are all types of lavender edible?

I have some growing and wanted to use it in cooking and wasn't sure if all type or only a few types were edible

Question by d2j5   |  last reply


. Which edible plants should I choose for my small greenhouse?

I'd like to start a small greenhouse from ikea in my balcony. It's an old model called Ort and as you can immagine it does not hold much space (about 1ft deep x 3ft wide x 6ft high with 2 or tree shelves in it). I'd like to plant something I can eat. and it definetly needs to fit in vases or other similar recipients. Which plants should I choose? I was thinking about beans, is it possible? Any other sujestion? Thanks

Question by EmcySquare   |  last reply


Edible Plants? AKa Underutilized crops

So.. I like to read the Wikipedia. I don't know why. However, the other day I found a little blurb interesting. I was reading about alternative crops when I realized I was very familiar with a few of the plants on the list. I do a fair amount of Gardening here in Northern Utah, so I was somewhat surprised to find that one of the weeds which I've been pulling for 90% of my gardening experience is actually an extremely nutrious food crop. So this got me wondering, what other alternative food crops were out there. I tore through the wikipedia's list of underutilized crops, and was surprised by the number of plants that just aren't used. In many cases, I can't see a reason why such a crop isn't being used. Especially in areas where cultivation of said plant would encourage use of land that's not otherwise arable. As a for instance, I live very near the Great Salt Lake. The flood plain of the great salt lake is salt killed, however, There is a small plant that grows on the flood plain. I was told that it was edible, but it wasn't usually eaten due to both the texture and the flavour. So, I was surprised when I noticed it's scientific name on the underutilized crop list. Turns out it's a good oil seed crop, and oil is one of those things we need. The other thing I noticed is that alot of the crops were indigenious, rather then more commonly used cultivars. Indigenous crops that have evolved to survive in specific locations are, in many cases, better suited to survive in local areas then food crops developed through artificial selection. Utilizing indigenious plants helps mitigate the impact of agricultural activity on the environment (which is arguably more destructive then any other industrial activity), and helps to reduce pests of popular cultivars. So with that all said, I'm interested to see what other people have donee along this line of thinking. I've noticed an instructable or two that have done just this. I'm probably put one up at the end of this year. Mine will be focusing on Common Pigweed and White Goosefoot (scientific names are in the links to the wikipedia at the bottom). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Underutilized_crops http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amaranthus_palmeri http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Goosefoot

Topic by Qcks   |  last reply




LED Grow lights for indoor plants?

I have a lamp with a couple of multi-color changing LED light bulbs and I was wondering if any of the red/blue combination settings would work well for growing plants indoors? This is a photo of the type of bulb I have.  I have a couple of non-edible plants that I got at a craft store and I was just wondering if this type of bulb would work well and help them grow since I can't get these plants into direct sunlight.  Thank you Instructaverse! 

Question by tklene   |  last reply


Are there any fruit trees that will grow "true" from the fruit's seeds? Answered

For example, an apple tree grown from the seed of an apple from the grocery store will have a very small probability of ever producing an edible apple. Are there any varieties of fruit that can grow productive offspring from their seeds? In other words, can I go into the grocery store and buy some fruit, eat the fruit, plant the seeds, and in a few years sell fruit back to grocery store?

Question by shoehornteeth   |  last reply


ReadyMade Garden Challenge

Our friends at ReadyMade are holding their second annual Garden Challenge. If you're into gardening, reuse, or reclaiming space on a small budget (sound like anyone here?), this should be right up your alley.Here's the info:ReadyMade is looking for contenders for its Second Annual Garden Challenge. Winners will have their outdoor space published next spring and will vie for yet-to-be-determined-but-amazing prizes.Here are the parameters:1. ReadyMade gives you $3002. You take that loot and transform your outdoor space (whether it be an actual garden, a stoop, a rooftop, or even a window box) in an innovative way. The transformation can include any of the following: creative landscaping, outdoor furniture/firepits/fountains, edible gardens, and so forth.Bonus points go to those who incorporate:-native plants-water catchments or grey water systems-food farming-salvage/reused objects3. You send in photos of your work by Sept 1. Our panel of judges selects winners, then we send out a photographer to shoot the garden by end of September.To submit ideas, take a "before" shot of the garden/stoop/roof/sill you plan to redo, and draw up a sketch or list of projects/plantings you plan to implement and email the lot by August 1st, 2008 to: shana (at) readymademag.com. You'll then have one month to perform your magic.Attached is an example of a winning entry from our first garden challenge. Derek's submission of backyard camping projects was so good, we hired him.Many thanks,The ReadyMakers

Topic by canida   |  last reply


A New, Global Oil Quandary: Costly Fuel Means Costly Calories - Peak cooking oil?

The interconnectedness of the world can sometime be striking. I noticed yesterday that Safeway, a west coast grocery store chain, has converted it trucks to biodiesel. Due to increased fuel-demand for things that were previously only considered foodstuffs, the cooking oils carried by the biodiesel-fueled trucks were probably significantly more expensive. In Malaysia, this has even idled some plants design to refine oils into biodiesel:Here on Malaysia's eastern shore, a series of 45-foot-high green and gray storage tanks connect to a labyrinth of yellow and silver pipes. The gleaming new refinery has the capacity to turn 116,000 tons a year of palm oil into 110,000 tons of a fuel called biodiesel, as well as valuable byproducts like glycerin. Mission Biofuels, an Australian company, finished the refinery last month and is working on an even larger factory next door at the base of a jungle hillside.But prices have spiked so much that the company cannot cover all its costs and has idled the finished refinery while looking for a new strategy, such as asking a biodiesel buyer to pay a price linked to palm oil costs, and someday switching from palm oil to jatropha, a roadside weed.from the NYT article A New, Global Oil Quandary: Costly Fuel Means Costly CaloriesAnd there's more: as more and more baked goods eliminate trans-fats, those fats are often replaced with palm oil, so the pastries carried by the biodiesel-fueled trucks are themselves consuming more edible oil. While this will increase the price to make and ship a snack cake in the US, it has much greater effect elsewhere. Since people in the developing world get such a large percentage of their calories from cooking oil, increased prices have caused riots:No category of food prices has risen as quickly this winter as so-called edible oils -- with sometimes tragic results. When a Carrefour store in Chongqing, China, announced a limited-time cooking oil promotion in November, a stampede of would-be buyers left 3 people dead and 31 injured.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Halloween = Success at Instructables HQ

Welcome to Letters from the Editor, a new feature we're trying out!  This week I'd like to share some highlights from our recent Halloween Show & Tell party. It's been a busy week here at Instructables HQ.  Halloween is a favorite holiday around here, and when we do it, we do it up right.  This year we did a series of in-house projects and guides to bring you the best of Instructables Halloween, and we went all out. Our ramp-up to Halloween culminated in a community-wide Show & Tell last Friday night.  HQ was transformed into a proper party hub as we socialized, snacked, and shared our latest projects with the crowd.  The night kicked off with an impressive costume by Peter and Nick Matsakis (winners of our costume contest!) inspired by the game Plants vs. Zombies.  Peter dressed as a Threepeater with working pea shooters, and Nick was Crazy Dave.  Why?  Because he's CRAAAAAAZY! Other highlights from the Show & Tell included Grathio Labs' Secret Knock Detecting Gumball Machine (you have to know the secret knock to get the gum!), and Robert Hermes' impressive Covert Public Messages, which you can only see when looking through polarized lenses. Very cool stuff. And let's not forget the food!  Drawing from our library of creepy Halloween treats, we recreated Edible Zombie Eyeballs omitting the goo to make it vegan-friendly, Pumpkin Bread in mini muffin form, Extra Satanic Deviled Eggs with a wasabi twist, and Halloween Candy Bark in various creepy colors.  Additionally, you can look forward to new Instructables detailing the making of peanut butter and chocolate Buckeyes and my Towering Pumpkin Cheesecake! All in all, it's been a very successful Halloween season.  Next we look to all of the great contests we have running.  Did you know that Humana's giving away a Dream Vacation to one very lucky innovative user!  Enter now! And don't forget to check back next week to cast your votes for our Halloween Contest finalists.  We weren't the only ones to go all out - you impressed us with almost 400 entries already! Until next time, all the best. Sarah P.S. for even more pictures, look here and here!

Topic by scoochmaroo   |  last reply