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the infinite improbability drive? Answered

I recently finished reading the hitchhiker's guide series. Douglas Adams is a genious! he and authors such as George Orwell, are commonly looked over by todays readers. anyways, on to my question. does anyone know the components required to construct an ifinite improbability drive, like the one from the books? (and for the ignoramous who decides to tell me that its fictional and to shut up, i rebut before you post with, i know, if you had any sense to know that before your reading this, you wouldn't post said comment.) but yeah, does anyone know? i am looking for great minds such as kiteman or gmjhowe, or maybe a less well-known person. whoever you are, thanks in advance.

Question by MrMystery96    |  last reply


Robot, made on the BBC

It's a big website (it even contains an Infinite Improbability Drive ), so it was bound to happen - Robot has snuck into the kiddies' Make and Do section of the website. He doesn't look too happy about it, though.Here are the instructions - there's even a video.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


And now we present the IGNobel peace prizes

Ig Nobels Salute Stranger Side Of Science:Audio for this story will be available at approx. 6:00 p.m. ETTalk of the Nation , November 28, 2008 - What do studies on potato chips, puzzle-solving slime mold and jumping fleas have in common? Each was awarded an Ig Nobel prize this year by the editors of the humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research.Annals editor Mark Abrahams serves as the emcee of this broadcast of the awards ceremony. Abrahams is author of The Man Who Tried to Clone Himself.The LINK to the IGnobel podcast from NPR

Topic by Goodhart    |  last reply


The Thought Bunker #1

Hello! I am doing a new Forum Topic train. This one involves some thinking. But it's not math! It's the fun thinking. The kind you can talk and laugh(and in this case, maybe yawn) about. So, what do you say? This week's Thought Bunker: If everyone in the world were to yawn at the same exact time, would Earth have enough oxygen to sustain all of us? Well, what do you think? Tell us! And now for this weeks best-thought:   Nov 4, 2009. 4:33 PMSeleziona says:  yes, everybody breathes normally, no oxygen shortages, and yawning takes a little more air, but not too much. So earth would have enough oxygen, and half of the world is asleep when we are awake, so it would be highly improbable  

Topic by chopstx    |  last reply


The Information Revolution -- Perhaps we're too connected?

Being a target victim of a hacker, I suddenly came up with an emergency protocol (Emergency Protocol 06) which involves computer scans, network disconnection, pass code implementation, security questions etc. Now several hours afterwards, I started to think about the dangers of the information highway, as perhaps we're speeding a bit too fast, end up in a high-speed crash and all that. Then after that, I asked myself, "What if this highway were to blow up?". That being the crashing / destruction of all or at least most of the servers in the world. All of the information, connections, gone. Sure, the satellites serve as a sort of backup cable, but really, it's not enough for the world to use. Hell, the only reason the Philippines has any internet is one, tiny, undersea cable from Japan. Not exactly tiny, but it's the reason why our "fast speeds" are just painstakingly slow to the more developed countries. This is more of a survival question, after a post... post... I don't know. Won't be really post-apocalyptic, but it is suckish and all communications gets cut around the world. If it were to happen, what will you do? Oh yeah, don't post stuff like "that's impossible" or improbability whatnot. It's a theoretical situation that is highly unlikely to happen, but if it were to be...

Topic by nutsandbolts_64    |  last reply


Home brew game system collab.

Design wouldI am sorry for how disorganised my ideas are but please bear in mind that it was at about 1:35 a.m that I typed this. I have an idea for a hahandledame system that would use sd memory cards as cartridges and would use two screens one would be a touch screen while the other would be a normal screen. For inter system communication I think that an ad-hock wireless web could be used like ninintendoid for the DS system. It would of course have onboard speakers but it would also have an onboard microphone for audio input, It would also have the apappropriateacks for external speakers and microphones on it. The handhandledld also have a mini usb port for charging and communications purppurposeswell as a female usb port for similar reasons though It would also be used as an input for external gamepads and usb flash drives. for the internal memory it would use compact flash memory cards to hold it's operating system and inernainternalare like a chat system and a simple non tabed web browser. for the operating system I thought that it could use linux since it is such a small compact operating system and doesn't need a whole lot to run. Now as far as external design goes I was thinking that a clamshell clamshellld probably be best for it. please tell me if any of this sounds improbable or downright impossible but please keep it clean.

