike Generator Attach a generator to the rear wheel and power up both the front and back lights. Never worry about the batteries dying again. posted by dbc1218 on Jun 1, 2008 Zigzag Pop-Up Here's a quick pop-up that only takes a few minutes and has a nice effect. All you need is a printer (preferably color), paper, and something to cut with. posted by fungus amungus on May 30, 2008 Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric

Topic by fungus amungus  


Dirtmobile?

So I got this awesome idea to make a trike with a snowmobile donor. Use the snowmobiles motor and track for the rear "wheel", and a gokart style front end, with 2 wheels, spindles, maybe suspension, etc.  Nothing too big, maybe 400cc or less. 2 stroke of course =D. I am proficient in fabricating, welding, and have a full auto shop worth of tools, so the actual construction shouldn't be a problem. However, I need to know some things about the snowmobile drive train.  Would the track itself work on dirt, light mud, light puddles (2-4 inches deep), and maybe some sand? If not, are there any tracks available for such terrain? Do most snow mobiles have the engine mounted infront of seat, below, or behind? This thing looks wicked cool in my mind.  OH, heres a good way to put it. Like a snowbike (Dirt bike with tracks in back), with two front wheels. Or a honda ATC with tracks flipped rear/front.

Question by LiquidLightning    |  last reply


looking for a component to control my 36v500w motor speed and direction from an arduino

Hello! I am currently trying to build my won electric scooter. i bought this motor http://www.ebay.com/itm/Razor-MX500-Dirt-Rocket-Bike-Electric-Scooter-Motor-36V-500W-MY1020-P-ST20-/141293042627?pt=Motors_ATV_Parts_Accessories&hash;=item20e5b8bbc3&vxp;=mtr and i have a 38v 10A battery which i plan on turning into 20A further more i plan on using a resistor to change the out volt to 36v. i am now looking for a controller that i can connect to an arduino so the arduino can control the speed and direction of the motor. any suggestions?

Question by bfeher1    |  last reply


How to ride DH safely

1. Always wear a helmet, wear body armor as well when needed (how much depends on course, and what you find to be suitable) at all times. 2. Look ahead of you. The faster you are going the further ahead you should look. 3. Stay focused and try not to concentrate or think while you are going at high speed, this tends to slow you down and/or cause accidents...practice alot and everything should come naturally with flow! - Before a run get a song or something that gets you "in the mood" in the back of your mind,and go for it - before you know it you'll be through the track/race no problem...you should all ready know the track turn for turn before doing this. 4. Make sure your tires have appropriate tread on them and are not cracking/damaged 5. Check your bike over in the parking lot before going up the lift. Ride it around and check the brakes and tire pressures. 6. Get enough sleep before riding and especially before racing. 7. Don't drink or get high before racing or riding (you can do it, and seen it done, but if you want to win or want to be safe...don't) 8. Stay relaxed and dialed in on the bike, be as relaxed as possible mentally before you start a race but be pumped physically at the same time. 9. Know the track as well as you can before racing it (the later steps will go into greater detail on how to do this). 10.Learn to 'pump through the ruff stuff'-pull up on the face and push down on the back side of bumps/rocks/landing trannys, etc... 11. Stay light on the back brake as much as you can and try to lock it as rarely as possible if at all...it may cause you to wash out. Only lock the brake on extremely sharp turns or to get into a turn if a cuttie won't be efficient enuff. 12. Try to go as fast as you can when you can-->PEDAL PEDAL PEDAL like a bat out of hell in the open or out of turns when/where ever you can. 13. Practice "cutties". 14. Buy the "Fundamentals" DVD available here on pinkbike.com or at most bike shops and study it...take notes if you have to. You will find how to do "cutties" on the DVD as well as many many more "fundamentals" for DH riding-----> BUY IT, you will be glad you did. 15.Off camber: make sure you weight your outside foot and stand the bike on the egde of the tire, that way it will stick 16. Rock gardens: the faster the better- you will bobble across the top and be on you way before you know it, rather than getting packed down and ending up with major arm pump. 17. Braking: only ever do real braking in straight lines, you can brake on corners but do it conservatively and only to slide around sharp turns better as it may cause you to wash out as mentioned above. The less you brake the faster you go and fast riding is a winning formula- think about that. 18. >>>Don't Crash It can have you out for the rest of the season and that can prevent you from winning races----obviously. Just dont ride like an idiot and attempt things that will probably end in you getting hurt. Ride within your limits! 19. (Words of Pro Down hiller Steve Peat from the "fundamentals" DVD mentioned above) "Stay as light as you can on the bike and pump through the back side of rocks or rough sections as a skateboarder pumps a vert ramp" to gain or maintain speed and momentum. 20. Trust your tires throughout the course. If you believe and have faith in your tires grip, chances are they will have grip fine. If you don't trust your tires and BELEIVE that they wont grip and you will probably fall, chances are they won't grip and as a result you will indeed fall. 21. Walk the track and look for new lines or which lines are best to take and are the fastest 22. Tuck when ever possible to conserve energy. Pedal hard in the open spots before the ruff stuff then tuck and pump and repeat. 23. True your wheels to increase your speed and pedalling efficiency 24. Don't use big fat mud bog tiresfor DH(i.e. 2.6"-3.0") EVER...unless your DH course happens to be a downhill mud swamp 25. Learn to brake with out losing traction , this helps in straight line braking before turns. 26.Push yourself in the warmups, (not stupidly) and give 95% of what your maximum was when you were pushing yourself, in the actual race. This way you wont fall, but you are still hauling a$$. 27.Practice shift points, it is very important to be in the right gear at the right time or youll be sucking wind trying to pedal a flat stretch in too high of a gear. On a fast stretch where you need to begin pedaling to maintain that speed, youll be spinning out. Know what gear to start in and what gear you need to be in at every point in the track. 28. If all else fails look fast across the finish line where everyones watching. 29.When learning, set your fork/and or shock harder than you would normally, this will teach you to use to body rather than relying upon the bike. 30. Try to pick memory markers for your self; tree stump, odd looking rock, etc... and break the course down in your head so you can become very quick overall. 31. Practice simple skills such as manuals (good for roots), Hops, roots/rocks) and of course cutties 32. Commit to berms, brake on a berm and it will end it tears, aim to "rail the berm" to do this - hit the berm at a speed that isnt too fast (this will cause you to slip up it) and not to slow (you will slip down and is slower duh) The ideal speed should carry you round as g forces will push you into the berm. 34.Take a couple of the "Learn to race" clinics offered before many of the sanctioned races. 35.Play with your set up, everything from seat angle, to brake postioning- it can all make a big difference. The more comfortable you are on the bike the faster youll go, the steepness can be different for each course(for instance) so tweak it a little each time but dont EVER change your entire setup before a race. 36.When walking the course, look back up at it. You will find new lines looking up rather then down. 37. While riding (including in the air) never squeeze the seat with your knees. This makes it impossible to flow smoothly, and makes you a ridged weight to be tossed around at the mercy of the trail. It may feel safer, but it will cause you to wreck and lose speed when you would not otherwise. In the air also, it you pinch your seat then you can not compress the lip and extend for landing. Also you can not whip and prepare for upcoming turns and bumps. The ONLY time that pinching your seat would be appropriate is when doing a suicide no hander which, if you can do it without loosing speed, is a cool way to entertain the crowd. 