Aluminum Extrusions?

Does one of you guys know the best place i can buy aluminum extrusions? I need some for an upcoming project.

Question by cooldude01   |  last reply


My plastic extrusion

Hi I've made this little extrusion as a prototype: http://www.preciousplastic.com/little-extrusion/ It's for my graduation project at my school...(still in progress) However, This is small..I want to make it big! Does any of you guys have an idea where I can get a serious screw for inside the plastic extrusion? Are where to get them second hand? New price is around $2500...way to much for me...

Topic by davehakkens   |  last reply


Extrusion plate in CAD

I have an idea that requires either machining abilities/tool access or CAD experience. A while ago, I found out something that was apparently common knowledge. Meat grinders with their blades removed can be used to extrude spaghetti. So I decided to look for additional pasta extruder plates for different noodles. There are no pasta extruder plates for standard meat grinders. You can, however, buy a glorified grinder and accessory plates or a dedicated pasta machine for top dollar. The marketted pasta makers at their very cores are the same as the meat grinders with the right plates installed. Obviously pasta dies/plates for meat grinders are intentionally not produced. The closest I could come was a garage sale extruder that looks like a plastic grinder with three dies. Big surprise, it doesnt work. But I modified a plate so it sort of works for a grinder. This worked as proof of concept. Would anyone be interested in helping to design CAD files to print pasta dies on Shapeways based on proper pasta dies? I don't know much about CAD, but it looks easier than the designs created by some folks on here. Basically disks with a dimple for alignment and specially shaped holes. admittedly, the hole depths would be the complicated part. Let me know what you think.

Topic by Darkman   |  last reply


What kind of aluminium extrusion is this? Answered

What is the exact name for this type of aluminium extrusion/profile? Because I have difficulties finding these profiles, when I google places to buy. them.http://www.tradekey.com/product-free/Aluminium-Extrusions-industrial-Aluminum-Profile-275215.html Best regards Chris S. Ramming

Question by Ramming   |  last reply


Thoughts on a prototyping device

Hey I'm a college student trying to create a specialty extruder to aid in prototyping, possibly to be used along side a 3D printer.  Attached is a CAD mockup but we're in the process of building this.  The applcations are fairly broad at the moment and if you think of a cool way to use long pieces of plastic for modelling, crafts, art, whatever, please let me know. This is my kickstarter and I'm trying to get any feedback you have, thanks! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects...?ref=discovery

Topic by saudade-pigeon 


Melting Issue in LDPE Extrusion with Black Masterbatch

We're facing this situation with black masterbatch for LDPE in extrusion lamination process where some of the masterbatch granules are not properly melted and mixed with LDPE, which creates a lot of defects in the lamination. I've tried a number of Black masterbatch samples from different companies and in different prices and the problem still exists. Increasing the extruder temperatures doesn't seem to be helping either. This happens only with Black masterbatch and all other masterbatch colors melt and blend in with LDPE to give an uniform color strength. Appreciate your professional advice on preventing this issue..Thank you!

Question by hasitha.saveco   |  last reply


Why would I need to know the 'extrusion direction' of Lexan?

I bought a small square of Lexan (sheet polycarbonate) to experiment with and noticed on the clear, protective laminate the words: "extrusion direction" and an arrow. I will most likely use this sheet for thermo -forming, but would like to hear any thoughts on how the extrusion direction might affect drilling, cutting, etc. Thanks, Marshall

Question by redplanetcorridor   |  last reply


Will a glued acrylic structure hold for a 3d printer ?

Hi,  I'm designing a delta style 3d printer from scratch while trying to use only laser cut acrylic sheets and aluminium extrusions. The entire design is based on the T Bolt construction idea. But there are a few parts that simply need to be glued together. I'm trying to avoid using such joints in load bearing areas but there are a few areas where this is becoming difficult such as the carriage. I'd like to know if i can safely glue the laser cut parts together with out the entire thing falling apart and if yes what kind of glue should I look for? Blckthng

Question by blckthng   |  last reply


Anyone knows how to make a homemade Bowl Extrusion Machine?

I'm trying to do a new shapes from a used PET bottles. Is possible?

Question by martindisenio   |  last reply


Commercially available semiconducting paint, ink, extrusion material? Photovoltaic properties?

Just wondering if anyone has a line on something resembling these keywords. Considering trying to print solar cells. Please do not respond telling me why this is not possible. I am more than grateful, however, for any info about the hurdles I would need to overcome.

Topic by bowakowa   |  last reply


SemiFlex filament on Printrbot simple metal

 I just wanted to start a thread to check if anyone has had experience using SemiFlex on a Printrbot simple metal .. Basically there are a couple of  hacks to modify extrusion, something similar to the ones implemented to print NinjaFlex(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2EAOJjQMxFE)..Thanks Also suggest a semiflex filament brand if you have had experience with any ..

Topic by CJA3D 


Ideas for DIY mesh chameleon cage?

We're planning to get a Yemen (veiled) chameleon and found a US manufacturer making cages like the one below, however the shipping to the UK was prohibitive. So, I'm thinking of a DIY version using THIS sort of mesh and rigid plastic extrusions and was wondering if anyone's made something similar. It needs to be fairly presentable, so plumbing tubing with net draped over is a non-starter. Required size is 30" wide x 16" deep x 42" high.

Question by AndyGadget   |  last reply


How to machine an o-ring gland in the corner? Answered

There is a gland in the corner on the right picture (piston o-ring gland, static work). What are disadvantages compared to design on the left? Do I have to machine a rounding in that specific case, when groove is situated next to the wall (marked with red circle) to avoid extrusion? Do I need to machine a clearance above this rounding? Blue arrow simulates constant pressure of 1 MPa (150 psi) only from one side.

Question by DDevilPL   |  last reply


what CAD package/software do you use?

Hi - I have been using SketchUp for a couple of years, and grown reasonably proficient in its use.  However, it's not very intuitive in terms of being useful when trying to sketch ideas, find correct proportions, squeeze or stretch items until they "look right".  Having always to think in terms of creating drawings from extrusion of 2d surfaces is not often helping creativity! So, I am interested to learn and hear about anyone else's experience of using alternative CAD software in light of my comments about SketchUp - what do you use?

Topic by t.mikerust   |  last reply


What size maintenance staff?

At an industial facicilty that cuts and welds polypropylene sheet to make huge tanks for steel mills and other industries, three buildings, 24000 sq. ft fabrication area, 4000 sq. ft for mixed sizes of offices, 5 propane forklifts, 1 mobile crane, 4 overhead cranes, 2 utility trucks, 2 heavy duty pickup trucks, several powertools, several extrusion machines, various rigging lifting and handling apparatus, a 25HP rotary screw compressor and a 10HP dual piston compressor, various shop machines and saws, seveveral pneumatic presses and fusion machines, and tons of other miscellaneous stuff. How many guys do I need to maintain it all?

Question by DrBrown   |  last reply


ABS Recycler for 3-D Printer Filament

Many inexpensive 3-D Printers use ABS filament as feedstock. This filament is not cheap and being a plastic, it is a substance that demands recycling efforts. Imagine a small 3-D printer that you use to produce useful household items with. Here is an example Instructable illustrating what I am talking about. Now imagine that you no longer need an item that you have made. You toss it into the hopper of the machine that I have in mind and it is ground into small pieces. These pieces are then melted with acetone and extruded anew into ABS filament for your 3-D printer! It may be possible to recover the acetone during the extrusion process since the acetone evaporates to restore the ABS.

Topic by Exocetid   |  last reply


What type of binder is user for making activated carbon briquettes for water purification?

Hello everyone, I am trying to make a water purification device which needs to have compressed activated carbon filter. I am facing the problem of binding the charcoal dust together so that it does not come out when contacted with water. I tried making the briquettes with starch but it is water soluble. I have read some papers on binding the charcoal using extrusion process but could not find what exactly is the binder used. Here the binder should not cover the surface area of the carbon particles as well. I am looking to find here, what is the binder used and how is it used, i.e, ratios. I want to make something like this in the image which is water insoluble. 

Question by vin177   |  last reply


Cleaning House....by house I mean machine shop

Ok...finally compiled a list of everything that's going so I don't have to make multiple posts... this is it:Water Heater 10 gal. Electric 22x24" $100CRT Monitors Qty. 4 FreeToledo Scale Vintage Counting Scale $100Electrical Boxes Various sizes, shapes $10eaDayton Right Angle Motors (Davit motors) qty2 (L&R;) 1/35hp from a boat model 5K5355 RPM 1725 $300 for both or $200eaExtrusion Various sizes, shapes, qty. $1/lbCable winch from boat trailer $20Time Clocks Mechanical, broken $20 for bothBrewmatic Junior Industrial Coffee Pot $60Baseboard Heater $15Matsuura tool holders *NEW* (qty2) setting/changing fixtures fits BT40 $470 for both or $275ea2 Spring Testers 1 torsion $Price unknown at this time1BridgePort DRO +Scales Scales OK, DRO broken $100Mitutoyo Touch Signal Probe 192-001 $115Micrometers Mitutoyo 8-9" part# 103-223 $125 & 10-11" part# 103-225 $135 or $200 for bothGarnet Hopper Jet Edge new this runs $8700! $800Spring Wire Various sizes, stainless (17-7, 302) and music wire $1/lb - large coils (pm/email for list)Drill Sharpener Darex M4 w/ accessories $500Drill Sharpener SRD 80-M $400Garmin GPS Old, still works! $10Briggs & Stratton Motor NEW. 18hp cast iron, twin cyl. 964cc $999Metal Desk 60" wide, seafoam green metal $60Hose Clamps 5.25" in diameter $.25/eaCoffing Hoist 1/2 Ton 3 phase hoist. Works, but is dirty. Has controls $450Pepsi Machines 2 older can machines. They work & we have keys $100Lip Cutter/Grinder Alexander 2CG (for engraving tools)w/accessories $600Capacitance Meter Emco Capacitance Meter, old, good condition. $20All prices are obo. It can be shipped UPS (sometimes USPS). I have pictures for most of the things on the list.Email garagesale@pittraffic.com if you are interested. I don't check PMs very often, but PMs ok too!THANKS!

