Search for heat absorbing glass in Topics


Heat absorbing glass question Answered

I'm taking apart a Kodak 4200 projector. The lamp assembly includes a piece of "heat absorbing glass".  The manual says not to touch it unless wearing gloves, to keep it covered when out of the projector, and that it may shatter.  Being clueless, this sounds spooky.   Is it dangerous, or will I just wreck it for projection if I get fingerprints on it?  Most glass shatters, but is this going to spontaneously burst into shards?  It's not going back into the projector.   Is it useful for anything, or should I wrap it in foil and toss it in the garbage?

Question by mole1    |  last reply


how to make (DIY) glass that keep the heat of the drink ex for hot coffee? Answered

I like to drink coffe, but it getting cold easily. i wonder how to make my own simple, DIY, glass that can preserve the heat of my drink. thanks before :)

Question by blass    |  last reply


which absorbs more heat, flat black or high gloss black?

Does flat black or high gloss black absorb more heat from the sun?

Question by gdv1939    |  last reply


Indoor heating

Hi, I hope this is the correct place to ask some rocket minded guys how we can solve our fridged home problem. Our 30yr old cottage built with 2 layer perimeter brick and covered with heavy clay tiled roof becomes a freezer in winter. With restricted use of power as a result of our Govt's poor planning it gets cut at anytime and gas heaters not being safe, is there a simple way to get natural heat other than installing a fireplace at great cost that could heat all rooms?  B'lieve me guys it's ccold here even with a winter's sun outside, so solar panels or similar would need to absorb heat to distribute it all round and be very costly -  Sunny South Africa not so warm.  Muscpro

Topic by Muscpro    |  last reply


Best dark metal for solar absorbance.

What's the best metal for absorbing sunlight? ie, darkest. It needs to be immersed in ethanol, which will dissolve pretty much any paint etc. I've tried steel with some kind of enamel or anodised layer, but the eths started eating that too. Also whatever it was seemed to reduce the heat getting into the ethanol. And are there ways of making metal darker, chemically or through heating? I've been recommended getting something rusty and using a rust converter, which turns the oxidised layer into a phosphate, which is dark and might work well. Also.. are there other characteristics I should be paying attention to in order to maximise the amount of heat transferred to the fluid, like conductivity, emissivity, etc? Cheers.

Topic by SolarFlower_org    |  last reply


Induction Heat used to melt glass and other metals

This is the start of an intended discussion about using induction heat to melt glass and other various metal.

Topic by JuxtaposedIToldYouSo    |  last reply


which absorbs heat better,gloss black or flat black?

Heat absorbtion-gloss black or flat black-which is better?

Question by bwesner    |  last reply


large magnifying glasses to heat swimming pool?

Why cant you use the large magnifying glasses if seen used to melt metal etc. to heat a pool by pointing them at the water instead of all the solar panels and black pipe?

Question by djlayman    |  last reply


9V battery heating up instead of the heating element

I am trying to make a heater out of nichrome wire. i have got a heating element (100 W) made specifically for 9V . but when i connected it to the battery, after few seconds of heating the element my battery heated up and i had to remove the connections. what am i doing wrong P.S. the heating element is connected to a stainless steel glass for heating 250-300 ml water to about 100 degree celcius. Please help

Question by samshk    |  last reply


Window or glass film that lets light pass through, deflects heat. Does it exist?

Just wondering is there such a thing? If it does, what would it be called? I'm looking for some kind of window film that can maximize the natural sunlight coming in, yet at the same time deflect most (if not all) of the heat. Some kind of film that can be layered/sticked onto windows, glass. Been googling around to no avail. Any kind of help is appreciated

Topic by Chein    |  last reply


Glass Question - How could I make a spout for a pitcher?

Okay, I am making some glasses from some old 750ml bottles (vodka if you must know). I happen to have a matching 1.5L bottle, which would be too big for a drinking glass. I was thinking of turning it into a pitcher (no handle - it's small enough to wrap my hand around). However, I have no idea how to make a spout. Is there an easy way to do this? I'm guessing heat would be involved. Would this be too difficult or dangerous to attempt? I haven't really worked with glass beyond using a glass cutter here or there. Thanks.

Question by novotm    |  last reply


Glass covered solar trough?

I have seen a lot of designs for solar troughs but I have not seen any with a glass cover on them. Why not? I want to build a solar trough to heat water for the hot tub but I need it to be able to shed michigan winter snow without filling with snow and wondered if the glass would interfere with the operation

Question by Rainh2o    |  last reply


How do I cut glass tubes?

So, I have some glass tubing, about 5mm diameter, about 1mm walls. I need to cut them to length for an Instructable (the cutting isn't the project, the tubes are raw materials).How do I do it? I'd rather not heat them up as I want them to stay straight and cylindrical.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Can fiberglass cloth take shape before applying resin? Answered

My question is after cutting a fiberglass sheet cloth , can the cloth take shape using ironing spray and some heating before applying resin , because im going to fiberglass a rc boat, but it is very slippery and there is no level between  the fiberglass patches  some details are deformed, so im thinking to put one or two complete sheets that cover every thing then resin it . is it possible?????

Question by vwtm2006    |  last reply


Not long ago....

Not all that long ago, I went there to get a Heat Gun, glass cutter wheel, glass drill bit and pay about $30 for the whole lot, according to their ad.....BUT when I got there, the Heat gun I wanted was on an even better sale so I got the whole lot of tools for what I expected to pay for just the heat gun; about  $20  

Topic by Goodhart    |  last reply


How to make glass adhere to silver ?

