Search for exoskeleton in Topics


Is ironman like exoskeletons possible

I was wondering cause this site called Aegis avenger has a exoskeleton although not finished

Topic by InsaneWrath    |  last reply


Exoskeleton Helps the Paralysed Walk

Exoskeletons frequently hit the news as projects to make super-soldiers, but a new, more slimline version has bee built by Israeli company Argo Medical Technologies. Inspired by the paralysis of one of their own engineers, ReWalk allows wearers to walk, use stairs, stand and sit.The wearer switches between "modes" with a tap on a wrist-pad, then controls the actual motion by shifting their upper body-weight. For instance, they would hit "stand", then lean forward to make the ReWalk straighten its exo-legs. The device is much more streamlined than some other systems, run from a very flat pack-pack, and can be worn all day, but is only suitable for paralysis victims who still have good control of their arms and shoulders.ReWalk seems much simpler and lighter than other exoskeletons, but that seems to be because the designers have not tried to replace the entire walking function - balance is still down to the wearer, using crutches, but I imagine practice could reduce that to sticks, or even a single stick.Weight and fitness seem to be factors as well - the man in the video is was an Israeli paratrooper, injured on duty, and there are no shots of the rather portly wheel-chair-bound inventor wearing the ReWalk, but I think you'll agree it would still be a major benefit to an awful lot of people.This video is in German, but shows more shots of the exoskeleton, and has clips of the designer discussing his project.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


How to make a cheap myoelectric sensor like the ones they use on the exoskeleton Hal-5? Answered

I'm working on building an exoskeleton like Hal-5. I have almost the whole thing planned out, but I don't know how/where to make/buy a cheap myoelectric sensor that will measure the faint bio-electric signals coming from the brain to the muscle. Any information would be apprieciated.

Question by Lewanuva31    |  last reply


How do you make a cheap myoelectric sensor or a cheap ecg/ekg sensor?

I'm pretty new to soldering, and circuit building. And I'm working on making an exoskeleton, but don't know how to build the sensors for it. So if you have any information, it would be appreciated.

Question by Lewanuva31    |  last reply


I'm looking for a high volume, small size air compressor but I can't find a good one. What do you guys recommend? Answered

I need an air compressor that has an EXTREMELY high CFM (Cubic Feet per Minute) rating. It is for an air-powered exoskeleton (crazy idea, I know). It needs to be pretty small, backpack sized if possible, It doesn't need that big of an air chamber (fire-extinguisher sized). Continuous run is a must. Powering it shouldn't be a problem because I will be carrying ~ 30 pounds of Li-ion batteries for running the compressor. I also won't be needing more then ~ 100PSI. Weight is an almost non issue, I wouldn't mind a 20 pound compressor, I'll probably remove the frame anyway, so that will take away some weight.

Question by bowmaster    |  last reply


What props/armor are a must-make in the DIY world?

I'm currently looking towards making something like weapons, armors, etc., specifically those with origins from movies, cartoons, video games, etc. Other than the ones everyone does such as Halo, Iron Man, knight armor, etc. what other armor, weapons, or accessories are a must-make or just plain awesome? Think along the lines of something like the Batman gauntlet, except from movies (or something) that are old but still remembered and cool. Also thinking of a long term project of a chiken-walker mech costume, exoskeleton costume (NOT Iron Man), or AT-RT. What do you think?

Question by D00M99    |  last reply


Where to get this body armor design made or how to make it?

I have a design for original body armor, but I don't know where to buy it or get it built. Think of a nomex survival suit, but Dragon Skin and Kevlar for fabric covering underneath armor, 2nd layer U.S.A. brand or Japanese exoskeleton suit with titanium caseing, 3rd layer graphene and dragon skin for plates covering entire body like a full body mold but cut in pieces for flexibility. Where can I get this built or how can I build it precisely. It will last against a FN FAL. I live in McAllen Texas. I prefer professionally made, so any suggestions. I have no budget.

Question by Anti11    |  last reply


Holey Expanded Polystyrene! Weevils are eating my noodles!

