Search for douglas in Topics


some pointers on getting Hunter-Douglas Duette blind back together? Answered

The problem: I pulled the cord that drops the blind from the top and it dropped ... like a rock. Now it will not go back up. It popped the plug that secures the 'top down' control cord and the cord pulled all the way into the top rail. No problem getting the cords all back in place. My problem (today) is getting the top rail assembly all back together. I'm close but can't seem to get that last couple of inches into place. See pics.

Question by rod howard    |  last reply


Hitchhiker's Guide Typewriter for Sale

The typewriter that Douglas Adams used to type out The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is up for sale. If you have $25257.94 it can be yours! The price is converted from 12,250 British Pounds. To be honest, I was hoping that the seller would be able to fit the number 42 in the price somewhere. I would buy it, but there are the eating and sleeping in houses things that I've grown accustomed to. Linkvia bbgadgets

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


the infinite improbability drive? Answered

I recently finished reading the hitchhiker's guide series. Douglas Adams is a genious! he and authors such as George Orwell, are commonly looked over by todays readers. anyways, on to my question. does anyone know the components required to construct an ifinite improbability drive, like the one from the books? (and for the ignoramous who decides to tell me that its fictional and to shut up, i rebut before you post with, i know, if you had any sense to know that before your reading this, you wouldn't post said comment.) but yeah, does anyone know? i am looking for great minds such as kiteman or gmjhowe, or maybe a less well-known person. whoever you are, thanks in advance.

Question by MrMystery96    |  last reply


What would Douglas Adams do?

So I'm about to embark on a month long voyage across the US and A (well, pretty much the places JetBlue services) - here's a cross link:https://www.instructables.com/community/MakerHacker-Space-Tour-2009-The-Two-Hands-Proje/So now, I'm left with a situation. I've never traveled for 1 month at a time (a week, at most, is my experience). And obviously packing light is a must (no problem). So that leaves me with a question....What would Douglas Adams Pack?1. A Towel - I'm claiming that one before the first 42 replies state so2. ?...What else and what would/do you pack? I've got clothing covered ;)

Topic by trebuchet03    |  last reply


Towel Day

Hey everybody, I just found out that May 25th is Towel Day.  Is anyone out there celebrating the life & work of Douglas Adams today? http://towelday.org/

Topic by CatTrampoline    |  last reply


Don't forget your towel!

As some of you may know, May 25th is Towel Day in honor of Douglas Adams, author of The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. I'd like to see what clever uses can be found for towels.

Topic by Sam the Wizer    |  last reply


Handmade Belt Buckle

This is a video of a meal belt buckle I made using tools in my garage.  I also made a leather belt to go with it out veg-tanned cowhide.   I hope you enjoy it.  You can see it on my YouTube channel.  My domain is pointed to my channel.  Go to www.retroweld.com.  Thanks, Douglas.

Topic by retroweld    |  last reply


Six degees of separation from Eric Wilhelm

Caitlainsdad says I have 3 degrees of separation: Eric walks the Streets of San Francisco. Karl Malden and Michael Douglas star as detectives in the "Streets of San Francisco". Adrian monk is a detective in San Francisco... How many do you have?

Topic by Lithium Rain    |  last reply


Dorkbot on the Beeb.

Before there were makers there were dorks, many of whom went to Dorkbot meetings to watch people do strange things with electricity.The Dorkbot movement was started by New York artist Douglas Repetto but they have grown far beyond the original idea of "dorks in New York" that he conceived. Now the world is dotted with Dorkbot chapters and the regular London gathering is one of the busiest.BBC story, with video of high-voltage music machines.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


H2G2 Anyone? (aka Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy)

Yes well, I was reading "The Salmon of Doubt", Douglas Adam's posthumously published work, and it kept giving me links to h2g2.com, so I figured I'd check it out. AS it turns out it seems alive and well, and I was wondering if any other Ibler's had accounts there.on another note I know it's a bit random but I don't think Arthur Dent, Trillian, Random, and Ford Prefect are dead... *sigh* I guess I will never know what fate befell them, what a bloody nasty cliffhanger, one that doesn't have a conclusion...

Topic by KentsOkay    |  last reply


Forge using wood?

I'm building a brake drum forge, and coal obviously is the fuel of choice. I understand some guys use lump charcoal which they say works well, because anthracite or bituminous coal is hard to come by in some places-- like where I live. Has anyone used just plain, good old fashioned wood? Or has anyone tried wood pellets? In my area, pellets are 10% of the price of either coal or lump charcoal. I have hundreds of trees on my ranch and I use wood for heating my log cabin. With a good air supply, will Douglas fir, other conifers, or even pellets get hot enough for forging? I'm sure wood was used in bygone times in places where there was no coal, but is it a good forging fuel? Does anyone have experience (good or bad) forging with wood? THANKS!!

Question by HenryFrapp    |  last reply


2008 IgNobel Prizes announced!

The IgNobel Prizes are awarded annually for research which "cannot, or should not, be reproduced"; achievements that "first make people laugh, and then make them think". The prizes are meant in good humour, and many winner pay their own way to attend the ceremonies. Past winners have been known to return to ceremonies in later years to show off their achievements to a receptive audience (this year it was a sword-swallowing doctor).The Japanese team that showed slime moulds can solve mazes sang their acceptance speech.The Winners:NUTRITION PRIZE.Massimiliano Zampini of the University of Trento, Italy and Charles Spence of Oxford University, UK, for electronically modifying the sound of a potato chip to make the person chewing the chip believe it to be crisper and fresher than it really is. They also showed that playing the sound of bacon frying can make ice-cream taste bacony.PEACE PRIZE.The Swiss Federal Ethics Committee on Non-Human Biotechnology (ECNH) and the citizens of Switzerland for adopting the legal principle that plants have dignity.ARCHAEOLOGY PRIZE.Astolfo G. Mello Araujo and Jose Carlos Marcelino of Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil, for measuring how the course of history, or at least the contents of an archaeological dig site, can be scrambled by the actions of a live armadillo.BIOLOGY PRIZE.Marie-Christine Cadiergues, Christel Joubert, and Michel Franc of Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Toulouse, France for discovering that the fleas that live on a dog can jump higher than the fleas that live on a cat.MEDICINE PRIZE.Dan Ariely of Duke University, USA, for demonstrating that high-priced fake medicine is more effective than low-priced fake medicine.COGNITIVE SCIENCE PRIZE.Toshiyuki Nakagaki of Hokkaido University, Japan, Hiroyasu Yamada of Nagoya, Japan, Ryo Kobayashi of Hiroshima University, Atsushi Tero of Presto JST, Akio Ishiguro of Tohoku University, and Agota Toth of the University of Szeged, Hungary, for discovering that slime molds can solve puzzles.ECONOMICS PRIZE.Geoffrey Miller, Joshua Tybur and Brent Jordan of the University of New Mexico, USA, for discovering that a professional lap dancer's ovulatory cycle affects her tip earnings.PHYSICS PRIZE.Dorian Raymer of the Ocean Observatories Initiative at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA, and Douglas Smith of the University of California, San Diego, USA, for proving mathematically that heaps of string or hair or almost anything else will inevitably tangle themselves up in knots. Their paper has one of the best genuine research titles I have seen for a long time: Spontaneous Knotting of an Agitated String.JOINT CHEMISTRY PRIZE.Sharee A. Umpierre of the University of Puerto Rico, Joseph A. Hill of The Fertility Centers of New England (USA), Deborah J. Anderson of Boston University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School (USA), for discovering that Coca-Cola is an effective spermicideJOINT CHEMISTRY PRIZE.Chuang-Ye Hong of Taipei Medical University (Taiwan), C.C. Shieh, P. Wu, and B.N. Chiang (all of Taiwan) for discovering that Coca-Cola is not an effective spermicide.LITERATURE PRIZE.David Sims of Cass Business School. London, UK, for his lovingly written study "You Bastard: A Narrative Exploration of the Experience of Indignation within Organizations."Journal of Improbable ResearchThe site will be hosting video of the ceremony in the next few days.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


It's IgNobel time again!

