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Glitter Sticks and its ingredients?

Basically, i just think about making my own kinda glitter stick - sumthin like this, but  bigger: http://www.geburtstagsfee.de/glitzerzauberstab-mit-fliessendem-glitzer-ca-30cm-p-9878-15.html - i guess, it wont be too diffy to find a glitter-vendor, but what kind of oil do i have to use? Any suggestions

Question by Luziviech    |  last reply


Cheap eye glitter sealant?

I love wearing glitter on my eyes but hate it when it starts flaking off. Eyeshadows with shimmers and glitter particles are too subtle for the look I'm trying to achieve. Vaseline is too gloopy and so the glitter never stays in place and MAC's EZR is far too expensive for me. Topshop did a glitter sealant a few years ago but I've never seen it since. Anybody seen it in the shops lately? Does anybody have any other suggestions of how to keep eye glitter in place?

Question by Cupcake_Weezie    |  last reply


Seal Glue Glitter on Plastic?

I bought some fancy reusable clear plastic cups and I applied some glue glitter on them.  Unfortunately, the dry glitter glue scrapes off, so I'm wondering Is there a sealant that can: 1) keep the glue from being scraped off, 2) dries clear (the glossier the better), and 3) is non toxic?  Tried Mod Podge spray sealer, Glossy Accents, even finger nail polish.  Any suggestions?

Question by drc536    |  last reply


What is the best glue for gluing glitter on plastic?

I was working on a project and i needed help. What is the best type of glue to glue glitter on plastic. What is the best sealer? I was thinking mod podge but i was wondering if i can use it for the glue and sealer. Any advice?

Question by Ilovepandas123    |  last reply


GLITTER SHOES. is there anye sort of finish to put on them that would help to keep the glitter on?

I read the glitter shoes instructable and thought it was ADORABLE! but im afraid that the glitter would fall of the shoes.. is there any sort of finish, sort of like modge podge but like for shoes? like an enamel to put over the top? thanks...

Question by squeaker1342    |  last reply


Non Toxic Adhesive Spray

I ordered glitter halters for my horses but the glitter falls off. Is there a safe product I can use on the halters to keep the glitter on without any danger to my horses either toxic smell or indigestion? 

Question by Horselove    |  last reply


How Do I Apply A Simple Glitter Coat to My Car?

I have a white 1993 Buick Lesabre and I just want to spruce it up a little bit. I want to know how to add a coat of glitter to it, and I want to know how to do it myself(the cheapest way). Thanks.

Question by sherrell2    |  last reply


Harry Potter Wands

Does anyone think there could be a way to make a Harry Potter wand, or even a regular wand that shoots glitter? I think it would be really cool to cast a spell on someone, and then they unknowingly get pelted - err, showered with glitter! LOL. But yeah, so if anyone has any ideas or know how or made one before, I would really like to know! Thanks!(:

Topic by lavon_dang    |  last reply



What substance should I use for this?

I need to figure out what to use for a certain application.  It needs to have small particles, say the size of large glitter flakes, sand, styrofoam balls, or those tiny glass beads without holes that people glue onto ornaments. I'd prefer if it could pile up a bit like damp sand... not too high, 1/2 inch max is all I need.  I need it to not rot or deteriorate in a closed container for an extended period of time, and I need it to not attract a charge over time and cling to the sides of the container (like glitter and styrofoam balls do). I need to be able to push it around easily if, for example, I dragged my finger through a pan of it. I need it to be white or clear.

Question by supersoftdrink    |  last reply


In an arduino controlled led matrix, can you control the brightness of leds?

I'm looking at making a matrix leds that pulse and glitter randomly but can also scroll message or display shapes when needed.  Can you control the brightness of individual leds during a matrix scan?

Question by fetchtables    |  last reply


Cheap colorless oil?

I like making these snow globe thingies, or just oil and glitter in a bottle. They fall slower when you use oil rather than just plain water, and I saw someone recommend baby oil. However, its a bit expensive just for this use, especially the colorless one. So I'm looking for any type of oil I can use for this project, that is cheaper than baby oil. As long as its clear/colorless.

Topic by Mikki G.W    |  last reply


Oops!

Over the years I've done a lot of things that didn't work out well, and I try learn something from them  hoping to avoid similar problems in the future. I think ibles  needs a place to share these 'educational moments'  to help others avoid pitfalls and to console with laughter anyone who is sitting amidst the ruins of their own project.   So here's the  place to share.    I'll go first........... My first dramatic failure at about age 8 - Gluing glitter onto balloons. Not a good idea. The glue popped the balloon (I think it was 'airplane glue' ) The result was glue and glitter everywhere (including in my eyes) and a lot of unhappiness. Then there was the hot glue surprise -  Using a glue gun to close drip irrigation holes in a garden hose.  It plugged the holes and worked just fine in the overcast cool spring weather. Then a rare sunny day  heated the hose, and all those plugs melted and the holes started jetting water.  I hadn't realized how hot a green hose in the sun could get. And I have made some just plain stupid moves - like spending hours pulling all the shreds of paper out of the toothed wheels on the paper shredder.... you know how they get sucked inside.  After getting it all clear I thought I might as well lubricate the thing with spray silicon stuff.  So far so good. And then I was so excited to see how it much better it would work, I turned it on.  Flash of flame, slightly singed eyebrows, and a TOTALLY dead smoking shredder.  Ummm.... it's really worthwhile to let solvents totally evaporate before turning on electrical things.

Topic by mole1    |  last reply


Simple fishing lures? Answered

Back in the day my grandfather use to make all sorts of artificial lures for us.From a simple spoon like thingy over spinners all the way to massive 300g killers to catch cod in the sea.And we always got our fair share of fish with them.These days everything is fancy, full of glitter and sometimes even with bluetooth and flashing lights.Are there any websites that show how to make the traditional ones yourself?I know how to make my own flies and have enough ideas for the rest but there must simpler ways then what comes to my mind..We even used wooden sticks with some aluminium foil around it and a small piece of lead for added weight to catch trout and redfin...

Question by Downunder35m    |  last reply


What would you do with eighty-five pencils? Answered

Found a big bag of pencils in all sorts of colors at the thrift store, and I know I have to do something with them - I'm just not sure what. They're about 1/3 standard pencil-yellow; 1/3 standard pencil-orange; and 1/3 a full rainbow spectrum of other colors, including glitter effects and multicolor patterns. Lengths vary: 28 are unsharpened & 7" long, there are 24 at 6" or more, 10 at 5"- 6", 15 3"-5" and 8 sub-3" stubs. My only ideas so far are a pencil box made of pencils (not completely lame), and a miniature log cabin with a stockade fence (totally completely lame). There have got to be some better ideas than those two - anyone able to help me out of my creative quandry?

Question by Gorfram    |  last reply


water-based kinetic LED lamp

I want to mak a kinetic light using high-powered LEDs to produce glitter line through a thin layer of agitated turbulent water in a wall mounted shelf. So, this gives me a few questions, but let me start with the idea I've got. I want to seperate a shelving unit (preferably solid wood not particleboard with some decent HxDxW) into two compartments. A glass sheet would be slid into grooves onto the side supports. The upper portion of the shelving unit would then be wood, waterproofed with some thin styrene plastic sheets. The bottom would then be composed of a large aluminum sheet (recessed slightly upwards for astheatics) which would house several LEDs in addition to the power adapter and voltage regulator. This would likely follow the "powering high powered LED" tutorial's alternate power source to the pucks. At this point a small pump would be placed into the upper compartment along with just enough water to submerge the pump to a safe level. Perhaps a small recess would be included in the top to allow instant colour shifts by using stained clear plastic sheets (this would reduce total illumination, but these are to be mood/ambient accents not primary lighting source) to avoid any of the more expensive/complex colour shifting lamps. The big question I have at this point is how thermally safe this would be, and how much LED I would actually need to achieve decent brightness. Also, I would prefer if the bottom was modular enough I could remove and work on it without dissasembling the entire assembly, but this may not be possible. Finally, I was wondering if I could run the heatsink material up the ront of the shelf, past the glass, and into the water (this should give great heat dissipation) and have a SAFE and STABLE waterproof join between a flush glass-metal joint with possible use of epoxy and/or silicone caulking. Anything not specified in here I'm uncertain of how to do exactly. So! If anyone has any ideas, suggestions, or awareness that this is pure madness (or has a better way t oget those glitter lines i lust for) please let me know.

Topic by JRGumby    |  last reply


Last minute no-talent Christmas stocking ideas?

Can't find our Christmas stockings! (We moved) Tomorrow I'm heading out to try to find red and white felt and a glue gun. I don't have a sewing machine or time to learn to knit or crochet. I need to make 4 of them, and they need to be super easy and not take special equipment or a lot of time. So I'm thinking I'll just cut out 8 stocking shapes and glue them together and glue some white trim along the top. And if I get real creative, maybe write the names in glitter glue. I am well aware that this is pretty cheesy, but it's all I've been able to think of. I hope one of you will have a better idea. I don't want to spend a lot of money because I'm convinced the originals will turn up before next year. Any better ideas than glued felt? Thanks.

Question by katetx2001    |  last reply


History of Printing Mesh

Sit in on a trade show seminar or visit an online forum, and you'll encounter countless debates about the "right" type of mesh to use. The truth is, while there are some guidelines to follow, the best way to determine what's right for your shop is by trial and error. Only problem is, who has the time to experiment? There are literally hundreds of mesh types out there. Trying to choose the best one can seem like an overwhelming task, but by following some general rules of thumb, you can narrow down your mesh choices to a dozen or so. Then testing each kind won't seem so unmanageable. Specs. It may look like the screen on your back door, but screen printing mesh isn't the same kind of material. The biggest difference is that unlike what keeps bugs out of your house, this type of mesh is made from fabric, not wire. For this industry, monofilament polyester is the most frequently used mesh material. When you start shopping for mesh, you'll also need to determine the weave, count, thread diameter and color that's best for your shop. The type of weave is a no-brainer. When researching mesh, you may come upon the terms plain-weave and twill mesh. The difference between the two is how the threads are woven to create the mesh pattern. Make sure you purchase plain-weave mesh instead of twill mesh, which can cause moiré problems, especially in the high mesh counts. Mesh is often referred to by its mesh count – i.e. 120 mesh, 230 mesh etc. – representing the number of threads per inch. The lower the count, the bigger the mesh openings. Low mesh counts are commonly used with specialty inks such as glitter and puff to allow big ink particles to reach the substrate. High mesh counts are mainly used to print fine details and halftones. Printing through high mesh counts also produces a thin layer of ink on the garment, creating a soft hand. Mesh with a count that falls somewhere in the middle is what most screen printers rely on for their basic, everyday print jobs. The last factor you'll need to decide on is thread diameter. Until a few years ago, terms such as S, T and HD were commonly used to refer to thread diameter. Now, however, a more universal method of referring to the diameter number (in microns) helps keep consistency throughout the industry. While there's no standard thread diameter for each mesh count, there's generally a heavy-duty and a light version for each mesh count. The thinner the thread, the better the detail, but the weaker the fabric. The mesh manufacturer or your local distributor will help you weigh the benefits of each and determine what's right for your individual shop. As you shop for mesh, you're sure to come across different colors. Mesh is typically offered in white and yellow, although orange is available from some manufacturers. During exposure, a white mesh will refract the light similar to the way in which a fiber optic cable works. The light travels down and out, affecting edge definition and quality. This isn't as important with lower mesh counts, but when you're doing a lot of fine detail and halftone work, such slight adjustments will show up in the final print. For this reason, many printers stick with white for lower mesh counts, but use yellow or orange for higher mesh counts. Assess Your Need. Everyone has a preferred type, but there are some general guidelines to go by when you're in the market for mesh. Look around your shop and you'll find clues to what type of mesh counts you should be printing with. The three factors to base your decision on are the type of garments you're printing on, your ink type and the kind of frame system that you use on a regular basis. You'll also need to take into account the type of print jobs you typically do. For most screen printers, T-shirts are the order of the day. They can probably get by using a middle-of-the-road mesh count such as a 110 mesh. However, if you print a lot of athletic numbers and use thick ink to withstand the rough treatment jerseys encounter on the field, you'll probably need a coarser mesh count to allow the thicker ink to reach the material. In such cases, it's not necessary to use a high mesh count. On the other hand, if you do a lot of halftone and fine detail work, you'll need a higher mesh count to retain the minute details in the design. Also let your distributor or manufacturer know what type of frame system you use, as some types require sturdier mesh (and higher thread diameters) to withstand repeated use. In general, most screen printers find that a 110 mesh count will work fine for most jobs. The key word here, though, is "most." Don't rely on 110 mesh for each and every single job. Instead, try out different mesh counts with different print jobs, and keep a record of your production results. Note the mesh type, screen tension, type of ink and whether the print job is multicolor, process color, etc. Also note the garment type: Are you printing on a nylon jacket or a cotton T-shirt? Regularly reviewing your records will help you see a pattern, and decide which mesh tends to work best with a particular ink and design combination. You'll be surprised by the varying results between your "everyday" mesh count and one that's a little higher or lower. If you want to experiment with different mesh counts, start with the coarsest mesh and work your way up to the higher numbers, noting how the print looks with each version. Hit the Trail. Most screen printers have an established local distributor that they order supplies from. Others may prefer to order directly from the manufacturer. To find a list of mesh distributors and manufacturers, check out IMPRESSIONS' 2003 Sourcebook. Decoding the Salesspeak. The world of mesh can get a little technical. Here are some key terms to help you navigate the terminology: Low-elongation (LE) mesh – Most monofilament polyester fabrics are low elongation. The term refers to the mesh's ability to retain its tension level. In the past, stretching screens required tensioning the mesh to say, 25 N/cm, letting it relax to a lower tension then repeating the process. Today's low elongation mesh typically only requires one go-around. Monofilament polyester mesh – Some printers who've been around for years still use multifilament polyester mesh. However, the majority of the industry has switched to monofilament. Although it must be abraded for good emulsion adhesion, monofilament mesh tends to stretch, hold tension and print better than multifilament mesh. Plain-weave mesh – Almost all mesh for the textile printing industry is plain weave. The term refers to the method by which the threads are arranged to create the mesh openings. Warp – The threads that run the length of a roll of mesh. Weft – The threads that run the width of a roll of mesh. The Numbers Game. Mesh is typically ordered by the roll, usually in yards. The price depends on the width of the roll (40", 50", 60" wide, etc.), the mesh count and the color. White mesh is not quite as expensive as yellow or orange mesh, because it doesn't go through the dying and rinse processes. Setup Surprises. Be careful how you open the packaging surrounding your new roll of mesh. Avoid using a knife if possible – mesh can be damaged just by being carelessly opened. Once you've opened your new mesh, store it someplace out of the traffic flow. Try hanging it on a wall like a paper towel roll. Getting it up and off the floor can prevent accidental damage. Keeping the roll visible also allows staff to monitor the supply. Don't wait until the last minute to order mesh – you may not be able to get a new supply in time for that next rush job. Care and Feeding. Once you stretch your screens, what can you do to keep the mesh in top shape? For one thing, be careful with your screens. While coarse mesh can withstand more wear and tear, high mesh counts can be easily damaged when moving them around the shop. To extend the life of your mesh, try stretching your screens so that the squeegee stroke runs parallel to the warp. After several print jobs, who can remember what the mesh count is on a particular screen? To help keep confusion to a minimum, consider writing the mesh count number directly on the screens or frame. Or, color code your stock: white for lower mesh counts, yellow for the more detailed work. So while there's no hard rule for what mesh counts to use, knowing what to look for can help you find what's right for your shop. – CW from Internet

Topic by sharefilters