book on induction furnace

I have been looking for a book on how to design and build an induction furnace but without luck, would anyone please help> I need a book that explains in details things like how to design a circuit, component list and how to build?

Question by srshpa   |  last reply


induction "furnace" from microwave transformer?

Hey guys I've seen around the net that it's fairly easy to make a spot welder from a micro wave transformer /micro oven transformer. So I was thinking if it's possibly to use the same idea to make a induction furnace? I would like to use it for melting/ casting aluminum (...and possibly metals with a higher melting point... if possible) any idea if it's possible.. and how to?

Question by lordl9999   |  last reply


What is the name of the machine that produce the induction coil for furnace?

The induction coil for funace  that we wanted to make is to be used in power plant , gasification application. Which mean the induction coil produced must withstand or generate heat temperature more that 1700˚C. Kindly  assist me on the following: 1) Name of the machine that make the induction coil (with brand, model and specification) 2) Manufacturer or supplier that sell or create this machine  -Company name, Contact details, Country,website etc. 3) The price of the machine 4) Lead time to produce it I look forward to receive valuable advice and directions to my question. Thank you

Question by Yeemay1491   |  last reply


How do I make an Induction Furnace?

I know the basic principle, but I can't seem to figure out how to design my own. If you know of any resources, those would help a ton :) The other thing that bugs me about induction furnaces is the size of the work coil.  Why are almost all of the work coils so small? (in turns)  It seems like the more turns the better, regardless of the power you're shoving through them.  The only reason that I could imagine is cooling, but I'm still clueless. Thanks I'bles! -muffin

Question by T3h_Muffinator   |  last reply


Can this work for DIY 3d metal printing at home?

Using metallurgical powders with a precision depositing feeder, layout a layer at a time (obviously) of the part you want to develop within a certain size parameter.  Lower the layer into an induction heater coil to raise the temperature of the powder to just below the melting point then hit it with a low power laser to melt the powder together to make the part, again layer by layer.  Theoretically removing the need for high power lasers and either a vacuum chamber running constantly or a constant stream of shielding gas.  Edit: You apply a vacuum or shielding gas only during the fusion cycle, hence the induction furnace. Removes the need for expensive vacuum chambers or heavy use of shielding.

Question by malleolus   |  last reply


What is the hardest titanium alloy i can smelt myself? Answered

Hi, Recently ive been looking into titanium alloying, i have access to a large amount of chemically pure titanium scrap, and want to alloy it into the hardest possible alloy i can, so i can build some very tiny yet strong mechanical objects as well as a titanium knife. the means by which i wish to produce the alloy is with an induction furnace My problem is, ive google searched, but cant find what the hardest suitable titanium alloy is, previously i thought titanium steel was hardest, but then i learnt that titanium aluminium is the best. Everywhere indirect terms are used like "best" and "most " and often they only talk about pure titanium vs steel alloys. Im really confused. I just want to know what the hardest titanium alloy is. What is the best titanium alloy i should make for use as a blade and for high strength structuring, e.g frame body for small robot i want to make as indestructable as possible. thanks

Question by oldmanbeefjerky   |  last reply