I make jewelry and I've managed to fill a copper loop with tainted glass. I hold the copper and glass in the hottest part of the flame of my little butane/propane torch. But when I try to do the same thing with silver wire, the silver melts before the glass does. I guess that is because silver isn't such a good conducter of heat. So I've tried to heat up the entire peace of silver (instead of just the little loop that I'm trying to melt the glass on) , which works a little better. But even if I do get the silver and the glass red hot at the same time without the silver melting together, I can't make the glass adhere to the silver like it did to the copper. Any tips?

Question by judith_ou    |  last reply


Summer heat in an old house... Answered

I am trying to find a new home but until then I am stuck in a '*§%& of a house that feels more like an oven. Problem is old age and a landlord who prefers unqualified DIY jobs rather than getting it done properly. I already wasted a lot of money on foam tape to at least prevent the wind from blowing through all doors and windows but the "aircon" is what kills me right now. The house is fitted with an evaporative cooler, which would be perfectly fine in a desert area but not around here with humidity levels usually between 50 and 65%, much higher when it rains on a hot day. My current choice is to sleep at around 34°C in my bedroom or to turn the cooler on to get down to 30°C but everything will be "wet" the next morning. Needless to say the system never had a clean or service done and the landlord is not going to change that as it is not a legal requirement here. Now I am seriously considering to waste more money and to get polystyrene boards to cover the windows that are fitted with just 3mm single pane glass. Was anyone ever desperate enough to such a silly thing and give some insight on how much of a temp difference was achieved? Any better or cheaper options out there apart from buying a portable aircon?

Question by Downunder35m    |  last reply


What material retains heat the best? Answered

I thought of something I could make for an Instructable. To keep the idea until I publish, I'll exclude the actual idea. I need a material for this project that will retain heat from a microwave for ≥20 to ≥30 minutes. It will be about 8x8x1 inches. What can I use for this? Here are some things I found to be helpful: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_capacity http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/130523-zeolite-thermal-storage-retains-heat-indefinitely-absorbs-four-times-more-heat-than-water http://www.fraunhofer.de/en/press/research-news/2012/june/compact-and-flexible-thermal-storage.html http://www.igb.fraunhofer.de/en/press-media/press-releases/2014/sorption-energy-storage.html

Question by knexpert1700    |  last reply


what is the best way to ensure that you get a bubble free laminated glass?

Dear all We have a bit of a problem with bubbles at the edge of the laminated glass and welcome suggestions. We are unsure about the best method and even whether our autocalve is working well, pvb quality, the temperature and the heating process of the pvb.

Question by alfredo fasafini    |  last reply


How to make a pair of heated gloves? Answered

I like to make my own pair of heated gloves using 1.5 volt battery as the power source and I would like to use a small button battery and not a standard D size battery to powere the wire in the gloves. Can anyone tell me where I can purchase Nicrome wire that is in a fiber glass silcone jacket and where to purchase a battery holder that would accomiadte a button battery.

Question by wacky    |  last reply


Who knows how to make their own aquarium tanks out of glass? Answered

I've been looking and the nets just to big, I've seen it done before, years and years ago. But I can't remember how people make their own aquarium tanks. I wanted to know if anyone knows if it's possible to bend a glass pane like Tap Plastics Instructables on how to heat and bend plastic.

Question by randomhat    |  last reply


Building a heating element for battery use?

Hello, I am new to the world of tinkering but  I would like to attempt something. I am trying to build a portable heating element that would only need to reach about 70-100 degrees and be attached to a piece of metal to allow the metal to absorb the heat. Now with this idea I am trying to make it 100% portable, thinking of utilizing 4 AA batteries and a switch so the element is not required to be on all the time. I thought about pulling an element out of a cordless curling iron or something and trying that but was not sure if it would reach the correct temp or be able to last about a month or so with moderate use. I am not very well versed in the circuitry world so the amps - volts thing is a little fuzzy for me so I apologize in advanced if I do not completely understand your responses. Thank you, Alex

Question by lilmudd    |  last reply


how do I bend sheet glass for a curved cabnet?

I need to bend glass for a display cabnet. I an not sure how to do this. Can anyone help a do it yourselfer?

Question by tdehoop    |  last reply


recycling plaster of paris used in glass casting

Actually it is a question again on same topic but the way the plaster has been used here may change the way it can be recycled. I use plaster of paris to make moulds for glass casting.I want to know if the plaster from these moulds can be recycled since they already have been heated for 24 hours in 800 degrees temperatures. Are the properties lost once heated that high?

Topic by patbagniewski    |  last reply


Glass bottle cutting?(a champagne bottle)?

I have explored all your pages with regards to glass bottle cutting and i can,t find anything with regards to cutting a champagne bottle. Yes, the bottom How does one cut the bottom off the champagne bottle?? i have tried many ways, with the tapping from the inside to heating the outside and then rapidly cooling and all are unsuccessful.... Please could you help?

Question by Supermassive    |  last reply


Turning a set of stairs into a heating element?

Hi All, My thought was this, I live in New England and of course there is a lot of snow and ice in the winter.  I am going to have an exterior stair that leads to the third floor of my house and keeping them snow and ice free in the winter will be  a major PITA!  I have looked at a lot of different heating products but none seem optimal.  I was thinking, after remembering small heating elements, similar to the coil you could just put into a glass of water to heat it, why couldn't I just turn the steps into a low temp heating element powered from the house's electricity? Is this totally absurd or should it be possible?  Any ides? TIA, Aaron

Question by offthedeepnd    |  last reply


is it possible to make a solar collector to sit on the bottom of the pool and heat it from there?

The bottom of the pool is the coldest water so why not heat it from there. what would be a good black material that would sink, absorb energy from the sun and transmit it as heat to the surrounding area. would this not create a method of convection current heating?

Question    |  last reply


Heating Element for DIY Melting Point Apparatus

Hi Everyone, this is my first post on this site!  I am seeking advice to help me construct a home-made melting point apparatus (M.P.A).  A melting point apparatus allows it's operator to determine the melting point of a chemical sample by heating it in a controlled fashion and noting the temperature when the sample melts.  I have most of the design made up in my head, but I'm not sure as to how I can obtain the proper heating element.  The heating element I am seeking is an emulation of the M.P.A.s heating elements in my school's chemistry lab, which look like this: a metal block (about 3cm tall by 2cm deep by 3 cm wide) with vertical holes bored into the face with a pane of glass pressed against said holes so a glass capillary tube (containing the sample) can be slid into the bored hole and viewed through the glass pane as the sample is heated by the metal.  Another hole is bored into the metal, adjacent to the sample hole, for a thermometer.  So again, my question is do you have any suggestions as to where I could by a heating element like this?  Or, any suggestions on how to build one?  I have a jewelry shop at my disposal so I can probably bore any holes myself.   Any suggestions will be appreciated, thanks!

Topic by Das Horse    |  last reply


Why dont they use alcohol in closed system steam engines? Other than safety?

By closed system i mean constant mass of working fluid.  i.e. no steam leaving system, like an air conditioner. My point is that alcohol has a lower boiling point that water, (some kinds can boil from the heat of your hand!). SO other than the safety problem of alcohol being flamable, alcohol could operate with a lower heat input than water.    With the addition of a cold resivoir, the closed system alcohol steam engine could work right? Or why not use a refridgerant gas in a closed system steam engine cycle,? >Which would effectively absorb the heat input any ideas? addition*  I mean for use in any steam engine with a closed loop cycle, like the Rankin cycle   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rankine_cycle

Question by MechEngineerMike    |  last reply


Heated concrete garden seats question?

Next year I want to use the garden a lot more, so this winder I'm building a gas bottle wood burner like btop & maybe a BBQ like Babe-BQ from abitdifferent (have access to a few bottles of various sizes) and some concrete (maybe papercrete, if i can gather enough old paper for the whole job) bucket style seats, as I have lots of left over cement from a previous project where the inlaws over estimate (by a large amount!) So i can use it longer through the year, I'd like to have them heated with some pipes going through them being heated off the burner. I'd have a copper coil at the burner end, but ideally to keep costs down, i'd like to use PEX in the seats.  Will this transfer enough (if any) heat outside the pipe? and also will the concrete absorb the heat?  I was thinking of placing the pipe 10/15mm deep and having it coil back and forth from front of the seat  by the knees to the back by the shoulders and back again, 2 or 3 times per seat. It will be a modular design, for smaller molds and adjustability, with each seat connected to the last. I've added a quick drawing i made. Hope it makes sense. Was also thinking that I could also set up a solar heater as a pre heater to heat them in the to just take the chill off, but thats a different project for another time Any suggestions or advice greatly appreciated. Tuns 

Question by tuns    |  last reply


Problem removing a glued on bearing from glass

I am a bit stuck and usually this does not happen too often :(Got a lazy Susan with two glass plates and the bearing sitting in two aluminium disks.The thing still works fine but the plates were never really centered properly.Starts to drive me nuts that it is always "wobbling"...My first attempt was to figure out if the glue might just be hot glue, so I gently heated it all up.Was a not go but didn't expect it to be that simple.Next try was to use some clay around the aluminum disk and then fill the dam with acetone to dissolve the glue.It did not even soften it a bit :(To make it complete I also tried it with Methye Ethyl Ketone as it never failed me but it seems the glue used is chemical resistant.In terms of echanic tried with a thin bladed tool but can't get it into the non existing gap between glass and aluminium.And even braided fishing line seems to fail as after about 20 minutes of trying to get in the glue I got nowhere.My last resort would now be to put it in the oven and slowly heat it up until the glue fails.Problem is that I highly doubt the Lazy Susan is meant to tolerate this and that it will crack.There is also the bearing and possible grease to consider as I have no clue yet whether or not I can take the disks apart to get to the bearing.Is there any good idea or tip that I missed that I can try before risking to heat it up?In case you wonder: The disk is about 5mm out of center...

Question by Downunder35m    |  last reply


ZVS Induction Heater help?

Hi, I tried to build a ZVS induction heater using this circuit http://img413.imageshack.us/img413/5136/inductionm.jpg , but I had no sucess. The work coil is 10+10 turns of 22 AWG wire around an old highlighter casing, and I am powering the circuit from a working 12 volt 7ah battery. The circuit works with my flyback transformer, but does not work on the induction heater. I am using all of the standard components in the flyback circuit, but I replaced the 5+5 turn primary with a 10+10 work coil. As far as I mesured with my thermometer the temperature of the object never increases over 1 degree (I am trying to heat copper wire or a small picture nail). Does anyone have some suggestions? Edit: Sorry about the delay, but I was able to heat a large paper clip using 8+8 turns of 16 AWG wire wrapped around a glass test tube. This time I used a huge 24 volt center tap 18 amp transformer to get 12 volts.

Question by TimTD    |  last reply


Copper tape for thermal concentration

Has anyone ever used copper tape to concentrate heat on an object to obtain a uniform higher temperature?   I've been doing some studies in the recent past that suggest polished copper foil is a good reflector of infrared energy. It is not as good as silver, but I don't think it would go over well to use silver in any sort of oven or kiln.  I used to think good ole aluminum foil was good for heat, but it turns out it is only good for stopping heat.  I've thought of using the instructable on the waffle iron or make one by way of a bread toaster, but will most likely not be able to go through with it.  The copper foil is the same type found at stained glass craft shops. 

Topic by jmikronis    |  last reply


Solution to turning on/off gas: new pump design.

I've been working a couple weeks now on solving the problem I posted here on how to improve my pump design by alternating the feed of ethanol vapour. I got good feedback but ultimately all the solutions involved mechanisms which were going to be somewhat tricky to build and source, which is against the brief of the project I'm working on; being an open source solar tracker concentrator makeable from scrap. In the end I solved the problem by largely redesigning the whole pump. Since it's driven by boiling ethanol, rather than add an extra mechanism for turning the feed of vapour off and on, I reduced the amount of ethanol being boiled, so that it boils itself out after an appropriate period. The vapour is then able to collapse fully, which sucks in more liquid ethanol and refills the system. 1. At the bottom right is the boiler, which holds about 2-3 ml ethanol. 2. This boils and the vapour enters the 'chamber' (the half blue, half white (liquid and gas)), forcing out the liquid, which pours into the wheel, ending up in the main reservoir. 3. This continues until the eths in the boiler has boiled away to the extent that it can no longer overcome the rate of re-condensation in the chamber, which starts to suck, so to speak. 4. This draws liquid from the reservoir, which passes through the boiler, shutting off the boil, the pressure drops quickly and the chamber and boiler refill with liquid. 5. Two valves (the only moving parts, besides the wheel) keep all this going in the right direction. 6. Repeat. The wheel provides the motion for the solar tracker. It's not in by any means powerful or efficient, but the whole thing can be made from a bit of metal tube, some thin pipe, a glass jar and two valves from bike inner tubes (plus a paint tin, bike wheel bearing and some drinks cans for the wheel). I haven't had a chance to try it in the field yet, but powered by a candle it seems to work fairly well. Blog entry here, will post photos and videos when available.

Topic by SolarFlower_org  


Heated print beds - are they overrated gimmicks?

For years now I use my old, trusty Mega Prusa with the bare basics in terms of hardware. But basically every new printer out there comes with heated print beds and most users "upgrade" to one to get better quality prints. So I started to to check the reprap forums and other websites to find out why a heated would be a "must have". Quite a simple task you might think, but not so for someone who prints every material on a cold bed with success... What are the official pro statements for a heated bed? 1. Better bed adhesion of course. 2. Less warping of parts. 3. Far less problems with layer seperation. 4. Better print results. And of course there are a few more but not worth listing them. Why do I think most of the four statements are actually unrelated to using a heated bed? Bed adhesion is a matter of print material and surface of the bed / bed preperation, like tape, glue and such. If you filament peels off a cold bed with no adhesion at all it simply means the surface is either unclean or unsuited for the print material. Warping of parts happens because the material shrinks when it cools down, a heated bed is only able to keep a certain height of the print warm. Higher prints won't have any benefit in terms of better layer adhesion with a heated bed. Same goes for seperating layers. Unlike the common believe a heated bed does not fix this problem - it only masks it! Layers seperate because there is not enough bonging between them. This can be due to insuffient extrusion width, too high print layers, wrong print temperature and of course wrong z-axis stepping and wrong extrusion multiplicator. And how good a print comes out of your printer depends on a good calibration and proper print settings - again a heated bed only masks problems ;) Ok, so heated beds are nonsense, right? Well, wrong again ;) They take a lot of worry out of the daily print life to start with. Especially prints with big foot print will benefit, although PLA should never be a problem on a cold bed. If you print long parts in ABS or even Nylon you can have a hard time forcing the plastic to stay on the bed all around the print. A heated bed, with the right settings of course, can make sure your print keeps the shape until it is high enough so the bottom part won't be affected by shrinking anymore. My opinion on how to get the best results... Manage to print on a cold bed first! Smaller parts don't need a heated bed anyway, so use them to improve on your skills of finding the perfect bed material / coating! You will find that once you have really optimised your printer and settings most parts won't need a heated bed anymore. Once you are really happy with the result of smaller prints on a cold bed try something bigger and pay close attention to any problems on the way. For example a big print might start out perfectly but after about 5-10mm of print height you see the part starts to warp and slowly peels of the print bed - especially long parts or thin areas are affected. The infill also affects how a parts reacts during the cooling, so try the same problem print with solid infill as well as only 15% infill to compare - you can stop the print once the problem is identified, don't waste filament. Now comes the magic of the heated bed... You want the temp as low as possible but still high enough to prevent the warping! Why go low if high would help more?? Simply said: If the bed is too hot the part stays soft for a long time, which can badly affect layer bonding and shape. Imagine you squish the plastic on an already "hard" layer - the plastic is pressed flat to be within the set specs. Now if the the layer is still too hot and soft the plastic will push the lower layer in - which of course will expand outwards. So the layer can actually end up to be lower than it should be - layer will still peel ;) Start with around 50° C for ABS and turn the heat down gradually every 10 layers or 25 if you print really thin layers. If the part still prefers to warp go 10 degrees higher. But again: If the stuff would not stick properly on a cold bed work on that first! How do I print on a cold bed and claim it works fine? To be honest, with a lot of time spent on trying, calibrating and finding the right "magic" to put on the glass to make things stick. Nylon, if the part is big, can still be a frustrating task unless cardboard or Bakelite is used but I still prefer the glass bed. I no longer bother with tapes as it can be costly and I hate changing the entire setup just because I use a different material ;) As said, the main key is a proper calibration of hard- and software! If your prints look messy and you spend as much time cleaning your parts as printing them you know what I mean ;) At the moment my "bed magic" is a clear craft glue with methanol as a solvent, mine is from Aldi but similar products can be found in every craft store. The bed is sanded with 600 grid diamond blocks to be as flat as possible and to provide a bigger surface area for the glue. When mostly printing Nylon is first clean the bed with alcohol and put a layer of plastic primer on it before re-applying the glue. With the right temp settings this glue surface can be reused several times with increasing bond to the part. Once the glue start peeling off the bed it cut the area clean and apply another coat just in the spot. A single bottle of craft glue, diluted down by 20%, lasted now about 3 rolls of filament - not too bad for a 2$ investment LOL Seriously though, squeeky clean your glass bed using alcohol and / or acetone and play with different types of craft glue. You want the stuff that is clear and uses either methanol or ethanol as the solvent, don't bother with water based glues! If the glue sticks well to your part but peels off the bed easily try a layer of plastic primer on the bed first - do this outside! However, if your printer is only capable of using PLA anyway you might not want to bother at all and stick to tape ;)

Topic by Downunder35m  


Best way to laminate plate glass? Answered

Was wondering what people thought might be the best way to laminate plate glass strips together to make a block-o-glass.  I will be sanding the edges with a angle grinder fitted with a flap disc, so a flexible glue would not be great.  Yes I know probably a belt sander would give me a flatter edge, but I am wanting a mottled sort of look.  Anyway, silicon is out, as it is not good for sanding  Epoxy might be the way, but I find it gets gummy under high heat friction sanding.  Gorilla glue maybe or is there some magic yet cost effective glue out there.  It will be a block about 2.5 feet by 2.5 feet with a thickness of about 3 inches.  It will held in a frame with continuous supports around the bottom and sides with the top 1 inch exposed, so it will not have to hold its own weight.  Double sided tape could conceivably  be used, but I am trying to make it somewhat water resistant.  It doesn't have to be clear, but it does have to allow some light transmission.  Enough caveats on it?

Question by iminthebathroom    |  last reply


Need some help on a solar oven design, please.

It's going to be one of those with a box chamber with gathering panels. Should the inside chamber of a solar oven be black, to absorb the heat, or should it be reflective to make sure that the tray and food are the only things that absorb it? What shape should the chamber be?

Question by GigaHertz    |  last reply


Heating options for hot bueing steel?

After moving house I am still living in a big mess of boxes that need to be unpacked, kitchen stuff be sorted and and so on... But with a big garage and proper workspace at hand it is also time to consider my options on how to create my tinker space. I would like set up a small forge later on if the landlord gives permission and that means bot blueing steel again. Which brings me to the problem of heating the nitrates :( My last setup was not only on a different continent but also totally oversized and powered by three big gas burners. This time I would like to go a bit smaller so I can use it inside the workshop. Was thinking of a max of around 8kg of nitrates that need to be heated in a safe way to melting point. Problem with that stuff is that it is not only highly corrosive but also requires quite some time and energy to melt. Using gas on such a small scale seems far to dangerous uless I include baffle plates and add several safe guards, so I would like to avoid the open flame approach here. Only reasonabe alternative that comes to my mind is electric heating. Did some small test last night outside :( Used a 2000W electric hotplate and an old stainless steel pot with about 1kg of nitrate in it. After 40 minutes there was still no real melting happening despited the entire thing padded and covered in glass wool. 20 minutes later I turned it all off and once cooled I found that only about 1cm of solid nitrate was at the bottom. If I would use a suitable container of let's say 20x10x10 cm as a small melting vessel: Could it be sufficient to use a 2000W nichrome heating element (with temp controller of course) in an insulated, forge like setup to melt the nitrate ina reasonable amount of time and be able to keep it that way once the steel is dropped in? Problem is the entire garage is already setup with power outlets and they all go to a single 10 amp breaker. I could max it out with 2400W but for obvious reasons would prefer to have some juice left for lights and other uses. If anyone here already made such a thing it would be great to hear how you solved the heating problem without waiting half a day for the stuff to melt.

Question by Downunder35m    |  last reply


Building a micro (ceramic) heating element for vaporizing e-liquid?

Hi there,  I'm designing a vaping device which is Li-Ion battery powered and uses standard e-liquids (propylene glycol / vegetable glycol). The liquid would evaporate around 200 celsius and the heating element should attain this temperature within 1 second. Current methods use a coil with a liquid absorbing wire, which is not durable nor easy to reuse.  I've been looking into ceramic heating elements but it's a forest of options out there, most of them becoming waaaaay to hot and/or needing a much higher voltage than a standaard Li-ion battery would provide at around 1100 Mah. So i've been thinking of building one, or having a prototype built for me. Problem is, i'm not 100% sure that a ceramic method would be the best way (so many options).  Around the ceramic element (or on top if it is in disc form), i'd place a replaceable sock that can absorb the fluid and withstand excess heat (better than the standard kanthal / ekowool / etc.). This way the end user would only need to replace a sock after some time (for instance when changing fluids). It would also not burn and contaminate the liquid like current system do.  Anybody have an idea?  Regards, Bert

Question by bertbeukema    |  last reply


Smart Phone face glass replacement kit

What this world really needs is a temperature controlled face glass removal and replacement kit. Most of my working friends that have Smart Phones have broken or shattered touch screens. A quick search for touch screen replacement provide a bunch of Youtube videos and DIY kits for under $20. All the vids and kits say that too much, or too little heat will destroy the actual touch sensitive surface under the glass. The only source of heat they use is a blow dryer. I already break enough stuff that is not technology that I do not understand. My brain says a flat aluminum plate with suction holes to hold it in place and act as a handle during removal. Temperature controlled that can be set to the exact temperature for easy removal and replacement without applying too much pressure on the inner touch sensitive part. The online kits offer plastic wedges for popping the glass loose when/if you get the right temperature. An exact temperature face glass removal kit with the necessary wedges or possible strong monofilament fishing line to ease the glass away from the base. Everything I mentioned is beyond my knowledge and/or skills, but DIY Instructables or even kits to help out friends in need would be awesome and probably a good source of income for the entrepreneur.

Topic by GrumpyOldGoat  


water-based kinetic LED lamp

I want to mak a kinetic light using high-powered LEDs to produce glitter line through a thin layer of agitated turbulent water in a wall mounted shelf. So, this gives me a few questions, but let me start with the idea I've got. I want to seperate a shelving unit (preferably solid wood not particleboard with some decent HxDxW) into two compartments. A glass sheet would be slid into grooves onto the side supports. The upper portion of the shelving unit would then be wood, waterproofed with some thin styrene plastic sheets. The bottom would then be composed of a large aluminum sheet (recessed slightly upwards for astheatics) which would house several LEDs in addition to the power adapter and voltage regulator. This would likely follow the "powering high powered LED" tutorial's alternate power source to the pucks. At this point a small pump would be placed into the upper compartment along with just enough water to submerge the pump to a safe level. Perhaps a small recess would be included in the top to allow instant colour shifts by using stained clear plastic sheets (this would reduce total illumination, but these are to be mood/ambient accents not primary lighting source) to avoid any of the more expensive/complex colour shifting lamps. The big question I have at this point is how thermally safe this would be, and how much LED I would actually need to achieve decent brightness. Also, I would prefer if the bottom was modular enough I could remove and work on it without dissasembling the entire assembly, but this may not be possible. Finally, I was wondering if I could run the heatsink material up the ront of the shelf, past the glass, and into the water (this should give great heat dissipation) and have a SAFE and STABLE waterproof join between a flush glass-metal joint with possible use of epoxy and/or silicone caulking. Anything not specified in here I'm uncertain of how to do exactly. So! If anyone has any ideas, suggestions, or awareness that this is pure madness (or has a better way t oget those glitter lines i lust for) please let me know.

Topic by JRGumby    |  last reply


I need an epoxy that won't yellow when heated (to 230 F) - please help.

I'm doing some craft projects where I'm attaching small LED lights behind pieces of glass and crystal-type stones.  Then I'm adding some decorative elements using Fimo clay.  The problem is, due to certain LED and clay placement, I need to bake the clay *after* connecting it to the glass/stones.  So the entire piece goes in the oven.  The lights and solder hold up just fine to the 230 degrees Fahrenheit for 30 minutes.  My epoxy, however, turns very yellow.  If I have a blue piece of glass with a white LED epoxied to it, it shines very much green.  So basically, does anybody know of an epoxy that won't go yellow when exposed to heat?

Topic by aliasjanedoe    |  last reply


Best type of batteries for solar panel use? Answered

I'm looking for something with a long lifetime that needs little maintenance, and is recyclable. Currently leaning towards "Absorbed Glass Mat" batteries. Has anyone had any issues using those, is there something better out there?

Question by action_owl    |  last reply


What types of plastic glass do not go white when bent, and what is the best cement to join it to itself, please? Answered

When I am mid-way through a project I start thinking about the next one! I want to build a small-ish fish tank with a curved front. I envisage building a former of wood and 'wrapping' the plexi-glass round it to meet in the middle at the back. I will heat the plexi-glass gently so it can be bent but hopefully retain most of its thickness. What kinds of plexi-glass can withstand being bent and not turn colour? Also, what would be the strongest kind of cement to secure that join? I intend to reinforce that join by 'sandwiching' it with an additional piece of plexi-glass to give a greater surface area for the join, as water is incredibly heavy! FWIW I will also have much thicker plexi-glass at the bottom and top (top with access holes) with plenty of silicone around all edges. Many thanks for stopping by; I appreciate any thoughts you have. I will be posting this project as an 'ible to say thanks for the help.

Question by kevinhannan    |  last reply


Is corrugated plastic (the type commonly used for signs) a good covering for a greenhouse?

I'm in the planning phase of a greenhouse next spring and I'm wondering if the corrugated plastic that you usually see election signs made of would be good for a greenhouse covering. Has anybody tried this? If so, could you post your results? Here's some information I've come up with already: 1) Corrugated plastic is relatively cheap as dirt compared to glass and corrugated polycarbonate panels marketed under "Palruf" and "Suntuf". 2) There is a greenhouse covering marketed as "Solexx" that appears to be nothing more than corrugated plastic and is claimed to be superior to glass and polycarbonate panels. It's also very very expensive. 3) Solexx panels are claimed to diffuse the light coming into the greenhouse. This is supposed to be better for the plants than direct light from glass or polycarbonate. Below is an excerpt from the Solexx website: "How does light diffusion affect plant growth? Plants create food from light so the type of light they receive is important. Plants exposed to direct light (no diffusion) produce a majority of their food from the top leaves facing the sun. The select leaves absorbing the sun energy do most of the work while the shaded leaves do very little. Direct light also creates excessive heat which causes plant stress. When a plant is immersed in diffused light, all the leaves can photosynthesize resulting in more food production and healthier, fuller plant development. In addition, the upper leaves of the plant receive less intense light which means they will not suffer from plant stress caused by sun burn and excessive transpiration. " Again ,if anyone has tried using corrugated plastic as a covering for a greenhouse could you please share your results? If anyone has their own comment or prediction please share it. If not, I plan on conducting an experiment to test the performance of different greenhouse materials on plant growth. I may have to use artificial light instead of sunlight however, since the growing season here is coming to an end.

Question by EcoMotive    |  last reply


Underground Tube Air Conditioning

I have long heard about using buried tubes/pipes to use as a heat exchanger to take the hottter air from your house, blow it through a system of closed loop underground pipes in order to use the earth mass as a heat exchanger. The earth mass removes/absorbes heat from the house air in the pipes and delivers cooled air back into the house. Can anyone direct me to web sites about this subject. Or, certainly, if you have knowledge about this, reply to me with it? Thank you, John333

Question by john333    |  last reply


how to fix holes in a polyethylene/polypropylene solar heat exchanger Answered

This solar heat exchanger is a 5m sq flat sheet consisting of two layers of black polypropylene or polyethlene (not sure which)with rows of fine bore plastic tubes sandwiched between through which water is pumped from the pool at low pressure.The water warms whilst passing through the system, then empties back into the swimming pool, hence, free pool heating. After 2 seasons of use, there are a few leaks at the joints where the fine tubes meet the main inlet tube. I tried to seal them with glass fibre, then cyano-acrylate resin...nothing stcks to this type of plastic. Any ideas for sealing these holes? The plastic is too fine to use a heating method.

Question by MalKnowles    |  last reply


Sub vs Carpet

So i have these, and I just thought, that since the sub's driver (is that the right term?) is on the bottom, facing the ground, and I have carpet...does the carpet impair the sub? ...Since carpet absorbs sound...Just a thought. Should I put it on top of a piece of plexi glass or something?

Topic by Weissensteinburg    |  last reply


Energy efficient, waterless, Copper strip based cooling system

Energy efficient ,waterless Copper stripe based cooling system:The presented Idea is based on Heat exchange principle.As per sketch there will be a conveyor belt system and some copper stripes will be connected with this belt.Each copper strip will have a moveable hook.The conveyor belt will move with a motor.Each copper strip will be separated with each other and with conveyor belt with the help of Insulation (wooden insulation).Each copper strip will be connected with the machine for 15 to 20 seconds to absorb the heat and after that this copper strip will be removed and next copper strip will be ready to absorb the heat.The removed strip will be cooled down after some time and will be ready to couple with the machine again.In this way each copper stripe will work one by one to absorb the heat to cool the machine and each strip will get cool down due to convection .What I thought is that if I use a continuous water jet to cool the motor then the motor will remain cool so if I use the copper stripes then the same effect will be occured.It will work in this way that temperature will be not increased of machine if I couple the device with the machine. It will be low cost,low maintenance,waterless solution to cool the machines. It will consume almost nil energy

Topic by vikram_gupta11    |  last reply


Tempered glass screen protectors - understand and beware!

I recently had the joy of needing a new screen protector for my mobile after being dumb enough to drop it on gravel. The hard cover took all the impact but the film protector on the screen was scratched badly. Was old and partially worn anyway so I decided to upgrade to a Tempered Glass screen protector. Being somewhere rural I had no chance to get one in a shop so I ordered online. With no intention of advertising for some sellers, I collected a few links so you can check what I am talking about: Item1 Item2 Item3 Item4 Item5 Item6 So, what is my concern with these? They all can be found on amazon and other online services as well as on local markets... As I said I ordered a glass screen protector. If you check these listings and even some of the packing you will notice they all have a thing in common - being shatter proof and of 9H hardness. I also love this video showing how to remove and fix a glass screen protector! The last time I checked glass had one very distinct feature: It is hard and before it really bends it breaks - unless you use fibre optics of fibre glass cloth... What is my concern and warning here? Pretty simple: Stay away from expensive scams! Some claim their screen protector is only 0.25mm thick, even the 0.2mm one I measured was over 0.5mm with the glue... The hardness of 9H refers to the so called Moh's hardness - look it up on Wikipedia if you like. That means these tempered glass protectors would have a similr hardness than a diamond, or at least close to it. Problem is that they are made from plastic to start with and not glass at all. They claims that the screen protector is flexible because it is so thin - again a fake! Even the thinnest tempered glass will shatter if you bend it enough, not so these plastic ones. If you think I am making all this up try to use a really sharp knife or deburring tool and cut the thin sides of one of these protectors. All the ones I tested could be cut quite easy - and I though glass can't be cut with a kinfe... A nice website showing that the scratch resistance is far from the claims can be found here. And a video showing how a real glass screen protector sounds and breaks can be found here. So is it really all bad and should I avoid getting one? Not really if it is only for the added protection. To be clear here, and without the intention to blame any of the above sellers, some protectors actually do have a top layer made from glass and you can hear it as in the above video - it sound solid and not like plastic if you tap it with something hard. Another factor is the simple fact that plastic absorbs impact much better than glass. So where a real glass screen protector might shatter and crack like in the above video, the fake ones might one get a nasty dint or scratch. But you should be aware and clear about what you get and what to expect from it. These glass imitations are made from a strong polycarbonate plastic, similar to the stuff used for bullet and explosion proof "glas" windows - if you every watched the Mythbusters you have seen the big sheets I mean. The top layer of these things is specially treated to repell water, oil and dirt, it also gives the surface the good scratch resistance. The technique is nothing new, camera lenses, plastic sheets and the clear covers you see over the timetable at your bus stop all use it. The new thing is to intentionally mislable a product to make the consumer think it is glass ;) What is the real difference for the user? Check this video. Here a guy performs a drop test with a real glass screen protector. Thing is once the protector breaks the screen itself is broken too but until then it was not too bad. Here it is demonstrated how a real glass screen protector reacts to certain types of abuse - one of the reason I decided on glass. Compared to the plastic counterfeits just the sound on the glass is worth it, but I think the hacksaw was best. Another video from XDA gives a bit more info on how the glass is made - if you can't seeing a phone being abused then don't watch the drop tests at the end ;) Glass with these hardness levels and types of surface protection will give the user a long and worry free use of the phone. The plastic fakes will perform at a similar level for some time but will show signs of wear long before even the top coat of the glass one fails. Both types have their uses and if the fakes would be labeled correctly the user would actually benefit from that. On bigger screens like a tablet I would actually prefer the plastic ones to prevent damage once it needs replacing. On a mobile used in less than perfect conditions I would also go for plastic as it usually is a bit thinner and will fit better within quality hard covers. But when it comes to real abuse like using with dirty fingers most of the time or mostly outdoors where a lot of dust and fine sand can be involved I always go for glass. If you paid attention to the surface treatment then you already realised that the plastic and the glass are in the same region, making them quite scratch resistant. Still fine sand or metal dust will scratch it.... The difference is in the hardness of the actual material that was covered with the oleophobic film. Glass will not give in any way, where plastic is much softer - so not to be confused with the surface hardness! This mean that sharp and point object will easier penetrate the plastic than the glass, something to be considered if you often ecounter harsh use. In terms of actual protection we need to differenciate between surface quality and actual screen damage. After all when badly scratched we can replace the protector but if the display got damaged we are back to square one. The surface hardness was already covered so let's move on to the screen itself. In some of the above videos you can see the abuse a screen might see in normal conditions, and if we would not drop our phones so often repair shops would not be at every corner LOL I have done quite a few screen repairs, mostly for friends and work mates that did not want to pay the hefty extras in a repair shop. From there I got the stories on how it happened and in almost all cases the screen cracked when the phone landed on the corners. In one case the screen and glass protector failed, including the actual display when the phone was dropped out of a 4WD and landed screen first onto a rock. A glass protector will spread the (direct onto the face) impact force onto a much larger area, where a plastic one will produce a dint onto the actual screen much sooner. So again glass wins in terms of actually protecting your expensive screen. But be aware that all this is useless if the phone lands on the corners!! Let me explain: Both the top glass on your screen and the screen protector have a thin layer of "glue". This acts like a shock absorber, so unless an impact goes deep enough so the pressure on the actual screen is too much only the protector should fail. But the screen itself is a tight fit into the frame of the phone, so all side and corner impacts go directly into the glass. As the rest of the glass has no way to give or go the stresses will crack the screen. How should I treat my phone with the new screen protector? Exactly the same way you would without it of course. But if you don't have a proper cover that offers protection of the corners you should invest in one. Having a quality protector and a good case does not mean your phone can be used as a football, see it as an added insurance in case something does go wrong. For obvious reason it can also pay off to have a spare at hand, if something bad happens that requires replacement of the protector you won't be left with an unprotected screen ;) Last but not least, double it up: For people that already know their screen will see a fair bit of abuse in term of scratches it is a good idea to put an extra film protector onto the glass one. Once it is too scratched you peel it off and replace it, while the glass protector gives you the actual protection for your screen. Corning Willow glass As time of wrinting Corning Willow glass is the only "flexible" glass on the market, unless stated with your flexible screen protector you can assume it will be just plastic. I did not list it above as this high tech material is mainly reserved for displays and at least to my knowledge is not available for screen protectors, although I will stand corrected as I have to assume some big players use it for their protectors. The material is actually a sandwich where an ultra thin sheet of glass stis bewteen two layers of durable coating, read it up on their website it is quite interesting. It won't reach the strength of their famous Gorilla glass so without an outer plastic that has the additional oleophobic coating it won't provide the strenght of real tempered glass protectors. Some phones like the Galaxy Round and the fleixble HTC phones use it for example.

Topic by Downunder35m    |  last reply