38.Learn to crash,it is an important skill to have that will save you alot of trouble in the long run. 39. Work your way up to the big stuff. Even if you are a good rider always warm up on an easier trail then go for the harder stuff you set out to conquer. Same for riding in general- dont go tackle the hardest trail on the mountain without first being able to do the easy ones---this may sound somewhat obvious but alot of people just cant get this bit of logic into their skulls without being told directly. 40. If the drop doesn't have a great tranny, hit it with more speed. this will cause you to have increased foreward momentum and less downward ( static ) momentum and make the landing smoother. let your bike go off the drop first. 41. If you are in the air ( off a jump drop or whatever... ) and your back end starts to dip too much, tap your back brake, this will cause the front end to dip forward. ( this is used all the time in Motocross) WARNING: Use this with caution and only when its a neccesity. 42. XC riding will make you faster. I always love watching the out of shape downhillers crossing the finish line and nearly having a hear attack. The more tired you are the more mistakes you make and the more likely you are to get hurt. Pedal! Then pedal more! 43. Train like a mofo. During my DH racing times I would spend the summer mornings doing 5-8 runs on local dh trails then dirt jumping and XC riding in the afternoon= Legs that were strong/fast as hell. Dont forget to train in the off season too. 44. Develop a training schedule not just for biking and racing but to keep in shape in general. The more you ride the better you will be. Like Ito was saying, do as much of each mountain biking discipline as possible with emphasis on Down hill. Cedric Gracia wins because he is a great all around rider as is Minaar. 45.Commit to the front end of your bike in corners. Watch Sam Hill, no-one does it better. NOTE: BEFORE DOING THIS, make sure you have practiced it and know how to do this technique at speed (Note is courtesy of Iceboy) 46. Don't pedal like a mad man out of the gate. Pedal, but let your bike gather speed and focus on keeping it. Racing comes down to one thing - exit speed , in particular your speed out of corners. Wait until you feel the flow before you start pushing it harder. If you pedal too hard from the start you'll flip in 60 seconds and get back on your bike a go harder to make up the time. Then you'll flip again. Speaking from experience on this one! It's all about being 'zen'. At least that's what all the dudes who keep beating me are telling me. Learn how to go as fast as you can through turns and sections to know your limits. 47. Make your riding FEEL slow when you are going fast! If you feel fast it's because the trail is catching up with you too quickly for you to process all the info in a comfortable time frame. Probably because you are too busy worrying about going fast and not feeling the flow. Look out, you are about to flip. It's that zen thing you're missing. 48. Practice having FLOW in all your riding, down hill (speed as well as flow), Dirt jumps (flow), XC(speed and flow), what ever (FLOW)... 49.Dont be intimidated by other riders, stay focused on what you have to do not what they are doing, if they crash pay atention to why, and try not to make the same mistake. 50. Learn to go over jumps at as high a speed as possible with out overshooting or losing speed by going too high. Jumps and learning to land them without thinking is a VERY beneficial skill to have... (if you want to stay low coming of jumps learn to soak up the lip...you will go just as far but you'll stay lower) 51. When doing a j-hop, bunny hop or going up the face of a jump don't forget to push into the ground and then come up to get more air. 53. The rougher the place you are riding the more ralaxed and flowy you should be trying to go . 54. Spend time at the track and just watch other riders(especially how they are going through the tricky sections that you are having trouble with), see what they are doing wrong and try to not make the same mistakes, also watch for where the speed spots of the section are. 55.Read Brian Lopes's & Lee McCormick's book " Mastering Mountain Biking Skills", this book covers everything you need to know in great detail from top to bottom, it is with out a doubt the most comprehensive guide for how to ride/race mountain bikes and how to handle and practice everything involved in riding. I HIGHLY RECCOMEND IT, and would say that it is the BIBLE for Mountain Biking! 56.Look where you want to go not at what you are trying to avoid. if you stare at the tree you are trying to go around instead of the trail around it you will more often than not hit the tree. 57. As mentioned previously-The faster you are going the further ahead you should look, always look at what lies further ahead when riding downhill AND avoid staring at your front wheel--staring at your front wheel will slow you down drastically and often will lead to crashing. 58.To re-inerate what Harding.Thomas was saying; do not focus on obstacles like stumps logs and rocks, because thats were you will go instead of where you want to go. In essence, keep an eye on where you want to go and you will go there. Do not look down at what your riding over, let your bike deal with the terrain, thats what its for. This is a very important tip to increasing speed and improving flow. 59. Before you go riding, I find that a simple 10 minute warm up on flat land and practicing tight turns and j-hops helps loosen you up and calms you down If you have any other tips, tell me! ill post them in the list.

Topic by struckbyanarrow  


Summer, sun and what to do with faded plastics

A lot of us have machine, bikes or such with plastic parts.And if you are in a country where a UV rating of 10 is a nice spring day already plastics seem to fade away and fail quicker.Over the years I experimented with a lot of things to either prevent this or to fix it.If you ever had your old farm basher parked next to the same but sun protect model you almost start crying LOLColors look like you painted a white haze over it, white plastics turn yelloish and clear plastic, like on the head lamps of your car go dull and yellow.You might know what I mean if have really nice and long summers...So what is the reason for this problem that only seems to affect things in hot and sunny countries?A lot of plastics are actually fully UV resistant and they won't be harmed or changed.Great but they still suffer! ?Not really, it is the softeners, fillers and pigments that suffer most.In the case of clear plastics it is usually polycarbonate mixes and the culprit is the scratch resistant coating applied on it.The hard UV rays promote the oxidisation and break down.So whatever is not resistant to UV will suffer in and mostly on the outside of the plastic.Problem is that UV penetrates quite deep and as a result we often find that UV protecting agents are added.Sometimes as a coating, sometimes as a mix throughout.Older cars often show peeling paint onthe roof or boot lid - the UV protecting in the coating has failed or was just bad.Back in the old days there was whiteners in washing powder, we had white sheets for the beds and other things and leaving them in the sun to dry actually made them whiter and kept them looking fresh - a positive use for UV bleeching ;)In terms of real prevention options are almsot fully limited to keeping the xposure as low and short as possible.There is no clear coating you can apply to keep the UV out that won't affect the looks of the paint job or plastic.And not all of these coating work on all plastics.One option though is to keep the plastic clean and shiny.A highly reflective surface will not scatter the sunlight as much throughout the plastic.Oxidisation is limited as well, especially if you add some polish every now and then.In a lot of cases though this is either no option or way too time consuming for us to keep it up.As a result we start to neglect the routing here and there andover they years the plastic ages faster than what it should.How to fix or restored faded plastic without paying an arm and a leg for specialised products?White is always nice and if you have a washing machine or fridge close enough to a window you might have noticed over the years that the plastic parts now appear a bit darker or slightly yellow, often just on one side of the thing...Old electronics, like Gameboys are doing this too.Red is my other favourite as like black it produces a white haze easy.Either way the solution is pretty much the same: reduce the oxidisation by oxidising it more ;)Whatever is really oxidised in a bad way changed the color instead of just breaking dow the pigments.UV does this...On the other hand hydrogen peroxide bleeches and breaks down stains....As long as parts are small enough it is quite easy to put them in a zip lock bag to submerge them for a few hours or over night in hydrogen peroxide.Otherwise use a suitable container and keep turning and moving the parts around every hour or so until all looks even again.In severe cases and if the plastic permits it you can also add a small amount of diluted hydrochloric acid.Talking diluted! So that means of a low concentration!In most cases though a day or two with just hydrogen peroxide will suffice.Do a little test first though as some plastics might just be caoted and either show no reaction at all or the coating has pigment that break down in the peroxide - I never had this happen to me but I have read reports of it and seen the pics of the results.When it comes to really big parts, like the spoiler on your car or plastic covers on your bike and boat it can be impossible to submerge them even partially.In most cases people try to fix these by polishing them until the faded areas are litterally removed.A much nicer and easier way to cheat is to use a simple car polish that is suitable for plastic parts.Means it should have no warning on it to keep away for plastic parts ;)Wearing proper gloves you can add some hydrogen peroxide to a small amount of the polish.And I mean polish, not the stuff to fix a dull or bad paint - what you would use on a new car...The trick is that the polishing cleans the surface while the peroxide works on the staining and fading.You just don't let the stuff dry after applying it and polish the dry stufff of, you keep going wet until your color comes back ;)After that give it a final polish the normal way with just the polishing compound and no peroxide.Clear plastic...If it is just yor headlamps or other smaller parts for a once off it might make sense to go to a auto shop and buy a head lamp polishing kit.Thing with clear plastics is that only too often they come in shapes or installations that make a full access impossible.Like your head lamps that you can only reach from the front as they are glued into the assembly.Another problem is that they are aslo almost always coated with some protective stuff.If hydrogen peroxide alone does not help here then polishing will always remove some of this coating or even all of it.If the coating happens to be the culprit of the fading and yellowing then you of course get it all nice and shiny by just polishing the coating off - but you also loose all benefits of the coating.Some car models have headlamps where just the coating discolors and once removed the plastic start to crack under the exposure from UV and through all the tiny damages it get when driving around.For things like clear covers over a little display there is the problem as access as you might not be able to remove the window pane, a replacement might be the best option.Hey! Why all the fuzz? I use just oil and it works perfectly!!You can find online videos and full tutorials where people show you that just a bit of some oil and polishing it off with a lint free cloth brings all you faded colors back out again.Don't be fooled just because it works so great!Take a frosted piece of glass and put some oil on it and it becomes clear enough to see through again.Even works with very thin paper...What the oil really deos is to coat all these microscopic imperfections.And with the light now having a very easy way to get through it won't scatter anymore and the fading appears to be gone.Once the oil is gone the plastic looks as bad as before, hence the need to use an oil that dries off.Worst thing is that these oil affect the softeners in the plastic.In some cases this might be benefitial in most it is really bad though.Like any other solvent the oil mixes with these softeners and over time they are removed from the plastic, the more you use oil to keep it shine the more brittle you plastic might get.Once you did that it is next to impossible to remove the oil from within the damaged plastic and only way out i to polish it off after sanding it.The benefit of seemingly protecting the plastic from dirt and water is short lived as well.Some old oil you got on it would just wipe off but with the added oil in the plastic it can now penetrate.And that little black dot becomes hard to get rid of...Last words of wisdom:Check the type of plastic before you decide on anything!Especially when it comes to the black plastic with fibre re-inforcements.Do a tiny spot test in an area that is not so important before going full scale!Trust me, nothing is worse than only realising too late you selecting of choice is actually removing the pigments from the plastic - hint: if your cloth tunrs into the same color as your plastic then something is wrong.Use PPE! Gloves and face shield or at least goggle are a must have when working with hydrogen peroxide or acids.Even at just 3% the peroxide will bleech your skin quickly and long exposure won't be better either.Once you got a drop of peroxide in your eye you will never forget the googles, so just wear them right away please ;)If the fading is due to the breakdown of pigments that give the color like a white haze on red or blue plastic you might still have to polish off that thinnest layer on the surface to remove the fully bleached out layer.This however is really quickly done and after that the smooth surface will last much longer.Work clean!! It is of no use to start before you actually fully cleaned the plastic!

Topic by Downunder35m  


Looking for a cheap compressor with a high pressure rating or for airbrush use?

Today a friend of mine asked me if I know a way to reduce the noise level of his compressor in the work shed. With the current heat he prefers to work in the evening and nights, which does not make his neighbours too happy. His main use for several airbrush guns and sometimes for mormal airtools or the big spray gun for an undercoat or similar. So his main concern is oil in the airline and the actual flow rate is of second concern as he has an old 25kg propane cyclinder as an additional air tank. For relative low air volumes I would suggest an old fridge compressor. With a thicker pipe at the outlet that is filled with stainless steel wool most of the oil stays in the compressor. That is if this pipe is a) long enough b) upright c) of sufficient diameter so there is enough for the oil to avoid it being pushed up A second, standard oil seperator will be enough for the oil level required for airbrush stuff - and most other things too. If there is no pressure regulator on the airbrush system it is best to add a small air tank and shut off valve for it. In our case however a fridge compressor would be just enough to keep the bigger airbrush gun running but not to fill the tank at the same time. Not to mention the problem of fluctuating pressure levels. Since we already had a tank and pressure shut off connected to the loud compressor it was only a matter of finding something that keeps the neighbours happy. The first thing we did was to check how often the compressor comes on and how long it runs till the tank is back to pressure. With that and the stated air volume on the compressor we guesstimated that something a bit bigger than the compressor of a window airconditioner should be sufficient. The search begins.... If you don't know what to look for I give you a few hints: Older airconditioners often run on R22 or R12 - both use quite high system pressures which is a bonus, but more on that later. As a rule of thumb for these compressors you cans say: the bigger the higher the flow rate. At the local wreckers and scrap yards we found a few units but noticed the bigger ones often used three phases and not just one :( So we opted for the R22 compressor of a 4.5kW unit. Keep in mind the 4.5kW is for the entire system, so the quite massive fans can be removed from the sum. Usually the compressor alone is the 2.5 - 3kW range. Ok, we found the big thing but how does this help us? First things first ;) The oil was removed as the housing stating the original oil amount. This allowed us to use an oil rated for air use that has little to no water absorption qualities - you don't want water in your compressor. With the usual heat the water should be no problem anyway. Next was a pressure test to make sure the thing actually still works, so we added some plumping in the form of standard connectors to the inlet and outlet. We got well above 200PSI and abondoned the test at this stage as it was more than enough already. The air volume seemd to be well more than expected too so let'S move to the next stage. A fridge or aircon compressor always needs to have a certain amount of oil in it as it will otherwise seize and overheat quickly. But they are also designed so that the oil mixes with the refrigerant to cool all moving parts. So the biggest hurdle is to make sure the oil stays where it should stay and won't enter or get lost in the tank. Only real option for this to use something to catch the oil that is capable of releasing it into the compressor once it shuts off. Now there are several options for this so I start with the most basic: A "catch can" will get most of the oil, especially if filled with stainless steel wool or similar. Downside is that you have to find a way to get it back into the compressor. A step better is a thicker pipe filled with stainless steel wool to catch the oil. If placed upright and the outgoing pipe can be bend a bit upwards you have a good chance that most of the oil will sweep through the valves and get back down into the compressor housing. But only too often the cheap or even free compressor is better than expected and the oil won't get back into the housing as the vlaves are just too good. The last and IMHO best option is a pressurised return system. Most compressors for bigger aircons have a seperate filling port or sealed off piece of pipe. In this case you can do a simple check to see if they are usable for our purposes. Open the port of pipe and use a simple bike bump or similar to get some pressure in it. With a dedicated oil filling port you are best off but they are hard to find. The air you pump in should come out of the high pressure side - you might need a little pressure to overcome the valves. If you hear any bubbling in the housing (use a pipe on your ear or a sensitive microphone) it means you are going through the oil inside the compressor - perfect! You might not hear any bubbling but the port or pipe is still usable. Get ready with your fingers and start the compressor. The fill pipe should be sucking air in, same for the service port if there is one. A dedicated oil port should not suck but instead force some oil up if you cover the high pressure outlet. I assume all is good and no oil is splashing out of the open pipe or port. Add a small amount of oil with a syringe or similar into the port/pipe. If you see an oil mist coming out of the high side it is bad news. Clean outlet air is good. To get the oil back from the catch pipe or can we have to add a hose or pipe with a needle valve. It needs to be adjusted so that there is only a very little airflow (or oil mist) coming out. This regulated outlet is now being connect to the port/pipe with a bit of suction that we found earlier. Now every time the compressor runs the collected oil is forced back into the compressor :) Please double check the port/pipe used is not directly connected to the intake port! The last thing you want is a puddle of oil going into the cylinder and damaging it! They are designed to move gas but not liquid! If in doubt use a hardened sttel nail or similar to create a small puncture in the top of the compressor housing if there is nothing else to use. Check first if the material sound very thick, if so it might help to drill with a 5 or 6mm drill first - only about 1mm to make sure you won't enter the housing and conimate it with metal shavings! Once you have a small puncture hole of about 2mm in diameter get some 2 component metal repair glue mix and add a suitable connection for the collecting pipe/can. If you feel up to it you can of course use a blow torch and solder the connection on. Now we have the compressor working with a oil return system that also gives up very little to no oil at all in our system. You might now think you are good to go but you should at least add a decent and fine filter to the air inlet ;) The compressor noise of a bigger system can still be an issue if thicker pipes are used that allow the noise to travel out. Keep in mind they usually run in a fully closed system.... As we only need to match the noise level of the compressor itself a solid steel can like an old fire extinguisher in the 1kg rage is a good way out. Fill it with filter wool and a fine filter pad after adding some hose connectors either end. You can misuse the trigger nozzle and keep it to seal the top if you braze a connector on it. If the intake here is about 5 times larger than the pipe connection to the compressor itself the air flow going into the thing is low enough for a cheap paper air filter can or box if you have a quite dusty enviroment to work with. The real trick is to have a hose or pipe on the inside of the fire extinguisher connected to the compressor pipe connection. A garden hose is great here as is reduces the noise quite good and is dirt cheap. Make a lot of about 2mm sized holes in this pipe and close the other end of it off. Now the compressor will suck it through the small holes and the soft garden hose reduces the noise, the surrounding padding brings it down to basically nothing. The special case of clean air for airbrush.... If you read this for the sole purpose of airbrush use then this chapter is just for you, all other might want to skip it. The two things you don't want to enter your gun is oil or water. Both are a common thing in normal compressors due to lubrication and pressure difference resulting in condensation of the humidity in the intake air. Oil free compressors of good quality can cost quite a few bucks and often require ongoing replacement of membranes or piston seals. A refrigeration compressor with the above modifications already provides clean enough air for most airbrush users if a proper tank is used to store enough of the compressed air. So you might just want to add a basic oil filter or very fine paper filter close to the regulator. For very detailed work with very sensitive paints you might want to build a filter box containing of several layers of oil absorbent paper. This stuff is often used in the industry to clean up minor oil spills and bind oil very well. A PVC pipe (pressure rated please) with 5-8 layers of filter screens should last about a lifetime before the filters need changing if the diameter is in the 10-15cm range. That leaves us with the dreaded problem of condensation and water contamination. Depending on the type of paint and gun used a small amount of water vapour is usually no problem. Solvent based paints usally show their disliking by unwanted drops or run offs caused by water droplets. Of course you just go and buy a professional dehumidifier and accept the ongoing replacement costs for the cartridges... But if you are in a climated that has above 30% humidity for most of the year than you will have to remove the water one way or the other. A big enough storage tank for the air that is upright usually helps to release any condensated water prior to usage. But if you use a homemade tank you might want to avoid this problem completely and forget about water in the system altogehter. Silaca gel is the answer here, specifically the indicating variety that changes color once "full". A spaghetti glas or similar should be big enough unless you are in a very humid climate - is so just use multiple in a row. The air intake side for the compressor has to go through the silica gel to be effictive. This mean we need two holes in the lid. One with a pipe or hose going all the way to the botom - that is the air intake side. The other right on the lid - this is the air outlet side which continues to the compressor intake. With the color change in the silica gel we can estimate how much usage we have left until we have to heat it up to remove the water. If this color change happens quite fast from the bottom to the top, let's say within three days or less than you really need to use more jars with silica gel in a row or a longer one - like using a long and clear acrylic pipe instead. Of course you can always just cut holes and "viewing glasses" along the length to a PVC pipe.... No matter how wet your climate is you want to get at least 100 hours of compressor run time before you need to recharge the silica gel. This brings us to the recharging.... Once the color changes and you only have about one quarter left to the top you want to get the water out of the gel and re-use it. To do this you simply heat it up in your oven to around 120-150°C - the supplier should state the max temp for this. If you use a gas oven or one with limited accuracy here it is best to stay within the 120° range. You need to stir and mix the gel or use something big enough like an oven tray. But be aware that these little balls are like glass! The roll and bounce like no tomorrow! IMHO it best to use an old cooking pot that has no plastic handles for this and not to overfill it. This allows for easy mixing without making a mess that might cause a bad trpping hazard on your kitchen floor tiles! Once the gel is back to original colr it is time to let it cool of to a safe temperature and to fill it back into our canister or pipe. Tanks and shut off systems.... We have a refrigeration compressor working for us, and since it was for R22 we can use much higher pressures as a simple compressor from the hardware store. The low pressure side is used to 70PSI or around 5Bar of pressure in normal working conditions. The high side often works at pressure in the range of 200-300PSI or 14-20Bar! The tank we used is a big propane tank that was restamped at some stage in his life for the use of LPG - so it was tested to quite high pressures. The lower pressure limit is what keeps the stored gas liquid at the given temperature. For Propane at an imaginary 30°C this would around 155PSI or 10Bar. The stamped test pressure, although outdated, showed 600PSI or around 40Bar of pressure with no problems - and the thing was thick in the walls... The old shut off switch from an old air compressor was adjustable after removing the safety cap with a bit of force and the help of few cold beer. With a little tank attached we adjusted it to turn the compressor off at 250PSI or around 17Bar of pressure. If your tank is old or has no test pressure stamped on do your own test in a safe location. Make sure the area is secured so there is no chance of debris from a brusting tank can go anywhere - this includes to chain down the tank itself ;) Use the aircon compressor to fill it up to 300PSI or 20Bar of pressure - this should be tolerated with ease by any propane or LPG tank. Shut the valves and let it rest for a day or so. It is best to do this in the early morning so the heat from the day will slightly increase the pressure. At the end you still want to have a working tank and no major pressure losses. All of our mods on this tank were done without actually harming the tank. This was possible as the original valve had a release port for filling purposes - as it standard on most refillable ones. Here we removed the valve and added a pressure guage instead - better to know what is happening than to assume things. As this "port" had a seperate connection to the bottom of the brass valve we added as T-connection to allow for the connection to the compressor. Just be be really sure a thin piece of copper tubing was brazed to the exit hole of this port so all incoming air will be going down and away from the outlet connection with the big shut off valve on top - which we use to actually isolate and close the tank when not it use. Last thing required was something to connect the pressure shut off switch and regulator to. That was the only major expense on this project as we had no old BBQ hose or similar to get a suitable connector to the tank. We bought a simple adapter for the use of smaller hoses and cut the unwanted bits off we there was only the bottle conntector with the nut left. After removing the rubber ring we brazed piece of copper pipe onto it. Here we drilled holes and fitted severy connectors. First for the pressure switch, then for the connection to the pressure regulator and two standard ones with a ball valve for air hose connections. One air hose connection female, the other male so a standard compressor can be connected as well or "backfilled" for additional and mobile storage use. As we wanted to avoid any reduction in the safety and burst pressure no release valve was added at the bottom on the tank. The added silica gel filter stage was used instead so no water will get into the system to begin with. Additionally, and painfully for me and me friend, the inside of the tank was coated with a layer of acrylic paint to prevent and rust as it was free from it when we checked it at the beginning. This involved filling a suitable amount of paint into it, closing the top while keeping the thread clean and then to move the tank around to cover the inside evenly. If you do this be prepared for some weird movements with your friends LOL Once we were sure all ust be covered by paint at least three times we released the exxess paint and allowed the inside to dry with the assistance of some air forced to go in with a length of pipe. This was repeated 3 times... Then another two just for the bottom third of it where there might be some moisture after all... Now you don't want to remove the brass valve with everything connected to it just to turn the tank over to releae the collected water. Instead we made sure the added pipe on the former relese port would go all the way to the bottom of the tank. If any water collection is suspected only the connection to the compressor needs an additional valve for the disconnection so the water will be force back out here. To make this easy and fast we used standard quick connectors and a piece of flexible airhose rated to 20bar of pressure for the connection to the compressor. We checked the performance of the moisture removal and oil removal only for a few hours of running time while priming some surface for later use. The compressor oil used was very smelly to say it nice but nothing coul be smelled in the first paper filter after the pressure regulator. To check for remaining moisture levels (65% humidity in the house) we used a 10m length of clear PVC tubing going through an ice bath. After 30 minutes of moderate air release there was no condensation on the inside of the tubing visible. Of course if you only need it for air supply and don't care about a bit of moisture and oil you can keep it simple ;) Benefits of doing such a stupid thing: For starters noise and the peace of mind that you can do a lot of airbrushing until the compressor needs to kick in again. Then of course the benefit of an almost silent system compared to a standard compressor - something you can actually tolerate while doing art. But the real deal is knowing YOU did it and you did it for cheap. Warnings and some advise... I know, it should be at the very beginning but I just hope you read till the end ;) If the compressor fails from overheating you are up for a new one. This means the tan size should be within the limits of what the compressor can handle - same for what you actually use on air. You want an empty tank to be filled before the compressor feels hot to touch - quite warm is fine but if you can't leave your hand on it then it is too hot. Same story for the usage. There is no point in using a tiny 10 liter storage tank if you need that capacity every few minutes. The compressor would only have little pauses and overheat quickly. You want a good balance of usage time before the tank goes below supply pressure and running time of the compressor to get it to full pressure again. This brings us to the safety of high pressures. Where possible only copper tubing or sufficiently rate hoses should be used, the later as short as possible to avoid them acting like a whip if something goes wrong. When it comes to the safety of the tank you want to make sure to stay withing it's rated limits. All benefits of a compressor capable of producing over 500PSI otr close to 35Bar is wasted if your tank and pressure regulator can't handle it. This must not mean that you try to use a gas cylinder of unknow age and pressure rating and assume it will work! If in doubt use a lower shut off pressure and stay within the limits of normal air compressors - which is around 120PSI or 8Bar. Never, ever use a tank that is compromised by inside rust or bad corrosion on the outside! If you don't know how to braze copper tubing, pipes and connectors then check out some of the great Instructables about it! Whenever you know you won't use any compressed air for more than a few hours close all valves especially the ones going back to the compressor on the high pressure side! Some compressors really don't like a huge pressure difference constantly pushing on the reed valves. If your tank is big enough to allow for more than one hour of operation before the compressor has to top it up you might want to consider a one way valve right on the compressor outlet. This will prevent any massive pressures going onto the valves - especially helpful for modern compressors that only rely on the sealing capabilities of the clyinders or rotary system used. One thing you should always consider is a pressure relief valve rated for about 50PSI more than your tank pressure - it can be added to the pipe ;) If the shut off valve ever fails the relief valve gives you the ease of mind that it will blow before your tank does. Maintenance... If modded correctly the compressor should stay in the compressor and the compressor itself should not overheat from use. Having said that your compressor might force out a little more than your best catch system can handle. If that becomes a problem it might help to use an oil with a lower viscosity. If all fails it just means you need to top up oil once the last last paper filter is filthy or use slightly more to begin with so the intervals are longer. The silica gel, if used should be recharged before all of it is wasted - no point in adding it if you use it once full of water. If no gel is used there will be water in the storage tank. Even with the added paint and a good air filter it is possible that nasty things grow in there. Making sure the tank is emptied of any water after long uses and again before the next use is good practise. If no pressure gauge is used on the tank you must make sure the shut off valve is always working fine and within set parameters. I strongly recommend using a gauge and if not to perform a pressure check of the system every now and then to confirm all is within parameters of normal operation. A compressor constantly running means you either use far too much air or you have a leak - same story if the compressos kicks in after some of forgetting to shut it off and close the valves. If you keep the above in mind the salvaged compressor should work just fine for many years to come. Troubleshooting and alternatives.... You put everything together the right way, double checked and something is till not right? Maybe my crystal ball helps me to find something... 1. Always oil coming through the catch system. It usually means you use too much of it. A salvaged compressor, if the refrigent was removed legally from the system should still have a "correct" level of oil inside. Too much oil would mean is being pumped through the system at an excessive rate. Very thin compressor oils tend to do that in the compressor is misude like we do. Changing to standard mineral oil can help here. As a last resort you can use a pressure gauge or good judgement to allow more flow through the needle valve from the catch system back to the compressor. Too much backflow here would mean we loose system pressure to the set level of this needle valve! 2. The R22 rated compressor seems to be unable to produce enough pressure. First do a leak test using soapy water to rule out any leaks. Do a back pressure test on the ports. If you can push air through them in the reverse way with ease it means the valves are damaged making the compressor useless. You need to replace it. A regular cause with our type of usage is a constand back pressure from the storage tank to the compressor. To prevent this it might help to mount an electric solenoid between the compressor and storage tank. Such valve should be off when the pressure switch is engaged and on when the pressure switch is disengaged. This prevents the coil from overheating but requires a "normally off" type of valve. A good source at the wreckers are cars with LPG systems installed, they usually have suitable 12V valves somewhere on or near the tank and filler cap. 3. I am using several kg of silica gel but still get a lot of water in my storage tank. Going overboard in a humid climate can be a good thing here but if moisture makes it into the tank even with great amounts of silica gel there are only two causes: a) the tube or cylinder used is not long enough or not wide enough to allow the absorption of all the moisture going through. b) the flow rate is too high and the temperatures are too. For the first the solution is obvious enough. The second is related to the first for the diameter and lenght but temperatures constantly above the 30°C while operating somehow limits what the gel can do. Using a cooling coil on the intake side or simply putting the gel containers in icy water will help to a great deal here. If that is not an option than I suggest to layer the gel and to seperate it with fine paper filter screens. This will slow and even out the airflow allowing for more contact time with the gel. 4. The compressor gets very noisy after some time. If "some time" means more than 30-45 minutes you simply have it running too much and it overheats. If the noise increases too much when reaching the shut off pressure it can mean the pressure is too high for it. 5. Can I use multiple compressors from smaller units or refrigerators to get enough air volume? Of course you can but it might mean you have to lower your pressure expectations. Consider that each individual compressor would get the back pressure from all other compressors running while it's outlet valve is closed. To avoid premature failure you want to make sure the compressors are shut off at a lowver pressure. 6. I don't want to use a big tank but require a good airflow for airbrush. Two or three fridge compressors working one after the other with a small tank to keep the output pressure even can allow for about 30 minutes runtime per compressor. With three it gives one hour for the the first to cool off and should be enough for ongoing work. Downside is you need to make some sort of automatic switch to "rotate" to compressor working. Last words.... Is you find any spelling mistakes you can keep them. However, if you use them in any way to make a profit with them I kindly ask for 10% of your earning from it ;) Why did I not make an Instructable out of all this? Well the day was very hot, the beer very cold and my mobile phone at home, so I did not take any pics. To top it up the whole thing is now in a seperate box for additional noise reduction so it can be used in the same room where the guy is working. Of course he just used a nailgun for the job without any regard of access or at least easy view of the two pressure gauges. Typical if you have a great idea and the cold beer tells you to forget all about screws or hinges ROFL Only comment was: You created it and it works fine, why would need more than the pipe connections for the gel and regulator? Maybe he will reconsider when the service is due....

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply