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Build something for kids or adults for hand -eye coordination

Hi,First post. I need to find out how to build a setup to help train for hand eye coordination.I was thinking a stand up type affair where the person using it had to reach out and touch a button or step on button( i say button but it would be something with a micro switch I imagine and a disk operating it,made out of a circular piece of wood or plastic.) That corresponded to a blinking colored light.When the colored light blinked the person has to react and press the corresponding colored button with their hand or foot.Something would have to keep score also. Something like a whack a mole game in an arcade except a lot less moving parts. If anyone has any ideas or has built something similar I could really use the help. Thank You

Topic by Hitlist    |  last reply


Any idea on how to make a camera kind of "eye" for arduino?

Any idea on how to make a camera kind of "eye" for arduino? And NO, I don't want to connect Arduino to a PC nor a laptop. Well, not a actually camera since: 1. no way arduino can process video stream. 2. all I need is a way for arduino to know if anything in front of it (about 90~120 degree field, around 3m distance) has moved or changed, and know where the change is in term of a simple x&y; coordinate. So instead of camera view, its more like a radar kind of view I need (the thing we see on movie that have submarine ) All I can think of is to use a huge amount of IR range finder(which only have 1.5m distance :\  ) or Ultrasonic range finder(which can't focus to one point :\  ), and arrange them so they a point outward from the same center (kinda like how old time TV work), so each range finder work like a pixel on the screen for arduino. (I don't need to display it, I just need Arduino to know where the change of environment is) So anyone have a better idea or better device suggestion than what I have? Even something that can only detect 1 axle will be better than the range finder solution. Thanks~ ===================================Update 1================================= While searching for new sensor other than the one I mentioned, I came across this>>> http://www.ebay.com/itm/270848882873?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649 According to the seller: "Camera sensor generates image data which is then processed real-timely by control board and displayed on the screen.", Atmega 32 have the power to process video in real-time? So is it possible to use arduino to process image data?  I mean by adding some filter to the image, filter out anything other than the moving part, and find the position of the moving object.  Is that even possible with the power of Arduino? However with the price of that shield, I can just buy an old Google G1 phone to connect to Arduino and use Android camera to capture the video, process the image data, and send the movement's coordinate to arduino. Just want to find something simpler than adding a extra "brain" (Android) that I need to learn how to program xp.

Question by ljfa321    |  last reply


Using the Eyewriter to control other devices. How can I find the x,y coordinates and use them for other applications?

I built the eyewriter about 6 months ago and it all seems to be working fine. It is an awesome project with a huge number of potential applications.  I want to use the signal from the eyewriter (the X,Y coordinates) to control an audio signal, but I am quite new to code and am struggling with how to go about this task. The rough diagram shows what I am trying to do. The idea is to have the cursor move around a screen controlled by the viewers's eye movements. When they look at different images on the screen, it would play the sound of that image. For example if they look at section 2 of the screen they would hear the sound recording of the plane, if they look at section 8 they would hear the sound recording of the dog barking, and so on. I think this should be quite easy to do by messing around with the eyewriter code. I wonder if anyone has any ideas or advice? Please check out my instructables to see what i'm up to! Many thanks!

Question by whorl    |  last reply


can i use an optical mouse (through an arduino) as a pulse oxymeter?

Arduino can read coordinates from a mouse, a small example is in the following link http://www.martijnthe.nl/2009/07/interfacing-an-optical-mouse-sensor-to-your-arduino/ But how could read color for using mouse as an pulse oxymeter? More than this we could use it with optical fiber adapted to the "eye" of the mouse for intravascular measuring ScvO2 !!!???

Question by clblue    |  last reply


What did Google Maps cameras discover over a lake in Switzerland?

Google Maps have been taking "street view" images for a number of years now, and they've captured some interesting things... In this case, there's a ghostly figure that appears over a lake in Switzerland. If you want to see it with your own eyes, go to Google Maps.   Copy and paste these coordinates for the location: 47.110579, 9.227568   Zoom in until you are in street view.   Then look to the sky (North-West over the lake). Was this just a strange camera anomaly? or something more divine? 

Topic by canucksgirl    |  last reply


Solar-powered hearing aids for the 3rd world

What's a partially deaf person in sub-Saharan Africa to do, when hearing aids typically cost hundreds of dollars, and he can't even afford the $1 a week to buy new batteries?Retired Canadian business executive Howard Weinstein came up with a solution - a cheap hearing aid for the 3rd world, redesigned with some donated 1st world technology knowhow. It's powered by rechargeable, rather than throw-away batteries - at about the same $1 cost per battery, except they last 2-3 years, and can be recharged using a pocket-sized solar charger. Oh, and he also found that the local deaf people make excellent employees to put these things together, because mastering sign language takes acute hand-eye coordination, needed to do the fine soldering and microelectronics.Sometimes the small things in life make a big difference...Something to Shout About - Africa needed hearing aids. Howard Weinstein got a chance to start over

Topic by Patrik    |  last reply


Electrical / Electronics Engineering Position in Chicago - RAW THRILLS

Hi everyone, We have one of the ultimate electronics positions available. We make coin-op arcade games and constantly innovate our electronics to differentiate our games from the home consoles. We're looking for someone that can hack innovative technology and make it work in our market. Official job posting is below. Please check out www.rawthrills.com for more information about our company! JOB INQUIRIES SHOULD BE SENT TO jobs@rawthrills.com. Please include a resume and an explanation of your qualifications and interest. ====================================== Available Position: Highly Motivated, Entry Level Electrical or Computer Engineer Raw Thrills, Inc. - February 2010 Raw Thrills, the leading US manufacturer of coin-operated video games, is looking for an enthusiastic Electrical or Computer engineer to join our Electronics Engineering design team. You will be working as an efficient member of a small team on products that continue to gain domestic and international market-share. Immediately, you will contribute to the design and verification of electronics, firmware, and software. In addition to the internal team, you will work with partner engineering companies to develop & maintain products, and interact with contract manufacturers to troubleshoot issues on-the-fly as they arise on the production line. You will collaborate with several experienced engineers and programmers, all the while working independently most of the work day. At Raw Thrills, our arcade games are designed entirely in-house, from the ground up. They are composed of custom mechanical parts (wood cabinet, plastics, metals, etc.), an off-the-shelf PC, a monitor, custom wiring, custom electronics & interface devices, and custom game software. As part of the Electronics Engineering team, you will be involved in much of the arcade game’s design, from low-level circuitry to high level software, and everything in between: * ESD testing & EM compliance * Custom circuit & firmware design * System integration & validation (peripherals ↔ PC ↔ API ↔ software) * Operating System (Windows Embedded) maintenance * Device driver & device-application interface (API) programming * Device functional & longevity test design (including GUI PC software, firmware, and mechanical construction) * Coordination between mechanical and electronics design * and more! Required Skills: * Demonstrable working knowledge of C/C++: need examples of work and debugging proficiency * Solid understanding of digital circuit design & troubleshooting digital systems (from circuit to PC software) * Experience designing & implementing a digital system from the ground up (school project, internship, etc.) * FPGA (VHDL or Verilog) and/or MCU (c or asm) programming competency * Self-sufficient and motivated to independently learn * Proficient with standard bench tools: soldering iron, oscilloscope, DMM, etc. Bonus Skills: * Programming experience with PC↔device communication: USB, RS232, LPT, etc. * Schematic capture and PCB layout experience * GUI programming experience (Win32 or Linux) * Active knowledge of Linux / home Linux user * Working knowledge of common scripting languages (Python, bash, Windows batch, etc.) Example Projects: * Design low-cost circuitry to robustly control addressable LEDs for eye-popping lighting effects * Design, implement, and perform game system latency testing (create hardware/software as needed) o EX: What is the round trip time from button-press to in-game feedback? Where are the bottlenecks? * Design hardware diagnostic software to allow automatic system diagnosis by end-user * Design automated functional test software for completed PCB assemblies * Design circuit and layout PCB for contact-less sensor module o Determine and perform validation testing * Add interface firmware features (i2c, Dallas 1-Wire, etc.) to MCU based board and update PC API so that game programmers can leverage the new features

Topic by rawthrills  


Instructables Show & Tell- in our town, and yours

Come to the first Instructables Show & Tell near you this March! Held in the Bay Area (Friday 3/9, 7pm at Instructables HQ), the Boston area (Saturday 3/10, 7pm, hosted by MITERS), Austin (Saturday 3/10 at SXSW, hosted by dorkbot ), NYC (Thursday 3/22, hosted by Etsy, Make, PopSci, and Create Digital Music) , Atlanta (Friday 3/30, 8pm), Savannah (Thursday, 3/22), and Orlando (Friday 3/23, 6pm). Contact me by private message if you'd like to host an Instructables Show & Tell in your area, and we'll add it to the list. Locations and times will be posted at the bottom of the page. We'll be doing this again, so plan ahead.The TheoryHow to Host an Instructables Show and TellBring your friends & family, drinks or a snack for the table, and something you've made (or are thinking about or working on) to share with the group. You'll meet a diverse group of smart, excited art and technology geeks who want to talk to you about your projects and ideas. Please RSVP so we'll have a decent guess how many people to expect.Examples: your new LED, LEGO, or K'nex project, a cool screen-printed T-shirt, neat origami, a cool bike mod, home-made kimchee, alternate uses for your ipod, a fire-breathing Godzilla, a neat example of vintage technology, or just a cool idea you'd like to explore with other like-minded people. Anything you'd put up as an Instructable is definitely fair game- bring it by and show it off. Email or message me if you've got specific questions.Note: NO PowerPoint. You've got 2-4 minutes to talk about your project; words and models are best way to do a quick demo.SCHEDULE:7pm Doors open for mingling and snacks. If you've got something to talk about, put your name on the whiteboard. If not, you'd best have brought extra snacks.~8-9:30 Show & Tell. We run through the list, giving everyone a couple of minutes to talk about their project/idea and answer a few questions. In-depth discussion is saved for later so everyone gets a chance to demo their project; there will be a gong.~9:30-10:30 Check out what you liked, ask the questions we didn't get to during Show & Tell, talk to the cute nerd you've been eyeing across the room, and help clean out the rest of the snacks.Now you can join your geographic group!LOCATIONS: Bay Area Instructables, Friday 9 March, 7pm2175 Monarch St, Alameda, CA directionsRSVP: canida(*at*) instructables.com Boston Area MITERS, Saturday 10 March, 7pm265 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA directionsMost of the Instructables & Squid Labs founders built things at MITERS when they were in school; it's a neat clubhouse full of people who love to make fun things. They've got an Instructables group to show some of them off. NOTE: Please don't bring beer or wine as this event is on the MIT campus. Austin dorkbot Saturday, 10 March, 6-8pmBrush Square Park at 5th and Neches map(electronic art) Come to a special dorkbot during the SXSW Interactive Festival! We'll have a carnival style presentation of mad science fun spread across stations around the tent. Between scheduled presentations, show off your own project and get 30 seconds on the mike to tell the crowd about your demented electronic pursuits before being unceremoniously buzzed off the stage by 20,000 volts of raw power! Enormously raw POWER! Brush Square Park is adjacent to the Austin Convention Center, host of SXSW.Mandatory RSVP here or email rsvp@dorkbotaustin.org New York Etsy Labs Thursday, 22 March, 7pm325 Gold St., 6th Floor, Brooklyn, NY mapHosted by Etsy, MAKE, PopSci, & Create Digital Music Atlanta Taco Mac Perimeter Friday, 30 March 8pm1211 Ashford Crossing, Atlanta, GA mapRSVP: PM irollmyown or email jenny (*at*) hackaddict.net Orlando Panera Friday, 23 March 6pm11472 University Blvd., Orlando, FL mapRSVP: PM trebuchet03 or or send him email @gmail.com Savannah Thursday, 22 March, 6:30pmCafe at Books-A-Million, 8108 Abercorn St., Savannah, GA mapRSVP: PM royalestelYour City Here?Volunteer to host now! Libraries, schools, and other community venues will often let you reserve space. Just send me a personal message or an email and we'll coordinate.

Topic by canida    |  last reply


TEDxBaghdad - Iraq - violence, dust storms and open sourced manufacturing

Baghdad Iraq. It was once the jewel of the Muslim empire and epicenter of knowledge in the Eastern world. Now it is best known for corrupt governance, bombings, and dust storms. It was also my parents’ home. After visiting once in 1991 as a child the few memories I have of Iraq seemed to be shouting matches as my parents yelled over the phone making overseas calls. Names of Uncles I had never met were mentioned and a phone was handed to me and I was left to nervously fend for myself with my weak Iraqi slang and an Uncle who apparently knew all about me while I knew nothing of him. The country was an impenetrable black box to me that would spit out another refugee somewhere in the world every few years or so. Sixteen years later the first wall between Iraq and me was broken. In 2007 my nuclear family had traveled to Syria and for the first time I met family members who still lived in Baghdad. I knew them now. My uncles and cousins grew flesh and blood. I could feel their prickly faces as we greeted with the traditional Iraqi 4 sided cheek kiss. They could graciously give me their dishdashas as gifts. Names finally had faces, but those faces were deep, sunken and afraid. 2007 was a bad year of sectarian war in Iraq, which is why the Damascas district of Harasta was flooded with Iraqis. The sound of construction continued through the night to keep up with the massive (ab)use of the "tourist" visas. I saw something in the Iraqis in Syria that I hadn't seen before; something that scared me. I saw hopelessness. It was then I settled on a long-term project to return to the country and share something that I had just discovered around the same time: the future doesn’t come prepared -- we make the future. The do-it-yourself attitude that was growing in America was being combined with the culture of sharing that you find in hackerspaces, at instructables.com and in open source technology. This atmosphere made anything possible. You want to build a vertical generator without any spinning parts? Sure! How about a walking quadraped robot with a sofa? Do you want to quit your job, write zines and sell them in the crafting circle? Sure! Start a business! Write a novel! Organize a benefit concert! Sure - sure - sure! “Make your own future” was the message. It was a message of hope - it was the message that I wanted to share in the Middle East, and especially in Iraq. In 2011 the opportunity to work on sharing this beautiful message in the Middle East presented itself to me, so I quit my robotics job and took it (sorry Andrew). A few friends and I started a tiny organization called GEMSI - The Global Entrepreneurship and Maker Space Initiative. We funded ourselves through Kickstarter and our first project was a Three-Day Maker Space hosted at Makerfaire Africa. We were hoping to let people experience the feeling of the Maker Movement first-hand. We collaborated with Emeka and the team from MFA, Cairo Hackerspace, along with many amazing egyptians from all over the country. We had a successful first attempt at sharing the message of "Yes you can!” It was a great start, but Iraq was still an impenetrable fortress to me. It took till 2012 and a chance encounter with friends in Cambridge, MA for me to find my first avenue back into Iraq. Via my friends, I met someone who’s friend was affiliated with TEDxBaghdad. A few steps removed, sure, but when I heard about TEDxBaghdad I knew I had found my way in. I knew TEDx and the types of programs they hosted; I knew they were hopeful, inspired, and shared a vision for a brighter tomorrow. I started communicating with Emeka from MFA, who also works with TED, and he put me in touch with Yahay. After my first skype call with Yahay I knew I was going. Someone else had done it - someone broke that barrier, did amazing work in the country, and survived. It wasn't the death trap my family was telling me it was. There was a new narrative being woven and I knew what I needed to do. I booked my flights before I even finalized any workshops. I needed to meet the TEDxBaghdad team. Later, I called my parents and told them I was going to Baghdad and they said, "Shinu?! Inta Makhabal?!" That probably means exactly what you think it does. Needless to say, they had their concerns, but I was going regardless. Now that the tickets were bought, we started planning. Yahay put me in touch with Abdal Ghany, one of the Iraqi organizers living in Baghdad. He coordinated everything. It was amazing. These guys kick some serious planning butt! Ghany basically told me, “Show up and give your workshop. We'll take care of the rest.” This was a welcome change from the hours of facebooking, planning, and coordination I usually have to go through to schedule events. It really seemed like this was possible. I was going to give an Arduino and 3D printing workshop in Baghdad and I was really excited! I sent an email to Sparkfun and Makezine asking them for open source electronics donations since I knew bringing my electronics box through the airport wouldn't be a good idea. They sent me a nice goodie-bag of beautifully packaged Maker products. These two organizations have given me a tremendous amount of help throughout the years, for which I am extremely thankful. I packed a suitcase filled with 2 3D printers, 25 Arduinos, an assortment of other open source hardware and sensors and headed out looking a bit like a bomb development lab. Yeesh! Somehow I made it through China, Saudi, and Turkey without any serious interrogation. Mostly just really quizzical looks from my unzipped bag up back to me... "You're a teacher?" they ask. "Yes," I say, "yes I am." Turkey was the stop before Iraq. Turkey was brilliant, sunny, lush, and seemed to be comprised of mostly happy smiling people walking by the sea. Coming from the deserts of Mecca, this was a welcome sight. I let the green of Turkey wash away the dust of Saudi Arabia. The mishmash of cultures, sounds, foods, religions gave me a great feeling of liberation. This was a lively place and the two hackerspaces I met up with there, Base Istanbul and Istanbul Hackerspace were fantastic hosts. Furkan and I spent a lovely day together chatting about Maker culture as it spreads through the Middle East and then in the end we had a potluck BBQ with members from both hackerspaces by the rocks of the sea. It was great to see these two Turkish hackerspaces and to be reminded that this movement is truly global. My dream of hackerspaces empowering people globally is really possible – and it’s great to know that it is a dream that is shared by others. I left them full of enthusiasm and flew directly to Baghdad. Landing in Baghdad was strange and a bit concerning. Looking out of the window all I could see was a brown cloud. We were landing in a dust storm. I had heard about the turab (dust) of Iraq, but this was the first time I saw it in person, and it would be one of the things most often on my mind. Getting a visa for me was surprisingly easy, except for the fact I forgot my passport on the plane and two guards had to escort me one to each side back to the airplane to retrieve it. But once I had my passport, I told them my laqab, which is the full name that includes ancestry. Showed them a copy of my dad’s passport and my Iraqi birth certificate and I was in. I was hoping for a nice stamp, perhaps with some Iraqi relic on it. But they took my passport and wrote in it: "Originally Iraqi", so there it goes, it's official. Ahmed, my cousin, was not at the airport when I took my paper work and headed out to the lobby. The airport was sparsely populated and heavily regulated. I barely managed to snap a picture before a guard came up to me and had me delete them from my phone. In the lobby I met a man just released from a Swiss prison. The Swiss had given him the option to be sent back home to Iraq, or be jailed. He chose to leave and come back to Iraq. This becomes a theme later as I see more and more people, all of whom desire to leave the country to become refugees elsewhere. It seems that when hope runs out for the country you live in, the only option is to find a new one. This story is one of a million various stories of struggling to find a new life. Each varies in its details, but all have survival at their core. Ahmed arrives 30 minutes late, apologizing. He's wearing jeans and a polo. His hair seemed freshly cut and his face was serious. We had never met before. The only thing I knew of him was that he thought I was reckless for coming. He had been spending hours on Skype with me attempting to convince me that coming would be a bad idea: "You have no idea how bad the bugs are. Just wait till you see the dust storms. The heat will kill you... etc" But once I saw him in person it all changed. I didn't think I'd grow to like Ahmed, but I grew to appreciate his ways and he became like a brother to me before I left. He took me to Mansour, a neighborhood in Baghdad, telling me stories about Iraq as we travelled. This is the neighborhood where the house my dad designed and family built stands. On the ride home we had our car checked for bombs at least 4 times by what Iraqi's call Saytarat, which is the equivalent of a checkpoint and, to me, seemed a total nuciance. They were the reason he was late. What would normally be a 20 minute drive can become three hours long because every car is checked for bombs. They are everywhere; throughout the city, on every road. We passed the guard who watches over my family’s neighborhood, and he takes his hand off his machine gun to wave at Ahmed, and I begin to recognize that weapons, car inspections and burned out cars are normal here, so they don't think to comment on it - like an empty lot in Detroit, or the homeless in San Francisco. We got to my family home with no time to rest. I had to leave to meet up with Abdul Ghany and the crew at a Cafe in an hour and then conduct the workshop in two. Ahmed comes with me - he doesn't trust people we'd never met before and won’t let me out of his sight. I trust first till proven otherwise, he has learned to do the opposite. It’s a telling sign of how different our lives are on a day-to-day basis. As soon as I met the TEDxBaghdad crew, I felt at ease. MNA, Abdul Ghany and the entire crew were thoughtful, hardworking, and inspiring people. I was really happy to have intersected with them and they helped me in more ways than I could count. We first met up at Everyday, a local Mansour café. Everyday cafe was hyper airconditioned and everyone seemed to think it was hotter than it was. The crew was awesome, they were really a great first introduction to the excited young people of Baghdad and they certainly have the famed Iraqi hospitality. But here's a tip: do not order a fajita in Baghdad ;D. Mohammed Al-Samarraie pulled out their iPads and started showing me video production work he was doing for TEDx. Abdul Ghany comes a little late and we have head out to the workshop. The workshop was held in a two story office building surrounded by palm trees. Looking out the the tinted back window we could see the muddy river run past, winding and dark. Slowly the TEDx people started trickling in. Then I started to get nervous. The checkpoints didn't bother me, the tanks in the streets were not an issue, but here were these people coming to learn something from me. What could I share that would really matter to them when they had so much to deal with daily? What could I share that could be relevant to people who see bombings as I experience lightning storms? I have been to other places in the world to share this kind of information, and some of those places have had political problems and ongoing revolutions. But Iraq was the first country I had been to that really seemed like a war zone. I decided that first I needed to learn from them! What were their projects? What did they hope for? I hoped they would learn from each other and get excited about their projects and I wanted to be able to share things that were relevant to them. Thus, everyone was encouraged to talk about who they are, how they learned about TEDxBaghdad and to share their project, share with us their mission, or share an inspiring story. I was amazed to hear about all the incredible initiatives the crew was doing. From intercultural exchange programs, to street clean ups, to historical artifact preservation, each of them shared and I started realizing something. They were not as interested in new technology as they were interested in arts and culture and after hearing about a few of their projects I started realizing why. Learning about culture and paying attention to the arts gives people the ability to pay attention to details. They can look at another human being and see all the subtleties that make us who we are. We each fall in love, we struggle, we question, and have doubts. Arts give depth to a black and white world. Sectarianism is difficult when we pay attention to the commonalities that tie us all together. What would the world be like if anyone who wanted a weapons license was required to have visited India, could pass an art history exam and could play stairway to heaven on the guitar? We were in a sort of office building near the river which ran by dark and muddy looking through the tinted windows. One by one, they stood up in front and gave their short presentations. There were doctors, engineers, and designers in the crew. They each stood up and told the story of how they found out about TEDxBaghdad and it was incredible. Each of them had a friend recommend it to them, and it was mostly done through Facebook. Some people's projects were related to health, culture, antiquity preservation, and connecting Iraqis with the rest of the world. While they spoke I made a graph of the things that connected all of their ideas together. It was a beautiful thing to see. The common themes were to help Iraq as a country through the integration of new ideas and how to bring a new face of Iraq and present it to the world. To have the news about Iraq be about amazing things, inspiring things, rather than explosions. Being in that room with that energy made me feel like we were already on our way. I pulled out the boxes of donations given to us by Sparkfun and The Make Shed and now it was my turn. I told them about my story coming into contact with my friend Alex through instructables.com, how being in San Francisco and Cambridge opened my eyes to a new way of entrepreneurship using communities and open source technology. And how they could make anything they could imagine if they got together to do it. We discussed how sharing and collaboration was a common value that held the entire system together. I used the concept of the LED throwie, which is a simple idea by Graffiti Research Labs to connect an LED to a coin battery and a magnet. They used it to throw at ferrous buildings as a form of electronic graffiti but once they uploaded it to instructables the idea was out there and people were inspired to take it and derive many other projects. You can never know what will happen when you share something or when you create a tool and share it. People created outlined throwies, LED floaties in balloons and finally we start seeing LED floaties which are sequenced to act like a light show at a phish concert. Hahaha! We then talked about the Arduino an easy to use microcontroller designed for artists. It's a bit of technology that is a simple and easy to use platform to build interactive projects. We talked about how the open nature of the project people can use the Arduino and then use shields to add features like being able to connect to the internet or play MP3s. Open source tools make building new products a lot like using legos. We were in the middle of using some of the sensors The Maker Shed had sent us to make a DIY heart rate monitor when the power went out and all went dark except for the LED throwies we had made. It suddenly felt very intimate. We put all the LED throwies in the center of the room and huddled around it for story time. The feeling of connection was palpable for me. Sure the lack of power meant that we were not going to be able to 3D print, but being in the dark with TEDxBaghdad was one of my favorite memories of this trip. The lights went on and we had a long question and answer session / photo shoot. Some of the doctors were interested to use the Arduino based heart rate monitors to replace the broken ones in the hospital. I heard about this and was flabbergast that the most basic and cheap tools I had brought with me might have a direct impact and may even save lives. Technology might not solve the political problems of the country but it seems that there was a lot of room for development and that the crew I was with was creative and excited to make use of it. I passed out 20 Arduino kits that day, including the Lillypad which is a version of the Arduino intended to be sewn into clothing. Although there were very few engineers in the audience, everyone seemed to be buzzing with ideas and ways to use the Arduinos. What a great workshop! I was super excited because not only had they understood the message, they seem to have been infected with the feeling of capability! Now to seal the deal, we were all going to go out and eat a classic Iraqi dish Simach Masguf. Ahmed has been calling me hourly making sure that I was OK, but I felt safe enough with my new friends so we all headed out to a fish spot by the river. Hours go by, lots of fish is eaten, and lots of juice is drunk. Some of the crew smoke some sheesha. It was like I was with new old friends. My Iraqi slang was improving hourly and although we had just met I knew me and TEDxBaghdad we're going to be working together again very soon. I would have stayed all night eating and chatting about future projects and the problems to solve in Iraq, but the cerfew was about to set in and we had to jet. Yeah, there is still a curfew. On the ride home my head is filled with contradictions. Hope and confusion mix in my head as my family rings 4 more times. I get home safe and decide that the only way to deal with the complicated situation in Iraq was to act with irrational hope and optimism. That's the way TEDxBaghdad seemed to work. And that's going to be mine as well. The next day there were five explosions in Baghdad so TEDxBaghdad and I decided against going out to the Iraqi National Museum even though we had to request permission to go. We meet instead back at Everyday and there we solidify our commitment to working for a more beautiful Baghdad and a country which will become a producing nation once again. Sharing with the world it's art, science and literature like it once did years ago. +BG

Topic by lamedust    |  last reply