And they're eating their way in through the styrofoam cup. I didn't think they could do that.  I thought there was a rule against that, or that they would not like the taste of styrofoam, or something.  And how did they get through the layer of shrink wrap plastic that's wrapped around the styrofoam cup?  I knew you would not believe it either. That's why I took some pictures. You see?  You see those little evil weevil-sized holes in the side of the cup? See the circular pile of weevil dust on the top of the dried noodles?  I told you it was true. I really don't mind the taste of weevils in my noodles, but the darned styrofoam cup is not going to hold water with those holes in it.  So I tape over those holes with clear plastic (cellophane?) tape, and now I can put some hot water on those noodles. The last picture shows the noodles in their hot, wet, state. There is a weevil carcass barely visible, or maybe it is just a shed exoskel (I think they molt) floating on top of that green pea, on the left there. Edit: I just noticed the finished, empty, cup has dead weevils stuck to the sides, and these are a pretty good example of what weevils and weevil exoskeletons look like, for anyone who has not seen weevils before.

Topic by Jack A Lopez    |  last reply


(newsletter) Brain Cake, Tesla Radio, Proton Pack

Sign-up for this newsletter: Welcome back! NEW: Stay visible as the nights get darker in the Light Up the Night! Contest and win some cool clothes from Cordarounds with secret reflective powers! Mega Contest: It's our most awesome Halloween Contest ever! Any Instructable published since the last Halloween contest is eligible! Win great prizes from Singer, Dremel, Ponoko, Monkeylectric, Photojojo, and an Instructables Pro Membership! Arduino Contest - Make anything involving Arduino and win an Arduino Mega or a sweet prize from Evil Mad Science! Want a more convenient version of Instructables with fewer ads? Get a Pro Membership! Brain Cake Professional Water Rocket Guide Precision Pumpkin Carving Spooky Tesla Spirit Radio Document your creations this weekend! Show off your brilliance! Bottle Cap Table with Resin Surface Toy Green Army Man Costume Yoshi Mascot and Baby Mario Costumes Ghostbusters Proton Pack with Lasers Look Like a Zombie Desktop Decepticon Maquette LEGO Halloween Costume How to Make Beer Last minute ideas Win sweet prizes from Evil Mad Science! Build a Solar Power Station Exoskeleton Costume Build a Large DB8 HDTV Antenna Respiratory Assist for the Flu   Now go make something awesome, and I'll see you next week! - Eric Instructables.com - 82 2nd St. - San Francisco, CA Sign-up for this newsletter:

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


Gilding a ...Wasp?

I have a  vision for a project but am unsure what would be the best means of achieving it.  When I was a kid, I had a bug collection. My grandfather found a perfectly preserved wasp in his garage and saved it for me in a plastic syrup bottle lid. Over the decades all my other insect specimens crumbled (I was a kid, so I just had them loose in a school box without proper mounts) but this wasp is STILL intact and perfect inside the syrup cap more than 20 years later! My grandfather was very special to me, and I was toying with the idea of somehow metal plating this wasp to turn it into a pendant. I have no experience with metal working and don't own the stuff to do it, but i'm open to purchasing materials if my goal even seems realistic.  It is a fragile exoskeleton, which probably limits what I can do in terms of casting  I have wondered about brush coating it with fiberglass resin (to strengthen it) and then painting it with gold leaf, but many of the faux gold leaf paints out there are pretty crappy looking.   Fearing I might just end up destroying the wasp, I've also thought maybe I should just get a Ryker mount and hang him with the rest of my legit insect collection, though it is not posed properly and is likely waaaaaay too old to be re-relaxed for posing. If any experienced jewelry makers, gold leaders, or entomologists have thoughts on how to successfully gild this wasp (or why not to), I welcome your ideas! Thanks in advance.