The 19th IgNobel Awards were presented this week (Thursday 1st):VETERINARY MEDICINE PRIZE: Catherine Douglas and Peter Rowlinson of Newcastle University, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, UK, for showing that cows who have names give more milk than cows that are nameless.PEACE PRIZE: Stephan Bolliger, Steffen Ross, Lars Oesterhelweg, Michael Thali and Beat Kneubuehl of the University of Bern, Switzerland, for determining — by experiment — whether it is better to be smashed over the head with a full bottle of beer or with an empty bottle.(I don't know their conclusions, their paper isn't available for free - anybody care to test for us?)ECONOMICS PRIZE: The directors, executives, and auditors of four Icelandic banks — Kaupthing Bank, Landsbanki, Glitnir Bank, and Central Bank of Iceland — for demonstrating that tiny banks can be rapidly transformed into huge banks, and vice versa — and for demonstrating that similar things can be done to an entire national economy.CHEMISTRY PRIZE: Javier Morales, Miguel Apátiga, and Victor M. Castaño of Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, for creating diamonds from liquid — specifically from tequila.(Seriously, they did!)MEDICINE PRIZE: Donald L. Unger, of Thousand Oaks, California, USA, for investigating a possible cause of arthritis of the fingers, by diligently cracking the knuckles of his left hand — but never cracking the knuckles of his right hand — every day for more than sixty (60) years.PHYSICS PRIZE: Katherine K. Whitcome of the University of Cincinnati, USA, Daniel E. Lieberman of Harvard University, USA, and Liza J. Shapiro of the University of Texas, USA, for analytically determining why pregnant women don't tip over.(Possibly "because they have spines"?)LITERATURE PRIZE: Ireland's police service (An Garda Siochana), for writing and presenting more than fifty traffic tickets to the most frequent driving offender in the country — Prawo Jazdy — whose name in Polish means "Driving License".(I remember this story breaking - the confusion was immense.)PUBLIC HEALTH PRIZE: Elena N. Bodnar, Raphael C. Lee, and Sandra Marijan of Chicago, Illinois, USA, for inventing a brassiere that, in an emergency, can be quickly converted into a pair of protective face masks, one for the brassiere wearer and one to be given to some needy bystander.(How many teens are going to use difficulty breathing as an excuse to get into their girlfriend's underwear?)MATHEMATICS PRIZE: Gideon Gono, governor of Zimbabwe’s Reserve Bank, for giving people a simple, everyday way to cope with a wide range of numbers — from very small to very big — by having his bank print bank notes with denominations ranging from one cent ($.01) to one hundred trillion dollars ($100,000,000,000,000).BIOLOGY PRIZE: Fumiaki Taguchi, Song Guofu, and Zhang Guanglei of Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences in Sagamihara, Japan, for demonstrating that kitchen refuse can be reduced more than 90% in mass by using bacteria extracted from the feces of giant pandas.(You've got to ask - where did they get the idea to try that?)References (and past award winners) available at http://improbable.com/ig/winners/#ig2009

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Making the pipboy/hitchhikers guide

I've been thinking about this for quite some time, unfortunately I don't have the economy to purchase a mini PC/PC mobile, let alone one powerful enough and with enough space for all the things that I have in mind for this gadget. Though there seems to be a lot of other people on this forum with the cash and possibly the motivation to complete this so I'll try and explain the idea for you. If you've ever read 'The hitchhikers guide to the galaxy' by Douglas Adams or played the new or the old Fallout games you'll have noticed that the common denominator is that in both instances they have nifty little pocket computers with all kinds of information and gadgets. Now I realize that it will be overkill for most people to have a mini Geiger-counter, a gas measuring device and a light sensor attached to it, not to mention to expensive. But it seems odd to me that some of the software options available isn't already included in mini PC's, such as: -Wiki-taxi which is an offline version of the entire Wikipedia. -As many search-able dictionaries as is practical. -A general library of PDF's that you find useful depending on where you are/are going to go, or maybe the PC you get your hands on has enough space to encompass a general library for the entire world like information about herbs, plants and animals in every region of the world Instructables for certain kinds of gourmet dishes for an example could come in handy while traveling the world, anything goes really . -Furthermore it could have stored maps of the entire world, of course not in "hair counting quality" but good enough to find your way if lost, then again some of these mini PC's have GPS built in but you will still need all the map packs for the different regions of the world. -One could add how-to videos of different things that might come in handy if traveling in poor countries or simply backpacking, like braiding and general hand crafting items to have something to sell. Or guides for learning to play a certain instrument and so forth. And so on, there's an endless supply of software one could put on a gadget like this, but that's just half the idea. The other half would be constructing some kind of housing that would allow a person to strap the computer sideways on ones arm so that it's always easily available like a normal wristwatch and preferably protected against shock and moisture/water, furthermore it would be nice to have extra slots in the housing for such things as a small LED flashlight and any kinds of other tools that would be practical for the person in question that makes this thing. This computer would of course need to have a rather big battery capacity as well, and if it has long lasting batteries then several more of the batteries can be incorporated into the housing allowing the user to switch between each of the extra batteries when the original one in the PC runs dry. For off-the-grid travel I'd believe a sufficiently large fold-able solar panel would suffice to charge the device, maybe it could be incorporated into a jacket or simply stored as a liner in the jacket. Now I don't know if this is all easily understandable so if anyone has any questions or maybe someone would even make this then please let me know as this idea is quite dear to me, do post any ideas or complaints as well, I welcome it all. Oh, and in case someone might be bothered by the extra weight this would put on (say your left arm) then simply make another housing for general tools that you can have on the right arm/wrist and balance the weight out so that after a while you wont notice it as your muscles naturally adjusts to the weight, would basically make you stronger in the process.

Topic by wolty    |  last reply


Something from Nothing: Films on Design & Architecture

If you're interested in Yerba Buena Center for the Arts' TechnoCRAFT exhibition, you might also want to know about the design film series we're hosting this summer.  See below for more information. SOMETHING FROM NOTHING: FILMS ON DESIGN & ARCHITECTURE Sundays, Jul 11 thru Sep 5, 2 pm In conjunction with our TechnoCRAFT gallery exhibition, we present these eight matinee screenings, covering not only design, but architecture, motion graphics and craft. Sun, Jul 11, 2 pm Refrigerator Fetish: Vintage Industrial Design Films We kick off the series with a selection of funny, bizarre, and maybe even educational vintage product design films, from the 1920s forward. Examining the sensuality of the fridge, the rhapsody of the pencil and the mysterious polishing of unknowable objects, this promises to be a one-of-a-kind day at the movies. Presented live by film archivist Dennis Nyback. Sun, Jul 18, 2 pm Citizen Architect: Samuel Mockbee and the Spirit of the Rural Studio By Sam Wainwright Douglas Citizen Architect chronicles the work of the late activist architect Samuel Mockbee, and his radical educational program known as the Rural Studio. The program teaches students about the social responsibilities of architecture and charges them to provide original and inspirational homes and buildings (mostly from salvaged materials) in rural west Alabama, one of the poorest communities in the country (2010, 60 min, digital video). Preceded by the short Robin Hood Gardens (Or Every Brutalist Structure For Itself) by Martin Ginestie (2010, 17 min, digital video) Sun, Jul 25, 2 pm wow+flutter Assembled by onedotzero, the London-based cutting-edge new media group, this compilation program showcases the most progressive and unpredictable work in motion graphics and short-form media. Fresh talent and celebrated masters alike strive to expand, blur and explode traditional notions of what future moving images could be as a playground for creative expression. (2009, 70 min, digital video) Sun, Aug 1, 2 pm The Greening of Southie By Ian Cheney This incisive new documentary is set in the traditionally Irish-American working-class neighborhood of South Boston, where a new kind of building is taking shape. From wheatboard cabinetry to recycled steel, bamboo flooring to dual-flush toilets, the Macallen building is a leader in the emerging field of environmentally friendly design. But Boston's steel-toed union workers aren't sure they like it. And when things start to go wrong, the young development team gets a little more than they bargained for. A film about building the city of tomorrow…today. (2008, 72 min, digital video) Sun, Aug 15, 2 pm Infinite Space: The Architecture of John Lautner By Murray Grigor John Lautner was the Southern California architect. Even if his name isn’t familiar, you have likely seen pictures of some of his most famous works, such as the space-age “Chemosphere,” the octagonal house on a hill, which has become a Los Angeles landmark. Lautner believed that the purpose of architecture is to create timeless, free, joyous spaces for all activities in life. Infinite Space traces the lifelong quest of a man to create “architecture that has no beginning and no end.” (2009, 90 min, digital video) Sun, Aug 22, 2 pm Rem Koolhaas: A Kind of Architect By Markus Heidingsfelder and Min Tesch Rarely has an architect caused as much sensation outside of the architecture community as Rem Koolhaas. His outstanding creations such as the Dutch Embassy in Berlin, the Seattle Library, and the Casa da Musica concert hall in Porto are working examples of his visionary theories about architecture and urban society. An engaging portrait of the man and his work, the film takes us to the heart of his ideas. Koolhaas has stated "it's the only film about me that I have liked." (2008, 97 min, digital video) Sun, Aug 29, 2 pm The Visual Language of Herbert Matter By Reto Caduff SPECIAL SNEAK PREVIEW! A revealing look at the life story of a highly influential mid-century modern design master. Known as a quintessential designer's designer, Swiss-born Herbert Matter is largely credited with expanding the use of photography as a design tool and bringing the semantics of fine art into the realm of applied arts. Through never-before-seen footage, personal photography and stunning graphic design, the film explores the social and cultural impact of his personal visual language that influenced a generation of designers and artists. (2010, digital video) Sun, Sep 5, 2 pm Handmade Nation By Faythe Levine This charmingly low-fi film documents the contemporary crafting community. These artists, crafters and designers marry historical techniques, punk and D.I.Y ethos while being influenced by traditional handiwork, modern aesthetics, and politics. (2009, 65 min, digital video) Where: Something from Nothing: Films on Design & Architecture – 701 Mission St., San Francisco, CA 94103 – YBCA Screening Room Public Info: 415-978-2787 or ybca.org $8 regular; $6 students, seniors, teachers & YBCA members Enjoy same-day gallery admission for all YBCA presented films!

Topic by YBCA