Smash atoms with Lego!

... or at least detect the debris of smashed particles with Lego: The LHC scientists do not yet have enough data to claim a discovery. But in the meantime, at home in Copenhagen, one physicist Sascha Mehlhase from the Niels Bohr Institute has made a part of the collider, the Atlas detector, out of LEGO toy bricks. »It took me about 48 hours to build the 3D model on my laptop and another 33 hours to actually put together all the pieces, this whole process spread out over several weeks,« explains Sascha. The model is made of 9,500 lego bricks and is about 1:50 in scale. There is no construction manual yet, but there will soon be one, he says on his website. The model is very intricate, even showing the innermost pixel detector. University Post article. Gallery of images.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


The Large Hadron Collider: is it worth it?

The Large Hadron Collider(LHC) is to be unveiled this year. It is designed to solve the much talked about energy crisis, and hopes to do so, but can it be worth all of it? From Wikipedia- (On October 25, 2005, a technician, José Pereira Lages, was killed in the LHC tunnel when a crane load was accidentally dropped. The construction of LHC was approved in 1995 with a budget of 2.6 billion Swiss francs, with another 210 millionfrancs (€140 M) towards the cost of the experiments. However, cost over-runs, estimated in a major review in 2001 at around 480 million francs (€300 M) for the accelerator, and 50 million francs (€30 M) for the experiments, along with a reduction in CERN's budget, pushed the completion date from 2005 to April 2007.[14] 180 million francs (€120 M) of the cost increase have been due to the superconducting magnets. There were also engineering difficulties encountered while building the underground cavern for the Compact Muon Solenoid. In part this was due to faulty parts lent to CERN by fellow laboratories Argonne National Laboratory or Fermilab (home to the Tevatron, the world's largest particle accelerator until CERN finishes the Large Hadron Collider). [15] The total cost of the project is anticipated to be between US$5 and US$10 billion.[2] On March 27, 2007, there was an incident during a pressure test involving one of the LHC's inner triplet magnet assemblies provided by Fermilab and KEK. No people were injured, but a cryogenic magnet support broke. Fermilab director Pier Oddone stated 'In this case we are dumbfounded that we missed some very simple balance of forces.' This fault had been present in the original design, and remained during four engineering reviews over the following years.[41] Analysis revealed that its design, made as thin as possible for better insulation, was not strong enough to withstand the forces generated during pressure testing. Details are available in a statement from Fermilab, with which CERN is in agreement.[42][43])

Topic by BkrevWlevqe   |  last reply


Large Hadron Collider's First Operation

The Large Hadron Collider has been tested on 10, September, 2008.Look here on Wikipedia if you don't know what a Large Hadron Collider is.Proton beams have already been injected into the first metres of the LHC, to test the injection process, but the first attempt to circulate beams all the way around the LHC will be on the official start up day. If everything proceeds according to plan the beam will circulate all the way around the 27 km long LHC. Over the following months the LHC scientists and engineers will commission the LHC, running beams at higher energy with the intention of beginning collisions, using relatively low energy (5TeV) beams, towards the end of 2008.Continued on this link...

Topic by Plasmana   |  last reply


The Higgs Boson ?

If you hang out in some of the nerdier websites (including this one), you probably couldn't help but get excited about yesterday's news regarding the Higgs Boson. If you somehow missed it, here's the breakdown.... Higgs Boson

Topic by Goodhart   |  last reply


End of World One Step Closer. Or Not.

A vast physics experiment - the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - reaches a key milestone this weekend ahead of an official start-up on 10 September.Engineers had previously brought a beam of protons - tiny, sub-atomic particles - to the "doorstep" of the LHC.On 9 August, protons will be piped through LHC magnets for the first time.The most powerful physics experiment ever built, the LHC will re-create the conditions present in the Universe just after the Big Bang.This last sentence is the one that's caused a little panic amongst certain groups of the population - they are convinced that the experiment will create miniature black holes which will fall through the LHC towards the centre of the Earth, where they will orbit around, gradually consuing the planet from beneath our feet.When the collider is commissioned, the beams will cross paths at allotted points along the tunnel, smashing into one another with cataclysmic force.My God, have these people never seen Ghostbusters??Scientists hope to see new particles in the debris of these collisions, revealing fundamental new insights into the nature of the cosmos and how it came into being. Now that is seriously cool (well, hot, actually) - to be able to recreate what the whole of reality looked like mere femtoseconds after it started...BBC storyCritics have previously raised concerns that the production of weird hypothetical particles called strangelets in the LHC could trigger the mass conversion of nuclei in ordinary atoms into more strange matter - transforming the Earth into a hot, dead lump.Earlier BBC storyAmusingly paranoid storyAnalog Magazine article

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


What actually happens inside a Large Hadron Collider.....how accurate is this?

I was wondering, perhaps KelseyMH could enlighten me further, how accurate the information is from this article.  I realize it is slated for the general public so it may not be as detailed as it should be, but barring that, how good a job does it do?  Large Hadron Collider:  how it works

Topic by Goodhart   |  last reply


LHC Rap Video !!!

I found this on gizmdo, its a Rap Video filmed at the LHC which pretty-much sums up what there doing there.Watch the video its funny and informative ! Doubble WHAMMY ! anchorman referenceIf you want to sing along you can find the lyrics here, along with video download linkshttps://www.msu.edu/~mcalpin9/lhc_rap/largehadron.htmlOh and you can donate some of your computers downtime to help the guys at LHC do their calculations http://lhcathome.cern.ch/lhcathome/

Topic by =SMART=   |  last reply


More on the LHC Countdown

The Large Hadron Collider is indeed large: the underground particle accelerator is about 17 miles in circumference (it is circular). Located between France and Switzerland, the LHC is now almost ready to begin full-length particle accelerations. Researchers are attempting to collide protons together that are accelerate to 7 TeV (tera electron volts).Following Tetranitrate's first post, LHC Countdown, people have been looking for more information.Even More on the LHC from Kiteman, with more explanation.Here is a great set of pictures from Boston.com, showcasing all stages of production of the LHC.For a better visual understanding of how it works, take a look at this LHC animation from the official LHC web site.More general information from the LHC web site.As I like to say, this is large and in charge.

Topic by joshf   |  last reply


58 mins ago The Large Hadron Collider Was Activated To Much Whoopee

LHC activate! So far I'm still alive and it appears that that our universe will not be ending. This comes much to the dismay of false prophets everywhere. Though as gmjhowe points out [http://Gizmodo http://gizmodo.com/5047732/large-hadron-collider-why-you-really-wont-die-today] indicates that our time of death may have been miscalculated. Although the beam is active, the collision wont happen till October. We've been bringing you the lowdown on the LHC for a while now. You know there has been some concern that this would be the [https://www.instructables.com/community/Its-the-End-of-the-World-As-We-Know-It-.../ end of the world] due to the creation of black holes. And now the The Large Hadron Collider is activated and ready for collisions. And those crafty CERN scientists have captured our attention like a presidential scandal.-bg

Topic by lamedust   |  last reply


Why do people always think the world's ending!?

Once again someone thinks the world's gonna end soon. Someone is suing CERN because their afraid that the new atom smasher (Large Hadron Collider (LHC) along the French-Swiss border) is going to create a black hole and suck up the Earth in a month or so. I think its gonna be another failed doomsday theory, like it probably will be.

Topic by wingman246   |  last reply


A novel lunar clock

The Large Hadron Collider is so big that tidal effects cause its beam paths to distort, as the machinery bends. http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2012/06/07/is-the-moon-full-just-ask-the-lhc-operators/

Topic by steveastrouk   |  last reply


How to build the LHC

If you found the Instructable on operating the Large Hadron Collider a bit complex, Ian O'Neill has provided much simpler assembly and operating instructions. Thanks to Physics World for posting this where I could find it!

Topic by kelseymh   |  last reply


LHC fired up this morning

At 7:00 GMT this morning, engineers fired the first beam at the Large Hadron Collider.It worked on the first try.We're not dead.They didn't discover extra subatomic particles previously unknown to scienceyet.Pretty boring, really.Actually, apparently they had technical difficulties the night before-part of the cooling system (which keeps the magnets cool. Very cool. 1.9 degrees kelvin, to be exact.) failed. They worked on it and managed to fix it overnight though.Details via newscientist (includes video).Via guardian.co.uk

Topic by Lithium Rain   |  last reply


Who's afraid to die?

Ok, This is not really a theological question. It came to mind while thinking of global warming, nuclear holocaust and the Large Hadron Collider. Are you afraid to die? I can only speak from a Christian perspective when I say, "No, of course not!" But I would expect atheists to feel the same way. If there's nothing to look forward to, then there's nothing to dread either. I am afraid of pain, suffering, misery, and the difficulty felt by those left behind, but death itself doesn't really concern me at all. How do the rest of you feel about death?

Topic by skunkbait   |  last reply


Time Travel Contest (with actual prizes!)

Fancy winning a few goodies?From the New Scientist magazine:Our theme this year is time travel. When the Large Hadron Collider at CERN was about to go into operation, some physicists speculated that it might attract visitors from the future (New Scientist, 9 February, p 32, and Feedback, 5 April ). For our competition, we ask you to imagine three such visitors arriving, each bringing glad tidings and bearing a gift from the future. What would the gifts be?Ten lucky winners will each receive a copy of Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration of the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation and Time Travel by Michio Kaku. They will also receive a selection of New Scientist goodies - including books from the Last Word series and a pen-drive.You may enter the competition online. You can also enter by email - with "Competition" in the subject field, please - or by fax or post.The competition closes on Monday 1 December {a significant date} and no entries will be accepted after that date. The results will be published in the 20/27 December issue of New Scientist. The editor's decision is final. Happy imaginings!

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


What is Kelseymh up to?

CELEBRATIONS have just finished at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, for the 50th anniversary of a milestone that had nothing to do with basic physics research. In October 1958, nuclear physicist William Higinbotham created one of the world's first video games, called Tennis for Two.Officially, his goal was to liven up displays at the lab's annual visitors' day, and in that he succeeded. Hundreds of people lined up to bat a glowing spot back and forth across the video screen of a common or garden laboratory oscilloscope.Unofficially, Feedback suspects he was really just goofing off on a slow day, or waiting around with nothing to do when the lab's particle accelerator was broken, being maintained or otherwise failing to deliver the goods. Higinbotham himself said the idea came to him while reading the manual for an early computer which could plot the course of a missile or a bouncing ball on an oscilloscope screen. He then designed suitable circuits and control boxes - Stone Age versions of today's joysticks - so that two players could bat an electronic ball to each other across the screen.The game was adapted for a larger screen, but eventually forgotten until 1982, when Creative Computing magazine heard about it and thought it might be the first video game. With the invention far enough behind for him not to worry about accounting for time wasted on the government payroll, Higinbotham claimed credit for Tennis for Two.Such primitive video games are old hat now, but hundreds of physicists including our own Kelseymh are still waiting for the completion of repairs to the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. What might they be inventing this time, while sitting around twiddling their thumbs?New Scientist Article.Tennis For Two Simulator (untried by your correspondent)

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


First image uploaded to web - subjects of photo splitting up (don't tell Kelseymh!)

From the BBC: An all-female doo-wop band whose image is believed to have been the first photo uploaded to the fledgling world wide web is to play its final gig. Les Horribles Cernettes take their swansong at the Hardronic Festival at the Cern laboratory in Geneva - the birthplace of the web. A picture of the women was uploaded to the web on 18 July, 1992, by web creator - and fan - Tim Berners-Lee. He wanted it to test out the version of the web he was working on at Cern. Press tornado The band was founded in 1990 by Michele de Gennaro who worked at Cern as a graphic designer. The Cernettes get their name from the initials of the giant particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider, used at Cern to investigate fundamental physics. The group has won fame in scientific circles by performing at Cern social gatherings and physics conferences. The women sing classic 60s pop songs, as well as their own compositions such as Microwave Love, Collider and My Sweetheart is a Nobel Prize. The gig on 21 July at the annual Cern music festival will be their first performance for five years - and is billed as their last. Jim Halley, manager of the band, said there had been a huge upsurge of interest in the band because of the anniversary of the image being uploaded to the web. The band was even featured on the US talkshow hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, said Mr Halley. "This photo was one of those that changed the web, from a platform for physics documentation, to a media for our lives," [the band] said. Les Horribles Cernettes.

Topic by Kiteman   |  last reply


Watch out everyone, the worlds ending. Sorry about that.

Scientists hit with 'end of the world' legal challenge over Big Bang experimentSep 1 2008THE biggest scientific experiment in history has been hit by a last-minute legal challenge - amid fears it could cause the end of the world.Opponents of the Large Hadron Collidor claim the machine may create a mini-black hole that could tear the earth apart.The £4.4billion machine, the most expensive experiment in history, is due to be switched on at the European Nuclear Research Centre - CERN - in Geneva, Switzerland, in nine days' time. Those behind the project hope it will unlock the secrets of how the universe began by replicating the conditions of the Big Bang.The machine will smash pieces of atoms together at high speed and generate temperatures of more than a trillion degrees Celsius. The collisions will create temperatures 100,000 times hotter than the centre of the sun in a space a billion times smaller than a speck of dust.But opponents fear the worst. An application for an emergency injunction was rejected on Friday and now the case will continue under human rights laws.German chemist and academic Professor Otto Rossler, one of the project's opponents, said: "CERN has admitted mini black holes could be created when the particles collide - but they don't consider this a risk. "My calculations have shown it is quite plausible these little black holes survive and will grow exponentially and eat the planet from the inside."We do not believe the scientists at CERN are taking all the precautions they should in order to protect human life." Professor Rossler claims in the worst-case scenario, the Earth could be "sucked inside out" within four years of a mini black hole forming. He argues the research violates the right to life under the European Convention of Human Rights. The legal challenge is against the 20 countries, including the UK, behind the project.Scientists involved in the project have dismissed concerns as "absurd". Particle colliders have been used by scientists for over 30 years without any noticeable harm to the planet. This latest machine, however, is the largest and most powerful ever constructed. Built 300ft beneath the French-Swiss border, it will fire particles round its 17-mile circumference 11,245 times per second before smashing them into each other.The machine will be activated on September 10, although it will be several weeks before the first particles are collided. Scientists hope that, among the debris thrown off by these collisions, they will find the elusive Higgs boson thought to be responsible for giving every other particle its mass, or weight.The CERN facility faces a second lawsuit due to be heard tomorrow, filed by environmentalists in Hawaii. But a safety report published this year gave the project the all-clear. It said nature produces higher collisions than the collider is capable of when cosmic rays hit the planet.CERN spokesman James Gillies said: "The case contains the same arguments we have seen before. "We are now concentrating on firing the first beams around the collider and then on fine tuning it until we can get collisions - when the science will start."Source: Daily Record OnlineWhat do you think about, A) this amazing use of particle acceleration and B) the technically plausible but remarkably unlikely end of the world scenario it might create?

Topic by lifelong-newbie   |  last reply