Topic by ashleyjlong    |  last reply


Iron Man

Hello. No one seems to have done anything in this group at all since inception. That honestly sucks, as I was hoping that someone would have put in some time and at least come out with some sketches, or put their thoughts down on paper. Well I am not one to complain without doing something about the problem. First up is the issue of powered movement. That is the core of Iron Man's super strength. You have 3 real options here. Hydraulic, Stepper Motor, or Servo Motor. I have filtered out hydraulic simply because it is not as easy to work with as the other electrical motors. I found a comparison chart, and a link to it is posted below. http://www.legacycncwoodworking.com/stepper-vs-servo-motors/ Based on the information it contained, I would say that a stepper motor is the most efficient way to go. It takes more power to run, and generates more heat, but neither of those problems is difficult to deal with. Heat syncs, and a propane/natural gas generator will solve both of those problems readily. The next problem is the exoskeleton, the armored body of Iron Man. I have looked into materials, and the difficulty in casting them, or machining them. ZA, or Zinc Aluminum alloys seem to be the way to go. They are relatively easy to make, requiring only about 900F to melt them, they cast extremely well, and they make extremely fine detailed castings. When they set up, they have hardness equivalent to that of Cast Iron. They also lend themselves readily to sand casting, mold casting, and to graphite casting. Alright, I have put my 2 cents in. Lets hear from the rest of you.

Topic by xarlock667    |  last reply


Ship of Theseus - Philosophy of Identity

This past saturday there was a show on TV about the advancements in the field of prosthetics and human augmentation. I only watched less than half of it - but the timing was interesting. I came across an article about the Ship of Theseus (from Greek Legend) and have been reading quite a bit about "identity" and similar topics. This is philosophy - so there's really no right answer, but I have found it very interesting to think about and thought I'd share and see what others think.The gist of the story: Say we were to preserve Theseus' ship. As parts deteriorated and rotted away, we replace them with new (better/stronger) parts. Eventually, we replace each part with a new one. The question now is - Is it still the same ship? I'm willing to bet most of you will say yes.Now lets say that instead of replacing the ships components with new ones - we take all of the parts from the warehouse (where the parts are being stored) and reconstruct the ship from these new/better parts. Which ship has the "identity" of Theseus' ship? This is an interesting question because I'm again willing to bet that the "first" ship mentioned is your answer. But why? The parts would have gone to the "first" ship if not into the "second" ship. Why should this be different?Third Case:We take Theseus' ship and we tear it completely down in dry dock. In its place, we reconstruct using new parts. Is it still Theseus' ship?Now lets look at a digital device - my laptop for instance. Let us say that I have an "identical" machine (spec wise) and I cut and paste each file from this hard disk to the "new" machine. Does this "new" machine take the "identity" of the "old?" Can we say this "new" laptop (ship) is in fact Theseus' laptop? Talking with my colleagues - their answer (unanimously) was no - it is not the same.So here is where I get to the human side of things... Biological process have our bodies continuously replicating cells. In about a year, roughly 90% of the cells in your body will die. But no worries - they are continuously replaced with new ones. So, does that mean we are a different person compared to 12 months ago (I've read this question from several sources)? How about amputees? Today, prosthetic limbs can allow them to do what many of us choose not to do - run marathons. Are they any less of what they were before? <-- I know that sounds "wrong" - put put "political correctness" aside (but by no means am I putting down the situation of an amputee).Again, I'm willing to bet many will say yes - we're the same person. One argument is that our memories make our "identity." Fair enough. Now lets entertain the future. We now have the technology to save your memories digitally. We can digitize the human brain preserving its intelligence and thinking ability. Just entertain this idea for a few minutes. So if my brain (and its memories) are now digital and I copy it to another vessel. Is it still me? Do "I" still have the same identity? I'd like to think yes, but what was your answer about copying a laptop's memory (was it no - they are not the same)? Why should my digitized memories be any different than that of a laptop's digitized memory?At this point, my colleagues were floored. They figured out where I was going a few sentences before I said it. That's what makes the topic so interesting (in my opinion).If anyone has ever heard of HAL-5 - you already know what a feat it is. HAL-5 (yes, that's a play off of a space odyssey) is a human exoskeleton designed to assist those whom otherwise would be unable to walk for long periods of time. The user can lift heavy weights (80kg - say a dishwasher) among other helpful tasks. How does it know to move? Sensors on the skin detect electrical impulses in the brain that tell the muscle to react. Those signals are processed and turned into mechanical motion. All of this happens before the muscles have time to move. That is, the machine is moving before you even do.So if we replace our bodies and even our nervous system with mechanical devices - what makes us the same person? AND, are we the same person if we can simply copy ourselves to a new body?So last point - and it's not even my own. One of my colleagues brought this to the table today (literally at the lunch table) :P We were talking about the advancements and the potential/reality of human augmentation. Then he says something that makes complete sense to me. He said that we are at the point where our brain is evolving at a rate faster than our human bodies are. Just give yourself a minute to contemplate and wrap your head around the potential of that statement. To a degree - we have already done this (just not internally). Why else would we fly in a plane or drive a car? Well, I for one sure can't fly or run at 70+mph.1. I apologize for the length.2. I'm curious of your thoughts -- if you have another aspect of this, please do post.3. Remember there is no "correct" answer, this is just philosophy.4. There will always be more question than answers on this subject (at least I think so).HAL-5: http://www.engadget.com/2006/10/29/hal-5-robotic-suit-ready-for-mass-production/HAL-5 (mountain climb): http://www.engadget.com/2006/08/08/hal-robot-suit-almost-summits-with-quadriplegic-man-in-tow/

Topic by trebuchet03    |  last reply


The worst time of my life

If three years ago somebody had told me that I would be at Maker Faire, using my cyborg arms, watching Arc Attack playing the “Doctor Who” theme, and meeting Adam Savage from “Mythbusters”, I would have said that person is crazy or is mocking me. But I was there. With Instructables. It was awesome when Adam Savage, in the middle of his conference, yelled to me “Hey man! Nice borg!!”. “OH MY GOD!” I thought, “ADAM SAVAGE FROM THE MYTHBUSTERS TOLD ME I MADE A NICE BORG!!” But, beyond Adam Savage, the giant robots, the fire and electricity shows, the beautiful steampunk women, the good energy, the delicious food and the pictures with Daleks; the most beautiful, shocking, awesome and magical moment of the Maker Faire 2013 was when I had just arrived at the Autodesk booth. I saw the giant map of DIYers from around the world, and I realized my picture and profile were representing Colombia and I was one of the three leading makers of South America. I was paralyzed remembering all this journey, from being a complete loser without a future to that point in time and space when I felt absolutely happy, calm, and at peace with myself. It was worth it to keep fighting, just for that sublime moment. I felt like a Rock Star. Not because I was, but because Instructables and Autodesk made me feel like one. ……………………………………… When people ask me “Why do you love Instructables?” my answers are always the same: because the site is awesome, has amazing projects and great contests with cool prizes; because Instructables is the only one who has supported my DIY activities, especially in my country (Colombia) where science and technology aren’t priorities, and so on. But I never gave the complete answer. And now, after these fantastic five months as Artist in Residence, I want to tell the truth: I love Instructables because they were with me in the worst time of my life. ……………………………………… In 2009, I lost my job as Security Analyst in an important Colombian company. I thought I could subsist thanks to my junk projects and creating my own business, but almost nobody was interested on buying recycled crafts (besides, I wasn’t as good then as I am today.) And the only interested people wanted my works for free. It was not enough for a living, so after a few months I started looking for a job. Due to its economic situation, Colombia has high rates of unemployment and it’s very hard to find a job, and there’s no government subsidy for unemployed workers (sorry Colombia! One day, I will talk about all your beautiful and fantastic things, because you have a lot. But not today). Besides, when you are a former military officer the only civilian jobs you can apply for are in security because nobody thinks you can be creative; and if you are, nobody takes you seriously. Every two weeks I had an interview. Every interview ended with just another “we will call you.” It’s time to confess something to the world: at the same time, I was diagnosed with mild Borderline Personality Disorder and depression. It’s not something that “SHAZAM! You are nuts!”. No. I knew from years ago there was something wrong about me, but just in that moment I found out what I have. Just in case you ask: no, this condition doesn’t make me a bad employee, and I’m very competent in my work. No, I’m not some kind of evil psycho. Just a little bit creepy sometimes, but I always try my best to be a good person. And no, I’m not trying to look like a “dark and bizarre, Tim Burton style” character just because I want to look interesting. It may work for an artist or a teenager, but not for somebody trying to get a job in the security business or a stable relationship. I didn’t have any health insurance; I didn’t have money for any treatment and, in case I could afford it, there is a social stigma about persons with some kind of mental disorder, and no company would be interested in hiring a security manager with that kind of problem. So, I had to keep it to myself. I didn’t even tell it to my family. And my girlfriend broke up with me. So, my life was “complete.” I was without a job, love and almost without my sanity. Almost all of my “friends” were gone. I was drowning in debts. I didn’t have money even for basic things. I had to return to my mother’s house. I lost every goal, every dream, and every hope. The situation was so desperate that I seriously thought about giving up. But only two things stopped me from doing that. One was Carolina, the only friend I had in that moment. The other thing was Instructables. ……………………………………… I found the site several months after because I was looking for simple robots ideas. Then, I saw Instructables has contests, and I entered my first project (the “SPD Exoskeleton”) for the 2009 Halloween Contest. A lot of people made awesome comments about my project, and I received my first prize: the “Photojojo!” book and a Robot T-Shirt. “What? I just post pictures of my project on an internet site and they give me free stuff? Interesting!” Then, I made another project, the “Valentine’s RoboGrinch”. I was a finalist in the 2010 Valentine’s Day Contest. People around the world commented about my ideas, and my projects started to become popular being featured in other sites and blogs around the planet. When I got the First Prize on the Dead Computer Contest, I gave to my mother the netbook I won. It was the only present I could afford to give her in a long time. In my darkest moments, when I thought about giving up, I remembered I had some project on Instructables I didn’t finish or publish, and then I keep fighting just one or two days more, because I didn’t want to leave it uncompleted. When I finished it, I endured one week more, just for knowing if it was successful in a contest. Sometimes I won. Sometimes I lost. When I could get some money, I used it for buying tools or materials for the projects, instead of food or paying debts. Because I started to think that every project, every idea I was making, every instructable I was writing, was my little legacy to humanity. Probably one day I will die, but at least in some part of the Internet, it would be a proof that I made something good, something that could be appreciated by anybody, and my life was not in vain. And I started to win more contests. It felt good, because I thought “I’m a loser, but this loser is kicking butts!” With so many fantastic authors, the competition got tougher, so I had to improve my skills (and my English. Instructables was the only opportunity I had to improve and practice this language.) I became very good at making stuff with plastic trash and limited resources! Besides, without knowing anything about me and my personal situation, even without being on the same country, the Instructables staff and community were (and are) very special and kind with me. They always made me feel respected and loved. Instructables was the only escape I had from my reality. This site has thousands of users and still they had the time to talk to me, to care for me, to make me feel like part of a bunch of friends! They were the only people that didn’t see me or treat me like a loser or somebody who needed to be pitied. They were the only ones that made me feel I wasn’t completely alone on this planet. All of this situation lasted one year and two months. Instructables kept me fighting almost all of that time. ……………………………………… Finally, in September of 2010, I got a job. It wasn’t the best (honestly, it was horrible!), but at least I was working. Four months later, I got a better job as security manager of a business center, enough to start paying debts. On October 2010, I went to the Colombian equivalent of Comic-Con, using the Cyborg suit I built for the Instructables’ Dead Computer Contest. Thanks to this, a beautiful woman found me out of the crowd, because she loves robots. She became my biggest fan and we shared a big love. I never thought I could find a love like that. She was the girlfriend I got thanks to Instructables! She was the inspiration of my “Cyborg Heart in a Can”. And I gave it to her. And then Instructables interviewed me as Featured Author. I would be the first Colombian to be a Featured Author! That was awesome! In total, I have won twelve Instructables contests and two challenges. Thanks to Instructables, people of all the world know about my cyborgs and my Roboplanters. (The funny thing is I’m still feeling like the black sheep of the family!) ……………………………………… It was 2012. After one and a half year of relationship, my girlfriend and I broke up, for good (our respective problems were stronger than our love.) Besides, I was stuck at work and I couldn’t study something art or robotics related because the restrictive schedule of my job. So, the depression was returning… I was lying on the couch watching “Doctor Who” when a phrase get stuck in my mind: “All of time and space. Everywhere and anywhere. Every star that ever was. Where do you want to start?” And then I realized that nothing was tying me to Colombia and I could apply to the Instructables Artist in Residence Program. I wanted to know, at least for a few months, how it was to be in the most awesome company in this world. So I quit my job, I sold most of my belongings, I packed my Dremel, my trench coat and my sonic screwdriver, I said goodbye to my family and I traveled to San Francisco on February 27th of 2013. I didn’t come for the “American Dream”. I came for the “Instructables Dream”! ……………………………………… What can I say? How can I describe the most fantastic experience of my life, using just a few words? How can I summarize five months of happiness, learnings, DIY and good energy, when every day was an amazing adventure? I felt, after 35 years of life, I finally arrived in the place I belong. I met the faces behind the site I love and admire. You know who they are (sorry for breaking the magic but, please! Update the Instructables Team page! A lot of awesome people are not there!) I’m trying to not mention specific persons, because I shared awesome experiences with each one of you. Every one of you taught me something, every one of you made me feel appreciated, every one of you does a fantastic job keeping this site working. And I want nobody feels excluded of this post (Sherry always fights for sending out prizes on time, silently. Why nobody says “Thanks Sherry?”) Because Instructables is more than servers and computers and projects and internet. Instructables is the people. From the beginning, Instructables and the Autodesk Consumer Group made me feel like one of the team, like part of something bigger than myself. The Pizza Thursdays, the Marvelous Mondays, the Build Days, the Design Nights, became magical events for me. But it wasn’t only Instructables and Autodesk. This beautiful city of San Francisco taught me real lessons about tolerance, respect and being yourself. It doesn’t matter if you are radically different to the other people. Just be a nice person, do your job and respect the others, and everyone will respect you. I had never touched a CAD software, because I didn’t see any possible use for it in my life. And I thought it was something so complicated that only engineers and designers could use that kind of program. But then I went from 0 to 123D Design! I learned the basics in just two days and I fell in love with this awesome program, and it’s free! (But, seriously guys, try to fix that problem with the crashes. Everyone in the lab knew that when I screamed, it was because the program had a crash and I hadn’t saved the progress). And later, I learned how to use a 3D printer, a machine beyond my wildest dreams! I remember the infinite sadness the first time I went to the amazing Pier 9 (new installations of Instructables and the Autodesk Consumer Group) and thought I could never try that fantastic technology; and the happiness when Noah told me I could stay two months more! You have all the best freaking hi-tech tools in this freaking world, and you don’t need to be a NASA scientist or a millionaire to use them! This place is waiting for people of all the world, to come with their ideas! (It doesn’t matter how crazy they are). 3D printers, laser cutters, a water jet, a bunch of expensive machines I still don’t know the names of, an awesome test kitchen, metal and wood shops, even a sewing area! And all available for the DIY community! But, more than being on Pier 9 because the fantastic machines, I loved to stay here because Instructables.  My life has good things and bad things, successes and failures. But being part of Instructables and sharing moments with all of you has been the most memorable experience of my whole existence! ……………………………………… I want to say something to my dear friends of Instructables and Autodesk: if one day, for some inexplicable reason, you feel like your work is meaningless, you don’t like it’s Monday or simply you forgot what this is all about, just remember something: you will never know exactly how many lives Instructables has touched: how many persons found their true calling thanks to the projects, and how many persons found a hobby that makes their life happier. How many couples fell in love thanks to the delicious recipes and romantic crafts, and how many parents shared precious moments with their sons building something. But now you will always know, at least, Instructables and Autodesk saved one life. My life! ……………………………………… I wish to finish my post with some “Doctor Who” quote. I love “Doctor Who”, because is all about being awesome and optimistic and keep smiling even in the worst situations or despite you are feeling absolutely sad and alone. And the series has a lot of badass and beautiful quotes! But now, when I have to start packing my bags, when I have to return to my hometown where I have to pretend I’m a “normal” person and try to get a “normal” job again, when I have to say goodbye to my coworkers (that are at the same time most of the only real friends I have had in my life), and to the greatest organization I have had the honor of being part (where for first time in life I felt truly appreciated, respected and loved, and happy because it was Monday and I could go to work in a company that is making of this world a better place); there’s one, and only one phrase that I got stuck on my head; the last words of David Tennant as the Tenth Doctor when, standing alone after saying goodbye to his loved ones (and to the most awesome time of his life), his final moment comes: “I don’t want to go.” Mario Caicedo Langer Former Artist in Residence. Instructables

Topic by M.C. Langer    |  last reply