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SemiFlex filament on Printrbot simple metal

 I just wanted to start a thread to check if anyone has had experience using SemiFlex on a Printrbot simple metal .. Basically there are a couple of  hacks to modify extrusion, something similar to the ones implemented to print NinjaFlex(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2EAOJjQMxFE)..Thanks Also suggest a semiflex filament brand if you have had experience with any ..

Topic by CJA3D  


How to make a bulb? Answered

Actually I know how to make a bulb, but the problem is that I don't have any tungsten for the filament. Can you tell me any other alternatives for my bulb?

Question by TTSS    |  last reply


What should I do with surplus Vacuum Motors?

I buy and sell vacuums and parts. I end up with an endless supply of vacuum motors and abs plastic frames. These are mostly all Shark Navigator UV440 or Shark Rotator UV560 Vacuums (Grey, White, Clear, and Burgundy ABS plastic) I recently got a 3-d printer, and I re-purposed a heavy duty paper shredder into a nice plastic shredder based on this: https://www.instructables.com/id/50-Plastic-Shredder-Grinder-Recycler/ I am now building a filament extruder to recycle the vacuum frames into filament. Can I/how would I use a vacuum motor to make the extruder? Any other ideas for vacuum motors? I literally have an endless supply, and it would be great if I could do something with them other than make my weekly trip to the recycling center.

Question by slappo    |  last reply


Is ABS/PLA filament from china okay to use in a makerbot. ? Answered

The price difference is what throws me off, should i be worried about the quality of this filament vs the $48 makerbot filament? Makerbot : http://store.makerbot.com/filament Cheap Alternitive: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Repraper-Reprap-3D-Printer-Filament-ABS-3-0mm-1-75mm-12-Colors-For-3D-Printer-US-/190847246981?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash;=item2c6f61e285

Question by LucasOchoa    |  last reply


3D printing filament recycling guide

If you print a lot then you also have a lot of plastic to waste.Support structures, brims, failed parts....At some stage you start to wonder if it makes sense to invest into a filament extruder.A filament extruder is a simple way to make you own filament.A 25kg bag of granules in ABS cost only a few bucks and it will last like forever.It also the prefered choice for a plastic extruder of any sort - fresh, new and clean material!I do collect a lot of leftover plastic from my projects, is it worth getting a machine to recycle it?Trust the advertisements of the commercially available models you buy one right away - if you can afford it...But there is always a catch!What are the basic requirements when collecting you already used filament?It would be easier to state what you should avoid at all costs, so let me start with the most forgiving filament types - ABS and PLA....Both will require that you keep your filament clean at all costs.You want dust removed before the filament even enters you print head and same for all that you want to recycle.Conatminents are the biggest deal breaker when you recycle filament!!!That means parts of dissimilar materials,like when printing with two heads are just rubbish and go in the recycling bin outside.The difference between ABS and PLS for recycling comes with the material properties.ABS, if not printed too hot does not change too much, PLA on the other side usually ends up to be more brittle than new filament.ABS should not be heated too high, same for PLA when you recycle.But when PLA gets too hot it not only becomes really runny but also deteriotes very quickly.Run a bit of PLA through print head like when changing filament or cleaning the head.Do one run at normal temperatur, one run at 240°C and compare how the extruded and colled string reacts ;)PLA is also prone to oxidisation and burning, espcially the black type is tricky here as you won't be able to see it, so avoid black if possible.If it happens then you end up with rock hard piece, the size depends and can be tiny or bigger than a grain of sand.A total nightmare if you did not spot that black spot in the filament and let the recycled stuff run through your printer.A total block of the nozzle is the result.Nylon I can't really recommend for recycling, too complext to handle it properly.Same for filled filament like the wood or metal types.With them it is really easy to accumulate a lump of filler that does the same block to your nozzle.To wash or not to wash....No matter what you try there will be always some contaminents that end in your collected material.ABS can be washed with water and does not require too much fancy drying.If in doubt you can even try your dishwasher or with a good bag your washing machine - both require proper rinsing several times and the last run with some added alcohol to demineralised or destilled water.I use a box with a flyscreen cover and let it dry outside in the sun for a while.PLA does not go too well with water especially with added soaps or detergents.On the other hand it has no big problems tolerate things like Acetone.Downside such solvents also dissolve a lot of contaminats which mean even though you can recycle your washing Acetone many, many time you always need fresh Acetone for the rinsing.If you can try too keep all as clean as possible to eliminate the need for washing.Can I get better results from my cheap filament maker or the one I build for some online instructions?I find that there is always room to improve on things.Before you even think about extruding your home made filament think about how to get your failed print into the thing ! ;)The most vital part comes before you even heat the machine unless it is a really fancy one with a build in and big enough shredder.That is right you need a shredder of sorts to be able to get your recycled material fine enough for the filament maker.Some models you might quickly find as tutorials to build your own use basically a big wood drill for the mechanical part to simulate a meat grinder for plastic.Even the better ones for real money often use this basic system in one way or another.The problem is that you need to get all air out the material before it ends up to be the outgoing string you roll up.Any bubbles in filament will certainly have consequences if the bubble appears during the printing of visible areas.Imagine printing in vase mode and hitting a bubble during the last 20 minutes of a 3 hour print...Unless it is dirt simple hobby built there will some mechanism to deal with the air.However if what goes in is already very fine material it melts easier and air has it a lot easier to find a way out.A good shredder will produce quite small granules but not strips or blocks.The have their limits for intake size though.The best way to get through bigger builds is a band saw, if have a clean table you can even recycle the "saw dust".I prefer to heat bigger parts in the oven at moderate temps and then to use a hammer or press to flatten it first.No shredder or no money to add one to the list? No problem!If your filament maker does not have a pre-heated feeding area of sorts it makes sense to add one with aheating mantle and external temperature controller.Trust me, if you have odd stuff to push in it is way easier if the material softens already before it enter the extruder drive part.As the extruder will get quite warm anyway it can be as simple as adding a short pipe section with the heating mantle between the extruder inlet and feeding funnel or hopper.the temperature in theis areas should of course be will below melting point and slightly above the temp when the material start to become plyable.Hence the external temp controller here.With this heating in the fedding area you really need to get your recycled material into a suitable size and shape to allow the material to be transported easy into the extruder.Ok, I got it working, sort of...You will need some time to find the prefect temperatures for per-heating, extruder temps and coooling, so take it!If your filament comes out with bubbles or fine (hard and unwanted) particles it makes sense to cheat.Most filament makers include a filter before the melted material enters the nozzle and really hot part.In some cases this filter can be as simple as a steel mesh.If none find ways to add one ;)Said filter screen should be quite fine, preferably even finer that what you find in your faucet that airates thewater for the sink.As a rule of thumb the mesh size should at least 15% finer than the nozzle size you intent to use.Anything that makes it through will only be a problem for your nozzle if a lot of crap comes through and that you should be able to spot right away when the cooled filament comes out.If despite this you still get too many bubbles check first if your temps are not going too high so the plastic start to boil in an area.Too much speed can also cause a failure to expell all air in time, reducing the speed (watch the temps!!) can often resolve this nagging air problem.It it really worth it then?On a hobby level only if you print a lot and know you will keep going like this.Otherwise you really need to be able to source or build your filament maker as cheap as possible.Someone with a little print shop and three machines running 24/7 will certainly have a good benefit over time.Especially if the recycling is part of the overall printing process.Recycled material could be used in a dedicated head and extruder for supports, infills and so on.For example in the printer dedicated to produce the biggest parts as these usually have bigger nozzle sizes anyway.In a commercial sense however it must be considered what the material is worth in terms of normal recycling and the added hours and electricity cost for making your own filament.Unless even the cheapest commercailly available filament still costs much more than what you need to invest to the machines and electricity over the time the man hours are the biggest killer.If you need someone to monitor the filament maker and keep feeding it while making sure the spools wind up correctly then your own spools might end up quite costly.So decide carefully before you invest or use you oven and a mold to make you own recyled plastic bricks for your garden beds and such.

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


3D Printer filament breaking in extruder?

Several of my recent 3D printer projects have failed in the middle because the PLA filament seemed to break in the extruder and cannot be pushed out the nozzle. Has anyone had this experience?

Question by John Morrissey    |  last reply


Does anyone have a Protocycler+ and is it worth the money?

I'm thinking about getting into low volume filament manufacturing and was wondering if it was a good machine. Is it worth $999?

Topic by CorbettY    |  last reply


Switching From PLA to ABS? Answered

What change in my printer do i need to switch ? i mean config or an hardware upgrade ? if hardware what do i need to buy  and if software what should i change ?

Question by _Boltz_    |  last reply


ABS Recycler for 3-D Printer Filament

Many inexpensive 3-D Printers use ABS filament as feedstock. This filament is not cheap and being a plastic, it is a substance that demands recycling efforts. Imagine a small 3-D printer that you use to produce useful household items with. Here is an example Instructable illustrating what I am talking about. Now imagine that you no longer need an item that you have made. You toss it into the hopper of the machine that I have in mind and it is ground into small pieces. These pieces are then melted with acetone and extruded anew into ABS filament for your 3-D printer! It may be possible to recover the acetone during the extrusion process since the acetone evaporates to restore the ABS.

Topic by Exocetid    |  last reply


WANTED: 3mm flexible plastic fiberoptic filament

Dear friends: I am looking for 3mm flexible transparent fiberoptic filament. I recently got one of those 'LED shoelace' kits off eBay and I have use for the fiberoptic filament itself, not the LEDs and driver circuits. The filament is very flexible, somewhat rubbery in texture. I believe it's polyester or silicone. It's not a wonderful light conductor but it will work for my purposes. I have attached an image. The filament is the exact diameter of a T1 LED. Any help in finding this stuff would be most appreciated. Thanks!

Topic by loopy-garou  


Fighting with Nylon ;)

As some might know I still use an old Gen1 Prusa but love the challenge of basically getting everything done with that oldie. One of my latest challenges of "always" printing on a cold bed includes Nylon. If you ever had troubles because you ABS or PLA filament got too moist you will already know what happens to your print... Nylon is even worse when it comes to moisture as you can't see or really feel it. I was thinking of making a complete Nylon guide as an Instructable but think I will start here to kick off some discussion first. So, we know the Nylon must be really dry for a god print as otherwise we get bubbles, bad adhesion and of course a foamy looking print. Well, not really... Let me explain: A perfectly smooth and shiny finnish is not always required, and with the right settings Nylon still forms strong bonds even with a foamy look. However, the dimensions of parts are affected as well - outside dimensions go bigger and hole diameters smaller. If that is no issue for your print then there is no real need to perfectly dry your filament ;) Speaking of drying: People use all sorts of methods to dry their filament, not just Nylon. One of the most common and most expensive seems to be the use of your oven for several hours to dry it. Another way involves food dyhydrators, bit less on the energy bill but still... Then we have the smart guys using the sun and silaca gel for the drying - good and great but so useless in cold and wet climates... My advise here: Take your time! I mean, sure you want to print right after the filament arrived in your letter box but a bit of preperation will save you filament and frustration. Usually filament comes in a sealed bag with a pack of silica gel and it should be dry and ready to use. But Nylon can become too moist within the time it takes to finnish a long print if you are in a wet climate. This means you start printing and all is good but the next day your new print looks ugly as for no real reason. Make use of these sealed storage containers. Put the filament in there with a good amount of indicating silica gel and only have a hole to feed the filament through - if in doubt use a bowden fitting and a short lenght of teflon tube to prevent friction. A piece of sticky tape over the hole when you don't use the filament and the filament is always ready to use. Reminds me to make an Ible for a suitable storage solution with spool holder... Anyway... When it finally comes to print Nylon you should know cardboard works best as a bed as Nylon sticks really well to it. I glue mine onto a layer of masking tape, this way it won't lift from the bed and I can still replace it very easy. But the most common mistake with Nylon is to print it too fast. The stuff really expands and shrinks a lot from filament to print and high speeds only too often cause the layers to seperate later on. Some people compensate with higher temperatures but I don't like the idea of fitting a filter system with activated carbon filters... Also keep in mind the intense shrinkage when setting the extrusion multiplier! If your ABS prints fine with 0.85 you can expect that the same sized Nylon prints fine somewhere in the range of 55-60! Now you also know why printing with thick layers is not such a great idea if you require all dimensions to fit. Although only outside accuracy can be done by cheating in the settings, getting outside, inside and extrusion widths settings accurate is almost rocket sience ;) Nylon is expensive or not available here in the diameter I require.... I had the same trouble and reverted to trimmer line and a modified, dedicated hotend instead. Why dedicated you wonder? Nylon can be real pain to clean as nothing dissolves and if you heat the parts hot enough to melt it you can not work easy with them. Having a decicated hotend means you won't run into the problem of burnt ABS or PLA clogging the nozzle ;) It also means you can match the hotend to the trimmer line you choice (more on that in a minute). For example, in some areas trimmer line of 2mm or 3.3mm diameter is the most popular and cheapest. Just drill out the hotend to cater for the new diameter, which I did after noticing the filament got stuck in the neck of the cold end ;) Trimmer line - does it matter which one? It does these days! Avoid everything that is not round or labeled with terms like "duracore", "dual core", "multi layer"  -basically all that indicates it is not just a single, solid stand of Nylon. Long lasting, special core line is great for your lawn trimmer but really bad for your hotend! PET, High temp nylon or even fibre re-inforced cores are in use, so in the best case you mix the nylon with overheating PET, in the worst you block your nozzle permanently. If it looks like it has a core or some sort of "mantle" around it, it means not usable.

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply


Can I use steel wool as a filament for a homemade lightbulb? Answered

I want to use steel wool as a filament for a homemade light bulb.  I would like it to just glow, like a soft red or orange.  Is there a reason why this wouldn't work?  I know tungsten is ideal for a filament but at a lower temperature I can't think of a reason why steel filament shouldn't be alright.  I figure I should pass it by the all knowing Internet first though.  Oh by the way, the steel wool would be enclosed in a vaccuum or in a container filled with inert gas.  I would use this Instructable as a base for my project  https://www.instructables.com/id/Hanging-Bottle-Light-Bulb/  .  Thanks for your help.

Question by cdubnbird    |  last reply


Can anyone help with my flameless lighter? Answered

I'm trying to build a flameless lighter but I am an electronics n00b. I gutted a cheap clear lighter and I have a momentary switch and a spring I stretched for the heating element. the case can only fit a AAA battery but that isn't enough to heat the spring(it does get warm though). Is there a simple circuit  I can make to increase the power of the AAA or maybe a different filament i can use that wont burn out and can be used over and over?

Question by csim85    |  last reply


running vacuum tube filaments on dc and getting 10 volts from 2 5 volt wires from a atx? Answered

I am going to run a 10 volt filament on the +5 volt and +5 volt to get a combined power of 10 volts. First of all will running the filament on dc hurt it? Also the tube takes 10 amps, so will the +5 and +5 power supply be able to cope with it? ( it is a atx power supply) also how do you wire 2 +5 volt wires with a common ground to get 10 volts

Question by electricfan    |  last reply


Nylon and substitutes on a cold bed

It's been some time and I made progress with Nylon. Aldi had some cheap craft glue with methanol as the solvent - this stuff works great for PLA, ABS AND Nylon. The common problem with nylon is that it has no real adhesion to anything, except cardboard and bakelite. Cardboard makes a clean up nightmare and bakelite is not always easy to find, especially not the right type. So I tried various glues, paints and primers but none was really suited for all printing needs. And the cleanup of the bed is imoprtant too as I did not want to spend hours scrubbing with acetone or similar nasty solvents. After the first great succes with the clear Aldi craft glue I checked the local 2$ shops and carft stores and found similar glueswith methanol as a solvent. Since not everyone is lucky enough to get these specials I will tell you what to look out for if you try clear craft glue: Don't buy anything that can be cleaned up with water - you want methanol or ethanol as the solvent in the glue! Do a test with the glue on something that usually does not bind well to cheap glue, like glass and blister packs. Let the glue dry and peel it off - it should be a clear film that is quite strong and barely streches when you pull it. It almost feels like hard paper. All good so far? Check if the nylon, pla or abs really sticks to it: Spread a very thin layer on a piece of cardboard and let dry. Add another, thicker layer and let dry again. Now hold it under your nozzle and extrude a bit of filament while moving the cardboard around. Let cool and check how good it sticks. In a perfect world the cool plastic should peel the papaer off with the glue. Time to prepare your print bed the same way and to start printing ;) Just use a very thin first layer and for the first layer much lower speeds than usual. I print nylon with 60mm/s and the first layer at just 25mm/s, any faster and the first layer does not look right. ABS and PLA are much more forgiving here.

Topic by Downunder35m  


How to make fiber optic filament from fishing line? Answered

I am thinking of making my own fiber optic lamp / toy and was wondering if it was possible to make my own optical fibers from fishing line.

Question by devicemodder    |  last reply


How many white leds(super bright white leds) would I need to produce the same brightness as a 60w, 240V spotlight bulb.

I have a standard lamp that uses two separate 60w, 240v filament spotlight bulbs. What I want to do is convert it to using white leds or super bright white leds- one led disc to replace a bulb. What i need to know is: how many leds of this sort I would need to use on one led disk to produce the same amount of light as one of the above bulbs.

Question by mdog93    |  last reply


How do I replace a filament light with and LED on an ATV?

During one of my last outings, my tail/brake light got damaged beyond repair so I purchased an LED assembly and it wasn't until I opened the package I realized there were 3 wires (brake, running and ground).  My ATV is older (a 2000), so it only has 2 wire, as positive and a negative for the older filament style lights.  How do I hook this up so that I get my running light and brake light running properly?

Question by jdg511    |  last reply


Source for "filament white" 1800-2200K color temperature warm white led's?

After literally hours, I can not locate small quantities of warm white led's with what is sometimes described as "filament white" color temperature. Most warm white LED's are a much cooler 3000K. Any suggestions? Ideally a 3 or 5mm discrete LED. Images of warm white led's are unreliable. A color temperature description is necessary. Anyone? Thanks! I received a sample of these, but their color temperature is actually much closer to 3000K. http://www.ledtronics.com/Products/ProductsDetails.aspx?WP=1922 2017 UPDATE:  2200K (and warmer) LED's are finally becoming more commonplace in bulbs, LED tape, etc... so I'm keeping my eye out for more component and project LED's to also include this warmer range. 

Question by davidandora    |  last reply


HELP DESIGNING WINDING MACHINE

The machine should be able to wind a filament or wire around a beam structure that could measure 40 feet long by a diameter from 5 to 40 inches. A mechanical tensioning system portable and compact for supporting and dispensing fiber filament or wire, to the filament winder with a standard tension range from 1 lbf to 10 lbf. The winding around the beam such be done silmultaniosly in a criss cross pattern to a 45 angle degree. If interested in helping me with the design, my options are open to discuss terms. Please contact me if more information is needed. thank you, munsangv

Topic by munsangv    |  last reply


Low voltage AC power for thermocouple tube?

I am trying to make a readout for a DV-6M thermocouple gauge tube to measure vacuum. The tube requires 380mV (0.38v) AC across its filament to operate, and anything more could burn the filament. (I was reading up on this tube, and found the filament has a resistance of 18ohms but if you tried to measure it with a multimeter you could burn the filament). I have modified a 555 tone generator circuit, to accomplish this, and have measured the output to be 380mV AC with my fluke multimeter, and 0mv DC. When I put an LED across the output leads however, the LED is able to light which should take around 3v, which makes me wary of trying to connect it to my tube. what is happening, and is it really producing 380mV AC or is something else going on?

Question by Higgs Boson    |  last reply


Which is the most flammable, non-regulated and non-hazardous material you know?

I'm trying to ignite a smoke cartridge from a 6V flashlight bulb tungsten filament. When connected to the battery, the filament vaporizes with a small flash, however not sufficient to ignite the smoke mix. The smoke mix requires some energy to ignite (equivalent, 5 seconds with a lighter). I am now looking for a ignition aid material to put in between the filament and the smoke mix. It can be natual or synthetical, the only requirements are that it 1. ignites from a small spark 2. Is not classed as hazardous material/dangerous goods. What I have already tried: Char cloth - works OK, but the filament has to be put right at the edge of the cloth as it doesn't ignite very well from the top. Dryer lint - Doesn't work Cotton pad with vaseline - Doesn't work Toilet paper - Doesn't work Any other ideas? Thanks!

Question by karolina81    |  last reply


how do you make a led's light extend?

As in, I have a flash drive that I want to steampunk and thought about putting a falseto vacuum tube on the end that the filament lights up when I plug it in. What is the most efficient way to transfer the light from the led to light up the false filament. (My led is an orngeish amber color.) Would it have to be like a fiber optic or a small tube filled with glue?

Question by Clayton H.    |  last reply


could someone make an adaptor for my hot glue gun to melt zipstrips

I want to make an adapter for my hot glue gun to melt zip-ties that way i can turn them into filament for my 3d printer. just saying... If it could melt zip-ties and make filament why not use it to melt pop bottles? I could cut the top and bottom off a pop bottle and slice the sides up in a paper shredder then take the shreds and put them in  a hot glue gun to make the pop bottle into filament for my 3d printer. a little help please ? / what would I need to do to make this? I have the ability to print anything if someone could help design it. I wll share it with EVERYONE !

Topic by Tormentory    |  last reply


how to connect 2 PHOTOCELL in series

How to connect 2 PHOTOCELL (Brand KAGA AS-22006A) in series which each cell controlling 1 light (filament type -220V) each.

Question by omar1679    |  last reply


Electron gun

How can we build a heater for electron gun? can we use tungsten filament of lamp for heater ? please tell me how to build heater?????????????????????????????? thank very much

Question by esfand_mhs    |  last reply


Plastic recycled 3D printer

Planning to design a 3D printer that takes plastic bottles as input, I mean long narrow pieces of plastic bottles are fed as the printing filament. What will the difficulties in realizing such a design?

Topic by SHAMSUDHEEN MARAKKAR    |  last reply


circuit to cut through plastic wrap

I can use a tungsten filament and only a 9v battery.i need the circuit to generate enough heat so as to cut through a plastic wrap.

Question by snehap22    |  last reply


Plastic bottle recycled 3d printer...!

Planning to design a 3D printer that takes plastic bottles as input, I mean long narrow pieces of plastic bottles are fed as the printing filament. What will the difficulties in realizing such a design?

Question by SHAMSUDHEEN MARAKKAR  


can you run a vacuum tube under its rated filament current? Answered

I have a 811a tube and a 3 amp filli. transformer. I know that the 811a runs on 4 amps, but can't I use it with no harmful effects? I know it will run not as well, but will it kill the tube?

Question by electricfan    |  last reply


can I make a home made LED? Answered

I don´t know if the resins used to make leds are special trated, or very difficult to find the metal of "filaments". But my question is: Is possible to make a home made LED?

Question by pesfan27    |  last reply


Discussion Regarding Search For Best Multi-Application 3D Printer

I should wish to have the input of the community regarding the best multi-application 3D printer. Some of the qualities that I'm looking for include the capacity to handle a variety of filaments (notably the Poro-Lay porous foam filament and a variety of carbon fiber reinforced filaments, in addition to the standard ABS and PLA filaments), an extremely high detail resolution capacity, and consistent, high-quality prints. I've seen a number of 3D printed items have sections "unwind" after printing, which is not something that I want to have happen. I'm also hoping to have something with a fine enough output that the printed item doesn't look horribly striped.  Naturally, I'm looking for a machine that's good quality and easy to maintain (relatively speaking), meaning that parts that wear out quickly, such as the filament feed head, should be replaceable by someone that's not been trained as an authorized service technician. While I am not overtly concerned with price, keep in mind that this is for medium-scale personal use (read that as NOT industrial use). I've done a bit of researching, and have found that the MakerBot systems are generally lauded in some circles, but when I've went to look at the reviews posted to a variety of retail sites that carry the item, I've found that they've gotten generally negative reviews. Granted, I'm not entirely sure how much of this negativity is the result of user error / ignorance, vs how much of it is legitimate. Similarly, the printers that have great reviews on the retail sites have very little mention elsewhere, such as in the number of 3D printing communities that I've been reading through.  That all having been said, I have been quite impressed by the work I've seen coming out of the 3D printing section of Instructables, and figured that this would likely be a good place to begin a discussion on this matter.

Topic by Mardalla    |  last reply


is it possible to continuously run a flash filament from a disposable camera. building DIY LCD projector

Is it possible to continuously run a flash filament from a disposable camera. I understand that I would have to rid the capacitor and run a few of the chargers in parallel to maintain enough power output. Will it over heat and what kind of light output are we talking about? Is it worth doing should I use high power LEDs?. I am planning to custom build one of those LCD projectors and have about 200 disposable flash cameras lying around and can get heaps more for free… so it would be more feasible if this would work.

Question by grimgroper    |  last reply


In a vacuum tube, are the anode and the cathode connected in any way? Answered

In the wikipedia article, they refer to the cathode as a filament, which I thought was a bit odd. The only other filament I'm familiar with is in a light bulb. I was reading a book about vacuum tubes earlier, when I looked them up in wikipedia searching for a diagram: vacuum tube. Basically, a vacuum tube is a capacitor with a vacuum as the dielectric? Does a vacuum tube retain a charge? They seem to have the same principle: anode, cathode, dielectric. In a way, a battery seems to also be similar; the difference being the galvanic process involved. I attached a picture of a Daniel's cell from back in the day.

Question by Vorenus    |  last reply


Can I add a DIY freezer compartment to my fridge?

I've got a large fridge, without a freezer compartment. I only use a small fraction of the space available in the fridge, so I was wondering if I could add a small freezer compartment to the top of it. The filament (or whatever it's called - the cooling bit) takes up the entire back wall of the fridge. It's built into the back, not visible. This is always getting covered with ice, even on low settings (probably because I only really use it to chill water - something to do with condensation, perhaps?), which I take to mean that it's capable of freezing stuff. And sometimes I leave bottles of water too close to the back of the fridge, and they get frozen solid. I was thinking I could maybe attach some kind of drawer to the back of the thing, just to keep ice cream, etc... But what could I make the drawer out of? Would it need to conduct the cool-ness from the filament at the back? Would I be okay to attach it by screwing into the sides of the fridge? (away from the cooling filament) I've spent all day googling for an answer. You're my only hope.

Question    |  last reply


Hand-blown Sculpture Amazes, Illuminates

Take a good look at these crazy and beautiful hand-blown light sculptures. Prices are in the range of $200 - $1,300 and look like they're not recommended if you have small kids in the house, but hey, they come with a free filament replacement. artist pagevia BoingBoing

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


Seach has failed me. :(

Hey all,I'm new here, but i've made a tonne of things from this site, and always forget to register. ANYWAY, i came across something a few weeks back, and i just cannot find it again. Please please please help me.I think i was looking for something on how to make LED's react to sound or possibly a guitar valve amp or a spectrum analyser, when i came across it. It was some sort of LED or filament bulb or something, that was being built as a decoration. I'll try to be as descriptive as i can here. The actual LED/Light thing wasn't an LED. It looked like a filament bulb, but instead of it just being a light, it made symbols, text etc etc. It wasn't like a segment led or anything led related, it looked more like a filament in it. The lamp itself was box shaped, and it looked like it was about 50mm x 50mm x 50mm. I can't even remember the name of what that lamp display type thing was. There were a few things i've come across that remind me of what that thing was. It was a bit like a display version of one square of one those old school alarm clocks where the numbers flipped down?Sorry if this is a bit vague, i'm hoping it might jog someone's memory?

Topic by trad3mark    |  last reply


Stratasys hack, legal??

Hi , I  think of making an instructable about how to hack  3D printer cartridges, so they can easily be refilled with cheap material. I got an old Stratasys Dimension BST 3D printer from 2005 or something and these printers need chip protected filament cartridges to operate- and these cartridges are quite expensive (~200$ per kg filament...) There is a way to hack these cartridges using a small arduino based programmer to refill them with generic ABS and HIPS, each about 20$ per kg. So its 200$ vs. 20$ , and 15 minutes of work. And I would like to make a small instructable about how to do that. But I don`t know whether this is legal. My question: whats the policy of Instructables here? And if Stratasys starts legal action (I seriously doubt that, because the printers are out of production) who is liable, would that be me or Instructables?

Question by ralph124c    |  last reply


is this print possible? Answered

Hello, i am working on my 3d printer, but i haven't completed it yet....... but still a question arises in my mind..... that can i print this (here- http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:399610)  , i mean i sliced it..... and saw..... that at one layer..... it extrudes filament..... in the middle of no-where...... i mean how can it stick in the air...... ???????

Question by _Boltz_    |  last reply


Grinding PET Plastics

Hello, I have recently been working on shredding PET plastics (#1 recycling symbol), to recycle the plastics into 3D printer filament. I have been struggling with finding a reliable and inexpensive method for grinding or shredding the plastics. The granules also need to be fairly small. Please share any thoughts you have! Thanks!

Topic by DylanD581    |  last reply


hot end of 3d printer problem? Answered

Hello instructors  i build big 3d printer 1000mm *800 mm *800mm  its working ok . but i have problem with hot end in the second layer stop milting filament  i build three 3d printers but this the first time i see like this problem if any one have ideas what the solution  thanks to u

Question by براءا    |  last reply


What to do with...?

I recently received two demo broiler units from my friend's dad. They both each have one broiler unit and a carbon fiber filament inside a quartz tube. (Just what my dad relayed to me from him.) What the hell should I do with these bad boys?

Question by Zem    |  last reply


Christmas lights aren't working :(

I have a small set of Christmas lights that will not come on. With my multimeter I tested the fuses, several light sockets (the one closest to the plug, the one furthest away, and one closer to the middle), and the female plug on the end. I'm getting 120v coming out of the female plug, the sockets are providing between 2v and 4v, and the fuses provide almost no resistance, and the filaments are visibly intact. What's wrong?

Question by C18H21NO4    |  last reply


What to do with a tube from a CFL that has broken electronics?

HiI have a couple of broken CFL's, The tube still works and I want to do something with it.Any ideas on how to make it light up from 12 volt, Without a ionization antenna (Using the heating filaments instead).Any other ideas??Anyone else want to know what to do with them too?I don't want any comments that say THROW IT OUT or similar

Topic by thermoelectric    |  last reply


does Indium tin oxide reflect inferred? and is it possible to coat glass with it?

Does Indium tin oxide reflect inferred? and is it possible to coat glass with it? in Wikipedia, it mentions its transparent, and acts like a "medal-like" mirror. this seems promising, but can i coat a fuse like light bulb with it, so it will reflect the inferred radiation back to the filament, heating it up more? i idea is this will help make light bulbs more efficient.  

Question by -max-    |  last reply


All the wires in my stepper motor are connected to each other, is that possible?

Hey guys, I just bought a stepper motor, and when I was checking to see which wire is connected to what I found that all the six wires are connected to each other, is this even possible? Is it probably because I left the filament end of each wire be connected to each other? Because I just left the wires together thinking that there was nothing wrong with that. Please help me out, this is urgent!! 

Question by NahidRM    |  last reply


New Light Fitting Smells Of Fish When Hot

Hi, I have just fitted a new light fitting. After it gets hot (60 Watt filament bulb) The room smells of fish. I believe that the smell is coming from the hot plastic, probably from the plastic that holds the shade in place. I don't want to reduce the wattage, The label on the connector says it is rated for 100 Watts. How can I get rid of the fish smell? Thanks

Topic by anon_private    |  last reply


Carbon Button Lamp

The Nikola Tesla group forum is asking for new projects, so I'm posting this as a suggestion. I would love to build it myself, but I lack the tools and money. This is my first contribution to Instructables, so please comment constructively.Nikola Tesla invented the Carbon Button lamp as a kind of incandescent light, because Thomas Edison banned him from using his incandescent filament bulbs. Nikola later discovered that versions of it could also be used in wireless, trans-Atlantic telegraphy, and to investigate what we now call x rays. In fact, he even used the lamp (or something similar to it) to take x-ray photographs, 8 years before Wilhelm Rotgen discovered them.For this reason, I must warn you: this device may possibly generate x rays. I am not responsible for any harm of any kind that may or may not result from re-creating this interesting device.There are phosphors that you can buy that will absorb x rays and re-emit them as visible light. I recommend that you coat the bulb with it until you know for sure that the x rays aren't strong enough to hurt you, or if makes x rays at all. Mixing it with a phosphor made for uv light wouldn't hurt either.Theory of Operation:The bulb is powered by a Tesla Coil, or other source of high voltage, high frequency current, such as a driver for a plasma globe (actually, the modern plasma globe is descended from this kind of technology!)When the power is turned on, electricity bombards the carbon button. Because carbon isn't the best conductor, this causes the button to heat and release electrons into the bulb's vacuum (the technical name for this is "thermionic emission," or the "Edison effect") . These electrons, in turn, excite the remaining air molecules and cause them to create visible light. This is strikingly similar to how fluorescent lamps work!Supposedly, the bulb should shine 10 times brighter than an incandescent bulb.(Note that the excitation of the air molecules, not the incandescence of the button, is actually the main source of light from the bulb.)If anyone decides to build it, please post an instructable showing the steps and finished product. I suggest you get started by reading the patent, number 514,170. You may also want to read part of Tesla's lecture, "Experiments with Alternate Currents of High Potential and High Frequency."To anyone who will attempt this, I wish you good luck!Patent: http://www.google.com/patents?id=UpldAAAAEBAJ&pg;=PA1&dq;=514,170+tesla&source;=gbs_selected_pages&cad;=0_1Lecture: http://www.tfcbooks.com/tesla/1892-02-03.htmQuestions:What can one use for the carbon button?Could one use a modern, hollowed-out light bulb for this? (I would think there would be some problems with sealing the globe, and with the stem.)Edit: I recently found the third picture in Tesla's Colorado Springs notes and his "apparatus for the utilization of radiant energy" patent. It must be the single-electrode x ray tube I was talking about before...

Topic by ElectricUmbrella    |  last reply


Is this legal? (UK electrical appliance question) Answered

Kitewife just bought a Christmas decoration, but when it came out of the bag, the connection was as shown in the image. The loose wire is already a safety concern, about which I shall be contacting the store, but I also I thought that appliances sold in the UK had to have a plug moulded onto the power lead? Since the decoration is lit with old-style filament bulbs instead of LEDs, I am wondering if she has been sold something that has been sitting in a warehouse since before the legislation changed?

Question by Kiteman    |  last reply


DIY method for sorting shredded plastic flakes by resin type?

I've seen thatthe Coca-Cola company is promoting the keep the cap on PETE bottles, and that they use sink/float methods to separate the bottle from the cap after shredding since PET sinks and HDPE floats, now is there a similar (easy/ homebrew) test for other plastics like PP or LDPE, and by the way can 2 & 4 mix on a Melt? looking into doing some layered DIY proyect that involves the DIY Extrution of PET filament and other plastics for experimenting purposes.

Question by AskDaDoc    |  last reply