Topic by Rainbowlaces   |  last reply


Fighting with Nylon ;)

As some might know I still use an old Gen1 Prusa but love the challenge of basically getting everything done with that oldie. One of my latest challenges of "always" printing on a cold bed includes Nylon. If you ever had troubles because you ABS or PLA filament got too moist you will already know what happens to your print... Nylon is even worse when it comes to moisture as you can't see or really feel it. I was thinking of making a complete Nylon guide as an Instructable but think I will start here to kick off some discussion first. So, we know the Nylon must be really dry for a god print as otherwise we get bubbles, bad adhesion and of course a foamy looking print. Well, not really... Let me explain: A perfectly smooth and shiny finnish is not always required, and with the right settings Nylon still forms strong bonds even with a foamy look. However, the dimensions of parts are affected as well - outside dimensions go bigger and hole diameters smaller. If that is no issue for your print then there is no real need to perfectly dry your filament ;) Speaking of drying: People use all sorts of methods to dry their filament, not just Nylon. One of the most common and most expensive seems to be the use of your oven for several hours to dry it. Another way involves food dyhydrators, bit less on the energy bill but still... Then we have the smart guys using the sun and silaca gel for the drying - good and great but so useless in cold and wet climates... My advise here: Take your time! I mean, sure you want to print right after the filament arrived in your letter box but a bit of preperation will save you filament and frustration. Usually filament comes in a sealed bag with a pack of silica gel and it should be dry and ready to use. But Nylon can become too moist within the time it takes to finnish a long print if you are in a wet climate. This means you start printing and all is good but the next day your new print looks ugly as for no real reason. Make use of these sealed storage containers. Put the filament in there with a good amount of indicating silica gel and only have a hole to feed the filament through - if in doubt use a bowden fitting and a short lenght of teflon tube to prevent friction. A piece of sticky tape over the hole when you don't use the filament and the filament is always ready to use. Reminds me to make an Ible for a suitable storage solution with spool holder... Anyway... When it finally comes to print Nylon you should know cardboard works best as a bed as Nylon sticks really well to it. I glue mine onto a layer of masking tape, this way it won't lift from the bed and I can still replace it very easy. But the most common mistake with Nylon is to print it too fast. The stuff really expands and shrinks a lot from filament to print and high speeds only too often cause the layers to seperate later on. Some people compensate with higher temperatures but I don't like the idea of fitting a filter system with activated carbon filters... Also keep in mind the intense shrinkage when setting the extrusion multiplier! If your ABS prints fine with 0.85 you can expect that the same sized Nylon prints fine somewhere in the range of 55-60! Now you also know why printing with thick layers is not such a great idea if you require all dimensions to fit. Although only outside accuracy can be done by cheating in the settings, getting outside, inside and extrusion widths settings accurate is almost rocket sience ;) Nylon is expensive or not available here in the diameter I require.... I had the same trouble and reverted to trimmer line and a modified, dedicated hotend instead. Why dedicated you wonder? Nylon can be real pain to clean as nothing dissolves and if you heat the parts hot enough to melt it you can not work easy with them. Having a decicated hotend means you won't run into the problem of burnt ABS or PLA clogging the nozzle ;) It also means you can match the hotend to the trimmer line you choice (more on that in a minute). For example, in some areas trimmer line of 2mm or 3.3mm diameter is the most popular and cheapest. Just drill out the hotend to cater for the new diameter, which I did after noticing the filament got stuck in the neck of the cold end ;) Trimmer line - does it matter which one? It does these days! Avoid everything that is not round or labeled with terms like "duracore", "dual core", "multi layer"  -basically all that indicates it is not just a single, solid stand of Nylon. Long lasting, special core line is great for your lawn trimmer but really bad for your hotend! PET, High temp nylon or even fibre re-inforced cores are in use, so in the best case you mix the nylon with overheating PET, in the worst you block your nozzle permanently. If it looks like it has a core or some sort of "mantle" around it, it means not usable.

Topic by Downunder35m   |  last reply


Heated print beds - are they overrated gimmicks?

For years now I use my old, trusty Mega Prusa with the bare basics in terms of hardware. But basically every new printer out there comes with heated print beds and most users "upgrade" to one to get better quality prints. So I started to to check the reprap forums and other websites to find out why a heated would be a "must have". Quite a simple task you might think, but not so for someone who prints every material on a cold bed with success... What are the official pro statements for a heated bed? 1. Better bed adhesion of course. 2. Less warping of parts. 3. Far less problems with layer seperation. 4. Better print results. And of course there are a few more but not worth listing them. Why do I think most of the four statements are actually unrelated to using a heated bed? Bed adhesion is a matter of print material and surface of the bed / bed preperation, like tape, glue and such. If you filament peels off a cold bed with no adhesion at all it simply means the surface is either unclean or unsuited for the print material. Warping of parts happens because the material shrinks when it cools down, a heated bed is only able to keep a certain height of the print warm. Higher prints won't have any benefit in terms of better layer adhesion with a heated bed. Same goes for seperating layers. Unlike the common believe a heated bed does not fix this problem - it only masks it! Layers seperate because there is not enough bonging between them. This can be due to insuffient extrusion width, too high print layers, wrong print temperature and of course wrong z-axis stepping and wrong extrusion multiplicator. And how good a print comes out of your printer depends on a good calibration and proper print settings - again a heated bed only masks problems ;) Ok, so heated beds are nonsense, right? Well, wrong again ;) They take a lot of worry out of the daily print life to start with. Especially prints with big foot print will benefit, although PLA should never be a problem on a cold bed. If you print long parts in ABS or even Nylon you can have a hard time forcing the plastic to stay on the bed all around the print. A heated bed, with the right settings of course, can make sure your print keeps the shape until it is high enough so the bottom part won't be affected by shrinking anymore. My opinion on how to get the best results... Manage to print on a cold bed first! Smaller parts don't need a heated bed anyway, so use them to improve on your skills of finding the perfect bed material / coating! You will find that once you have really optimised your printer and settings most parts won't need a heated bed anymore. Once you are really happy with the result of smaller prints on a cold bed try something bigger and pay close attention to any problems on the way. For example a big print might start out perfectly but after about 5-10mm of print height you see the part starts to warp and slowly peels of the print bed - especially long parts or thin areas are affected. The infill also affects how a parts reacts during the cooling, so try the same problem print with solid infill as well as only 15% infill to compare - you can stop the print once the problem is identified, don't waste filament. Now comes the magic of the heated bed... You want the temp as low as possible but still high enough to prevent the warping! Why go low if high would help more?? Simply said: If the bed is too hot the part stays soft for a long time, which can badly affect layer bonding and shape. Imagine you squish the plastic on an already "hard" layer - the plastic is pressed flat to be within the set specs. Now if the the layer is still too hot and soft the plastic will push the lower layer in - which of course will expand outwards. So the layer can actually end up to be lower than it should be - layer will still peel ;) Start with around 50° C for ABS and turn the heat down gradually every 10 layers or 25 if you print really thin layers. If the part still prefers to warp go 10 degrees higher. But again: If the stuff would not stick properly on a cold bed work on that first! How do I print on a cold bed and claim it works fine? To be honest, with a lot of time spent on trying, calibrating and finding the right "magic" to put on the glass to make things stick. Nylon, if the part is big, can still be a frustrating task unless cardboard or Bakelite is used but I still prefer the glass bed. I no longer bother with tapes as it can be costly and I hate changing the entire setup just because I use a different material ;) As said, the main key is a proper calibration of hard- and software! If your prints look messy and you spend as much time cleaning your parts as printing them you know what I mean ;) At the moment my "bed magic" is a clear craft glue with methanol as a solvent, mine is from Aldi but similar products can be found in every craft store. The bed is sanded with 600 grid diamond blocks to be as flat as possible and to provide a bigger surface area for the glue. When mostly printing Nylon is first clean the bed with alcohol and put a layer of plastic primer on it before re-applying the glue. With the right temp settings this glue surface can be reused several times with increasing bond to the part. Once the glue start peeling off the bed it cut the area clean and apply another coat just in the spot. A single bottle of craft glue, diluted down by 20%, lasted now about 3 rolls of filament - not too bad for a 2$ investment LOL Seriously though, squeeky clean your glass bed using alcohol and / or acetone and play with different types of craft glue. You want the stuff that is clear and uses either methanol or ethanol as the solvent, don't bother with water based glues! If the glue sticks well to your part but peels off the bed easily try a layer of plastic primer on the bed first - do this outside! However, if your printer is only capable of using PLA anyway you might not want to bother at all and stick to tape ;)

Topic by Downunder35m