High-Tech LED Throwie

Topic by UgniusR   |  last reply


High tech smoke signals

Daniel Schulze is an industrial design student in Berlin who is working on a sweet smoke machine. The plan is to have a 7x7 grid of holes that shoot little clouds of smoke into the air. The smoke comes from a fog machine and is shot up in the air with drivers. Check out the video below to see a test of one row. The full setup will be shown next week at DMY Berlin. A Modern Take on Smoke Signals: "For Those Who Can See" via engadget

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


additional tech

If we send it up then should we put any extra tech? by this i mean in my design im working on i have a altimeter to see how high it flys and a gps tracker for recovery and to see the flight path also should there be a camera added?

Topic by shabaki   |  last reply


High-Tech Peashooters with laser beams!

In this peashooter competition in the UK, some entrants have modified their basic tubes with some high-tech parts. This one uses a laser sight and a gyroscope to help aim. All of this is fine with the organizers who have allowed laser sights for a decade.Even so, the winner this year was someone with a regular peashooter so it still is quite a bit about skill. Pea shooters fight it out for world championships via BoingBoing

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


Electroplate tech used for 3D printing

Obviously it wouldn't work for large scale objects, but could high current, localized "plating" be used to deposit large, controlled amounts of metal to sculpt an object??

Topic by NumbersAndLetters   |  last reply


3D Printing for High School Students

As part of our effort to print awesome things for awesome people, we printed out 8 models designed by students at Oakland Technical High School. The models were designed by kids during their spare time to assist younger students in the program to visualize shapes in three dimensions. “It’s amazing, but it’s all on the screen,” shared junior Zoey S. when I asked her about the main challenge facing students in the program. “It’s one thing to see it [the model] on the computer, but another to see all the aspects and angles in real life. It’s nice to have a physical representation in order to see all sides.” Students in the Oakland Tech engineering program begin by modeling basic shapes and slowly develop their 3D modeling chops by manipulating geometric shapes. By senior year, students create an architectural design that incorporates everything they’ve learned about 3D modeling (and calculus and trigonometry and environmental design). The high school juniors designed their models to help sophomores who are just beginning to create objects in three dimensions. The prints were mostly cylinders and boxes with various cut-outs and indentations that present a real challenge to neophyte 3D designers. High school students are not the only people who can receive free 3D prints of their models. With a small army 3D printers, we're printing our favorite 3D models from the gallery at 123Dapp.com. Just submit a design to the 123D gallery to be considered for fabrication. For free. We'll send it to you. Even if you're not in a high school that we can easily drive to. And be sure to submit any designs to the Make it Real Contest (by the end of May) for the chance to win a $50,000 3D printer of your very own.

Topic by wilgubeast   |  last reply


High-Tech Surfboard Made from Cardboard

Instead of the traditional methods, this surfboard is based on a core that's made up of nearly 400 pieces of cut cardboard that intersects and is then coated with fiberglass and resin. So far it's only a one-off, but more will surely be made.When it came time to replace his old surfboard, Mike Sheldrake decided to build his own. But the former Web programmer didn't have the sculpting skills to carve one out of foam the way professional builders do. So he used 3-D modeling software to design a snap-together deck that's as sturdy as a conventional model and performs just as well, made from the cheapest material he could find: cardboard. link

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


High Tech Microscopy on a Very Tight Budget

 Among microscopy amateurs there is a long established tradition of grinding lenses and making their own microscopes. ( Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, who is known as the "Father of Microbiology", was a linen-draper by trade with no formal scientific education, yet his skill at making microscopes and his observations won him international recognition.)  When it comes to non optical microscopy (electron and scanning probe) the idea of making your own microscope at home is more intimidating. Mostly because of the cost and difficulty of getting parts you'll need.  But it seems that this man, John D. Alexander from Gilbert, AZ, found a clever way to build a scanning tunneling microscope using cheap and commonly available parts.   Have a look at his site www.geocities.com/spm_stm/Project.html  Very interesting. If someone of you will try to build his own microscope, let us know.

Topic by Fabio M   |  last reply


Spanish or French | Intro to Metalworking or Intro to Engineering and Tech.?

Ok, so it's that time of the year - picking 9th grade courses. I'm signing up for all gifted (higher than honors) academic classes, but am stuck on my electives.To get into universities and colleges in Georgia, I have to take 2 sequential years of either French or Spanish. My mom says Spanish is easier, like I'm sure most people would. I don't really care about speaking fluently in either language; I just need to go to college.What would you say would be the easiest to get through?So, I guess all of y'all know that I aspire to go into the mechanical engineering field. High school is a good place to start out, but I've come upon another bump in the road: Should I go with the metalworking classes, or the engineering (and technology) ones?I've always wanted to be able to weld, and I'm sure that's a major skill when it comes to engineering. Classes that my future school offers include Intro to Metalworking, Arc Welding, GMAW and GTAW (which I won't take), Intro to Milling (which includes using a lathe and a CNC machine), and a sheet metal class. The engineering class covers things like CAD, CAM, CNC, robotics, audio and visual productions, and other technology things.I think the metalworking would be best for me - I'm more of a hands-on person; i.e., I like tangent things, not doing "theoretical" things on a computer, though I know all of the CAD stuff would be very useful.I'd like to take all of it if I could, but that's only possible by going to summer school (which costs $180 per class).Any help would be appreciated!

Topic by Bran   |  last reply


Draw high quality image on computer Answered

Thank you for reading/answering my question i have a cartoon charecter that i need to draw in a high quality i have gimp and paint but neither are working if you could recomend a free software i would be so grateful

Question by DELETED_DELETED_HIVLTGE1   |  last reply


Tech-tastic Coffee Tables

Coffee tables can really bring a room together, especially if they're high-tech and provide their own entertainment. They're expensive, as the site suggests, but just the ideas warrant personal kudos. Of course, as with any coffee table, you'll need to have a coffee table book about coffee tables.Link via Neatorama

Topic by joshf   |  last reply


New assistive tech channel?

We're about to break out a new channel for assistive/adaptive tech projects, and other "disability hack" type of Instructables.  The big question:  what do we call this channel, and what category do we sort it under? Why is this a hard question?  Check out the Humana Health by Design contest entries - they include everything from ultra low-tech tools and life hacks to construction projects and full-on techie builds.   Perhaps we need more than one channel.  If so, how should we divide the Instructables?  Do we need one channel for high-tech projects, and one for low-tech?  I've been playing with the ideas of "assistive tech"  for the high-tech/gadget-based projects to be filed under Technology, and "adaptive tools" for the low-tech/reuse projects and life-hacks to be sorted under Living.  These still seem to be arbitrary distinctions, and I'm not sure they make sense.  What do you think?  Please discuss in the comments, or feel free to send me your suggestions by email/PM!

Topic by canida   |  last reply


High-tech tool (ie laser-cutter) gripe

You know, there are some high-tech tools that I'd like to have, and it's starting to annoy me that they're so SIMILAR, but there doesn't seem to be any way to combine them and save some of the costs. Consider your Laser cutter, your CNC router (for plastic or wood), your PCB milling machine, and your CNC hotwire foam cutter. All feature a major portion of their cost in a precision X-Y tool movement (and sometimes Z.) But can I switch tools (and perhaps bases) and convert one to another ? No! Sigh. The differences in tool and base properties are pretty significant; is there any way something like this might be possible?

Topic by westfw   |  last reply


audio amplifier for singing arc speaker, 110v design

Okay, I'm planning on starting on a plasma speaker, I know somewhat how I want to build it. My neighbor has one of the old school neon sign transformers for sale, he wants next to nothing for it. So I intend to use that to simplify finding materials. I am incapable of designing a circuit, so I am asking for help. What I need is for somethng to control the 110v for the transformer based on the audio input. My alternate idea was to use two NSTs and have them become a stereo channel unit. I do prefer that idea myself. I simply have no idea how to control the sound from the arc without taking the arc out. Honestly, my electronics knowledge in circuit design made me think a really big relay would work. Until I realized that was stupid. Anyways, my preferred idea is using a project box to contain a circuit, fused around critical areas to prevent the music device being blown up on accident or anything else bad happening. A stereo plug, with one transformer being the left, the other the right. I also want to try to drive either the low voltage or the 110v computer cooling fan type things so that there is an airflow through the arc.  Please help me-I can't design circuits for the life of me, and I would rather this work out. Thanks!

Topic by Nyanman 


Where can i get cheap high powered LEDs? Answered

I was thinking about some ideas for future projects and i was wondering, where could i buy some cheap LEDs that actually are good, since the once from radio shack aren't that great.

Question by FrozenStar   |  last reply



Anyone have any high-quality machining techniques that can be used in a low-tech situation? Answered

I want to make a CNC machine but I don't have the tools or access to tools that I'd like to make one,  all I have is a simple drill press, a little stand-alone vice that I can use on it, calipers, and micrometers. What I want to know is how can I, limited tools only (I hope), precisely drill (and possibly tap, I do have a tap set) a bunch of holes in aluminium angle/channel, acrylic, and MDF?

Question by The Ideanator   |  last reply


High Speed Wireless for Fencing Strip

I've had the idea of trying to create a wireless fencing system (like what they use in the olympics) for my club, and was wondering if this is possible using AVR's and available (and fairly cheap) wireless tech. For those of you who don't know what this would entail because you do not know fencing, I would have to have two transmitters acting simultaneously that could send out signals checking for touches on a blade that would be received well within 40ms of eachother (the double touch time for epee). I would also need them to be able to send out two different types of signals (for on and off target for foil and sabre). I found online a project based off of rfid tech that claims to accomplish this and was wondering how effective this route might be? http://www.worldacademicunion.com/journal/SSCI/SSCIvol02no02paper03.pdf

Topic by nkraus1   |  last reply


does anyone know where i can get any of the below materials for cheaper than normal???? Answered

-A vacuum chamber, preferably in a spherical shape -A roughing vacuum pump capable of reaching at least 75 microns vacuum -A secondary high vacuum pump, either a turbo pump or oil diffusion pump -A high voltage supply, preferably capable of at least 40kv 10ma - Must be negative polarity -A high voltage divider probe for use with a digital multimeter -A thermocouple or baratron (of appropriate scale) vacuum gauge -A neutron radiation detector, either a proportional He-3 or BF3 tube with counting instrumentation, or a bubble dosimeter -A Geiger counter, preferably a scintillator type, for x-ray detection and safety -Deuterium gas  -A large ballast resistor in the range of 50-100k and at least a foot long -A camera and TV display for viewing  -Lead shielding

Question by garagegenius   |  last reply


Wholesale electronic components???

I was hoping someone here would know of a place i could buy electronic components at wholsesale prices. I'll buy bulk. The reason i say this is a friend is setting up an electronics store, but at the moment it's looking like he'll have to buy-in at retail, which'll leave his sales prices very high. Please help me out. Tom

Topic by lifelong-newbie   |  last reply


HS Tech Director, teaching positions in SF

A friend forwarded this job posting, figuring Instructables users might be interested!It sounds like a fun place to work:Lick-Wilmerding is a pretty cool high school in San Francisco. Bothour daughters went there. They have a full mandatory shop course forall students -- woodworking, metalworking, glass, architecture, etc.This is a job posting for a new tech director.Job posting info here. They also have listings for English, History, and Math teaching positions.

Topic by canida   |  last reply


Does anyone know what a high quality digital multimeter brand would be and where I could find it? [Excluding RadioShack] Answered

I've seen some some digital multimeters on RadioShack for around $20 but they kinda make me nervous.   The qualities I'm looking for are: Reliable, very accurate (can measure very small amounts of current, like from small solar cells, small wires, computer fans, etc.), large variety of ranges, as well as very durable. Any help in finding out what the right digital multimeter for me would be, is very much appreciated!

Question by BucketBasher   |  last reply


Questions about computer stereos

Hi! I'm building a portable amplifier from old computer-speakers and I have a couple of questions about them. 1. How do I make the stereo-speakers mono the best way? 2. Is it possible to make low- and high-pass filters to a simple amplifier as the computer ones? I thought I'd connect one bigger speaker (a whopping 5" one!) to amplify the low frequencies and one small to amplify the high frequencies. This would work the best with a 1-channel amp. Thank you in advance, hope you understand what I'm looking for! P.S. Please move the thread if it is in the wrong category, wasn't sure if it suited better under "music" or "tech".

Topic by Henell   |  last reply


Ultimate nation

What nation is the best in terms of firepower?

Topic by Iwantbigboom   |  last reply


Modding High-end pet door

I currently own and am using a High Tech Pet electronic pet door (http://www.hitecpet.com/px-1detail.html) and would like to modify it to: 1) Read/activate via a small RFID tag instead of the very large (for a cat) sonic transmitter. The cat is feral (we lock him at night in the garage), so he sometimes gets in fights and loses his entire collar. The transmitters are $40 each! He's lost three so far. 2) Switch mode to "in only" at a preset time very night and "in and out" mode every morning. I like the features of this door, and it's already installed. It's extremely weatherproof and resilient. Most Lexan/acrylic cat flaps I've seen or owned aren't even in the same league as this one, which is why I would prefer to keep this door as opposed to modding a different brand of door. I know how to solder and have a very basic understanding of electronics. I could probably muddle through a DIY, but I'm not even sure it can be done. Is it as simple as locating the receiver on the board and replacing it with an RFID reader? Or is that wishful thinking? Thanks in advance for any insight, advice, help. :)

Topic by S2kvan   |  last reply


Digita Media Enthusiast/Tech Support Specialist

Job description ABOUT PAI PAI is a community rich in culture and diversity, distinguished by its high level of job satisfaction. We believe that our team members are our most valuable assets, so we recognize and reward great performance. We believe in open communication and foster an environment of creativity, loyalty and respect both for employees and clients alike. THE BIG PICTURE Do you like to get into in-depth trouble-shooting that would revolve around TiVo, DVR, or multiple types of digital video media? Do you excel in communicating with people in both a technical and non-technical way? Are you known for thinking outside the box when it comes to creative trouble-shooting solutions? If so, there’s a strong possibility you’d fit in well with an exciting new project at PAI. As Team Leader, you’ll assist in providing first-and second-level customer support for the full line of video media software products for our newest client. You and your team will interface with customers via telephone and email to provide troubleshooting, patches and/or bug fixes, version upgrades and software use tips. Ensuring the highest level of customer satisfaction is key, and will be measured by providing quality issue resolution within the established response time intervals and service level standards. DESIRED EXPERIENCE/QUALIFICATIONS • Basic professional understanding of video standards such as NTSC and PAL, frames and fields, and frame rate and basic video signals such as composite, S-video, Component, SDI and DV. • Basic understanding of broadcast digital video formats and compression such as Standard Definition, High Definition, MPEG-2, GOP Structure, Program and Transport Stream, as well as popular internet streaming, and download and desktop media formats such as Windows Media, Real Networks, QuickTime, MPEG-l, MP3, MPEG-4, etc. • Understanding of audio channels, digital audio sample size sample rates. • Understanding of non-linear video editing concepts. • Familiarity or use of a content management system or digital asset repository THE EVERYDAY VIEW • Phone, Email, and Remote Desktop support to resolve client issues, • Lead a professional team in providing world class support to leading industry customers • Verify and escalate bug reports to Engineering for resolution • Document problems/resolutions for internal/external knowledge base articles. • Effectively communicate with customers, both written and orally, to manage expectations through the trouble-shooting and issue resolution process. WE’RE LOOKING FOR SOMEONE WITH: • Excellent trouble-shooting/problem solving skills with high attention to details and good follow-through. • Excellent written and oral communication skills. • Ability to install and configure Windows Operating Systems. • Basic hardware, software, operating system and device driver troubleshooting skills. • Basic understanding of MS SQL and/or Oracle server installation and configuration. • Basic Linux/Unix installation and administration skills. • Understanding of Windows File Systems, configuring IIS, JBOSS, Apache, File permissions and Disk management. • Ability to troubleshoot basic networking and connectivity issues including TCP/IP, DHCP and DNS. • Ability to effectively work with a variety of personalities and occasional stressful situations. • Ability to multi-task under time constraints. • Able to work Evening and Late Night shifts. • Experience providing support within a Network Operations Center environment, • Digital Media or related Software or Production Service or 2+ years Digital Media Encoding/Production Experience.  To apply: 142a+8972@c1.catchthebest.com http://pai.catchthebest.com/apply/142a/8972  Cindy Law HR Manager 858-495-3525

Topic by clawpaisd   |  last reply


cool door?

Help me reproduce this door here look http://www.livescience.com/9310-high-tech-door-star-trek.html

Question by tinker234   |  last reply


Are there instructions on how to easily build an infinity mirror?

I can remember in the good old days of electives like electric shop, metal shop, wood shop, print shop, etc. that we made an infinity mirror very easily as we were junior high students with little or no skills. The shop teacher had very easy plans and materials for us and I would love to make one for my kids.

Question by gregorymiyata   |  last reply


How to make your own high-tech Christmas gifts - Instructables in New Scientist

How to make your own high-tech Christmas giftsIt's easier than you might think. The web has a swarm of sites that show you how to make this year's must-have gadgets from heaps of electronic components and old junk. So there is no excuse not to give your mum that digital photo frame she wants or your nephew a dancing teddy. Not only might you save money and keep tech junk from the dump, your friends and family are more likely to cherish a home-made present than something acquired with a wave of a bank card. At least, so says Eric Wilhelm, who has created Instructables.com, a website forum for people to share their home-made projects.While studying for a PhD in mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Wilhelm took up kite surfing. It was an expensive hobby, though, and Wilhelm couldn't afford to buy his own gear. So he began designing his own, hand-sewing the kites and building the surfboards. "Half of the equipment performed beautifully, half failed spectacularly," recalls Wilhelm, who began documenting his designs on his own website.Soon Wilhelm was inundated with notes from kite-surf dudes asking for advice, sharing their ideas and swapping photographs. Dealing with all the correspondence was time-consuming, and he realised that people like him needed a better way to share their projects online: Instructables was born.Today the site has step-by-step instructions for 17,000 projects, with as many as 20 new ones added each day. Here you can find out how to make a robot like the one in the movie Wall-E, a flashlight from a Chapstick and an iPod speaker from a tin of mints. More than 350,000 fans rate other people's projects, suggest improvements and add their own photographs and videos. The most popular projects have been compiled in a book, The Best of Instructables.More news and press about Instructables here.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


Cool collection of tech related videos, lots of make-able projects

You'll need a high end connection to the net and a decent computer to watch theseI esp like this, looks simple enough to make: Glass table with dark liquid and sheet of latex over the top of that, light underneath...http://www.neave.tv/#kloss_delightable

Topic by radiorental   |  last reply


I was given a 42uF 12KV oil capacitor. Any suggestions for having some high tech fun with it? Answered

It's rated for oscillatory currents, pretty old, but it is in good cond. electrically. I can easily and safely charge and discharge it. The thing is, it was free, and I suppose I couldn't turn it down. Now what? The highest voltage I would possibly need a filter cap for is 4500 for an amplifier, so that's out. The "oscillatory currents" rating makes me think it was for energy storage and high frequencies. It is likely from LANL surplus. Can crusher? disc launcher? I'm mainly interested in suggestions for projects that will focus on a fast discharge and high peak power levels, and do not require a lot of additional items, but I am open to any decent ideas.

Question by Opcom   |  last reply


TWIT.TV: Make Mag, Maker Faire, Boing Boing, etc discussed.

The first podcast of the week is the last word in tech. Join Leo Laporte, Patrick Norton, John C. Dvorak, and other tech luminaries in a roundtable discussion of the latest trends in high tech. Winner of "People's Choice Podcast" and "Best Technology Podcast" in the 2005 People's Choice Podcast Awards. Released every Sunday at midnight Pacific.The pod cast is at TWIT.TV - link - And the "death of.....(newspapers, radio, etc.)

Topic by Goodhart   |  last reply


Water Bridge

I was reading this article on how scientist made a bridge out of water, just liquid water, using a high voltage of electricity. They flipped the switch and the water from one glass(well i'm not sure what they put it in, i am assuming a glass beaker) over the very air between the beakers and into the other glass, held up by nothing at all. You won't be driving cars across this thing anytime soon, they biggest they could make it span was 25mm. Supposedly the current restructured the water molecules to create it. I do know they used DC current though. Also the bridge only last for 45 minutes, because of heat, which as the article states, it went from 20(degrees) C to more than 60(degrees)CQuoted from the article,http://www.physorg.com/news110191847.html)Upon investigating the phenomenon, the scientists found that water was being transported from one beaker to another, usually from the anode beaker to the cathode beaker. The cylindrical water bridge, with a diameter of 1-3 mm, could remain intact when the beakers were pulled apart at a distance of up to 25 mm.I'm not sure how much current was going threw them but I would be amazed and appreciate it if someone could find out, experimenting or however they could.

Topic by cd41   |  last reply


Watch out everyone, the worlds ending. Sorry about that.

Scientists hit with 'end of the world' legal challenge over Big Bang experimentSep 1 2008THE biggest scientific experiment in history has been hit by a last-minute legal challenge - amid fears it could cause the end of the world.Opponents of the Large Hadron Collidor claim the machine may create a mini-black hole that could tear the earth apart.The £4.4billion machine, the most expensive experiment in history, is due to be switched on at the European Nuclear Research Centre - CERN - in Geneva, Switzerland, in nine days' time. Those behind the project hope it will unlock the secrets of how the universe began by replicating the conditions of the Big Bang.The machine will smash pieces of atoms together at high speed and generate temperatures of more than a trillion degrees Celsius. The collisions will create temperatures 100,000 times hotter than the centre of the sun in a space a billion times smaller than a speck of dust.But opponents fear the worst. An application for an emergency injunction was rejected on Friday and now the case will continue under human rights laws.German chemist and academic Professor Otto Rossler, one of the project's opponents, said: "CERN has admitted mini black holes could be created when the particles collide - but they don't consider this a risk. "My calculations have shown it is quite plausible these little black holes survive and will grow exponentially and eat the planet from the inside."We do not believe the scientists at CERN are taking all the precautions they should in order to protect human life." Professor Rossler claims in the worst-case scenario, the Earth could be "sucked inside out" within four years of a mini black hole forming. He argues the research violates the right to life under the European Convention of Human Rights. The legal challenge is against the 20 countries, including the UK, behind the project.Scientists involved in the project have dismissed concerns as "absurd". Particle colliders have been used by scientists for over 30 years without any noticeable harm to the planet. This latest machine, however, is the largest and most powerful ever constructed. Built 300ft beneath the French-Swiss border, it will fire particles round its 17-mile circumference 11,245 times per second before smashing them into each other.The machine will be activated on September 10, although it will be several weeks before the first particles are collided. Scientists hope that, among the debris thrown off by these collisions, they will find the elusive Higgs boson thought to be responsible for giving every other particle its mass, or weight.The CERN facility faces a second lawsuit due to be heard tomorrow, filed by environmentalists in Hawaii. But a safety report published this year gave the project the all-clear. It said nature produces higher collisions than the collider is capable of when cosmic rays hit the planet.CERN spokesman James Gillies said: "The case contains the same arguments we have seen before. "We are now concentrating on firing the first beams around the collider and then on fine tuning it until we can get collisions - when the science will start."Source: Daily Record OnlineWhat do you think about, A) this amazing use of particle acceleration and B) the technically plausible but remarkably unlikely end of the world scenario it might create?

Topic by lifelong-newbie   |  last reply


Make SF Meeting

This past Sunday I went to the Make SF meeting graciously hosted by Tech Shop in Menlo Park. I unfortunately do not have names and/or links to work relevant to the presenters, but I will try to give an overview of what I saw as best I can.The first presenter showed a musical interface he made with a laser pointer and a photocell that altered a track of music to correspond with the disturbance of the surface of the water. He told of how he embedded many such bowls in a table and had the laser pointers shining straight down into them from the ceiling so that it seemed as though the water itself was changing the music. He used it a party the previous weekend (side note: I never get invited to parties nearly as cool).Followed him was a man that created a device to interface with a computer as a USB HID. In short, it pretended to be a keyboard, mouse or joystick and then you could send it commands from a micro controller. He had his device installed in a model plane and based on accelerometer readings used it to control a flight simulator. Next there was a man from Google who showed the low-cost Arduino based glowing orb that he was working on based on the Arduino Orb Build Warden. This was presented as one possible solution to have widespread visual indication for monitoring the status of their ongoing projects. Presenter #4 promised not to have anything quite as high tech and passed around a copper bracelet made using copper wiring and traditional cold forge methods. He then spent the rest of the time talking about how he welded the ends of the bracelet with a tig welder made from a microwave much like this one. And even though he promised not to have anything technical to show, he went into the finer points of building your own microwave welder in regards to transformer modification and the importance of finding a reliable metal foot pedal to control the weld. Lastly, someone came from Shape Lock and demonstrated his "Ultra-High Molecular Weight Low Temperature Thermoplastic." Or in other words, you stick it in a pot of water heated to 160 degrees for a few minutes, take it out and bend it into any shape you want, let it harden for a few more minutes and you're good to go. You can use it to quickly and easily make all kinds of high-strength custom shapes and fasteners. It is actually very cool. However, remember, don't stick it in your mouth (or anywhere else!) because albeit non-toxic it will lock your jaw shut and good luck getting that back to 160 degrees. Oh... I should also mention that the meeting was organized and hosted by the legendary Andrew Milmoe.And that summarizes what I saw and heard.The next meeting will most likely be the first Sunday in March and you can get more info on the official Make SF site. Also, there will be a Make SF social gathering next Thursday at Mars Bar in San Francisco (7th and Brannan).It starts around 7 PM and there is rumored to be a special robotic guest attending. (if anyone has more info on any of the presenters please let me know)

Topic by randofo   |  last reply


Eric Wilhelm wins TR35 Innovation Award

Sharing your projects and ideas on Instructables is now officially a Big Idea. Eric just won the TR35 award for top innovators under 35 from MIT's Technology Review magazine for his work with Instructables; check out the press release below, and read about the other winners.I'm pretty psyched to be part of this site, as we're clearly doing something exciting and important -- it's especially neat to be an early adopter with the power to change the way society works.-- ChristyProject-Sharing Website Creator Named Top Young InnovatorSan Francisco, CA - August 19, 2008 -- Eric Wilhelm has been recognized by Technology Review magazine as one of the world's top innovators under the age of 35 for creating Instructables.com, the Internet's #1 project-sharing website.Instructables.com began as a way for Eric to document his engineering work and grad-school kitesurfing projects, and has evolved into a world-wide hub for documenting and sharing creative projects. The site's simple, elegant step-by-step format provides an intuitive platform that allows anyone to publish their project, complete with pictures, text, and embedded video.In a world of mass-produced culture, hand-making and personalizing is experiencing a resurgence, and people everywhere are reviving classic skills and technologies. Instructables is the hub of this movement, providing a social and interactive environment to demonstrate amazing projects and ideas. The site dramatically lowers the barrier to sharing projects, enabling crafters, modders, engineers, artists, cooks, bicyclists, and techies to gather and share their work freely, and where cross-pollination is actively encouraged."Everyone wants to be a creator, not just a consumer," Eric explains. "We bring passionate people together to learn from each other. Instructables makes it cool to be smart." Instructables is also a valuable educational resource. Parents and teachers rely on Instructables as a source of project ideas, and students maintain their personal portfolios at the site. By coupling old-fashioned tinkering with thoughtful discussion and long-distance collaboration, Instructables has begun to revolutionize learning and innovation.Eric Wilhelm and the other TR35 winners for 2008 will be featured in the September issue of Technology Review magazine and honored at the EmTech08 Conference. "The TR35 honors young innovators for accomplishments that are poised to have a dramatic impact on the world as we know it," said Jason Pontin, editor in chief and publisher of Technology Review magazine, "We celebrate their success and look forward to their continued advancement of technology in their respective fields."About Eric Wilhelm:Eric earned his SB, SM, and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from MIT, where he developed methods to print electronics and micro-electromechanical systems using nanoparticles. He co-founded Squid Labs, an innovation and design partnership, and a number of Squid Labs spin-off companies including Potenco, producing a human-powered generator for cell phones and laptops; Makani, an energy company seeking to harness high-altitude wind; OptiOpia, developing low-cost portable vision-testing and lens-fabricating devices; and Instructables, a collaborative how-to site that helps people document and share a process or skill. See Eric's How To Start A Business Instructable for the more detailed story.About Instructables.com:Instructables is the most popular Do It Yourself community on the Internet. Started in August 2005, Instructables provides accessible tools and publishing instructions to enable passionate, creative people to share their most innovative projects, recipes, ideas, and hacks. The site is currently home to over 14,000 projects covering such diverse areas as crafts, art, kids, electronics, pets, bikes, cars, robotics, green projects, and cooking.About Technology Review, Inc.:Technology Review, Inc., an independent media company owned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is the authority on the future of technology, identifying emerging technologies and analyzing their impact for leaders. Technology Review's media properties include Technology Review magazine, the oldest technology magazine in the world (founded in 1899); the daily news website TechnologyReview.com; and events such as the annual EmTech Conference at MIT. ContactsFor Instructables:Christy Canida, 510-931-5622press (at) instructables (dot) comFor Technology Review:Sarah Mees, 978-208-1499press (at) technologyreview (dot) com More news and press about Instructables here.

Topic by canida   |  last reply


how can i make a railgun with a taser?

Theres lots of instructables about how to use capacitors for it, but i have a high powered stun gun, with more volts than any camera circuit capacitor bank. 1,800,000 V or 1800 KV. i know there has to be a way to do this. considering a camera capacitor only has about 330 V.

Question by mikmkt93   |  last reply


Current limiting high voltage - ccfl inverter help ? Answered

Okay as my first question i'll say hi first , and Darren from Ireland here , fair "know how" of electronics and how things roughly work. I have a 32inch TV who's inverter board is toast (okay its going on and off straight away) , I know its getting power from the psu board as there is little or no voltage drop when I flip the TV on and the lights fire up. I have asked 3 people at work (Electro techs at work) and they all say the same thing , replace the board , its too much work (I think there just lazy) and also they all say they would need the data sheet on all components or the circuit diagram. So well me with my stupid head wants to try and have a stab and getting a free TV. So I have ordered a CCFL inverter power source for a neon case light , which I intend to use just to see if any one bulb is gone as im not sure if that is what could be kickin the inverter off. And the other thing i have ordered is a "Universal inverter for 10-30v 4 bulb 17-24inch" from ebay. So the question is , if one bulb is gone and well i doubt i can order a bulb like this and replace as that would be end of tv if i open than panel . is there a way to simulate that bulb working in any way to stop the inverter going off because of one bulb. And the other question is , if I want to use this universal inverter , what is causing it too be a 17-24 inch only ? From what I understand is if I am wrong correct me please , that the larger bulb would burn the driver chips/fet's drawing too much current. So would there be a easy / safe way to just limit the out put so they will run but a little dim (as the tv is intended to be used in a dark room any way) Any ideas welcome , and for what ever comes up , Thanks !

Question by dwoods-1   |  last reply


Back that Arduino Up

Hello instructables, I am a student at High Tech High North County and we are working with arduinos in our Engineering class. Our project is to create a reverse sensor for a motor vehicle, we are having trouble finding a way to set up the sensor with the arduino. The sensor we are using is HC-SR04 Ultrasonic Ping range sensor. If you have any idea on how to do this, please reply. Thanks.

Topic by hthnc-student   |  last reply


Hover Technology

I have an idea for Hover Tech./Hover board. See if you used sound at a high enough decibel, but at a frequency humans and animals couldn't hear, it could work. Because sound is also a force, it can move things. Anyone agree or have some input?

Topic by Kyzyks   |  last reply


Electrical Engineering Schools

I want to go to a good electrical engineering college. I've been looking at schools like Georgia Tech, and University of Michigan Ann Arbor. I'm leaning toward Georgia Tech, but which college would be the best. My Reach is MIT, considering my scores are high enough. So if I magically get accepted to all electrical engineering colleges, which should I go to?   My potential college list: Boston U Bucknell U Carnegie Mellon U Cornell U Franklin W Olin C En Georgia Tech MIT Miami U Oxford Penn State U Park Polytechnic I of NYU Rensselaer Polytec I Stanford U U Calif Berkeley U Illinois Urbana U Michigan Villanova U Virginia Tech All offer Electrical engineering and rank in the Top 100 based on various US surveys and ranking list for Graduate Education 

Topic by monkhm   |  last reply


photovoltaic or solar thermal? Answered

I've been designing a high tech, off grid, self sufficient home over the past few months as a hobby. So far it consists of an artificial island floating on recycled plastic bottles and other buoyant devices (see: Spiral island) with an average sized house made of recycled shipping containers and plywood with a greenhouse. I basically want it to be a more high tech version of Spiral Island, but I have two questions. 1.) I'm trying to decide on whether or not I should use a Solar thermal generator or an array of Photovoltaic panels, but which has a better efficiency rate in terms of power and cost? 2.) Does anyone have any suggestions on plumbing? cause so far all I've thought of is a self composting toilet, but it would be really cool to have running water.

Question by tieguy   |  last reply


Craft Panel at SXSW

Our friend Natalie Zee from Craftzine will be moderating a panel on High-Tech Craft: Why Sewing and Knitting Still Matter, with some neat people filling out the discussion. Sounds like fun - it's already on my schedule.Nat and Phil from MAKE will have a booth - be sure to stop by for a visit!

Topic by canida   |  last reply


Are electric vehicles deadly dangerous to build and repair? Answered

A local high school tech class is converting a pick-up truck to electric and I got the idea that I could convert our Explorer, (the engine is shot) but an auto mechanic I met told me he can't get insurance to work on an EV due to the danger of the high voltage- this is disappointing to me because I could really get a lot of use from re-purposing this truck to a green(er) vehicle. Help me be more green!

Question by paganwonder   |  last reply


tiq probe - a new kind of electronic debug tool for makers, techs and engineers

Hi! I'm launching a new product on Kickstarter this week that I think will be a great help to makers! It's called tiq and it's a new kind of high-performance tool for debugging electronic circuits, including projects using Arduino, Raspberry Pi, PCI, AVR etc. When you're debugging a project, you're usually looking for unexpected behavior, and you probe around the board to find out what's going on. With conventional test equipment this can require multiple pieces of equipment, hooking each up to your target, which often is in a hard to access place, changing ranges and looking away at the equipment displays. With tiq you can simply probe your circuit and tiq will display detailed logic level, logic pulse and voltage information completely automatically, without range switching or adjustments - and show it all close to the probe tip! Here's a one minute video of tiq in action: http://youtu.be/aNhjCvGdqkA Here's a short overview of tiq's features: http://www.innavatus.com Please let me know if you have any questions about tiq. I will post a link here to the Kickstarter page when it goes live. Cheers - Mark

Topic by markhen57 


tiq probe - a new kind of electronic debug tool for makers, techs and engineers

Hi! I'm launching a new product on Kickstarter this week that I think will be a great help to makers! It's called tiq and it's a new kind of high-performance tool for debugging electronic circuits, including projects using Arduino, Raspberry Pi, PCI, AVR etc. When you're debugging a project, you're usually looking for unexpected behavior, and you probe around the board to find out what's going on. With conventional test equipment this can require multiple pieces of equipment, hooking each up to your target, which often is in a hard to access place, changing ranges and looking away at the equipment displays. With tiq you can simply probe your circuit and tiq will display detailed logic level, logic pulse and voltage information completely automatically, without range switching or adjustments - and show it all close to the probe tip! Here's a one minute video of tiq in action: http://youtu.be/aNhjCvGdqkA Here's a short overview of tiq's features:  http://www.innavatus.com Please let me know if you have any questions about tiq. I will post a link here to the Kickstarter page when it goes live. Cheers - Mark

Topic by markhen57   |  last reply


Russian translation by native Russian translator

Hi! I thought this may be interesting to website owners out there who want to translate their website, documents to Russian. I do website translation, document translation and tech document translation. Reasonable rates, high quality. Visit my website to see samples of Russian translation.

Topic by ivanpr   |  last reply


My LED Driver? Answered

Right so i asked about how i could dim this circuit but i forgot to put a link of the circuit in question . i wanted to know how i can control dimming of an LED. i have 3 LEDs into one LED RGB they use 350 MAh 3.7 V each and i used 1W 3.9 ohms resistor on each Vreg. they have + as the Common.   is it possible to just put a potentiometer between the driver and the battery?  or do i need to a high tech micro controller?  https://www.instructables.com/id/Super-simple-high-power-LED-driver/

Question by unaffiliatedperson   |  last reply


Yuri's Night Bay Area: updated science/tech/art lineup announced

Prepare for Liftoff! www.worldspaceparty.org Get ready for something entirely different. On April 13th the Bay Area joins the world in celebration of space exploration in a unique convergence of artists, scientists, astronauts, performers and musicians. Yuri's Night is a commemoration of humankind’s first venture into space, by Russian Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin. This gathering bridges national, cultural, generational and social barriers to ignite excitement about what is new on the horizon in space exploration and to remind us of the magnificent feats humanity is capable of. Yuri's Night Bay Area will be held at Moffett Field in the NASA Ames Research Center's massive SOFIA hangar, home to the world's largest aerial observatory. Our host for the evening is pioneering space traveler Anousheh Anasari, the first privately funded female to reach orbit. She is joined by Dr. Chris McKay, world renowned expert in astrobiology and terraformation with the Space Science Division of NASA Ames Research Center, as they welcome you to a dazzling array of interactive art installations and science demos, interwoven with musical and acrobatic performances by some of the world's finest entertainers. Cutting-edge interactive technology and live demos will include: Neuro feedback games and visualizations including Telekinetic Asteroids and Mind RipplesExplorations of the world through NASA World Wind and Gigapan, the high-resolution panorama projectPortals into Second Life and Burning Man Earth, Google's Black Rock City browserA roofless stargazing lounge, with an exceptional telescope provided by NASASquidlabs' Instructables and ground-breaking kite technologyScience demonstrations and innovations from the worlds of robotics, engineering, biology and astronomy, will also be on display: A talk and interactive demos from a senior SETI scientist on efforts to detect earthquakes from spaceExplorations of Techgnosis by Erik DavisInteractive next-generation science data visualization software from NASA Ames' Astrophysics DivisionRobots from Justin Gray, Carnegie Mellon University, and NASA, including the next generation of roversExclusive heavenly imagery from SloohDisplays of microbial fossils, live microbial mats, and magnetic and fluorescent bacteriaASME's human-powered vehiclesEngage with space-inspired and technology-infused art installations, including: StarZipper, the 200 foot high installation powered by LEDs and Helium created by internationally renowned artist Michael Light and collaborator Dave RattrayPeter Foucault's self-propelled motion sensor Drawing RobotsSpot Draves' collaborative evolutionary high-definition visual algorithm generator, Electric SheepDynamically inflating sculptures by AKAirwaysHypKnowTron and ChakraTron, the interactive light sculptures by GaspoExperience rare video works documenting art in space: Matières Chorégraphiques by Kitsou Dubois, celebrated French dancer, choreographer and artistic director of Ki ProductionsProjects from the Zero Gravity Arts Consortium, Lowry Burgess's monumental project The Seed of the Infinite Absolute, Lorelei Lisowsky, and Frank Pietronigro's 'Drift Painting' in microgravityMeet Japan's space artist Ayako Ono and watch Jean Luc Soret's Space Art videos, direct from Paris's International @rt Outsiders Festival.The Documentary Dome, featuring our planet's greatest space documentariesWitness awe-inspiring space-themed performances by an armada of acrobats and dancers, featuring: KC Bella Fuega and Spiral Hoop Dance (orbital hooping and bellydance)Flowtoys (celestial light performance and UFO flowplanes)VigilAntiUP (intergalactic stilting)A Parade from the Future (with cutting edge Bay Area circuit benders and other worldly creatures).Live dance and acrobatics fused with audiovisual performances, will be coordinated with a world-class lineup of live electronic music: PLAID - Warp Records, UK TELEFON TEL AVIV - Hefty Records, Chicago (special early evening set) BLUETECH - Aleph Zero, Native State, Portland OOAH + BORETA - Glitch Mob, LA/SF SUTEKH - Context, Soul Jazz, Leaf MR. PROJECTILE & JONAH SHARP (aka SPACETIME CONTINUUM) - Merck, Reflective, Astralwerks RD - Designed Disorder, Glitch Mob, LA WELDER - Cyberset MOZAIC - Nexus DR. TOAST - False Profit Music environs will be complimented by a team of visual artists -- including KOSHO, CELESTINESTAR, RECURSIVEVIDEOLAB and VIBERATION -- spinning light into space throughout the night. Meanwhile, outside on the tarmac, the SPACE COWBOYS will have their own dynamic lineup of djs aboard their interstellar party transporter, the UNIMOG. Also on the tarmac will be Playaflies and Rabbit in the Moon's outside VJ set PLUS large scale sculpture and multimedia installations from the bay area's finest and beyond. This year’s theme is the greenification of space. The event is bio-diesel powered, a variety of organic food and drink will be available, waste products will be composted and recycled, and one tree will be planted for every ticket sold in an effort to offset the event's carbon emissions. Come join us in celebrating the accomplishments of mankind on a collective cosmic journey to the depths of space and beyond. Brought to you by Nexus, Symbiosis and so many others. *********************** Friday, April 13th, 2007 Event opens at 6:30pm NASA Ames Research Center* Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA, 94035 Tickets are on sale now. Limited $30 presale tickets still available, but not for long! Purchase advance tickets at: http://www.worldspaceparty.com/tickets.phpLimited VIP tickets available. Privileges include: VIP room overlooking the main floor, open bar and food throughout the evening, a chance to meet silicon valley innovators and dynamic thinkers, exclusive Bay Area Yuri's Night memorabilia and much more to be announced. PLUS! Space Cadets are invited to go weightless and experience zero-gravity on Sunday, April 22, 2007! This unique VIP experience will provide you with a ZeroG flight flown from San Jose International Airport PLUS exclusive access to all Yuri's Night Bay Area 2007 events. 3-2-1 Liftoff! VIP Flight Tickets $5,000.00 each. Email zerogartists@mac.com to reserve your seat today. Don't let this zero gravity opportunity to fly float by! As always, please check www.worldspaceparty.com for the latest… Yuri's Night Bay Area Crew, Over and Out. End Transmission.++++++ Any special requirements for individuals with disabilities should be related to the event staff or security, and reasonable arrangements will promptly be made. An ADA/Handicap parking lot will be available and marked with signs. References to NASA Ames shall not be construed as official NASA approval or endorsement of any non-Governmental or commercial entity or activity.

Topic by lannanh 


Arduino

Can you help me I have a problem, this program :/*Blink *The basic Arduino example. Turns on an LED on for one second,then off for one second, and so on... We use pin 13 because,depending on your Arduino board, it has either a built-in LEDor a built-in resistor so that you need only an LED. *http://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/Blink */int ledPin = 13; // LED connected to digital pin 13void setup() // run once, when the sketch starts{ pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT); // sets the digital pin as output}void loop() // run over and over again{ digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH); // sets the LED on delay(1000); // waits for a second digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW); // sets the LED off delay(1000); // waits for a second}it says that the input pin is 13, ok, but I don't see the output pin, WHERE IS THE OUT PUT PIN???Lets say, I connect the positive(longer ) wire of the LED to pin 13(the input pin), and the negative (shorter) wire to what pin, what output pin???Thanks!

Topic by comodore   |  last reply