I need a 7-8 minute dramatic monologue!?

I'm in speech and 15, and i have come across a problem. i need a dramatic monologue (for a man) that lasts 8 minutes by next week. can anyone please help me! it would be preferable if it was from a book or play. duologue would be nice as well. thank you.

Question by redsuit09   |  last reply


Dramatically different "total views" when logged in and not logged in

Why the difference? Which is correct? Taken at the same time after a refresh. They have been consistently far apart since the beginning. 4411 logged out 7909 logged in It doesn't seem to change when I repeatedly open the instructable, so it doesn't appear to be counting my hits.

Topic by tcollinsworth 


How can I haunt my yard dramatically and cheaply for halloween?

I live in neighborhood that has about 400 kids trick or treat annually. Every year I do a little more decorating of my yard. Last year we had a fogger and did a vampire theme. I want to wow them this year. How can I haunt my yard that is a corner lot with large front porch, dramatically and cheaply?

Question by Antiqueallie   |  last reply


The Robot Movie

The Robot Movie A timeless coming of age tale about murder, romance, danger, mystery, war, intrigue, accents, choreography, and dramatic shots by the water. Starring myself (Tetranitrate) and The Robot. Coming soon to an Instructable near you.

Topic by Tetranitrate   |  last reply


Super-fast kite-surfing

A new kite-board patent was published in August: a hyrofoil board.A curved hydrofoil lifts the whole board out of the water, cuts friction dramatically and gaining massive amounts of speed.Apparently.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Rating problems, Help!!

I don't know what happened, but my Plasma Speaker instructable's rating had dramatically dropped down, and nobody had rated bad! Does anybody have any idea what is going on???

Topic by Plasmana   |  last reply


Is Chinese economy reach a battleneck?

China has been incresing the interst rate for years(although recently it is finally decreased), and also there are lots of problem within the housing market. Is China meet a battleneck after its sixty-year's dramatic development? If it is, why?

Question by Lzx   |  last reply


Embarrassing Moments in Engineering

Mental Floss compiles four great examples of not-so-great engineering feats and one dramatic fix. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge makes an appearance, of course, as well as three other detailed examples to learn from. Mental Floss articlevia Neatorama

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


Campfire lighting tricks?

I find myself with the task of lighting a camp fire, either dramatically, magically or mysteriously.  I know a couple of methods, but the campfire audience have seen them before. Anybody got any novel ideas for lighting a campfire at the sneaky pull of a cord, or throw of a hidden switch? (Yes, I know about wire wool and batteries...)

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Why is the Stats "Total Views" wildly different when logged in vs. logged out?

I see dramatically different "total views" when logged in and not logged in. Why the difference? Which is correct? 614 logged out 3513 logged in It doesn't seem to change when I repeatedly open the instructable, so it doesn't appear to be counting my hits.

Question by tcollinsworth   |  last reply


Is it feasible to use plastic as the material casing for a miniature fan driven jet engine?

I would like to use an old cpu fan and some old 2 liter soda bottles to experiment jet engine designs. Using lighter fluid for the fuel and probably running the engine in short bursts just to measure thrust output, it should be strong enough to survive at least several runs without dramatic failure right?

Question by    |  last reply


atx power supply wrong voltages

I've done some experimenting with an ATX power supply, trying to turn it into a bench top, and I've come close.  I have 1 more problem, the voltages are off.  Instead of 5v I'm getting 5.25, instead of 12 I get 11.4 and most dramatically of all instead of 3V I get 4V. Has anyone had this problem before and learned to solve it? 

Topic by bobobano   |  last reply


How can I recover a "crystallized" cutting disk?

I was cutting an iron L rod, and the cutting disk began to produce red sparks, instead of these habitual bright orange. Simultaneously, its cutting effectiveness was down dramatically. I searched in the web, and learned that this phenomen is named crystallization,and it is due to overheating. Now, my disk is a new one, I want not throw it to the waste. Any idea how to get it back? THANKS IN ADVANCE!

Topic by rimar2000   |  last reply


Filters Please

 Hello,  I would like to officially request a "blocked list" so users can prevent certain results from showing.  It would dramatically improve my experience if I could eliminate any instructable that's a toy.   For example; in the user's profile, have a field in which keywords can be added such as knex and lego,  or perhaps the whole toy category, and then have that list apply at all times.  I'm sure there are other adults who will appreciate this as well, while still letting the kids have their fun. Thank You. 

Topic by cylonics   |  last reply


Bird box visitor's motion detector

Hi, I'm looking for a motion detector with difference & wonder if anyone has any bright ideas. I have setup a bird box on the side of my house & it's early spring here in the uk. I'm only getting occasional visits from a bluetit couple & would like to know when the're home.An initial idea is to check the brightness of the video image. It's monochrome so the brightness reduces dramatically if a bird is home. Any ideas how I can acheive this?bird box link

Topic by waldy   |  last reply


What gram airsoft bb should I use?

I recently bought a UHC super 9 pro airsoft gun.  The problem is that .2 gram bbs curve dramatically (a very steep curve) up after about 75 feet or so.  The hopup is off, and if the hopup is on, the problem is worse. Will .25 gram bbs make much of a difference, or should I use .30 grams or higher?  Note: the fps with .2 gram bbs is about 410.  I am hoping the airsoft community at Instructables is willing to help me. Thanks.

Question by hunter1125   |  last reply


Eating Meat and Overpopulation

I'm not try to start a flame war just wanna bounce some Ideas around. If everyone stopped eating meat and animal products (total vegan). What would happen to the animal population. I think at first it would increase dramatically, then after humans started to consume more and more fruits and vegetables there would be a shortage of food ether for humans or animals (most likely animals). Which would cause a sharp decrees in animal population (possible extinction of species lower on the chain). Or if there is not enough fruits and vegies for humans, they will be forced to eat animals. What do you think?

Topic by TheCheese9921   |  last reply


According to physics, does driving with a heavy load increase traction in winter?

Many Canadians enjoy adding weight to their vehicles over the winter to increase traction. How does it work? Since friction is force normal times mu, thus having a greater force normal means more friction. However since mu is usually so small, the increase in friction is negligible as compared to momentum. The momentum from added weight, mass times velocity would be dramatically increases, meaning longer distances to stop and easier fish tails around corners. Therefore less weight is more benficial. This is my logic, and I may be wrong. I don't know, thats why I'm asking...

Question by VentingIntrovert   |  last reply


DESPERATE CRY FOR HELP?

Sorry to seem so dramatic but this is probably the 6th time I post on a forum (instructables, adafruit makezine, element14, etc) and havnt found any answers. My TPA6021A4 amplifier I made has alot of distortion that goes away when i touch the positive terminal of the audio input with my finger. the weird thing is, every single (5) audio amplifier ive tried to make so far has had the same problem. the reason I am using the TPA6021A4 chip is because I emailed Ben Heck and that is what he suggested I use, but I cant get it to work. I am making them on breadboards mabey thats the problem? please help.

Question by fossilshark   |  last reply


Can somebody identify this plant?

I bought this plant a couple of weeks ago in the houseplant section of my local garden centre. It came with a label that I soon found to be completely wrong (It's certainly not a cactus) and now I have no idea how to look after it. At first it grew very quickly and then slowed down dramatically, so I fear that it isn’t getting the right care. It has long, smooth, chunky leaves (Though I’m not sure you would call them leaves) and a pale green stem. At first most of the plant was covered with a kind of hydrophobic white powder that has since worn off. If someone could provide the name of this plant that would be perfect, thanks a lot!

Question by Ikkalebob   |  last reply


Help with motion detection idea

I had an idea for a dramatic halloween set up where the porch light turns off as the person approaches the door and turns back on again when they leave.  First off I don't even know if this is possible. I assume I would need a PIR motion detector and arduino to make this work. I have had some experience with very basic electronics but never anything like arduino so I wouldn't know how to begin programming something like this. I'm guessing I wouldn't be able to use the actual porch light so I plan to set up another light bulb. I would love any advice as I want to make this idea happen but I simply don't know how to approach it. Thank you!

Topic by CrazyClever   |  last reply


Focus an LED

I was wondering if anyone knew how to focus more than one LED (infra red) into one tightish (about 1m at 100ms) beam. This would actually be for a laser tag gun that i would like to make an instructable about. The game is based on these high powered infrared leds that are focused by a 2cm-5cm diameter double convex lens assembly. Snipers obviously need further distance and have a tight beam while others have a much wider beam. The focus can be adjusted by moving the led back or forwards. Having more than one LED may lead to dramatic leaps in range (so it is theorised). I have been told to use cube beam splitter but i don't even know what they are. Thanks community any help is seriously much appreciated Thankyou Thankyou Thankyou Thankyou

Topic by DELETED_D4VOBRO 


Electricity over IP

This is not really a new concept (first published in 2002), but one to mull over :-) Electricity over IP (EoIP, pronounced "yoyp") is a proposed scheme for delivering electric power via IP (Internet protocol). EoIP was developed to eliminate the unnecessary redundancy inherent in maintaining separate distribution networks for electricity and the Internet. The technology could be especially beneficial in remote areas with Internet kiosks but without electricity.The architecture for delivering EoIP is known as MPLampS (Mostly Pointless Lamp Switching). Electricity is digitized and encapsulated in discrete packets. According to the IETF's marketing segment, "MPLampS has the potential to dramatically lower the price, ease the distribution and usage, and improve the manageability of delivering electricity." Electricity over IPThe IETF Network Working Group described EoIP in RFC 3251, published on April 1, 2002. April 1 is also sometimes known as "April Fools' Day."

Topic by Goodhart   |  last reply


The "Truth" about Tesla?

These guys at www.lindsaybks.com/gallery/teslamyth/ttesla1.html say that Tesla didn't invent the Tesla Coil, radio, or AC power. Now, I'll admit that I didn't read all of the arguments completely. I did, however, read the Tesla Coil page in its entirety. One claim is that the Tesla Coil was predated by one Elihu Thomson's patent  "Method of and means for producing electric current" (number 500,630). This patent was filed in 1893 - while Tesla's earliest patent on the Tesla Coil, "System of Electric Lighting" (number 454,622) was filed in 1891. Nice try. They are definitely correct, however, in saying that many parts of Tesla's history has been overly-dramatized. For instance, there is a claim that Tesla's remote controlled boat used a primitive form of voice recognition to take spoken commands from his audience. Obviously, it didn't, and the patents show nothing of the like. Do the other claims on their website have any merit?

Topic by ElectricUmbrella   |  last reply


LEDs keep on taking over. Excellent.

It's no secret that we love using LEDs for our projects. They sip power and are fantastically tiny. You can even get an introduction to how they work with just an LED and a coin battery. If you haven't used one yet, make it a new year's resolution to make one light up this year. If you want to complete any resolutions, that'll be one of the easiest.Yesterday's announcement of the Macbook Air in San Francisco pushes the LEDs further. This isn't the first laptop to have it, but it's a dramatic display of how far the tech has come and how far it needs to go. LEDs aren't perfect for every use, but they hopefully will be someday.According to this article some of the current goals are for better whites, deep-UV, and quantum cryptography. All of which sound pretty tasty.But what about you? What do you want from LEDs that you don't see just yet?

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


Traffic light plates and other waste glass reuse

What does a municipality do with old traffic lights? Why, they can make them into dinner plates! Recycled Glassworks makes plates from old traffic light covers from retired lights, often the ones replaced with the newfangled LED kind. Oddly, the green lights end up as blue plates... dunno if this is an artifact of the plate-making process or if the light behind is very yellow, necessitating a blue "green" light.But while that's probably their most dramatic product, there's another. Most glass recycling is limited to bottles and jars. The only thing to do with broken windows, or broken glass tabletops, or other glass of this kind, has been to throw it away. Recycled Glassworks accepts this kind of glass in addition to the traffic light kind. They cut it to size and kiln-bake it in a mold (a process called slumping) to produce extremely attractive bowls and plates.Way to go, Recycled Glassworks!

Topic by rachel   |  last reply


One Must Go

Sorry for the dramatic title.  I know it's been a long time since I've posted anything.  I've been having a rough time lately and I really haven't had the time nor energy to begin a new project, although I do have a couple promising designs drawn that I would like to begin working on.  But unfortunately I am going to have to take apart either the KLS v.2 or my beloved Kinetic Rifle to begin a new, potentially better project. Because I am attached to both (embarrassing, isn't it?) I want to ask you guys which one you think I should take apart: 1)  The Kinetic Rifle               or 2)  The KLS v.2 Either one should give me enough pieces, so don't take size into your consideration.  Thank you for helping me out and I promise I will have something great for you guys within the month. -Kinetic 

Topic by Kinetic   |  last reply


Air Compressor RPM? Answered

I found an old cast iron 50 + year old 2 stage air compressor and I was wondering what RPM's I should run it at.  My dad says it is running much slower than he remembered and it is going 323 RPM's compared to the original gear ratio that would have run at 269 RPM's.  That should be dramatically faster, so could going too fast decrease performance, or something, or is there a reason the original motor may have slowed down? The RPM's are a complete guess based upon the 1725 RPM motor average.  The only reason I had to change pullies was because the original had FLAT BELTS (awesome) from back when people cared and build stuff right.  Now I have a v-belt on it and the compressor pulley wobbles by like 2 inches and the thing is out of line, but these shouldn't be slowing it down. Basically I need to know what RPM's I should be running the compressor at. P.S.  It can double as a vacuum  pump and it uses old fashion check valves!

Question by jj.inc   |  last reply


Why I like Instructables

In junior high and high school I was an avid reader of Popular Mechanics, Popular Science, and Mechanix Illustrated magazines. I liked the technical articles and the project plans. Many of them required tools about which I could only dream; like a bench or table saw, a drill press, a lathe, or a welder. Thankfully, in the intervening five or six decades I have access to most of those tools. Unfortunately, those magazines either no longer exist or have turned dramatically toward consumer interests and reviews in place of hands-on projects for the weekend handyman and home workshop. Instructables is a place where new projects appear daily. Some of them seem to me to be a little silly (hypothetical example: an environmentally friendly spit wad that doubles as a USB battery charger). But, some of them are solid useful things easy to do and of great benefit. I am greatly enjoying my new bicycle cadence meter from a recent Instructable. It has also been fun to post some things that I have found very helpful over the years.

Topic by Phil B   |  last reply


Universal Nut Sheller

Today's feature is the awesome Universal Nut Sheller. Designed by Jock Brandis of the Full Belly Project for a women's coop in Mali, this tool dramatically increases peanut-shelling speed from 2 lbs per hour (hand-shelling) to 110 lbs per hour.  Since roughly half a billion people in the world rely on peanuts as a primary protein source, this nut sheller has the potential for serious impact. The machine is simple to make, relatively inexpensive, and can shell pecans, pine nuts, neem nuts, shea netus, Jatropha, and other nuts as well as peanuts.  Molds and metal parts can be ordered from the Full Belly Project. Check out the 2005 video introducing the machine to Uganda: Check it out, and get inspired.  What can you do to help people in developing countries?  We need more ideas, the simpler the better. This post has been sponsored by Pepsi. The Pepsi Refresh Project celebrates the people, businesses, and non-profits with ideas that will have a positive effect on our world.

Topic by canida   |  last reply


micro alternator airborne / out runner balance charger for large scale rc aircraft

Using the same concept as diesel trains. As they drive / pull on electric. The drive train is actually electric . The noise we hear are the generators charging the power banks. . Electric are far more efficient than diesel or gas engine direct  to the drive train. That being said. How can we set up micro scale generator on board 1/3 scale electric rc airplane. concept : connect 40 size os max rc nitro engine direct to 700 kv E. out runner shaft , rectifier bridge /  12 volt SMART lipoly charger, all this to enhance primary lipoy bank on large scale electric rc planes. ( increase flight time dramatically) sounds stupid I guess, but the concept apparently works in real world cargo trains. Can anyone help wth the system set up of rectifier bridge components to give this a shot ? I have no electrical expertise.  Thanks Jeff

Topic by JeffR135 


Bernina + BurdaStyle's "Party Through the Decades" Competition

Bernina and BuraStyle are teaming up to bring you a chance to win a Bernina 3 series sewing machine by putting your design skills to the test in the Bernina "Party Through the Decades" International Competition! They are asking you to create a party look that represents your favorite era in fashion history.  BurdaStyle asks: Which decade represents the epitome of style: Are you mad about the 50’s? Do you swoon over the roaring 20’s? Your party look can be a dramatic evening gown, a dress, or even a tuxedo! Inspiration could be found in a painting, an architectural monument, film or fashion— we just want to see your best skills put forward towards creating a dazzling party look! So get your materials together and get sewing for your chance to win a Bernina 3 Series sewing machine or one of three cash prizes!   Get the full details here, and be sure to share your creation on Instructables.  We can't wait to see what you make.

Topic by scoochmaroo 


DIY Dialysis - an Ultimate Make?

There are makers, and there are Makers.Two years ago, Dr Malcolm Coulthard, of Newcastle's Royal Victoria Infirmary, had a patient too small for dialysis. The baby girl had suffered kidney problems following bowel surgery, but, at only 6 lbs in weight, she was too small even for the "child sized" dialysis machines.Rather than let the girl die, Dr Coulthard, with the help of senior children's kidney nurse Jean Crosier, designed and built her a dialysis machine from scratch in his garage.Every so often, the idea of Instructables Awards pops up, but only for people on the site. Kitewife said now they are people who deserve a Robot patch, and agree, but more so. We need to recognise the achievements of people like this, so I propose we set up an award - the Ultimate Maker award.Nothing dramatic, just a simple certificate they can frame, a Robot patch, and maybe a logo they can display on their website if they have one.What say you, Makers?BBC Story

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Dutchj's Top Loading Rifle

Well, here's my Top Loading Rifle. I built this for the sake of building something after being inactive for such a long time. The original idea was to make a very solid gun that could be top-loaded with rods, so the pusher would never have to leave the gun, which would make for quicker reloading. That didn't work because rods always pull on and push each other, but I managed to complete it with different ammo. Some may find it to look a bit boxy, and that's because I didn't add anything to the gun that wasn't needed. No long barrel, no wedge-shaped stock, none of those things. The stock is strong enough as it is, and a longer barrel would only decrease the range ( dramatically ). Here's some basic stats:Type: RepeaterAmmo: Grey connector - green rod - orange connector - green rodCapacity: 9 without the pusher leaving the gun at all. otherwise 10, or more with mods.Range: Depends. I haven't tested, but I think it gets pretty average ranges for a repeater.Power: It drew blood at point blank.Reload time: Shorter then other repeaters with fixed magazines because the pusher never leaves the gun.INSTRUCTIONS: http://knexinnovation.net/forums/viewtopic.php?f=49&t;=846

Topic by Dutchj   |  last reply


SF Climate Challenge

If you live in San Francisco, this sounds like a great contest. http://www.sfclimatechallenge.org/The contest is among teams of five or more households. There are several ways to get involved. You can start your own team with your friends, families or coworkers. You can join an existing team. Or you can just sign up solo as part of your local neighborhood team. The contest begins October 25th. You spend your next PG&E;* billing period doing everything you can to reduce your energy use. The more energy your team saves, the better your chances of winning.It can be as simple as turning off a few lights and lowering the thermostat, to as dramatic as installing solar panels on your roof or creating a human-powered generator. It's all up to you.At the end, we compare the contest period with your bills from the same time last year, and dish out cash and prizes to the teams who've done the best and come up with the most creative solutions. Even if that isn't you, you'll still have saved some money on your power bill and helped fight global warming. So in a sense, everyone wins.Prizes:Greatest absolute reduction in energy use: $5,000Greatest percentage reduction in energy use: $5,000Greatest reduction by a School: $2,500Greatest reduction by a neighborhood organziation: $1,000Greatest reduction by a business or other organziation: $1,000

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Controversy drives sales - will tabloids never learn?

There's a small family company, BrickArms, which plies its trade online, selling modified Lego minifigs.They are genuine Lego pieces, but modified into (mainly) military garb.Recently, their sales rose so dramatically that they have had to stop taking orders. Not bad, for a company selling individual Lego figures for ten times their originalpurchase price in the middle of a credit crunch.What happened?The media, that's what happened. In the UK, right-wing tabloid Daily Mail found out about the company, and immediately got all in a tizzy because the characters glorify terrorism - they all wear head-scarves or Nazi uniforms. They got a quote from a Muslim and a Jew to say how horrified they were. They got a quote from Lego to emphasise they were not official.They completely ignored half the company's range - as well as Germans and desert-clad figures, they have US marines, a Bond-style secret agent, a Colonial Marine and a zombie-assault set. The figures are meant for diorama-style displays, not to be played with by small children.Things aren't all bad, though - as soon as many readers saw the article, they went straight off to find out where they could be bought. Sales have soared. Even their UK distributor has had to close their ordering systems to catch up.Maybe somebody from BrickArms ought to write a letter of thanks?BrickArms website

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


An idle thought on career diversification.

As you may know, I teach Science.You may have noticed that I occasionally venture an opinion on science-related topics.You may also have noticed that bad science, and the acceptance of anti-science tend to get on my nerves.Part of the problem, of course, is the meeja - the majority of journalists have little or no science training, so they focus on the dramatic sound-bites when reporting stuff. Heck, these days the majority of journalists aren't even journalists - they're bloggers.After the massive fuss I had to put up with at school over the LHC (destroying the world by sucking it into an exploding black hole then turning time backwards), I tried to find out where the kids got their panicky ideas from, and it turned out to be the tabloid press (the Star and the Sun, for UK readers).Now, I could wait until the papers publish their bad headlines and write an annoyed letter, or I could be pro-active.Do any of you guys think there is any mileage in setting myself up as a consulting service to the scientifically-illiterate news media?I thought, maybe, offering "expert opinions" on scientific events to newspapers that don't have scientists on staff, or maybe a translation service, turning scientific papers and press-releases into something journalists can cope with.Comments?EDITI have emailed the main local newspapers, plus the BBC.Let's see...

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Charge unprotected lipoly with desktop power supply? Answered

I have a few, almost dead 700ma li-polies taken from a macbook battery that would not charge. I have no formal Li-Poly charger, and most commercial charger will refuse to charge these batteries anyway- because most of them are lower than 2.7v right now. I wanted to see if I could revive these, which I have read can be done, using constant voltage and current.  My problem is how to charge these using a common desktop power supply. My setup right now is a charger set on 3.7v, multimeter in parallel (to measure the cell voltage), and a current of 20ma. So far, nothing dramatic has happened thus far. Thing is, the "shorted" light on my power supply is on, and the voltage says its around 2.8v right now (rising slowly). Is this just due to the battery charging? I mean, is this behavior normal for an unprotected cell charging on a power supply?  Also, please note that I do know what lipolys can do. I am not just gonna hook this thing up to 20v and leave to go to town. I am monitoring it, and have it in a large, thick plastic box that is 2ft from a door. I will not leave it on unsupervised. 

Question by astroboy907   |  last reply


Pen + sprinkler = get out of school free!

I will not be as descriptive or dramatic in this story as I was in my last. Last year, someone in my class made a small elastic gun that shot pens and pencils. Someone, who shall remain nameless, was screwing around during LA class trying to get a pen stuck in the ceiling with it. Whats the one thing you hit if you aim at the cieling and miss? A sprinkler. Black, smelly fluid (I know, black? wtf?) sprayed out everywhere as everyone in class eight one was screaming. Within seconds, the school alarm system was activated, and the entire school (~1000 students) was evacuated. 1/4 of the school was flooded, as were 4 computers. (Nameless) did get caught and was suspended from school for ~1 week. We got the rest of the day off school. If you can hit a sprinkler with one of these weapons, and activate it, It's basically a good way to get out of school free. You must have tremendous aim though. Someone with knowledge in the field of sprinkler systems said that (nameless) was extremely lucky that he did not set off every sprinkler in the school, which probably would have gotten us out of school for a week. (and got him suspended for the rest of the year, if he were caught) remember, aim between the red part and the metal part.

Topic by cwid   |  last reply


Epoxy vs resorcinol or other adhesives for boat building

I've been a big fan of epoxy for a long time. It's been recommended to me as the best glue ever, and lately as a great/durable coating to be used like paint. It's so popular that companies are starting to market things as epoxies that might be related but, really are something else. FYI anything sold as a "one part epoxy" is not an epoxy at all. it's something else. Epoxies must be 2 part.My father started building wooden model sailboat, and wanted to use Resorcinol. What?? Never heard of it. can't be good. must be toxic. use epoxy, Dad. Lately, I've heard differently, with some caveats.This was mentioned on www.woodenboat.com forums:http://www.cpadhesives.com/media/ClassicBoatAppendix.pdfThe upshot is that epoxy bond strength weakens dramatically with exposure to heat or (maybe?) saltwater or UV light. Additionally, epoxy's bond is not as fatigue resistant as wood. So using it as a structural bond is questionable. Using it in hot (120F+) environments is questionable. Using it in saltwater environments is questionable.Since boats sit in the sun, tend to flex, and are often exposed to saltwater, how can we possibly use epoxies in long term situations.I had to search hard to find any info on Resorcinol, but it's cheaper, supposedly lasts longer. But, as far as I can tell, it's really hard to find. Comments?

Topic by danlocks   |  last reply


Oops!

Over the years I've done a lot of things that didn't work out well, and I try learn something from them  hoping to avoid similar problems in the future. I think ibles  needs a place to share these 'educational moments'  to help others avoid pitfalls and to console with laughter anyone who is sitting amidst the ruins of their own project.   So here's the  place to share.    I'll go first........... My first dramatic failure at about age 8 - Gluing glitter onto balloons. Not a good idea. The glue popped the balloon (I think it was 'airplane glue' ) The result was glue and glitter everywhere (including in my eyes) and a lot of unhappiness. Then there was the hot glue surprise -  Using a glue gun to close drip irrigation holes in a garden hose.  It plugged the holes and worked just fine in the overcast cool spring weather. Then a rare sunny day  heated the hose, and all those plugs melted and the holes started jetting water.  I hadn't realized how hot a green hose in the sun could get. And I have made some just plain stupid moves - like spending hours pulling all the shreds of paper out of the toothed wheels on the paper shredder.... you know how they get sucked inside.  After getting it all clear I thought I might as well lubricate the thing with spray silicon stuff.  So far so good. And then I was so excited to see how it much better it would work, I turned it on.  Flash of flame, slightly singed eyebrows, and a TOTALLY dead smoking shredder.  Ummm.... it's really worthwhile to let solvents totally evaporate before turning on electrical things.

Topic by mole1   |  last reply


Which lacrosse gloves do I choose? Answered

I recently got a coupon for 25% any Warrior or Brine item at a lacrosse store. I need new gloves, and I have narrowed it down to two pairs. Should I get the Warrior Riot Custom (red-black-white.)? (25% off of $120) The first lacrosse glove with inerchangeable - SWITCH CUFFS - for instant customization right off the retail shelf Each Riot glove comes with 2 cuffs - one home and one away Mix and match your stock cuffs or purchase accessory SWITCH CUFFS - available in multiple colorways and designs The Riot glove features a new tighter fitting pattern for the perfect snug fit The single layered palm gives you by far the best touch on your stick and makes it feel like you aren't even wearing gloves Breakaway Lacrosse exclusive color in Black, Red and White Leather. Or should I get the Brine King Superlight Custom (red-white)? (25% off of $100) Introducing the 1st glove in the Brine Superlight Series where dramatic amounts of weight have been removed by the use of high-tech materials and manufacturing processes. The King Superlight boasts the lightest weight in the Brine family, coming in at 6 oz! Dual material build of high end leather and high grade nylon knit. Superb Back hand venting and dual density foam make this glove a fortress for you hands. New palm design that allows for ultimate air flow. Great mobility and flexibility with an adjustable floating cuff. Ventilator moisture-management performance liner. Breathable mesh palm inserts and finger gussets. Breakaway Lacrosse Exclusive Color, Red Leather, White Mesh and White Print

Question by freeza36   |  last reply


What's the difference between an electric boiler and an electrolyzer?

Backstory: I don't understand how they create steam without hydrogen and oxygen. I've been researching the prior art on electric boilers. This involves the type that passes the current through the water. Here's one of many examples: Electric Boiler There are also jet flow boilers which seem to do the same thing. I thought it might be the ac current instead of dc which allows the creation of steam without the dissociation of the water molecules. I've actually been trying to create steam this way. But this has been driving me crazy. I started experimenting with a AA. I start small. Safety first. :-) Then a AA with a disposable camera circuit. It will charge up a cap to 319 Volts. Then I jumped to 9V, 12V car battery, 120VAC, then rectified 120VAC with a bridge rectifier. So far, I've just used regular tap water. My meter reads open circuit.  I've tried a couple different electrode materials for the 12V in the 2 gallon container: plated screws, aluminum plates, spark plug. The only thing I can think of is to decrease the size of the container, dramatically. Even then, I would still have the problem of dissociation. I've been told to throw in some chemicals to decrease the resistance. But that's how to get more hydrogen production as well, from what I've read.  I would think it should go something like this: As I increase the power, heat would rise, proportionally, till it starts becoming a vapor. As I continue to increase the amount of power, the moisture of the gas decreases as the hydrogen and oxygen content increases. That's not what happens. Production starts almost immediately, with very little heat. No steam. I'm going to try decreasing the chamber next, but I still think I'm going to be getting hydrogen and oxygen, just with a higher moisture content as the water starts to heat up.

Question by Vorenus   |  last reply


Eric Wilhelm wins TR35 Innovation Award

Sharing your projects and ideas on Instructables is now officially a Big Idea. Eric just won the TR35 award for top innovators under 35 from MIT's Technology Review magazine for his work with Instructables; check out the press release below, and read about the other winners.I'm pretty psyched to be part of this site, as we're clearly doing something exciting and important -- it's especially neat to be an early adopter with the power to change the way society works.-- ChristyProject-Sharing Website Creator Named Top Young InnovatorSan Francisco, CA - August 19, 2008 -- Eric Wilhelm has been recognized by Technology Review magazine as one of the world's top innovators under the age of 35 for creating Instructables.com, the Internet's #1 project-sharing website.Instructables.com began as a way for Eric to document his engineering work and grad-school kitesurfing projects, and has evolved into a world-wide hub for documenting and sharing creative projects. The site's simple, elegant step-by-step format provides an intuitive platform that allows anyone to publish their project, complete with pictures, text, and embedded video.In a world of mass-produced culture, hand-making and personalizing is experiencing a resurgence, and people everywhere are reviving classic skills and technologies. Instructables is the hub of this movement, providing a social and interactive environment to demonstrate amazing projects and ideas. The site dramatically lowers the barrier to sharing projects, enabling crafters, modders, engineers, artists, cooks, bicyclists, and techies to gather and share their work freely, and where cross-pollination is actively encouraged."Everyone wants to be a creator, not just a consumer," Eric explains. "We bring passionate people together to learn from each other. Instructables makes it cool to be smart." Instructables is also a valuable educational resource. Parents and teachers rely on Instructables as a source of project ideas, and students maintain their personal portfolios at the site. By coupling old-fashioned tinkering with thoughtful discussion and long-distance collaboration, Instructables has begun to revolutionize learning and innovation.Eric Wilhelm and the other TR35 winners for 2008 will be featured in the September issue of Technology Review magazine and honored at the EmTech08 Conference. "The TR35 honors young innovators for accomplishments that are poised to have a dramatic impact on the world as we know it," said Jason Pontin, editor in chief and publisher of Technology Review magazine, "We celebrate their success and look forward to their continued advancement of technology in their respective fields."About Eric Wilhelm:Eric earned his SB, SM, and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from MIT, where he developed methods to print electronics and micro-electromechanical systems using nanoparticles. He co-founded Squid Labs, an innovation and design partnership, and a number of Squid Labs spin-off companies including Potenco, producing a human-powered generator for cell phones and laptops; Makani, an energy company seeking to harness high-altitude wind; OptiOpia, developing low-cost portable vision-testing and lens-fabricating devices; and Instructables, a collaborative how-to site that helps people document and share a process or skill. See Eric's How To Start A Business Instructable for the more detailed story.About Instructables.com:Instructables is the most popular Do It Yourself community on the Internet. Started in August 2005, Instructables provides accessible tools and publishing instructions to enable passionate, creative people to share their most innovative projects, recipes, ideas, and hacks. The site is currently home to over 14,000 projects covering such diverse areas as crafts, art, kids, electronics, pets, bikes, cars, robotics, green projects, and cooking.About Technology Review, Inc.:Technology Review, Inc., an independent media company owned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is the authority on the future of technology, identifying emerging technologies and analyzing their impact for leaders. Technology Review's media properties include Technology Review magazine, the oldest technology magazine in the world (founded in 1899); the daily news website TechnologyReview.com; and events such as the annual EmTech Conference at MIT. ContactsFor Instructables:Christy Canida, 510-931-5622press (at) instructables (dot) comFor Technology Review:Sarah Mees, 978-208-1499press (at) technologyreview (dot) com More news and press about Instructables here.

Topic by canida   |  last reply


Design and the Elastic Mind @ MOMA until May 12

I just stumbled across this wonderful exhibition at the MOMA in NY, which will be running until May 12. If you browse the online exhibit, you'll see a bunch of technologies and artworks that have graced these pages previously, but there's tonnes more of Really Cool Stuff - definitely worth passing by if you happen to be in New York...Design and the Elastic Mind, February 24-May 12, 2008View the Online Exhibit!In the past few decades, individuals have experienced dramatic changes in some of the most established dimensions of human life: time, space, matter, and individuality. Working across several time zones, traveling with relative ease between satellite maps and nanoscale images, gleefully drowning in information, acting fast in order to preserve some slow downtime, people cope daily with dozens of changes in scale. Minds adapt and acquire enough elasticity to be able to synthesize such abundance. One of design's most fundamental tasks is to stand between revolutions and life, and to help people deal with change. Designers have coped with these displacements by contributing thoughtful concepts that can provide guidance and ease as science and technology evolve. Several of them—the Mosaic graphic user's interface for the Internet, for instance—have truly changed the world. Design and the Elastic Mind is a survey of the latest developments in the field. It focuses on designers' ability to grasp momentous changes in technology, science, and social mores, changes that will demand or reflect major adjustments in human behavior, and convert them into objects and systems that people understand and use.The exhibition will highlight examples of successful translation of disruptive innovation, examples based on ongoing research, as well as reflections on the future responsibilities of design. Of particular interest will be the exploration of the relationship between design and science and the approach to scale. The exhibition will include objects, projects, and concepts offered by teams of designers, scientists, and engineers from all over the world, ranging from the nanoscale to the cosmological scale. The objects range from nanodevices to vehicles, from appliances to interfaces, and from pragmatic solutions for everyday use to provocative ideas meant to influence our future choices.

Topic by Patrik   |  last reply


Why did my WAGAN inverter blow up? Answered

Hi all, I have a WAGAN Slimline 1500 watt Inverter. I ran the output through the breaker box in the house, which is grounded. I used my car to run the system, but had another, larger battery in parallel with the car battery. The unit ran everything in the house. Microwave, fridge, lights and TVs. Had the unit going for about eight hours, then decided to give it a break and turned it off. I then experienced a very dramatic fireworks / light / smoke show. I was most upset. I know enough about electronics to figure that the inverter was toast. I put it down and forgot about it. Two years later I broke out the electronics gear and decided that I would try and fix it (the fact that another storm had passed through leaving us without light again probably had something to o with it!) I found that the MOSFET's on one side of the circuit board, all eight of them, were completely gutted. Talk about your catastrophic faliure. The MOSFETS are Fairchild FDP8770 N-Channel. There are eight other MOSFET's on the opposite side of the board, LVP640's (N Channel also). They look fine. The fans were working at the time of the fireworks. My questions are: 1) Why did it blow up  when the unit was being turned off? 2) If I start the car with the Inverter connected will it do any harm to it, and why? 3) I see three pots on the board, and am decent with a soldering iron. I want to fix it myself. Assuming I can get the parts I think it needs, Do I need to match the MOSFETs, which would mean I might have to throw away some good looking LVP640's, and how do I go about doing this? The board is set up with four transformers, and each is in series with a fuse. None of the fuses blew. I know that I'm kinda above my head in this, but I wanna try. Thanks for any help I can get!

Question by BoogWar   |  last reply


Design Changes on Instructables

As you've noticed, we've been making some design changes to Instructables.  We're trying to accomplish a number of things including making it easier to find content you're interested in, creating more compelling products for advertisers, and supporting and growing what we've already built.  Here, I'll share the details around some specific design changes. One of my big goals for 2010 is to increase our direct visitors.  A direct visitor might type our URL into their browser, click on a link in a newsletter, come to the site from one of their bookmarks, or search for a phrase that includes "Instructables".  Other types of visitors include searchers, who come to the site from phrases such as "sweet potato fries" but aren't specifically trying to reach Instructables.com, and visitors from blogs or news portals.  My thesis is that more and more brand advertisers will want to reach our true community, and not people who are just passing by.  A pretty good proxy for our true community is direct visitors, and we've already seen the savviest advertisers try to reach only that community by advertising exclusively on our homepage (the recent Apple campaigns, for example).  To grow our business and ensure that Instructables thrives, it's important that we have great opportunities for advertisers, and a stronger community means more great Instructables and more intelligent people seeing and commenting on your Instructables. To this end, we've been working to increase the likelihood that someone will go deeper into our content, and remember to come back in the future.  Said another way, we want that sweet potato fries Google search to introduce someone to Instructables, and then have them think, "wow this site is amazing, I'll bookmark it, sign up for the newsletter, come back, etc..."  Some of the most dramatic changes are on the homepage and channel homepages.   On the homepage, we've removed the intro text from the links to Instructables.  By making the homepage less cluttered with words, I was hoping to increase the number of people clicking on an Instructable.  Also, I felt that the beginning of the intro text didn't contribute much to my understanding of the Instructable, and often it was no more than a repetition of the title (and at worse a note about how it was someone's first...).  Removing text to increase engagement might seem counter-intuitive, but with too much going on, visitors sometimes just leave rather than decide what to click on.  So far, clicks from the homepage are flat or slightly up, so this change hasn't had a negative effect on deepening visits, and may over time move us in a positive direction.  On the channel homepages, we've drastically changed the layout to be more blog-like.  My theory here was to give people a format they were more familiar with from elsewhere on the web, and results have been dramatic.  The exit-rates (the percentage of visitors that leave Instructables from a particular page) on our channel homepages have been cut in half.  For example, the exit-rate on the home channel homepage has dropped from 12% to 4.5%.  This is really good!  To me, this indicates that on the channel homepages we're giving visitors more compelling content, and they are more likely to dig into that content. In support of our efforts to deepen visits, we've been doing similar smaller changes all over the site. Most of these are based on our traffic and click analysis, and if my theories are wrong, we change back or try something else.  One particular change that has generated concern is the removal of the Answers link from the header.  This has nothing to do with our support of Answers in general -- it's based on data.  That link was almost completely unused.  Coming again from the perspective of making a slightly cleaner look, we removed it.  As the link wasn't generating any clicks, traffic to Answers has been unaffected.  In fact, as we're highlighting specific answers on the channel homepages, traffic to the Answers section is actually up 7% since we removed the link:  from Feb. 1 - 18 answers did an average of 11.1 K pageviews per day; from Feb. 19 - 28 it's done 11.9 K pageviews per day.  Perhaps that's noise in the data, but removing the link certainly hasn't been the end of answers, and the trend since the change is positive. So, we do rearrange the furniture from time to time, but it's never without reason.  We're always trying to make Instructables better.  We've messed up in the past, and we'll surely mess up in the future; but I think this is good, because if we're not reaching and striving a little bit beyond our comfort zone, we're not learning and improving. 

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Construction ideas for this concept?

Recently, I have been working on a gas 'vaporizer' that evaporates gas before being fed into an engine. During my short-term experiment, I found that this saves ~70% (+-20% for crudity of measurement.) This works because the vapors will burn more thoroughly and cleanly, leading to higher apparent efficiency. Below is a basic diagram of how the system works. You can see there is a container that is half-full with gas, and a hose goes down with many small holes. As the engine's compression draws a vacuum on the container, air will come up through the holes. As it rises, the gas-air surface area rises dramatically, leading to the vaporization of gas. To further increase the surface area, I also added a felt liner on the inside to allow the gas liquid to rise and evaporate. The final mixture ends up very rich, so to compensate, a 'T' fitting has been added to allow air to mix in with the vapors/fumes. Some valves have also been added to control the air inlet (similar to a 'choke') and the amount fed to the engine (similar to a throttle. In fact, it is possible to use the original throttle or choke as a throttle on the carburetor on my tractor!) The problem is: My original design utilized a plastic folgers coffee can, and the flimsy plastic top was hot glued to a thicker plastic cutout for strength and support. Since most glues will dissolve in gasoline, including hot glue, it could not be used. most did not hold anyway. I also tried JP weld plastic cement and it did not hold at all. I had to trash this build. I did, however, get enough use to run the tractor for several minutes while testing gas use. I found that the tractor used nearly twice as much simply running on gas than the fumes. I did not have the float valve and electric pump hooked up with the prototype. Also the 3/4in housing I used may be a bit constrictive and also seems to get slightly damaged by the gas. It will not be a long-term solution.  So I need to redesign the project, and I am thinking of using a 1-3 gallon bucket that is sealed or a gas tank. I need good almost air-tight seals on everything. I am asking for any ideas related to the construction of this device and any tips you may have.

Question by -max-   |  last reply


The Community Over the Years

In the seven years I've been on Instructables, one thing I know to be true is that the community has changed. A lot. It is amusing to look over the "How to Steal An Instructable" post made years ago, which satirized the theft of projects. Looking back on things as old as this proves funny but also depressing though; the community has changed so dramatically in the years that have transpired that copied projects are now no longer the objects of satire or chiding but the recipients of praise and prizes. A few months ago, when I again broached the topic of copies on Instructables and the problems they cause, I was met with responses indicating that to overcome copycats all one needed to do was work a little harder. That is, those who have already put forward the effort of actually developing something new and of their own design should now work even harder to succeed. Curiously absent was any suggestion that copycats exert themselves and actually do something say--original. By chance, I ran into a thread I had not seen in years while writing this: the thread on the "Instructables laws," guiding principles users ought to observe. There are four, with some accompanying notes to all. The first entry, the Zeroth Law, is the one relevant to projects and their content. It states that: "if an Instructable exactly like yours has not already been posted, then you shall post your Instructable." An addendum is made to it, stating: "If your Instructable has an identical goal to a pre-existing Instructable, but achieves that goal by a different or improved route, or in a different style, then you shall also post your Instructable." The legitimacy of simplicity is also noted in an accompanying corollary. None of the above ideas are wrong. On the contrary, it is people ignoring this thinking which has caused serious issues. Nowadays, people know other projects have been published with identical instructions (and even superior quality), yet they proceed on and repost it themselves anyway. Furthermore, their copying usually violates the copyright restrictions laid out by the original creator. When the Instructables laws were written down, it is clear that original content was valued highly and respected. Nowadays, the dedication of the community toward these ideals is questionable to say the least. Today the community displays a disconcerting apathy toward makers and what they do. Just a few weeks ago, I was told the community is not interested in anything but the results--that the makers and their efforts are completely irrelevant. I'd rather not believe that is how the community at large believes things ought to be (especially given that it's a particularly unimpressive pitch to attract new makers and new ideas), but it seems like it may in fact be just that. With that in mind, things have obviously changed--for better or for worse is in the eyes of the beholder; I have already reached my own personal conclusion.

Topic by OrigamiAirEnforcer   |  last reply