Topic by Dwarg    |  last reply


And the winner is...

It's that time of year again - the Annals of Improbable Research has announced the 2010 IgNobel Prizes. It makes you proud to be British.... The full list of winners: Engineering Prize: Karina Acevedo-Whitehouse (UK) and colleagues for perfecting a method to collect whale snot, using a remote-control helicopter. Medicine Prize: Simon Rietveld (Netherlands) and colleagues for discovering that symptoms of asthma can be treated with a roller-coaster ride. Transportation Planning Prize: Toshiyuki Nakagaki (Japan) and colleagues for using slime mould to determine the optimal routes for railroad tracks. Physics Prize: Lianne Parkin (New Zealand) and colleagues for demonstrating that, on icy footpaths in wintertime, people slip and fall less often if they wear socks on the outside of their shoes. Peace Prize: Richard Stephens (UK) and colleagues for confirming the widely held belief that swearing relieves pain. Public health Prize: Manuel Barbeito (US) and colleagues for determining by experiment that microbes cling to bearded scientists. Economics Prize: Awarded to the executives and directors of Goldman Sachs, AIG, Lehman Brothers, Bear Stearns, Merrill Lynch, and Magnetar for creating and promoting new ways to invest money — ways that maximize financial gain and minimize financial risk for the world economy, or for a portion thereof. Chemistry Prize: Eric Adams (US) and colleagues for disproving the old belief that oil and water don't mix. The research, supported by BP, was published under the title: "Review of Deep Oil Spill Modeling Activity Supported by the Deep Spill JIP and Offshore Operator's Committee". Management Prize: Alessandro Pluchino (Italy) and colleagues for demonstrating mathematically that organisations would become more efficient if they promoted people at random. Biology Prize: Libiao Zhang (China) and colleagues for scientifically documenting fellatio in fruit bats.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


It's that time of year again!

Yes, it's award season again - the IgNobel Awards. PHYSIOLOGY PRIZE: Anna Wilkinson (of the UK), Natalie Sebanz (of NETHERLANDS, HUNGARY, and AUSTRIA), Isabella Mandl (of AUSTRIA) and Ludwig Huber (of AUSTRIA) for their study 'No Evidence of Contagious Yawning in the Red-Footed Tortoise." CHEMISTRY PRIZE: Makoto Imai, Naoki Urushihata, Hideki Tanemura, Yukinobu Tajima, Hideaki Goto, Koichiro Mizoguchi and Junichi Murakami of JAPAN, for determining the ideal density of airborne wasabi (pungent horseradish) to awaken sleeping people in case of a fire or other emergency, and for applying this knowledge to invent the wasabi alarm. MEDICINE PRIZE: Mirjam Tuk (of THE NETHERLANDS and the UK), Debra Trampe (of THE NETHERLANDS) and Luk Warlop (of BELGIUM). and jointly to Matthew Lewis, Peter Snyder and Robert Feldman (of the USA), Robert Pietrzak, David Darby, and Paul Maruff (of AUSTRALIA) for demonstrating that people make better decisions about some kinds of things — but worse decisions about other kinds of things‚ when they have a strong urge to urinate. PSYCHOLOGY PRIZE: Karl Halvor Teigen of the University of Oslo, NORWAY, for trying to understand why, in everyday life, people sigh. LITERATURE PRIZE: John Perry of Stanford University, USA, for his Theory of Structured Procrastination, which says: To be a high achiever, always work on something important, using it as a way to avoid doing something that's even more important. BIOLOGY PRIZE: Darryl Gwynne (of CANADA and AUSTRALIA and the USA) and David Rentz (of AUSTRALIA and the USA) for discovering that a certain kind of beetle mates with a certain kind of Australian beer bottle PHYSICS PRIZE: Philippe Perrin, Cyril Perrot, Dominique Deviterne and Bruno Ragaru (of FRANCE), and Herman Kingma (of THE NETHERLANDS), for determining why discus throwers become dizzy, and why hammer throwers don't. MATHEMATICS PRIZE: Jointly awarded to the following "team" for teaching the world to be careful when making mathematical assumptions and calculations. Dorothy Martin of the USA (who predicted the world would end in 1954), Pat Robertson of the USA (who predicted the world would end in 1982), Elizabeth Clare Prophet of the USA (who predicted the world would end in 1990), Lee Jang Rim of KOREA (who predicted the world would end in 1992), Credonia Mwerinde of UGANDA (who predicted the world would end in 1999), Harold Camping of the USA (who predicted the world would end on September 6, 1994 and later predicted that the world will end on October 21, 2011), PEACE PRIZE: Arturas Zuokas, the mayor of Vilnius, LITHUANIA, for demonstrating that the problem of illegally parked luxury cars can be solved by running them over with an armored tank. PUBLIC SAFETY PRIZE: John Senders of the University of Toronto, CANADA, for conducting a series of safety experiments in which a person drives an automobile on a major highway while a visor repeatedly flaps down over his face, blinding him. You can watch the whole ceremony here, although the video is over two hours long... Annals of Improbable Research  

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


2008 IgNobel Prizes announced!

The IgNobel Prizes are awarded annually for research which "cannot, or should not, be reproduced"; achievements that "first make people laugh, and then make them think". The prizes are meant in good humour, and many winner pay their own way to attend the ceremonies. Past winners have been known to return to ceremonies in later years to show off their achievements to a receptive audience (this year it was a sword-swallowing doctor).The Japanese team that showed slime moulds can solve mazes sang their acceptance speech.The Winners:NUTRITION PRIZE.Massimiliano Zampini of the University of Trento, Italy and Charles Spence of Oxford University, UK, for electronically modifying the sound of a potato chip to make the person chewing the chip believe it to be crisper and fresher than it really is. They also showed that playing the sound of bacon frying can make ice-cream taste bacony.PEACE PRIZE.The Swiss Federal Ethics Committee on Non-Human Biotechnology (ECNH) and the citizens of Switzerland for adopting the legal principle that plants have dignity.ARCHAEOLOGY PRIZE.Astolfo G. Mello Araujo and Jose Carlos Marcelino of Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil, for measuring how the course of history, or at least the contents of an archaeological dig site, can be scrambled by the actions of a live armadillo.BIOLOGY PRIZE.Marie-Christine Cadiergues, Christel Joubert, and Michel Franc of Ecole Nationale Veterinaire de Toulouse, France for discovering that the fleas that live on a dog can jump higher than the fleas that live on a cat.MEDICINE PRIZE.Dan Ariely of Duke University, USA, for demonstrating that high-priced fake medicine is more effective than low-priced fake medicine.COGNITIVE SCIENCE PRIZE.Toshiyuki Nakagaki of Hokkaido University, Japan, Hiroyasu Yamada of Nagoya, Japan, Ryo Kobayashi of Hiroshima University, Atsushi Tero of Presto JST, Akio Ishiguro of Tohoku University, and Agota Toth of the University of Szeged, Hungary, for discovering that slime molds can solve puzzles.ECONOMICS PRIZE.Geoffrey Miller, Joshua Tybur and Brent Jordan of the University of New Mexico, USA, for discovering that a professional lap dancer's ovulatory cycle affects her tip earnings.PHYSICS PRIZE.Dorian Raymer of the Ocean Observatories Initiative at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, USA, and Douglas Smith of the University of California, San Diego, USA, for proving mathematically that heaps of string or hair or almost anything else will inevitably tangle themselves up in knots. Their paper has one of the best genuine research titles I have seen for a long time: Spontaneous Knotting of an Agitated String.JOINT CHEMISTRY PRIZE.Sharee A. Umpierre of the University of Puerto Rico, Joseph A. Hill of The Fertility Centers of New England (USA), Deborah J. Anderson of Boston University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School (USA), for discovering that Coca-Cola is an effective spermicideJOINT CHEMISTRY PRIZE.Chuang-Ye Hong of Taipei Medical University (Taiwan), C.C. Shieh, P. Wu, and B.N. Chiang (all of Taiwan) for discovering that Coca-Cola is not an effective spermicide.LITERATURE PRIZE.David Sims of Cass Business School. London, UK, for his lovingly written study "You Bastard: A Narrative Exploration of the Experience of Indignation within Organizations."Journal of Improbable ResearchThe site will be hosting video of the ceremony in the next few days.

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply