Grapple Gun?

Does anybody have any idea how to make a grapple gun, like they use in Star Wars: Episode I?

Topic by abun1991   |  last reply


Grappling hook gun

I want to know how to make the smallest grappling hook gun and the mot powerful

Topic by byufan   |  last reply


Knex Grappling Hook

I had an Idea. Basically, you have a lame set of grappling hook arms that dont Do anything, well change it so that when the hook hits the object, it closes the arms....block trigger perhaps. I know I Am Canadian, Shadowman ect would be able to design and build this in like 30 minutes, but i was thinking someone could give it a try...im working on it too! Thanks in advance Hedzup456

Topic by hedzup456 


making a grappling hook ?

I know there are already instructables on grappling hooks but none are quite what i want . criteria are :strong,cheap, a good weight heavy enough to get distance on a throw but not so much that it feels like carrying round a rock , adaptable from tasks like getting up a tree to using as an anchor from a boat(which i plan to make at some point) to dragging logs around etc. i have an idea of welding together some heavy duty nails or screws.   or possibly putting some screws into wood but im worried that the former would be quite difficult for me to make with m lack of experience and the latter to be to weak .so please could anyone reading this put there ideas forward ,  thanks wood wizard

Question by wood wizard   |  last reply


Neat Gadget

I just made an 'ible for a really neat gadget, the mini grapple gun, check it out

Topic by evilkidjr   |  last reply


Random McGyver idea I had today

So i was browsing the web and say a cool little mini grappling hook for sale for $25. I thought to myself "Gee, it sure would be funner to make one myself." So i thought how could I make one. Sure I could get some steel stock bend it weld it and sharpen it as nesasary. Then I thought i could write an instructable on it but most people cant weld. So how can I make it constructable for most people. DING McGyver So the McGyver bill of materials 1x ratchet wrench 2x steel L brackets 1x Bungie cord Take one L bracket and fasten it to the haandle somehow Take the other and make a hole to fit the driver end put a couple holes in the brackets for the bungie cord then take the wrench and set it so the bracket points are facing the same direction but slightly obtuse. turn the direction setting to go towards the opening. now its locked in place. when it strikes something the momentum wull cause it to rotate towards each other and close with the help of the bungie As soon as I get the materials to do this I will post an instructable. But first . . . What do YOU think?

Topic by drakesword   |  last reply


How to build dummy for grappling lika that, what is in side of this dummy?

Https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPkRvSAtoTA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=piDPkkJv7sc

Question by bblz   |  last reply


Fully-Function Retractable Grappling Hook Gun Vs Jetpack

 Hi. I'm new to this site that I discovered on my quest to create the above mentioned item. A fully-functional retractable grappling hook gun. Vs, however purchasing a jetpack. I need blue-print of how to make a strong enough retractor, I already have a grappling hooking in mind. Here goes.  Nothing like planning to dawn a cape, just like to keep up with the times. Been into mobility for awhile.Thank you.

Topic by Jedi_Pimp   |  last reply


Batman Grapple Gun Help!

So for awhile now I've wanted to make the batman grapple gun with all the features, including the ability to pull you up after the rope is launched. The only piece of the puzzle i need help on is finding the right motor to use in my project. In a Colin Furze video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arbNxONg88c) he used a drill motor but it was almost to slow, any thoughts from anyone?

Topic by noahdye   |  last reply


Coil Gun / Grappling Hook.

Hey Everyone!  I am kind of an amatuer prop designer and I've recently been taken with pocket sized coil guns. My question is quite simple: I would like to know what disposable camera (brand) contains an LED indicator that flashes/turns on when the capacitor is fully charged? I've seen one such disposable camera used in this post: https://www.instructables.com/id/The-Coil-Gum/ I would love to know the exact brand or alternatives.  I would really appreciate any and all help and would love to post the resulting product. 

Topic by notnowmyheadhurts   |  last reply


how do you make a nerf grappling hook(easy)? Answered

I'm using the nerf with the laser pointer thing on the front.I took that off cause that doesn't have a purpose in a grappling hook. below is the gun I am using

Question by Module 1   |  last reply


Instructables in Popular Science magazine

My Bungee Bazooka along with crreed's Grappling Hook Launcher were noticed by the folks at Popular Science magazine, and they published snippets about both projects in the March 2012 issue (page 66). Here they are at popsci.com. I thought this was awesome!

Topic by seamster   |  last reply


what is the best type of wire for coil guns?

I've been planning on making a coil gun for a while, I've got around 25 capacitors and the charger circuits, but i'm unsure as to what type of wire i should use, i know that the thinner the wire and the closer the winds are the stronger the electromagnetic pull but what is the best type of wire? any help would be appreciated p.s i plan to make a coil gun grappling hook launcher

Question by freerunnin1   |  last reply



Baseball retrieval system?

My son plays little league baseball and there are quite a few balls "just out of reach" on some private property with a 6' high chain link fence. No barbed wire, but lots of poison ivy. Wondering if you folks could help me McGuyver something to retrieve these baseballs. I got as far as PVC and some sort of grappling hook, but then again, I'm a newbie ;-) Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

Topic by Dougmeister   |  last reply


Mini Weapons of Mass Destruction 2

Toy inventor John Austin released Mini Weapons of Mass Destruction 2 (Chicago Review Press) this past October. This awesome sequel to the Mini Weapons series includes over 30 new mini weapons with which to terrorize your office with. Here's an excerpt from the press release: "All the projects in Mini Weapons of Mass Destruction 2 are built from inexpensive, commonly kept items: binder clips, playing cards, rubber bands, markers, clothespins and discarded packaging materials. The projects - modeled after real-life gadgetry - range from "sidearms" and "weapons in disguise" to "villain mini weapons" and "surveillance and intel" and cost mere pennies to assemble. This easy-to-follow primer also features plans to construct periscopes, bionic ears, grappling hooks and code wheels. plus, each project includes a supply and tool list, italicized safety tips and step-by-step instructions supplemented by clearly marked, illustrative diagrams" I managed to get my hands on a copy and made the Grappling Hook Gun; the project was easy to follow and my project came together in under 30 minutes (including the time it took to snap a few pictures). My grappling hook went about 20 feet and I'm sure it could travel further with a few minor tweaks! So if you're reading this while sitting bored at your desk, take a look around you. If you're surrounded by un-used rubber bands, pen caps, and markers, perhaps it's time for you to assemble your own office supply arsenal! For Authors outside Canada, USA, UK and Australia The first 3 comments left here with a picture of your own version of an office supplies mini weapon of any type will receive a free copy of this book! All books have been claimed!

Topic by mikeasaurus   |  last reply


Office Warfare Book on Sale Now

Spending all day in a cubicle is a lot like a war of attrition between you and the clock, with skirmishes against neighbouring tribes to establish dominance. While we haven't yet figured out a way to speed up time to get your out of your white-collar jail, we do have a handy book that could make your hours under fluorescent light s little more enjoyable. Presenting, Office Weapons: Projects to Fortify Your Cubicle A collection of over 40 projects made by YOU, members of Instructables, that you can create in your cubicle from easily sourced office supplies. There's grappling hooks, trebuchets, darts and more - all made out of office supplies! We've even included some fun non-warfare projects at the end to keep you entertained in times of peace. Check out the projects that are in the book, then head over to ThinkGeek or Amazon to grab a copy for yourself. If all else fails, you can always use the book as a shield from your cubicle neighbour (who has already purchased this book and is arming himself as you read this).

Topic by mikeasaurus 


(newsletter) Solar-Powered Walkway, Lady GaGa Glasses, VHS Notebook

Art | Craft | Food | Games | Green | Home | Kids | Life | Music | Offbeat | Outdoors | Pets | Photo | Ride | Science | Tech Calm before the (contest) storm Wow, it's all quiet on the contest front with nothing to enter. Or is it? We have big plans in the works, and all will be revealed soon. Get a head start: one will involve good old-fashioned romance, another reusing dead computers, and we want you to stay sew warm this winter. Oh, and think of something great that can fit into a shoebox. Winners announced: Congratulations to Team Cocktail! See the awesome prize-winning drinks in the Cocktails vs. Mocktails Contest. Solar-Powered Garden Tiles VHS Spiral Bound Notebook Bend PVC Pipe DIY Cough Drops Credit Card Grappling Hook Lady GaGa Video Glasses Drinking Bird "Flock Clock" Cantilevered Foot Bridge $4 USB Latte Foamer Polarizer Glasses Copyright and Copyleft Gloves Sew an Electronic Circuit Hemma Chandelier IKEA Hack Pearl Necklace Makeover Credit Card iPhone Stand Make Perfect Saddle Cuts Guides Cocktails vs Mocktails Winners 17 Uses for an Old Club Card Notebook Mods Easy Recipes Instructables.com - 82 2nd St. - San Francisco, CA

Topic by fungus amungus 


Hydrophobic music, dubstep windchimes, Smash Smash Revolution and etc @ Knox Makers Build Night w/ MaKey MaKey!

Wow, what a month at Knox Makers! We were absolutely invaded by MaKey MaKeys at our hackerspace all throughout January. To start us off, we released a freebie project a little early to help out members and guests get some ideas, to drum up local support for our events, and to offer a fun + easy starter project for the other spaces participating: Oversized Music Chest This ended up getting featured in Electronics! It leaves a lot of room to add extra components and tote the MaKey MaKey around, and we turned ours into a musical advertisement for our first Build Night, a mystery hack night about music. Mystery Hack Night: Music! What a blast! Talk about a weird time.. One family brought a theremin and a circuit bending kit for kids; another group brought an amp and speakers, a suitcase of effect pedals and circuit bent instruments, and a 4 channel mixer; we had a random component table for open hacking; an acoustic and broken ukulele was converted into an electronic instrument; we had painters painting music instrument for the MaKey MaKey with conductive paint; there was a table with our hydrophobic drum pad, bananas, an eggplant, flowers, and a grappling hook all controlling a set of browser based drums through the MaKey MaKey; we had members hooking up tactile buttons and levers to MaKey MaKeys; and we closed with the weirdest jam session this side of Alpha Centauri with all the things playing all the sounds at the same time. Mystery Hack Night: Video Game Controllers! This was a fun night, and we had a few new people show up. We tinkered with a platformer adventure game called Fancy Pants Adventure, where we assigned each person one button. At one point, the whole table was controlling the game's protagonist. Somehow, we made it pretty far into the game, considering. A few people commented that this type of exercise seemed like a really useful team building exercise, so we might look at creating some tutorials with this in mind. We also had individuals and small groups testing out their own inventions and games, again revisiting concepts like conductive ink or simple conductive objects. A two person team tinkered around with some simple fighting games that only use one button for each player, there were people playing Tetris and other games with their inventions, and we again offered a random hack table with an assortment of items and components to rummage through. MaKey MaKey Build Night I: When MaKeys Attack.. We had a nice turnout for this event. This was an introduction to the basic concept behind MaKey MaKey, how to remap the beta v1.2 boards using the web remapper, different applications that make a MaKey MaKey naturally awesome to use, and a few sample projects. We opened up the floor to open hacking, and that day our Adafruit group buy had just come in. We were able to add to the random hack table some awesome components, such as: male/male and female/female jumper wires, various diffused LEDs, slow and fast cycling LEDs, conductive thread, flat LED panels, sewable LEDs, tactile buttons, and other items. We wrapped up and one of our newest members stayed late to craft a thin copper wire into a flat copper instrument using a mallet. He ended up using a breadboard with the MaKey MaKey and Wolfram software to write his own music program. As with our other Build Night events this month, we also had people working on side projects in the background which added to the creative energy of the room. For this event, one of our members tested out a Gocupi that managed to draw Rear Admiral Grace Hopper and Albert Einstein on the whiteboard in dry erase marker using continuous lines. MaKey MaKey Build Night II: Big Projects! We had a decent turnout for this event, but mostly the attendees were there for their own big projects unrelated to MaKey MaKey. We got a few MaKey MaKey projects in around good company, though. We had members working on a large geodesic Airolite boat, someone showed up to work on their 3D printer and print out their first scale model of a scanned person, our Facilities Director was able to get some critical inventory done, a couple members mounted new shelves that had been donated that day, and one member's daughter wanted to play around with hydrophobics. We also were able to get electronic musical wind chimes made that work very nicely with the MaKey MaKey, and the same member who tinkered with Wolfram software at the prior event made more progress on some of his own MaKey MaKey ideas. MaKey MaKey Build Night III: Advanced Reprogramming! This was one of the build nights I was most excited about, and we had a nice turnout. We walked members through reprogramming the older MaKey MaKeys using the MaKey MaKey sketch for Arduino IDE. We bested Windows and its infernal resistance to unsigned 3rd party drivers, and we advanced onward. We looked at basic reprogramming of the settings.h key bindings, and we also looked at other Arduino programming such as delay, Keyboard.print, Keyboard.press, Keyboard.release, and some other concepts. A father team duo that are also involved in a local high school robotics club showed up and schooled us a little on Arduino with some tricks they had up their sleeves, another father son duo showed up to experience the MaKey MaKey for the first time together and it seemed to blow their minds, and we talked about the new web remapping tool for the beta v1.2 boards. Mad Science Bingo For one of our educational outreach events, we attended hijacked bingo night at a local senior citizen community center. We let everyone have their bingo fun without interruption, but as bingo concluded we invaded with a MaKey MaKey, our hydrophobic drum pad, fruits and veggies, and some flowers. The senior citizens loved it and have invited us back. At one point, we had three participants record themselves singing into a Scratch program that we mapped to the flowers. The room erupted with laughter when the community center manager went to touch the flowers and they sang at her in her patrons' voices. She even lent her voice to be recorded, which sent the room into mad howls. We also made a chain of about dozen people between ground and the triggers. We didn't really invent anything unique here, but it was a fun bonus event for the community center patrons. We ended up tinkering around a little with hydrophobics and electronics. So far after all our events, we ended up with a few more Build Night projects: Hydrophobic Drum Pad (featured in Science and then Homepaged!) annoy friends with this party game: Wonky Pong Smash Smash Revolution ... black acrylic, conductive paint, and conductive thread Electronic Windchimes sewable Cardboard Feet DDR (featured in Video Games!) We've also set out our MaKey MaKey kits for space use now that our January Build Nights are over with. We have a few members with projects they are still working on at the space, a few projects that are still being documented to upload to Instructables, and a few people batting around their own ideas. If we come up with anything else, we'll be sure and update. A couple "lessons learned" here: Random hack tables are awesome. But.. if they are too chaotic and without the right presentation, these can be intimidating to beginners that may want more direction. Multiple Build Nights rule! But.. it is probably best not to hijack every Saturday of a shared workspace like a hackerspace. This could have been orchestrated a little better (my fault). Overall, this was a blast to participate in. Thanks to Joylabz and Instructables! PS.. with two features and one homepage, that gave us 1 and a half years of Pro. One got used, but we're giving away the remaining year of Pro and 3 months of Pro. The bounty: quick connect projects for MaKey MaKey. Ends 3/1 EST. You know what to do..

Topic by smalltortoise 


Howtoons the Book Launches!

It's been a long journey since I first looked over Saul's shoulder in our shared 4th-floor MIT Media Lab office and saw the proto-sketches that would become Howtoons, but today the book finally launches! Here's the word directly from Saul:I along with my co-authors and illustrators, Nick Dragotta and Joost Bonsen are proud to announce that today is the official publication and release of our fully-illustrated, science-meets-adventure-and-mischief comic book, HOWTOONS ! The Possibilities are Endless. I know I personally am nervous, relieved, and all of the other things that a first time author can be. You can buy the book directly from AmazonAlthough all of the authors wish to compel you to walk, run, or ride a bike to your local book store and get one there (or demand that they carry copies!).We'd like to thank each and everyone on this email list for their moral and other support in the gestation of this exciting project. Thanks for loaning us your children, your ideas, your inspiration and your feedback. Hopefully we are now returning all of them to you in good healthy order and with interest on top!We'd love to encourage you all to buy hundreds and thousands of copies of this book for all of your favourite 4-94 year olds. The jacket copy says 8-12, but we know that our group of friends have nothing but the most intelligent children (hence extending the age range down to 4) as well as being fundamentally immature and appreciative of fart jokes (hence increasing it to 94).HOWTOONS seeks to put the joy, the story, the adventure, the free-spirit, the fun, the downright ridiculousness, and the real heroicism of science and engineering back into education. We do this through stories and illustrations designed to show children that science and engineering is not only one of the coolest possible things that you can study, but that it touches upon everything in modern life and can be found in the simple objects around you... One tag line we often like to associate with the book is: "See the world for what it can be, not for what it is." The world is increasingly technical, and many of the greatest challenges of the 21st century will require technically aware people whether they are working on science and engineering themselves, or whether they are the artists, writers, accountants, musicians, lawyers, politicians and educators who make the world a rich and interesting place to live. I believe the magnificent artwork of Nick also highlights that there is a genuine marriage between the arts and sciences and the oft cited tension between the two is un-necessary as both come from a desire to create and share new ideas and ways of representing them.You can see our new website, including many samples of HOWTOONS and a regularly updated blog at www.howtoons.com. We'd like to send an especially big thanks and shout out to Ryan McKinley for help with the website (if you don't know him you should! He's a programming powerhouse), and of course also to Phil Torrone, everyone's favourite blogger and DIY mastermind. We'd also love to thank all of the people at O'Reilly media, especially Dale Dougherty, Tim O'Reilly, Mark Frauenfelder and Carla Sinclair for including HOWTOONS in their fabulous magazines MAKE and CRAFT (www.makezine.com, www.craftzine.com). Also in the thank-you list should be Judith Regan who plucked us from obscurity to help us get started down the book-making path, and now the wonderful people of Harper Collins Children's Books for all of their help. We should include all of our apologies for editorial lateness!. Naturally we'd like to thank the people at Squid Labs and Eric and Christy of www.instructables.com fame for their support and work in bringing the make-it-yourself ethos to a much larger audience. MIT, MIT's media lab, and MITERS (MIT Electronic Research Society) are also to be whole-heartedly thanked for turning a blind eye to our insanity. The support of all these people and more (you) has been invaluable to us.Not to rest on our laurels — we are already working on a 2nd HOWTOONS book full of more wonderful projects and crazy storylines to encourage you to grab a 9-year-old and relive the joy of messing with world around you just because it's interesting, because rockets are cool, because bugs are fascinating, because flying is magnificent, because mechanisms are intriguing, because a sheet of paper isn't a sheet of paper, it's a work of origami art waiting to (un)fold.Furthermore, we are working on another book project, specifically a selection of DIY projects around the topic of renewable energy presented HOWTOONS-style, in order to encourage energy literacy and intuition amongst the next generation of engineers and scientists. Energy will be one of the key issues of this century and helping people understand all of the options and the promise and beauty of renewable energies is something we believe we can do to help.If you'd like to help support Howtoons in any way we'd love to hear from you; it is still a fledgling project in its infancy trying to wend its way towards fiscal sustainability. The biggest thing most of you can probably do to help is SPREAD THE WORD! Buy some books! Go out and give yourself the experience of reliving the joy of discovering the world by working on some Howtoons projects with your favourite kids (or even better, kids you don't know yet). If you have suggestions for future projects we'd love to hear about them. One of my favourite projects in HOWTOONS Book 1 is an open-source whooppee cushion that delighted my father (and haunted his teachers) when he was a 9-year-old and will hopefully induce raucous laughter everywhere.Again, thank you all.Saul Griffith, Nick Dragotta, Joost Bonsen,co-creators of HOWTOONS!www.howtoons.comPS. Finally, and most importantly I want to wholeheartedly thank my co-authors for their friendships, musings, and hard-work. It's tremendous to work with such great people at the top of their respective games.In case you don't know them (or me):Nick Dragotta first knew the power of comic art when he drew pictures of injuries on the blackboard at school that were so graphic that his fellow classmates had to leave the room to throw up. Since then he has tirelessly practiced the art of comics and researched the great artists of the field. Nick has drawn for Marvel and DC, including Spider-Man, X-men, Fantastic Four, and X-static titles. He is currently passionate about making more comic books for kids. Nick lives in a small apartment with walls lined by the shortened stubs of ruined pencils. He sleeps in a pile of eraser filings, drinks black ink, and exists on a diet of pureed superhero comic books.Joost Bonsen immigrated as a young boy to the United States from the Netherlands with his parents and his personal suitcase full of LEGOs. He grew up in Silicon Valley, California, immersed in that creative and entrepreneurial culture. While Joost was growing up, the vacant lot across the street from home served variously as play space, special effects set, race track, rocket launch pad and more as he and his friends made home movies, practiced being space explorers, and plotted space projects. Joost went to MIT for undergraduate studies in bio–electrical engineering and recently finished his graduate degree at the MIT Sloan School of Management looking at how labs are run, how research themes emerge, and how new technologies are commercialized.Saul Griffith grew up in Australia and his earliest memories of inventing things were of making grappling hooks for climbing trees and buildings. His childhood adventures included making his own rocket–powered toy cars, kites, and enormous puppets. He kept a diary of drawings of his inventions as a kid that included fantastic monorails and airplanes shaped like manta–rays. Saul ended up studying materials science—the structure of the materials we use every day—before going on to MIT to do a PhD in building self–replicating machines and a theory for folding 3–dimensional objects. He now works at Squid Labs in California inventing cool new things for making the world a better place. He still builds kites, they are just much, much bigger now.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply