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Gorilla tape

This may sound random, but I am super psyched about the gorilla tape that I purchased today! This stuff is technologically superior to any tape ever invented, and I can't wait to use it. If anyone wants to join a group about gorilla tape and how useful it is, I'd be glad to start one.

Topic by sugg22    |  last reply


Picnic with gorilla tape

I have long been a fan of gorilla glue, but only recently have I even checked out gorilla tape. I thought that duct tape was good enough for most needs, but now I'm pretty much converted over to gorilla tape. Here's why.Last weekend a group that I work with was having a pig roast/potluck in the park. It was a little breezy and I was in charge of putting up some of the signs. I figured I'd give the gorilla tape a try as I was stopping off at the hardware store and it was near the vinyl rope I was picking up.When I got to the potluck site there were some other guys there tearing off sheets of butcher paper to be used as tablecloths. To attach them to the tables they were using big pieces of blue painter's tape. It was ridiculous. Before they were halfway through some pieces were already taking flight, making them run back with more painter's tape.Long story short, I started tearing off small pieces of the gorilla tape and it stuck all the paper down to the old wooden tables good and tight. Everything held strong during the picnic and during clean-up the tape held strong and the paper ripped when we were puling them off.Summary: Gorilla tape is pricier than duct tape, but I ended up using less of it than if I were using duct tape and it held on stronger. Wasn't able to check about residue however.

Topic by fungus amungus    |  last reply


Tape

There seems to be a lot of types of tape. The most famous, Duct Tape, but there have been variations on it. Gorilla tape, a stronger and stickier version, Marine Reflective Tape, X-Treme Tape, and gaffer tape.What's your favorite type of tape and uses for it?

Topic by starwing123    |  last reply


What to do with Gorilla Tape? Answered

I just used some to help me seel my outrigger sailing canoe and now i have plenty left...what do i do with it?

Question by connoboarder    |  last reply


The Best Kind of Duct Tape

What do you think the best kind of duct tape is: 1) Duck Tape 2) Nashua 3) Gorilla Tape 4) ect.

Topic by makemarsh    |  last reply


Can I use Gorilla Tape to Mend a Pool Liner?

I've found the tear....finally...but now I need to fix it. Right now the water is down below the rip so it's dry. Does anyone know if Gorilla Tape will hold or is there something better?? I've used Gorilla Tape to mend my Bean boot in the winter....that's tough stuff!!

Question by michelle49    |  last reply


Woodpunk Lamp, 3D Stereoscope Camera, Optimus Prime Costume

Woodpunk Lamp 3D Stereoscope Camera Optimus Prime Costume Delicious Fruit Tart Pokemon Snuggie Costume RC Quadrotor Dark Knight Joker Makeup Make Hard Cider DIY Suspension Bridge Arduino RGB LED Tutorial Halloween Robotic Top Hat Homemade Tofu Simple Animatronic Hand Gorilla Tape Gorilla Mask Green Lantern Prop

Topic by randofo  


Best way to laminate plate glass? Answered

Was wondering what people thought might be the best way to laminate plate glass strips together to make a block-o-glass.  I will be sanding the edges with a angle grinder fitted with a flap disc, so a flexible glue would not be great.  Yes I know probably a belt sander would give me a flatter edge, but I am wanting a mottled sort of look.  Anyway, silicon is out, as it is not good for sanding  Epoxy might be the way, but I find it gets gummy under high heat friction sanding.  Gorilla glue maybe or is there some magic yet cost effective glue out there.  It will be a block about 2.5 feet by 2.5 feet with a thickness of about 3 inches.  It will held in a frame with continuous supports around the bottom and sides with the top 1 inch exposed, so it will not have to hold its own weight.  Double sided tape could conceivably  be used, but I am trying to make it somewhat water resistant.  It doesn't have to be clear, but it does have to allow some light transmission.  Enough caveats on it?

Question by iminthebathroom    |  last reply


cooling water mister fabrication, with hand pump, for carry or backpack use? Answered

I noticed that there are a lot more part suppliers for mister type cooling systems. i am thinking of fabricating one . i was thinking of using the same parts used in the air zound bicycle air horn. i could use a small bike pump and schrader valve to turn a 2 liter soda bottle into the pressure chamber , i think i would have to wrap it in gorilla tape for the added pressure.. i am not sure if i could also put water into it.  i did a search and didn't  see any instructables on building cooling misting systems.any ideas?

Question by escapefromyonkers    |  last reply


Can my guitar be inexpensively fixed? And if so, how?

I recently accidentally broke the head off of my Epiphone acoustic guitar. A buddy of mine who knows guitars told me I could fix it using a strong super glue (like gorilla glue), wood putty, black spray paint (the guitar is black) and painters tape. I would like to know if my guitar can be fixed this way and be playable afterwards. I would've gotten rid of it and had a new one bought but the guitar has a lot of sentimental value to me as it has helped me though the toughest of times. I'd love to get it fixed so I can do my Johnny Cash impersonations perfectly, right down to the spec of things. So, if anyone can help me, I'd really much appreciate it. "For those about to rock...."

Question by keaglez_2011    |  last reply


Longest Comment on Instructables (Possibly)

Https://www.instructables.com/answers/What-essential-tools-should-I-include-in-my-dorm-r/The longest comment on this site is one by Guardian Fox on the "What survival tools should I keep in my dorm room tool box?" If anyone can find a longer one, please PM me the link.Keep in mind, he typed this with his own fingers, not by holding down the paste command for a day. If that's what you want, then go to https://www.instructables.com/community/the_forum_for_spam/ Source: Guardian FoxFor the dorm room, you only need a few tools. You're not going to be renovating, and you're not going to be doing much woodworking. You aren't allowed to do anything at all to the room beyond hanging pictures (if that), and most dorms forbid power-tools in the rooms no matter what you're use them for. Here's my take on what you'll need for the dorm. I've included a lot of things that seem unnecessary, and you can probably live without some of it... but the kit will get you through nearly any problems you'll encounter at school or in an apartment:-At least one decent multi-bit screwdriver. Look for something with a comfortable grip and sturdy construction. Avoid gimmicks like built in flashlights. I recommend the Piquiq brand which comes in a few different sizes and can be found in many hardware stores in North America. You can usually get their three-piece set for less than $20.-A set of jeweler's screwdrivers. Get a cheap set because these little things WILL get lost. Look for something with at least a few unusual bits as well as the usuals. Get a 30ish-piece set for less than $20. Most handy if you've got a thing for messing with your electronics, but also great for changing a watch battery, fixing glasses, etc.-A basic hammer. Nothing fancy needed here, and I've always preferred an ordinary wooden-handled hammer anyway. Go for a smaller hammer if you only plan on hanging pictures, get a regular-sized hammer if you plan on using it to do real work later on. Stanley is a good brand with decent prices, but there are lots of good budget-priced hammers out there. Drop by a hardware store and pick one that feels good in your hand. Less than $20 for a brand name. $10 or less for a bargain hammer. Make sure the head of the hammer is securely attached to the handle, no matter what brand you pick but a little tiny wiggle is ok. Hang a picture or tap a few finishing nails into a small project. Very handy, even when you use it wrong.-Two utility knives with snap-off blades. One with the small size, and the other with the larger size. There are hundreds of brands of these on the market, and a lot of them are junk so spring for an Olfa (the best i.m.o.) if you can find it. Richard is a decent low-cost brand which is often found in paint stores. Again, avoid gimmicks. The most important thing you need to know is if the locking mechanism works well or not, as a utility knife can become dangerous if the blade is going to slide around while you're using it. Good knives can be around $10-20 each. Cheap, "disposable" knives can be found for less than a dollar, but be sure to buy something that seems sturdy. Add a self-healing cutting mat from the dollar store, and while you're there get a metal ruler for cutting straight lines. Smaller utility knives are good for light-duty applications like trimming photographs or opening packages. Larger utility knives are good for harder work like cutting lots of cardboard-A measuring tape. You probably already have a ruler for school, but a measuring tape is much more useful for around the house. Get a 16' tape for good versatility. Choose one that has a sturdy housing and a tape that slides in and out easily. Bennett is a good budget brand you can find for less than $10 and I recommend theirs over any of the name-brand tapes out there. If you can't find that brand, go to the building supplies store and ask what brand the clerks and outside staff use around the shop. You could skip this one during college, but you'll need it one day and it's the kind of thing you can make uses for.-Pliers. For around the house and crafting I find a pair of long-nose pliers more handy than a pair of linesman's pliers, but both tools have their place. Locking pliers (aka vice grips) are also super-handy. Get one or a set, but avoid the bargain brands. Look to spend at least $7 each for basic pliers, and at least $12 for a good pair of locking pliers. -An adjustable wrench (aka thumb-wrench). Pick a smaller-sized model for your toolbox. Most of the nuts and bolts in the house will be small anyway. Go for something that opens up to 1" or 1 1/2" Brand isn't an issue, but make sure it operates smoothly and won't jam or work loose. Spend less than $10. -Scissors. A usable, general purpose pair of scissors can be found at the dollar stores or in an office supply store. Make sure they open and close smoothly and that the blades don't wiggle. Look for one with a metal screw at the pivot so you can tighten it if it works loose. If you're using it routinely for cutting fabric or any other specific task, spend some extra money and get the right kind for the job or at least a good pair of general purpose ones. Less than $5 for cheap ones, $20+ for quality ones.-Sewing notions; A pack of needles, a roll of white thread, a roll of black thread, and a roll of transparent thread, a few safety pins and any spare buttons you find. That should get you through any wardrobe fixes you may need. Each item in the kit should be a dollar or less, and you can save money by starting with a pre-made kit from a dollar store and adding a few of your own extras. Also highly recommended is this, http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.1352 , but keep in mind it is cheap for a reason and needs constant attention.-A soldering iron if it's allowed in your room, and only if you're working with or fixing electronics or jewelry. Get a scrap piece of plywood or something to use as a work surface. $15 for a basic 30w iron. Another $10 for a safer stand.-A toolbox that holds everything. I like the ones that double as a step-stool, which you can find for $20-$30 if you look hard enough (mastercraft and rubbermaid brands). You might like something different, but small plastic toolboxes and even small plain steel ones are all quite cheap so go look and see what you like. You can even use your imagination and just use a plastic tote, a tacklebox, a backpack/messenger bag, shoebox, etc. Just pack your tools in it neatly and avoid putting the heavy or sharp ones on top of the ones that might break.-A plunger. If your dorm room has a bathroom, this is a must even if you never have to use it. It's an insurance policy against one hell of a mess. $10-$15.Anyway, that's all I can think of for tools. Craftier folks need more gear, and less DIY-prone folks need less. Use your best judgment and buy only what you can afford and might actually use. Pick up a few fasteners and adhesives too, usually as needed. Here's what you should probably keep on hand.-A package of assorted picture-hangers and hooks (if hanging pictures is allowed in your dorm). Buy a pack at the dollar store. A few extra finishing nails and small screws would be a good addition to this as well.-Thumbtacks. Buy a pack at the dollar store or office supply store.-Scotch tape, packing tape, duct tape (or Gorilla tape).-Twist ties. Get a bunch from a pack of trash bags.-A package of superglue. Rather than one large tube, get the pack with several tiny tubes so you don't lose your entire supply when one dries up.-Craft wire. Use it wherever you might use a twist tie, but also can be bent into whatever shape you need to become a tool or a piece of art. Dollar stores carry rolls of it often at 2/$1

Topic by DELETED_M4industries    |  last reply


How to make a replica of The Riddler's Box (Work in progress)

All right, I admit it. I liked Batman Forever, and still do. I also liked the "Box," which was the film's signature gadget. (And no, I don't count the Batarangs--they're equipment. The Box is a gadget in the purest sense of the word.) To that end, I decided to build a replica of the Box last summer. It's still not finished--I need to work out lighting, a motor, and the lower coils. (EL wire, maybe?) By the way, I'm posting it on the forum first because it's still a work in progress. I have no Monet to buy Degas to made de Van Gogh, as it were... YOU WILL NEED: One clear 28-oz. tumbler, acrylic (I got mine from Jewel for $1 last year...I don't know if they still carry 'em) One 20-oz. tumbler, acrylic (I got mine from Walgreen's last year...ditto) Two super-size cup lids from McDonald's One large bottle of Gesso One bottle of gold paint (Antique Gold works best) One bottle of green glow-in-the-dark paint A really long paintbrush, preferably made of foam A normal paintbrush The wings are made of a piece of foam I had lying around...I need to get them made specially. It's also got some Christmas-wreath lights stuck inside, just for the picture. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ SO: For the 28-oz. tumbler, first you need to thin your Gesso out with water. This will allow you, later, to add the paint in such a way that light can shine through. Then, you will want to paint the INSIDE of the tumbler with Gesso, and then with the green paint. Simple as that. For the 20-oz. tumbler, you can leave the Gesso thick if you wish. Depends on your preferences, really...Then, you'll want to paint the outside of the 20-ouncer with the gold paint. With me so far? Then, you'll want to glue the two McDonald's lids together for a bit of sturdiness. I recommend Gorilla Glue for this. When that sets, you'll want to paint the outside and the inside with Gesso. The outer lid is gold in color; the inner lid is black. This prevents light from shining through the lid, which could give the game away. WINGS: As for me, I cut a pair of 11 3/4" oblong triangles from foam for the wings. They're not stable at all, but at least you get the basic idea of what it is. I stacked the 28-oz. tumbler on top of the 28-oz. tumbler, put the lids on, and stuck the wings on with tape. It's a crude mockup, but it works for now. I put the Christmas-wreath lights inside just make it look like it's doing something. I'm thinking about adding a "Fusion" light from Windy City Novelties for the finished result. The final version of this will involve some very tricky wiring--I want to wire the light-up gadget and the motor to one switch or button. If any of you have suggestions, the mailbox is open and waiting. I've very little technical experience, and would like as much input as possible from anyone who knows something.

Topic by Sharaz Destler    |  last reply