Mouse glide Pads

Ever have that mouse that fits just right then it starts to drag no matter what the surface? I dont want to give it up but would like to replace the pads that allow it to slide smoothly across the mouse pad. Any ideas? 

Topic by poorjohnn 5 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


need wiring schematic for silver glide stairway lift? Answered

Question by draket10 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Nearly 20 inch long paper airplane!!!

I have just perfected a paper airplane that is 19 1/8 inches long, and it FLIES!!! It's name is the Albatross g1. Pics and vids attached.

Topic by copyright9 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Glider Part That Makes Gliders Glide? Answered

From the title, I'm sure you can tell that I'm absolutely ignorant about what this part is or how to replace it.  Basically, I have a few gliders with broken bits that are supposed to make the gliders glide.  And because I have no idea what this part is, I've taken a few pictures. I'm wanting to fix these parts, but I don't know the name of the part and, consequently, where to find them.  Brah!!!!

Question by AngryRedhead 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Which is safer, hang gliding or paragliding? Answered

I am very interested in buying a hang glider or paraglider. It seems to me that hang gliders are less expensive, but I am more concerned about the safety than I am about the price. Which do you recommend, a hang glider or a paraglider? And, which goes faster and farther? Thanks

Question by Technicolor 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Do you know a source for chair glides that can be used for the emco ( good form) aluminum chair?

The chair legs are 1 inch square with a 5/8 to 3/4 inch hole in the bottom. The original glides were metal and were held in by a compressible rubber gromett. The only chair glides I have seen made today are metal inserts for square or round chairs with a screw in metal glide. I wonder what replacement type would be most suitable for these chairs

Question by mgrower 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago



Biophysics: Airspeed of an unladen colugo...?

I'm looking for hard data on the relationship between typical airspeed / stall speed, glide angle, and wing loading of large gliding/flying mammals like the colugo, japanese giant flying squirrel, and flying foxes.  At first glance, Google turns up these facts with minimal digging. The catch is that the data are provided for different individuals, which is almost useless for my purposes.  Could someone point me toward a source that has all three pieces of information for the same individual, and preferably lists them for several individuals? Better still, is there an existing paper comparing the relationship between these numbers across unrelated species?

Question by passersby 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Knex Flight

Seeing as knex is light, strong and flexible, and most importantly, using rods, I beleive it would be feesable to build a Knex 'glider'. After seeing how gliders are made, it could be possible to build a lightweight spacframe wing out of knex, and make it fly using clingfilm as its 'skin'. An extra boost of gliding power would come from a clingfilm propeller, powered by the very fast and smal, solar motor. Do you think it is possible to make something like this glide 10 metres? Ideas welcome.

Topic by TheFoofinator 8 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


What can I use to slide sat down on carpet

.I want to row with resistance bands on carpet. I rather not use carpet slides or glides

Topic by LAPIII 4 years ago  |  last reply 3 years ago


how to make a electric powered 1-2 seat trike hang glider on cheap?

What cheap materials would be best for making the wing (the frame and wing skin) and the trike part? also, i must know about the balancing of the 2. at some point i'd like to add 2 extra (adjustable) propellers to aid in hovering. Any info directed towards achieving this is greatly desired. Pics and detailed schematics are greatly desired. I'd like to be up and flying within 2-3 months maybe 4 if not sooner. Thanks.

Question by freenergyfuture 7 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


Rubber band aeroplane is not flying correctly

Created Rubberband aeroplane ,and glides fine without propeller.But when the propeller is turned ON ,it just lost the balance and its not climbing into height.The propeller is home made.what would be the reason?.please help me.

Question by AnasCS 2 years ago  |  last reply 2 years ago


RC Car --- RC Plane?

Okay, so today at school, we learned about Bernoulli's principle and how wings help a plane fly. So I was wondering, if you built some good wings, attached them to an RC Car, and drove it off a ramp, would it glide for a little bit?

Question by Frozen Twinkies 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


The Christmas Special 2010. [Paper airplane]

In this special, you will make a paper airplane that are: Tough Water Proof Ice Proof Snow Proof Mud Proof Made out of Foil Strong A glider Fire Proof [Option] paper airplane. To enter this, just put a picture of it outside in the snow or inside and put some bit of comment about it as well also put your paper airplane instrutable web address. Make sure it's flys, glides and works for lasting months or more!

Topic by wat. 8 years ago


Is this the last step in an unstoppable robot?

I just saw this video via Laughing Squid's Twitter feed. It's a small robot from Boston Dynamics (the people that brought you the Mule walking pack-robot) that can jump 30 feet straight up. Now, imagine if they combined that leaping technology, and the ruggedness to survive the landings, with the terrain-crossing a flight capabilities of a Mini-Wheg MMALV, and you've got a robot that can get anywhere - as soon as the terrain gets too rough to clamber over, jump 30 feet straight up, and then either glide or fly under power to a better location! Come on, roboteers, get to it!  

Topic by Kiteman 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


What do i consider while making a flying machine? Answered

For a while i've been studying, designing, and building hang gliders. To my great disapointment however, none of them have even glided. I am starting to think there are more things to consider than just center of gravity, balance, and the over all "lightness" of the craft. Are there more things i should consider? I have also pondered upon the idea to make a Ultralight Helicopter, or somthing along those lines. What are some things i need to consider beond what i've already mentioned?

Question by aar0nc0le 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Surface tension propels tiny boat without sails or moving parts

From the New Scientist:WATCHING Sung Kwon Cho's model boat glide silently across the still water with no propellers or sails, you'd be forgiven for thinking a phantom hand was drawing the vessel forward. The boat is actually being driven by water surface tension, the same force that allows some insects to skate across the surface of a pond.The design is inspired by Pyrrhalta beetle larvae, which also use surface tension to propel themselves. Since it requires no moving parts, the method should be more robust than those involving propellers and may use just a hundredth of the power.Another story on the NetworkWorld site (with a few skeptical comments.)Doesn't look too difficult to replicate, does it?

Topic by gmoon 10 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


K'nex Challenge 2: 18th Sept - 11th Oct - FLIGHT

After the success of the last contest, Gmjhowe, =SMART= and myself decided we'd go for it and launch a second contest.The first we really enjoyed and saw some awesome entries. This time we've decided to make the guidelines a wee bit looser so you can use your imagination more. We'll be setting a category for you to design and build within and then provide you with some example ideas to get you started. And this category is....FLIGHTAnything plane, helicopter, glider, flight related is allowed. Please read the rules carefully.Rules:Your entry must do something. It can't just be a model of a plane or a helicopter. We want them to move or glide or have spinning parts or be functional for something else around the house but be aircraft themed.Entries must be over 50% knex. The remaining can be paper, glue, card, tissue paper.... anything!To enter, write up a full instructable of your construction process with clear pictures and descriptions. Post the link here.Please steer clear of guns. That's not what this is about.Starting and closing dates are GMT.What the judges say goes!Have fun!Judging - 12th Sept - 18th SeptSuggestions:A propellor. Small and compact, if you design a good one you might get extra kudos if your design's then used in loads of other entries.A ceiling plane. With a plastic propeller on the front and the top attached to a string to the ceiling, this plane will fly itself around in circles on a string.Paper plane launcher. Probably the closest you'll get to a gun.A vertical launch rocket. Rocket being a rocket model not a meagre collection of rods.While knex by itself might not be light enough to fly.... perhaps you could run some string through the middle to make it appear to glide.... Mum's washing line might be of great help.Prizes:There will be patches for prizes. Gmjhowe will be uploading them soon.

Topic by Jayefuu 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


80.000 nose dive autopiloted

Hi all, I'm planning to drop a glider from a weather balloon from about 80.000 feet. I want to let the airplane gain speed and then glide to the launching place or at least as close as possible to it. The idea is to do a nose dive (nose heavy) until enough speed is reached and slowly turn the airplane towards the launching site. Is this achievable with ardupilot software? I'm already sending a bunch of instruments like gyro, gps and magnetometer and I could use their readings on a Raspberry pi to run ardupilot , at least until video range is available to switch to manual. If possible I want to avoid buying the autopilot hardware 1. Any idea if this could be achievable the way I'm going about it? 2. Is this even legal? (I know it has been done already but I'm planning on doing this many times) Thank you in advance for any answer backed up by facts. 

Topic by Matienzo 4 years ago  |  last reply 4 years ago


What LEDs for a light signalling system that needs to be visible at over 1000 yards?

I'm building a light signalling system for a gliding/soaring club that will be used for indication to the winch driver. This is done by means of flashing lights where the on/off timing indicates the launch phase (take-up-slack, all-out or stop). The original plan was to use car spotlights (2 x 55W) but I am considering LEDs. Assuming LEDs would be suitable for this application (I have no experience of using high intensity LEDs) can anyone enlighten me (pun intended!) on what would be the best type to use i.e. colour, brightness, quantity etc. The light will be located at the launch point (i.e. where the glider starts from) and needs to be easily seen by the winch driver who is over 1000 yards away. It needs to be usable in bright ambient light conditions e.g. on a summer's day (yes we do occasionally get them in the UK!). Thanks

Topic by Biffo Bear 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Free energy via adjusting buoyancy- why not?

Hypothetical setup- a floating object which can adjust its own buoyancy via ballast tanks full of air (if it's a submarine) or compressing/expanding a helium bag (if it's a blimp).  Naively, it feels like the amount of energy you could harness by letting it float and sink is a lot compared to the amount of energy required to adjust the buoyancy, but I'm starting from the axiom that free energy is impossible so I must have made an error somewhere. If we take the example of a submarine, is it that filling the ballast tanks with air effectively raises the sea level by a tiny fraction, and that water's potential energy is what makes the submarine float upwards? I guess in the case of a helium balloon, the act of inflating it pushes the atmosphere upwards and that is what provides it with lift.  This question was prompted by a Youtube video of a hybrid helium-balloon-airliner that used buoyancy to reach altitude and then glided back downwards, which made me think "that's quite a neat idea... hang on... where does the energy come from?".

Topic by PKM 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Dawn

This poem is from my book Melodious Verse. It is a Carmen Figuratum of a sunrise on a fall morning I wrote while sitting on the shore of Lake Ontario 37 years ago. I did not have a camera with me so I did not capture an image of the dawn to go with the poem. I have photographed the dawn a thousand times and never captured just the right image of the dawn to accompany the poem. Carmen Figuratum a poem that has a certain shapes or pattern formed either by all the words it contains or just by certain ones therein. An example is the shape of each stanza resembles a wine cup.                                                             New Day                                     I sit watching god’s creatures of the night,                                      fleeing from the ever-approaching dawn.                                A bright orange and red haze caresses the horizon.                                                     Beyond this is the sun.                             Slowly ever so slowly rising above the edge of the earth:                                           to explode into an orange ball of fire.                              Sending a red-river of shimmering light across the water,                                                           now it is dawn.                           I can hear the cries of a seagull as it gracefully glides by me.                                               In the water ducks swim around,                                                 as the sun lights up the world.                                                       It becomes morning,                                                        it is dawn no more,                                                           but a new day.                                                                   By                                                    Josehf Lloyd Murchison                                             Copyright ©2007 Josehf Murchison

Topic by Josehf Murchison 7 years ago


Outrigger specs seem a little etchasketch??

Three piece plywood outrigger canoe, current rig has a 16 foot hull consisting of the two outer pieces, and is 22 inches wide. It’s hooked up with a tacking rig, a 14 foot mast, and an 11’-10” boom. Originally, it would total 24 feet with the third middle section, but I’m not building that. With a hull 16' long coupled with a fat 22" width, and a simple tacking rig, am I guna get much speed on this thing? What’s more is that the closest body of water is "Steal house lake" and other various lakes in and around the Killeen, Ft. Hood, Austin (Texas) area, everything’s bigger in Texas, but they're still just lakes, coupled with a 24' monster designed to cut and glide over ocean class behemoths (also why I kicked the 8' mid section that i really, really don’t need in these tiny waters). So what do you think, the plans I’ve got are solid, clear, and decisive, the boat and rig are all drawn up, and I’m about to start the first piece of the hull tomorrow (soon as I get the wood). Should I stick with this 16' by 22" hull, should I add the 8' even though I’m just on a lake (a big one ill grant, but a lake all the same), should I jump for a strip-planked composite, or go somewhere else entirely, what should I do, what should i do?? p.s. Rig also computable with an oceanic lateen, or “Crab-claw” rig, lest that’s what i think it’s called.

Question by Jumpin Jehosaphat 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Gravity Lamp, the LED lamp powered by gravity

A Virginia Tech student designed an LED lamp that is powered by gravity. It is called the Gravia, and it took second place at the Greener Gadgets competition in NYC. Gravity as a renewable energy source? Amazing!From http://pesn.com/2008/02/19/9500471_Gravity_Lamp/Concept illustrations of Gravia depict an acrylic column a little over four feet high. The entire column glows when activated. The electricity is generated by the slow fall of a mass that spins a rotor. The resulting energy powers 10 high-output LEDs that fire into the acrylic lens, creating a diffuse light. The operation is silent and the housing is elegant and cord free – completely independent of electrical infrastructure.The light output will be 600-800 lumens – roughly equal to a 40 watt incandescent bulb. Each drop of the gravity mechanism runs the light over a period of four hours.To "turn on" the lamp, the user moves weights from the bottom to the top of the lamp. An hour-glass like mechanism is turned over and the weights are placed in the mass sled near the top of the lamp. The sled begins its gently glide back down and, within a few seconds, the LEDs come on and light the lamp, Moulton said. “It’s more complicated than flipping a switch but can be an acceptable, even enjoyable routine, like winding a beautiful clock or making good coffee,” he said.Moulton estimates that Gravia’s mechanisms will last more than 200 years, if used eight hours a day, 365 days a year.The winner of the Greener Gadgets competition was the Enerjar.

Topic by Brennn10 11 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


Sharp Tactical Folding Pocket Knife from Budgetgadgets

Sharp Tactical Folding Pocket Knife Everybody needs knifes, wether it is for a project here, cutting your apple, or just for fun. Budgetgadgets is a fairly new company that takes operates in the free delivery market. The item that I will be reviewing today is a knife, folding release, of reasonable size. When closed it measures approx. 5 inches, when opened it is about 8. The knife is completely made out of stainless metal, and the actual blade is coated in a black substance, for a sleek look. There is a very narrow slice of uncoated metal, which is the actual edge of the blade. The coating has the same colour as the handle. The blade has a proper thickness, and is rigid. Now for the actual review. I will judge the blade on several fronts: Construction quality, appearance, ease of handling and cutting abilities. Construction quality As soon as you get a hold of this knife it feels very sturdy, and has a nice complete finished look. The coating on the blade is nice and even without imperfections. Opening the knife is very smooth, and the locking system works very well. All is operated by one hand easily. Only downside is that is isnt locked when closed. This doesnt bother me though; as I keep it in the pouch that it came with when not in use. There is no wiggle room between the blade and the handle. Appearance Its a matter of taste, but as far as Im concerned it looks great. The knife is entirely made out of good materials, which make it look valuable. The unpainted metal parts are partially brushed, and the black handle had a nice textured surface which looks sturdy. Ease of use As I said before, the knife is easily operated with one hand. Considering the handle of the blade is slightly larger than usual, this knife is operated by larger hands than average ones easily. Its also able to transfer more force to the blade by having a larger handle. Cutting abilities This is what its al about in the end, how well does it cut. A test with a piece of paper works flawless, the knife just glides right through without ripping the paper, and leaves a very clean cut. Plastic is cut with ease to, all on factory sharpness. Cutting fruits is somewhat harder, considering the increasing thickness of the blade, meat on the other hand is very easy to cut. Overall score A knife that offers outstanding value for a small price. For only 7,64$ including shipping this knife comes to your home. Grade: 9,5/10

Topic by Centurion_NL 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Make Fireworks, RFID Pet Feeder, LED Jellyfish Costume...

Sign-up for our newsletter here. Sept. 13, 2007 Welcome back! The iRobot Create Challenge has just finished up with over a dozen cool and we're still seeing some cool Launch It! Challenge entries come in on top of the usual cool projects. Check them out! Halloween LED Jellyfish Costume Using LED rope lights and a plastic washing basin to create a deep sea bioluminescent jellyfish thing.posted by deadinsect on Sep 11, 2007 How to Make a RFID Pet Food Feeder Make sure dogs aren't stealing food with an RFID alarm.posted by mlarsen on Sep 5, 2007 Creative Discontent: Squalk (Squirt Chalk) Non-destructive communication tool for mass public discourse. Erasable graffiti at its finest.posted by pdip_stiffi on Sep 9, 2007 How to Make Monkey Bread The ultimate finger-licking, finger-picking dessert of all time. Soft balls of dough, coated in a cinnamon sugar crust of sweet goodness.posted by trebuchet03 on Sep 9, 2007 Colossal Cannon: Building a Behemoth Piston-Valved Pneumatic Launcher Sometimes you think to yourself, "Hmm...I wonder just how far I can hurl stuff, maybe even into the next county." posted by DeusXMachina on Sep 9, 2007 Contest ends on Sunday! Answer our burning questions! Get a free shirt! See who won the $1,500 top prize! How to Make Fireworks Learn how to make your own aerial shell and wow the neighbors.posted by pudi.dk on Sep 7, 2007 eyeRobot - The Robotic White Cane How to hack an iRobot to guide blind and visually impaired users through cluttered and populated environments.posted by shrimpy on Sep 8, 2007 Piano-wire Slingshot A small but powerful slingshot made using 1mm gauge piano-wire and ordinary rubber bands.posted by chluaid on Sep 9, 2007 Gliding/Floating Laptop Dock A floating laptop dock that moves back and forth, eliminating the need to station the laptop on your lap. posted by Romado12187 on Sep 8, 2007 How To Build A Pit Oven (And Cook A Salmon) Learn to do a little backwoods cooking with a pit oven. posted by Mr. Nova on Sep 11, 2007 Now go build something awesome, and I'll see you next week! -Eric

Topic by lebowski 11 years ago


Paper Airplane Contest 2 (Closed)

In hopes of seeing more paper airplanes and innovative designers on Instructables.com, I have decided to host a second mini-contest. My goal is to stimulate the paper airplane channel and encourage more paper airplane builders to post their innovative designs. Requirements: 1. Aircraft Requirements: • Stability at all operation speeds • A minimum glide range of 30 feet (9.144 meters) • Durability to fly 30 feet or more after 15 flights • Use of less than 15 inches (0.381 meters) of tape in construction • Use of less than 5 pieces of 8.5 by 11 inch (A4) paper in construction • Ability to carry at least 6×100mg toothpicks • Provisions for landing gear and/or skids 2. Instructables Requirements: • 1 page strictly devoted to materials required in construction • 1 page explaining how to fly the aircraft • The instructable's license must be: "Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike (by-nc-sa)" • The sentence and link (see below) publicly indicating the instructable’s acceptance into this contest The sentence which must be displayed on your intro page: “This instructable is an entry in Paper Airplane Contest 2 (Instructable URL).” Prizes: For this contest I will award the publishers of the top 5 performing paper airplanes* one patch each. The first place winner will also recieve a 3 month Pro membership. By default, these patches will be medals (1st place, Patch with Gold Medal image and 3 month Pro membership; 2nd Place, Patch with Silver Medal image; 3rd Place, Patch with Bronze Medal Image; 4th Place, Patch with 4th Place lettering; 5th Place, Patch with 5th Place lettering). If the winners of the patches would like a different image, there will be a 24 hour period between the announcement of the winners and the awarding of the patches. During this time, the user would need to send me a private message with their desired picture. *Multiple entries are allowed. To keep the distribution of patches wide however, each entrant can only win one prize. How To Enter: To enter this contest, you must send me a private message entitled “My Paper Airplane [Member Name Here]” with your instructable's URL included. I will then put the link and author's name onto a list on this topic under "Current Entries". Judging: For this contest, I have decided that I will judge all the planes myself based on abilities. I have decided this way because I believe judging on performance rather than shape is a more objective approach. The contest begins Friday, January 14, 2011 and ends Monday, February 14, 2011. Entries must be published before Friday, February 11, 2011. From February 11 to February 14, I will be judging all entries. I will announce the winners of the contest on Tuesday, February 15, 2011 and issue them their prizes Wednesday, February 16, 2011. Current Entries:

Topic by OrigamiAirEnforcer 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


Status update (Update: Barackuda soon to post)

Hey, peoples. I'm rather sad to see the community dying but I figured I'll cling on a little longer, try to spark some more activity if possible. I see people still posting instructions, so that's good. Just wish we'd keep more discussion going on the forums. Anyway, a couple things: Just to show what I have around, I tried to make something after my Barackuda but didn't end up going anywhere. I just wanted to have something around, so I remade and improved my SMRI model. This version was designed solely for looks based off my last version. I couldn't really be bothered to try making this one shoot. It still uses Red's stock because I couldn't think of a better design at the time. Anywho, this wasn't meant to be the impressive bit, just something to show while yabbering. =P With the Barackuda and the SMRI, I realized that I'm still limited in a few pieces. I desperately need more dark greys, oranges, and black hands. I also realized I feel bad destroying guns and never keeping them around so that I can build new ones. I figure I might as well build my collection up so I can keep more guns around. So I've ordered more pieces. I'll get them probably some time early next week. I'm hoping to build something right away. I'm thinking of revisiting my Barackuda to see if I can improve the trigger and feed ramp. I might redesign it entirely. I'm hoping to attempt a repeating slingshot of some form at some point too. But it's an area I've never worked in before so I might get discouraged pretty quick. I dunno, I need to try actually building these ideas I have sitting in my head for years. I'll post more in here once I get the pieces and start building something. Update 2/19/16: I'm mostly finished with my new version of the Barackuda. I filled in the empty gaps on the rods of the magazine to make it fuller looking. The trigger -should- work better now but I just noticed it struggles to set when it's still pulled back while cocking. I suspect I just need a better band setup to resolve this, otherwise it works fine when you manually push the trigger forward. Last, the stock was changed entirely to give the bolt a rail to glide inside of with a solid bolt stop right after the trigger engages, allowing for a quick and smooth action. The handle connection is also more sturdy, so the stock is surprisingly rigid. Overall I'm much more pleased with this version, as long as I can figure out the trigger bands this might be posted. I'll begin working on yet another remake of the UMP soon. Update 11/9/16: Man, the year sure flew by. I apologize for never really getting around to posting the Barackuda before. This time I think I've finally gotten over my perfectionism. I've adjusted the stock to keep the same track design but attached it differently and otherwise made the rest of the stock use less pieces. I've figured out a (I think) new pair of K'nex sights more precise than our usual chunky ones, not that it'll help much. The trigger and back of the gun has been adjusted to block the pin further back, hopefully improving range slightly. The front of the gun was made more compact and flat at the bottom to allow potential changes to the front of the magazine in the future. It also makes muzzle loading much easier in tandem with the new ramp. The ramp is also simpler, more consistent, and hopefully offers better range than my other ones. Finally, the magazine has been adjusted to be easier to load and hopefully more reliable. I'd finally say this is a practical war weapon alternative. I'll post this...hopefully sooner rather than later. This time I mean it.

Topic by TheDunkis 3 years ago  |  last reply 1 year ago


My Month at Instructables as an Artist in Residence

It's easy to see Instructables as a single entity who's persona is summed up in one yellow robot. During the month of November I had the good fortune to spend a month as an Artist in Residence at Instructables HQ and had the opportunity to look behind the yellow curtain and learn more about the people who craft the website and the work that they do. During my stay I met artists and technicians, crafters and programmers, and I was allowed to peek into their world and see the inner cogs whirling away. Oh yeah, I was also let loose with a million dollars worth of 3D printers and laser cutters with no more direction than to have fun and make stuff! Day to day life at the office was not what I expected. Before arriving I had envisioned a, well, a madhouse. I figured that there would be 10 ft cardboard robots beeping away in one corner, office supply archery in the other, and paper airplanes gliding over the top of it all. When inside though I didn't find a room of chaos, but a room of people quietly working. I soon found out that between community management, site development, contests and other site duties there is a massive amount of work that goes into making the Instructables DIY hub function. It wasn't all business though, there was certainly time for liquid nitrogen ice cream, communal lunch hours, and pizza Thursday! I am very much a robot / tech person, so one of the highlights of my visit was getting to talk shop with randofo and amandaghassaei, Instructables technology editors. They had the coolest gadgets, and both fit the role of tinkers perfectly. Randofo had a huge bin of motors, gearboxes and other electrical delights that he patiently let me riffle through, and Amanda's work area was mass of dismantled keyboards, wire and test equipment. They practiced a type of electronics where novelty is the main function, and it was amazingly fun to see their projects come together. And yes, of course, the 3D printers were a blast. I really was allowed to dive in and try anything I wanted with the Objet machines so I took every spare moment working with them. I spent a fair amount of time running test prints of the different materials and testing their physical and mechanical strength, (aka breaking them). Once I had a feel for the UV cure pseudo plastic, I had just enough time to print everything I wanted plus some. I should also mention that this same building had two of the fastest laser cutters I've seen, and all the plastic and cardboard I could possibly need for my scale of projects. I can't possibly relate how liberating it felt to be able to think of an idea, draw up the CAD, and have a working prototype in less than an hour. The Instructables office is found on a busy street of San Fransisco, above a deli and a bar that plays full Talking Heads albums. This was my first time in California and I loved every minute of it. There was this creative energy all about and it seemed that there was some kind of art plastered anywhere it could fit. I felt like I was on an expedition, seeing for the first time things that I had only read about; I saw subway performers, photographers, and a silver painted robot guy. I ate at a Kwik Way and bought guitar string from the store that the Mythbusters bought their trumpets from. Not only that, but there are celebrities in California and I'm almost positive that Elton John rode the same bus as me every day. I could be wrong, but he had these huge glasses and the hair cut and everything. (I've never seen a celebrity before.) I visited California for a month but it felt like it flew by in minutes. After giving a small presentation over a Thai lunch and a short goodbye, I left San Fransisco and Instructables with a greater awareness and appreciation of the creative community and the talents of its members. Visiting the office and meeting the Instructables crew was an unforgettable experience and I hope to visit again someday. I would highly recommend the AIR program to any one in the position to participate, I had the time of my life.

Topic by Tomdf 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago