Search for incubator in Topics




Why do the number of views in the instructable topic not appear as they appear when i click to view the topic?

Hello, I noticed something in the last topic. number of view 202 but when i click on the topic it appear 498 view? thanks 

Question by medhatko    |  last reply


E coli incubator

I am building an incubator for ecoli.  Any comments or improvements?

Topic by drystreams    |  last reply


12 volt incubator circuit

I need to build a dc circuit which will maintain a certain temperature using a globe as the heat source for the purpose of making a small incubator.?

Question by gozitano    |  last reply


how to make a fully automatic homemade chicken egg incubator

How to make a fully automatic chicken egg incubator?

Topic by arfannasir    |  last reply


how to make a temperature control kit for an egg incubator

Hi can anybody tell me how to make a temperature control kit for incubating bird eggs with a max temperature of 40 degree celsius ?would be eagerly waiting for your reply!!

Topic by koolio_72000    |  last reply



Does anyone know anything about incubating geese?

We had geese die at our lake and the eggs were left, so my sister and i took them and are incubating. They were sort of cool when i got them.

Question by r3nrut  


How to make Finches - Love Bird Incubator

Hi, I have read many blogs on how to build our own small incubator for my finches or hen eggs. The problem is every blog, instructable, guide shows to put 25 watt bulb, but my question is.. Is there any possiblity to put some automatic thermostat which gets on when the temperature is lower then desired  temperature (eg. 102-103 degree fahrenheit) and the thermostat should shut down when the temperature is reached to desired temperature. Using bulb can not be effective in different climat condition and after a long run it becomes very hot inside the incubatore, plus it needs extra attention during the incubation period. I checked on net for this type of automatic thermostate but it is too costly and basically made to control for room temperature. Any guidance on low cost automatic temperature control where a user can set temperature for low temperature of appx 100-103 degree fahrenheit would be much appreciable. Thanks in Advance. Rohit

Topic by Rohit.Agrawal    |  last reply



Making a 120 volt heating element/general heating element info? Answered

If anybody has some general tips/calculation about wire thickness, length, material. Im not even sure which way to adjust. If I make an element that doesn't get hot then I either need to make the element wire thinner or shorter, right? I'm trying to make a 20-50 watt element. Variable would be nice. I have a multimeter. seem to be having trouble getting a steady reading on lengths of wire for some reason. 

Question by avocadostains    |  last reply


Incubated Pheasant has Egg Peeped, but then Stopped. What should I do? Please Help Soon Answered

On 7-09-13 at around 7:00P.M. the first pheasant egg in the incubator peeped.  It made a new crack yesterday next to the first hole like it is going around, but it hasn't done anything more.  Is this normal, if not, what should I do?  It has been 38 hours. Thanks for any help

Question by electronicz    |  last reply


diy chicken egg incubator fully automatic 500 egg capacity?

I want to make a chicken incubator fully automatic with capacity of 500 eggs. I am alien to electronics. I want help in building one both design and its electronic gadgets too.

Question by suresh060979    |  last reply


How can I make an automatic egg turner (for chicken eggs) about 6.?

Hi peeps, I would like to make an auto egg turner. Turn 6 to 8 chicken eggs about 180 degress once every hour. (approx) (this is for an incubator) I have motors etc...... all the gear with a few ideas...... Timing and distance of travel are my main concerns...... The turning process should also be as smooth as possible and quite slow... The eggs should not be covered as keeping their temperature constant is crucial.....

Question by niceribs    |  last reply


In search of an electronics/circuitry mentor.

I am in search of a skilled and knowledgeable person to mentor me through building an incubator. I currently have about 13 eggs that are in various stages of embryonic development and need help building the appropriate incubator. I have a design and more electronic and circuitry components than you can shake a stick at. I have always tinkered and done investigative teardowns on multiple pieces of equipment. I want to eventually build a large, floor based, multi media 3D printer. ( I have been working on a printer that I salvaged.) My interest is more than curiosity, but, I have no starting point to learn in forward gear. I hope to find a person willing to assist my goal accomplishment and guide me through the process. I have more than I need to do the build, I am willing to discuss a trade of components or whatever comes upon need of the interested  mentor. Please contact me as soon as possible as I have lost a lot of sleep, turning the heating pad on every hour to maintain the temperature for the incubation, and am ready to give the eggs to someone else to raise. I prefer not to do that though.  You can reach me via G+ under Kathleen Copeland or through this forum. I will eventually provide pictures and a private contact once a mentor is established.      Thank you.                         

Topic by KathleenC36  


Bio Incubator Arduino Code - Problem

Hey guys hope your making wonderful things and providing more value to this incredible world.Inspired by the project of building the Bio incubator from PiyumF I started making my own DIY incubator with slightly more detailed features.https://www.instructables.com/id/Low-cost-and-accu...But however when I started working on the brains of the system I ran into problem I couldn't solve myself. I know that there are, in this community some of the brightest people I could know, more experienced with arduino and coding than I am.So the main problems are:When I started compiling the sketch of the provided finished program I ran in some errors I couldn't fix and cant really describe it in detail, because of my lack of knowledge. Another problem is that I cant properly connect the LCD keypad shield with the I2C backpack and arduino and dont know how should I modify the code to work properly with all of it. So that it creates menu in which you can choose a target temp and set it up.Can you guys anyhow help me solve this situation, because I'm running out of options. Many thanks in ahead

Question by JohnSmith-Workshop  


Mother Earth News contest: Design a Solar Poultry Waterer, Win a Brinsea Incubator!

  The Mother Earth News, is having a contest. Design a Solar Poultry Waterer, Win a Brinsea Incubator! To submit your design for a solar poultry waterer, e-mail a description and photo to “letters (at symbol) MotherEarthNews.com.” Mail hard-copy entries to “Solar Poultry Waterer” at Mother Earth News; 1503 SW 42nd St.; Topeka, KS 66609. We’ll publish the winning entry in the magazine, and the designer will win a free Brinsea Octagon 20 Eco incubator. Entries must be received by May 1, 2011, to qualify.

Topic by Goodhart    |  last reply


Auto egg turner motor. What motor do I need for my incubator?

I built an incubator from a redundant wine cooler but the motor wasn't up to the job. I had underestimated the total load and stripped the gears in the gearbox. Can someone tell me in very basic terms what I need to change and where to look for them? Also, the top connection needs to be a ball and socket type affair (not very smooth at the moment). Where do you buy components like that? Thanks. Paul http://www.backyardchickens.com/web/viewblog.php?id=33362

Question by toxo    |  last reply


peltier cooling/heating system for transportable animal incubator

I am trying to design a heating system for an animal incubator that can be transported in a car to rescue animals and keep their body temperature level. I was thinking of using the peltier systems to heat the box the animals will be staying in but I'm not sure if they would have the capability of 70-90 degrees fahrenheit. Also the temperature needs to be very specific (plus or minus 1 degree) is there a thermometer out there that would work well for this? I just need some help on learning about these because I've done a little research but I'm still confused on how they work and if I could even use them. Also, is there a good website to buy these on? I could use a lot of little ones or one medium sized one (up to 1ft by 1ft) but not too tall.

Topic by oabf19    |  last reply


i have some jars laying around what could i do with them? Answered

Its about as 10 inches tall and 5 inches in diameter

Question by albylovesscience    |  last reply


Fend off Impetigo?

 Well, it turns out my girlfriend has Impetigo and I fear I have caught it from her. Is it possible to minimise damage or stop it during its 1-3 day incubation period? Any advice wanted.

Question by DELETED_zoltzerino  


120v thermostats: need help building or sourcing

I'm planning to build an incubator, and I need something to help regulate the temperature.   I've found some in-line thermostats online, but if I had a parts list, I could easily wire something myself.  Does anyone have any knowledge or experience they can share with me?  Thanks!

Topic by awascholl    |  last reply


Re-purposing a refrigerator

I am re-purposing a refrigerator to make an egg incubator. What crossed my mind was that perhaps rather than using another source to heat it, perhaps the chiller system (which is fully intact and working) could be reversed? Has anyone on here undertaken a project which involved deliberately causing a refrigerator to work in reverse and so heat up inside? Any information would be gratefully received.

Topic by grumpydad    |  last reply


Breeding Spiny Leaf Insects....what are the best conditions & how many baby insects immerge from each egg?

Does climate play a factor with the incubation period? We currently have approximatly 50 eggs and i am curious as to how many baby spiny leaf insects hatch from each egg? And i'd like some idea's for keeping the eggs and the babies safe and in escape proof housing until they are big enough to join the adults.. thank you

Question by Bekk    |  last reply


Start a makerspace in Tampa?

I have been trying to turn a 3bedroom house with a big yard into a makerspace but the only 2 interested groups wanted an exclusive agreement, despite FREE rent, and didn't seem to want to do much except collect fees from other people. How can I get creative people who want to collaborate, innovate, and learn and DO? It could certainly be an incubation for sustainable business that need a place to experiment, or a lab or anything, I just don't want it to be a constant power struggle with no plan, and no results.

Question by terrefirma    |  last reply


Is it hard for you to get answers to hardware problems and connect with connect other makers? We have an upcoming solution

MakrConnect is a networking platform for makers to problem-solve, share ideas, and collaborate. We are currently incubated at MIT Launch. Post your questions on our platform and other makers will provide you with solutions. Furthermore, MakrConnect will build social aspects upon our forum infrastructure. We will allow you to share your projects, build your profile, and even find makers near you to work on projects together in person. We believe that with MakrConnect, making will be easier than ever. Please take a few seconds to sign up on our mailing list at markrconnect.com. Stay Awesome!

Topic by jliang5    |  last reply


Can carefully plucked hair be grown (or kept alive) outside the body? Answered

While sitting down to actually type this out, I realized that some might read this as gross or creepy.  I'm curious however, so my question to you brilliant instructamals out there is this:  If I carefully pluck a hair from my head, is it possible or feasible to provide it an environment where it could be "kept alive" or grown?  I realize the hair itself is not actually alive, but it's the follicle I'm interested in.  If provided a sterile tray with agar, what elements would be required to save the follicle?  Hair Multiplication uses a similar method, but I can't locate any good information on it.

Question by huck alexander    |  last reply


Do It Yourself Genetic Engineering

From New ScientistKATHERINE AULL's laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, lacks a few mod cons. "Down here I have a thermocycler I bought on eBay for 59 bucks," she says, pulling out a large, box-shaped device she uses to copy short strands of DNA. "The rest is just home brew," she adds, pointing to a centrifuge made out of a power drill and plastic food container, and a styrofoam incubator warmed with a heating pad normally used in terrariums.In fact, Aull's lab is a closet less than 1 square metre in size in the shared apartment she lives in. Yet amid the piles of clothes she recently concocted vials of an entirely new genetically modified organism....Read the whole article in New Scientist

Topic by kelseymh    |  last reply


Collaboration, Innovation

I have a nice, (almost!) ready to use house in sub-urban Tampa close to everything! with a huge yard, garage, roof, EMPTY that I have tried to offer to a few small groups of semi-makers, who immediately put a contract under my nose limiting access to all others for 5 years while they make money there. NO NO NO     Where are all the woodworking, electronic robotic/arduino contolling aqua/permaculturist  hackers with great organizational skills that want to collaborate, innovate, grow their own food while mentoring their own and others' kids in S T E A M and maybe incubating new businesses like rainwater diverting, alternative energy material, exploring new and old skills and practices that make sense and keep our money home.? My son and I attended a conference put on by the extension service of the U of FL which basically told of so many opportunities available right now for back yard businesses to be allowed under the Best Management Practices umbrella. But noone is telling the citizens about this. We have to seek and find ourselves. I'm ready. Any farmers or fisherman out there that want to try something different for a season?

Topic by terrefirma    |  last reply


Makers, but not as we know them....

Japanese technology companies are renowned for their innovations. But, really, what completely new products have come out of Japan in the last decade? It seems that Japan has lost its creativity, and slipped into serial innovation, producing upgraded versions of established sellers (sounds like Apple?). There are Makerspaces, but not as we know them. Tokyo is home to a Makerspace stuffed with a 1bn yen ($8.5m; £5.5m) worth of equipment, but it's behind serious security and costs $250/month to be a member. It's more of a tech start-up incubator than the Makerspaces we know in the US & UK. I know Japanese makers exist, they had their own Makerfaire, but the stuff they make is subtly different.  It's "finished".  Every hobby 3d printer, drone or CNC machine I have seen has had exposed workings, loose wires, visible guts that you can see doing stuff.  Duct tape is a styling must.   Japanese projects have hidden internals, sleek, professional-looking enclosures and casings.  Even one-off projects look like they came from a warehouse with another ten thousand stored in crates. I'm not saying this is a bad thing.  It's just a different aesthetic (me, I like seeing stuff do stuff, rather than a polished case flash an LED to tell me it has finished silently doing hidden stuff), but where does it happen? Do all Japanese Makers have professional-quality workshops hidden under their bed? Does anybody know?  Do we have any Japanese makers here to tell me I'm wrong?

Topic by Kiteman    |  last reply


Remote controlled Pager/vibrating device-compact and light

I am new to Instructables and was hoping for some help. I have been reading through many posts and projects to find what I need, but still need help. I am trying to build a vibrating remote controlled collar to signal to my deaf dog. I would like something very compact that has a small vibrating motor in it that also works at a small distance, not more than 50 yards or so. I only need one setting, two would be great if possible. I just want a small transmitter, (size of a garage door opener) with a single or two buttons to produce a small vibration, and maybe a more intense vibration, to get the dogs attention when he is not looking at me. From there, he is trained to visual hand signals. Any help on how to build this, and build it as LEAST bulky as possible? I have seen a few instructables I am trying to piece together, but I am not an electronics person, have done a few projects like building an egg incubator...So far I know I need a transmitter and a receiver, a power source, which I was hoping could be smaller than a 9volt battery, and a small vibrating motor, possibly the minidisc or bullet type that runs off 3V? Not sure if that would even be strong enough, but my dog is pretty sensitive. I am not opposed to spending a little money, as the dog collars on the market are either cheap garbage for around $20 or good quality but have way more unnecessary features than I need and cost a whopping $200. Thank you very much!

Topic by DaveB154    |  last reply


For Sale-- Long Range Wireless Networking Equipment --- New and Used

I worked with a local business for 2 years helping to set up and maintain a long range wireless network system to provide DSL internet to rural people. It reached over 75 miles from end to end with several offshoot branches. The owner applied for an extension on a Small Business Incubator loan that had come due and for some reason they said no. They called in the loan and he shut everything down because he didn't have the cash to cover it. Anyway, 2 years later and the dust and lawsuits have settled and my former boss has asked me to sell off all the salvaged and new equipment for whatever I can get for it. Much of it is going to be going on E bay. But before I start with that I thought I would give the instructables community a first chance at it. I do not yet have a full list of the equipment, some is still out in the field yet to be recovered, and the rest is on its way to me from our former building to sort and evaluate. If you are interested please leave a comment and or send me a message. Some of the new radios will sell for a fair amount, although not as much as if you bought it from the manufacturer. Some of the well used but functional stuff will sell pretty cheap. What is included : Our radios have a reliable range of 25 miles, with directional antennas. The picture is the mast on my house. Some radios are 2.4 MHz and some are 5.8.    The 2.4 which is the standard frequency used for normal wireless served as client radios. The 5.8 ones we used for long reaches to connect the backbone. They can act as bridges in a network or as access points. All have built in router functions. It takes 2, one to send and one to receive to make a network bridge. What can you use them for? They can link up buildings across cities or towns or anything that is in line of sight. We set up an Omni from the internet source and then tasked the surrounding radios to it. One central omni radio can connect with 200 or more clients. The local  school district uses this same technology to link all their buildings together. With just a couple of them you can link your house to your friends house miles away, and have a local LAN with them. They would work for extending LAN game play. You can link your house to your barn or shop or whatever and share your internet  through a router. There are lots of possibilities. We have the radios, the antennas, the cabling, even antenna sections, but I don't know if those can ship UPS. We have it all and its all going to go, which is sad to me but good for you. Possibly the biggest plus is that I will provide you with some tech support to get it up and running if you decide to get anything. I can also pre program the radios here so they are matched and set to link up for you once installed. So, let me know if this is of interest to any of you. I believe the shipment of these radios is limited to the US and Canada but I can check into that if you are from outside those areas.

Topic by Vyger    |  last reply


From the Editor: Greetings and Salutations

Hello! Many of you already know me, so please bear with me as I introduce myself to all of those who don't. My name is Randy Sarafan and I am the Technology Editor here at Instructables. What led me to this point is not necessarily a straight trajectory, and I hope the tale I am about to tell may prove useful to someone. Contrary to popular belief, I did not wake up one morning as a child and say, "I want to be the Technology Editor at a user-submitted how-to website." In fact, as a child, I would normally tell anyone who was curious enough to inquire that I wanted to be a duck. I persisted telling people that I wanted to grow up into a duck until an alarmingly mature age. Anyhow… understanding that not everyone can grow up to be a duck, I developed a backup plan to become a 3D computer animator, and make special effects for movies. I fell in love with special effects after seeing Jurassic Park as a child. While my peers were playing sports, chasing girls, and doing recreational drugs, I spent my teenage years developing an animation portfolio. This largely translated into learning gestural figure drawing by sketching nude models with artistically inclined retirees at the local community art center. So, I got good at drawing naked people. As a teenage boy I thought this was a very useful skill to have. Unfortunately, when I finally went off to college to do 3D computer animation, I learned that 3D modeling is nothing like drawing naked people. At the dawn of this millennium, it turned out that creating a 3D animation was very unpleasant - a bit like getting a root canal. I spent many long hours in a dark, sweltering computer animation lab, literally sleeping on the keyboard. The rule was that if you left your computer for more than five minutes, anyone could stop your rendering job and lay claim to the workstation. This experience - like any professionally executed root canal - gave me a lot of time to sit still and think. I concluded that I was wasting my time creating and animating virtual worlds when there was already a perfectly good world to animate all around me - I wanted to animate real things. This sentiment may not sound very silly right now, but expressing these feelings in 2001 was pretty much crazy-talk. By that point, all of the things we now take for granted, like, smart devices, open-source technology, hackerspaces, the maker movement, online sharing, and personal fabrication were not even blips on the collective radar. In fact, I did not even begin to know where to take my desire to "animate the real world." It was only by accident that I chanced upon the Parsons Design and Technology program at a college portfolio day while attempting to transfer colleges. The admissions representative asked me what I wanted to study. I told him animation. He told me they didn't exactly have that as a major. I - in turn - asked what they did have. He responded with Design and Technology. I asked him what that was. He mumbled something about building websites and robots. "Robots?" "Yes. Robots." I was sold. When I enrolled, the Parsons Design and Technology program was in its infancy as an undergraduate major, but existed for about six years prior as a graduate major. What made my educational experience unique was that albeit I was an undergrad, I was largely taking graduate classes with some really phenomenal professors and graduate students. I cannot emphasize enough how influential and formative it was for me to work side-by-side with brilliant, and highly motivated graduate students for three years. I went into the experience with the vague goal of "animating the real world" and left with the conceptual education, technical foundation, and confidence to do it. This rightfully panicked my mother. It was now 2005, and there still was not a clear career path for someone with a degree and talent for "animating the real world." She thought I was doomed. To be honest, I too was a little fuzzy on the big "what next?" question. Albeit, I was a little less concerned. I could not articulate what I intended to do with my education, but I began to sense there were opportunities available. By this time Make Magazine had come into existence, Instructables blipped onto the radar screen, and the Eyebeam OpenLab was churning away as an idea incubator. I sensed we were on the cusp of some fundamental change, but it was still looming a little too far off on the horizon to see it clearly. Having no real path yet laid out before me, I followed my girlfriend to the west coast. I figured that perhaps a change of scenery would be nice. I ended up living in her parent's basement in the middle of the coldest and foggiest part of San Francisco. While doing a series of odd jobs, I began posting projects on Instructables primarily to keep myself sane. There is something powerful about going from a lone weirdo making things in your girlfriend's parent's basement, to be amongst a community of weirdos all making things in their basements and garages. Suddenly, what I had been doing on my own did not seem quite as strange. I may have just been some guy in a basement, but I felt like I was part of something larger. Instructables became a website that I visited religiously. One day while lurking on the site, I noticed that they were not only local, but hiring interns. I immediately applied, and almost as quickly was invited in for an interview. When I went for the interview, I was foremost surprised by the unconventional nature of the work environment (to say the least), that everyone I met knew me as "USB Apple Guy," and everyone seemed genuinely interested to meet the "USB Apple Guy." It turned out this was less of an interview than an informal screening process. Before I knew it, I was part of the Instructables team, with a vague job, and loose instructions. Over the six years that followed, I held a number of positions within the company before landing squarely upon Technology Editor. Of all of the different jobs that I have done for Instructables, I would be lying if I were to say that Technology Editor is not my favorite. I now make a living "animating the real world," sharing this knowledge with the Instructables community, and inspiring others to do the same. Even though I would have never guessed life would bring me here, I am very glad that is has. I look forward to helping this community grow and prosper.

Topic by randofo    |  last reply


The Middle East and the Global Hackerspace Movement

Please follow me and imagine this. You're in a city and are taking a rattling train somewhere to the edge of town. The buildings get shorter as they get wider. You are entering the industrial area where the jobs dried up long ago. Where there are more broken windows than whole ones in each building. You pass the streets your parents warned you about and a street covered in "DO NOT CROSS" tape. Two stops later you get off at the stop your friends told you about questioning your sanity and wondering why your friends brought you out there. The graffiti is beautiful though, and somewhere in the distance you can hear the thump of heavy bass. The address your friend gave you can't be right, you look up and see a massive complex thankfully this one seemed to have more of it's windows intact. You push the rusting door noticing the rough texture and surprising heft. You walk in and see a roughly refinished hallway. The drywall isn't yet painted but it appears that this massive factory has been transformed on the inside. You pass a few drywalled off artists studios on the first floor and they smile at you with plaster in their hair. It smells like lavender and you notice you just passed an artist making candles. The "hackerspace" your friend told you about is on the second floor. So you walk to the cargo elevator and push the call button. It makes a horrifying rattling sound as it descends to meet you, instead of a door it has a grate. You take it up and as it slowly moves you can see concrete, then wood and suddenly the thumping bass get's louder - Hello Skrillex. It's too much to take in at first, you only notice the chaos. There are tools everywhere and in every state of operation. A wall of computer monitors lines the back wall. There's someone binding books in the corner, and what appears to be a viking with knitting needles sitting in what appears to be a lounge, he looks up and smiles at you and says "welcome to Scrumspace*!" you've arrived at your first hackerspace. Notice an open basket of dollar bills and place a 2 dollar donation in the basket near the fridge and grab yourself a drink from the fridge in the kitchen. You walk into a common area painted like a scene from Super Mario with what appear to be server racks painted as the tubes. Finally you see your friend. He walks in with a scorched shirt and you see his eyes twinkling through the welding goggles. "Told you this place is awesome!" he says. Hackerspace Values and Culture Hackerspaces like this exist almost all over the world. These places collect (and perhaps helps inspire) people who are passionate initiators. Walking into one you might find someone who wants to share a new iPad application which monitors the GPS on the weather balloon they've released -"It's over //CHINA// right now!!". People in hackerspaces are happy to share, it's a part of the culture! Interacting with them is often uplifting and inspiring. They are building and creating things they think is amazing. They may be playing with technology or science or art without concern for the categories. The only apparent question they ask themselves is how AWESOME is this!? It's a contagious atmosphere of capability where people learn from each other constantly. They can't help it! People are so passionate about what they are doing, they inadvertently teach. The other feature of a hackerspace which is more important is that they give people a venue. It's an open space that is owned by the members. Need a place to host a workshop on hat felting, it's yours! Need a place to build the first prototype of your product? Just make sure you pack it in the lockers when you're done working on it! The atmosphere is fundamentally collaborative. It can't be anything except participatory because of the way the spaces are most often organized and run. There is no single owner. Everyone pays for a portion of the rent, and more importantly everyone brings something new to the table. They might bring with them a new tool, their coffee machine, a desire to set up a program to run a STEM program for children. The spaces become a snapshot the local community of amazing people and their projects. Many of these people started developing their projects during their final years in university. But their is a gap between a school project and feeling capable to take it and turn it into something yourself. I'd love to start here. With these fresh graduates. These young people who (perhaps not coincidentally) are also the driving force behind the revolutions of the middle east. This is a great place to start. These are the young people changing their countries today. They feel empowered to change long standing traditions and the culture of oppression in their governments. Perhaps it's also time to give them the tools to do the same for their local communities. Where they have the ability to have a more direct impact. Who the heck cares about the government if you are free to repave your roads, create alternative energy from solar power, clean your own water and start your own online webstore distributing products that are rapidly prototyped and drop shipped to other places around the world. Sure you might call this line of reasoning anarchistic. But when the systems around you are falling apart, banding together to pick up the pieces is the admirable thing to do. Social entrepreneurship in the states often focuses on countries outside the states. They basically act as for profit NGOs. Non profit organizations as they operate in America don't exist in the middle east. Thus I'm beginning to think that the concept of social entrepreneurship might just be a great way forward for these countries. Doing well by doing good! This concept is a development hack, and one that could possibly have it's roots in the Hackerspace scene. There are features of hackerspaces that I see can give rise to more DIY social entrepreneurship in the middle east. They are: 1) The culture of good. Make something wonderful. Share it with others online and off. Be inspired and inspiring. 2) The availability of tools along with the docracy culture. If you want to see it, do it. 3) A supportive global and local community which has within it stories of other successes to emulate. Where does this culture come from? It appears to be derived from the open source movement. Open source technology is often spearheaded by a few individuals but is maintained, built and supported by a global community of makers who want the tech for themselves as well. Do you want to see that feature? Write it? But don't edit the program and keep it to yourself! Share! That's a doocracy combined with the culture of sharing that the internet helps so much to support. All of this seems to be directed by the common value for people of all ideologies. The golden rule. Do for others as you wish to have done for yourself. Do you want free tools. Freedom. Access to clean water? A cheap space to build projects? Free vector drawing software? Be a doer. Be a part of the change. And then share with others. Your vision is what makes the future. These are some of the amazing features of these spaces. This is why I am in love with hackerspaces, open source technology and makers of all types. They are beautiful people who come from all types of backgrounds who get together to create a culture of sharing and collaboration that enhances their local communities and connects them globally. If you have not visited your local hackerspace yet, visit it. If you live in a place without a space, put your name up on hackerspaces.org, I'm sure you will find like minded people who crave this type of community. Hackerspaces in the Middle East Now that we have described hacker culture and hackerspaces can a space like this become a the hub and home of amazing people in the Middle East? Does the west have a monopoly on awesome. Absolutely not. Are middle easterners creative Heck yes! Are they inspired to work collaboratively? Heck yes! Are they educated? Heck yes! Do they want to fix the problems they see around them? Heck YES! Are they powerful? Heck YES! Again and again I've seen example after example of the young people in the middle east (yes, those that are 30% unemployed) showcasing example after example of incredible projects. And talking to them a message I hear over and over is that they want to show the world that in Beirut, Baghdad, or Cairo things other than violence is created. They want to create positive news that goes out to the world. They want to reach out to the world and participate in sharing! Here's a short list of incredible people I've met personally in my two short trips to the middle east: Bassam Jalgha Tarek Ahmed Ahmed Tohamy Salma Adel Rami Ali's Smart Breadboard Marc Farra Maya Kreidieh Cairo Hackerspace Book Scanner Project An awesome home automation system in Baghdad Iraq Mustafa Elnagar Furkan Alp Pehlivan Hind Hobeika's Butterfleye Project Jad Berro's Tank Robot Mounir Zoorob Octocopter! Here's a video of Munir's octocopter: Beirut is beautiful:   One incredible graduation project by Cairo Hackerspace organizer Salma Adel is one that focuses on the very heart of the maker movement and looks at the artisan as the creator of value. How do you take new design, match it with old technology and create amazing new products. I'm proud to know she's an active memeber at Cairo Hackerspace:  I hope I have shown you that there are already "hackers", makers and entrepreneurs there in the middle east. People with the open source attitude Arabs with the culture of sharing and collaboration. There are many here that work with the Google Technology User Groups or other open source initiatives. Linux user groups. Tons of coworking spaces. And some incredible incubators and entrepreneurship cultural development projects. Android phones are more popular in Egypt than the iPhone from my own small survey. It might have initially started as a cost issue has turned into a passion with Ubuntu, firefox, Android and other open source technologies really taking off. A few things were missing though. If you read hacker news you will begin to think that anyone with a desire to make foursquare mashups is an entrepreneur. In the middle east we have incredibly skilled people languishing after college while their counter parts in the west are out attempting to recreate Facebook. Why?! I think it has to do with the lack of proper story telling about entrepreneurship in the Middle East. Wamda seems to be helping greatly in that regard, but we need more publications talking about this issue! This also comes in concert with an inability to find cofounders. Why? A lack of collaboration? Why? A lack of self initiated projects? Solution? Do stuff. Just do it. Where? Here. At your local hackerspace. Do you have an interesting idea you want to try? A drone to take ariel pictures of the pyramids? Or a service like Utlub which delivers soap to bathers who are wet and realize they ran out of soap. Well in a space like a hackerspace you can do it! The tools are there. But more importantly you will find collaborators! People who are willing to jump on board to help!al Patterns of Propagation The Arab world is not just ready for Hacker culture, hacker culture is already there. My work with GEMSI is simply to connect the right people together and showcase the awesome possibilities hackerspace afford their communities and attempt to create the right environment to allow these amazing people to take their own future into their hands like they already are, but to do it not only politically, but financially, and with direct community education and organizing. Before I went to the middle east I was privileged to participate in the rise of the hackerspace movement in the United States. In 2007 there were very few (if any self identified) hackerspaces in the United States. That same year Mitch Altman, Bre Pettis, and Nick Farr went on a trip to Germany visiting the hackerspaces that were there. Being filled with inspiration and the realization that these spaces were created by PEOPLE who wanted to set them up. They came back to the states and started Noisebridge, NYCResistor and HacDC respectively. Due to the culture of sharing, they started putting up projects online. They shared the process of creating these spaces. And slowly at first people started noticing that they too could start their own local community spaces for creation and we started seeing them grow rapidly. The mathematical name of the function that describes this type of growth is exponential. The more spaces that existed that have this culture of sharing the more people heard about them and wanted them in their own cities. Then something wonderful happened. The economy collapsed in 2008 which had two very positive effects on the development of hackerspaces:  People were freed from their jobs  Space was becoming cheap as tons of manufacturing facilities were abandoned. Check out this chart which shows the rapid growth of hackerspaces and the acceleration around 2008/9. Hacker culture is an attitude that anything can be done by any resource available. MacGyver will make you a mouse trap from your sunglasses and your underpants. A hacker would use it to make a one way privacy screen for your cellphone. But how do you transmit a culture? This is why a space is so important. Having a place where people can sit with others and recognize the possibilities. To see the value in the stuff they know, to share it with others and to build together. The first few hackerspaces that are being set up in the middle east have the same property of viral transmission as we saw in America. Istanbul Hackerspace and Base Istanbul are both hackerspaces in Turkey. Istanbul Hackerspace being in the European part and Base Istanbul in asian section. As widely spread apart as they are, they both have something in common. Both founders had visited a hackerspace, one in Japan and the other in Germany before coming home and deciding they wanted to start one there. It's kind of incredible to see the same pattern repeat in the middle east. This appears to be a universal need, the need for community, creativity and having a open space to build your future. The pattern has been proven in Egypt as well. Alexandria's hackerspace initiative was galvanized after a delegation of students visited  Cairo Hackerspace two hours to the south. It's exciting to see the very same forces at work that took the hackerspaces from being a concept barely known to having a large impact on the American Entrepreneurial and cultural landscape in five short years years at work in Egypt. Cairo Hackerspace currently is without their space but is actively seeking a new one and it's one of my current goals to help in any way I can. Let's conclude with the list of hackerspaces just starting up in Egypt and Beirut. This is just the start. Keep an eye on these guys and know that there will be many many more to come: Egypt: Cairo Hackerspace El Minya Hackerspace Alexandria Hackerspace Mansoura Hackerspace Egypt Fablab (Same idea ;) Lebanon: Beirut Hackerspace (link coming soon) If you'd like to talk more about the global development of hackerspaces. Let's continue talking online at GEMSI's facbebook group. *Scrumspace does not exist as a hackerspace. If you like the name take it!

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