Painting an inflatable boat. Answered

Hi folks. I have been given a Gladding Float-Pac inflatable dinghy that has been left out in the weather a bit too long & the surface of both the orange & green rubber has become stained from fallen leaves. I have had a look around the interweb & have found a couple of paints suitable for inflatables but to tell the truth they are a bit expensive just to smarten up a boat that will seldom get used particularly as I would have to buy two colours. The boat is in otherwise good condition with no holes or punctures & there is no scuffing or fabric showing through so finishes like Tuff-coat wold be a bit over the top. Does anybody have any suggestion for a pait that would be flexible enough for the job, i'm not really too worried about the colours although the original green & orange would be nice to keep. Thanks in advance for your suggestions folks.

Question by Nostalgic Guy 8 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago


boat bottom 4 raft

I have an inflatable raft I want to put a firm (solid) bottom in--need ideas from all--its 41" x 106"--once I have a bottom I want to use w/ a trolling motor--Thanks in advance for any & all suggestions

Topic by zucchini 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Has anyone repaired a inflatable boat (such as a small Zodiak inflatable) - gluing seams that have separatated? Answered

I purchased a small zodiak inflatable that needs work (yes I got it for a great price). The end of the inflatable tubes have come off and an our lock has separated. I have looked online and most places say that it is hard to impossible to repair outside a professional shop, I tend to disagree. But I have been wrong before. The boat is older and is likely PVC (looks like canvas covered in rubber). I was also wondering if it is possible to place a tube inside the float tube of the boat - or is this redundant?

Question by gates1132 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Inflatable electric car

Inflatable structures have always fascinated me. They can achieve amazing strength to weight ratios, and only take up space when required. At Instructables, I often sit on an inflated ball!: https://www.instructables.com/id/Ergonomic-work-station/ So, I've fantasized about an inflated car that's just as safe as something more massive, but weighs a mere fraction -- deflate to store or park! XP Vehicles is stepping up and trying to make it real with a direct-ship sub-$5000 electric car: A baffled pressure tube system (think Zodiac rubber boat) provides the actual supporting and protective structure of the vehicle. How safe is it? Recall that NASA recently threw tens of millions of dollars of ultra-sensitive electronics onto the surface of Mars from nearly a mile up and then bounced that same delicate gear for over a mile over boulders and everything worked flawlessly.This was due to the instruments being shrouded in an already expanded inflatable housing that has served as the model for the Whisper body structure. Anyone looking at the warnings on their visor can be concerned about the dangers during airbag inflation so XP simply built a vehicle entirely out of next-generation, always inflated, safety airbags. The engineers for the Whisper are confident you can drive it off a 25-foot cliff without serious injury to its passengers. They claim this is the safest car ever designed for drivers, passengers and pedestrians.Initially designed for the Southeast and Western Asian markets, the car will float in an emergency such as a flood or tsunami and can be assembled by any two people of reasonable competence. The vehicle, similar in appearance to rounded edged sports cars, will be configurable online by each customer much like you build and customize personal computers online today at various major retailers. Colors, trims, features, and styles will be user-configurable on 4 different body-types.

Topic by ewilhelm 11 years ago  |  last reply 11 years ago


boating help! I need help finding a CHEAP dingy for fishing and recreational use. HELP!! FAST!! PLEASE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I need an inflatable dingy for fishing and recreational use.  the small fishing kayack cant fit me and my friends and I'd love something motorized for longer trips out to the channel island and such.  Im thinking of buying a 10 to 5 foot boat for cheap with a motor.  where should I do this in Santa Barbara, Ventura,  LA or Camarillo.  help!!! 

Question by pufferfish9108 8 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Power Foil Kite? Please someone make instructable?!

Can someone make an instructables or give me info on making a foil kite from easily obtainable materials? After all Foil kites give greatest lift. I would love to boat or skate with a foil kite to pull me along. I would even try a flying myself (albeit  several feet from the ground so i wont kill myself). Please try. . Thanks Instructable COmmunity It doesn't have to be cloth sewed, it can be durable paper, plastic, foil or basically anything. Mainly i just want the basic layout design of the kite, its cells and some knowhow on why the cells inflate. (the winds inflate it, but why?) P.S i seem to have a surplus of garbage bags if any could one for that it would be appreciated

Topic by alester333 9 years ago  |  last reply 5 years ago


Building materials for kayak?

HI there I was wondring if anyone has ever considered/ tried building a solid bottom kayak out of recycled plastic (maybe a bin)? I loved the ease of carrying and price of my inflatable kayak but hate how easy it is to puncture in running water. I'd like to make something thats light to carry to the water and can stand being bashed around a bit. I was thinking of cutting some pannels out of any plastic I can get my paws on, stitch and gluing them together to form a sort of pea pod shape and then lining the edge with some of that foam stuff they make floats out of. Any thoughts?

Topic by moogle123 7 years ago  |  last reply 7 years ago


How could I secure multiple 2-liter bottles for use as emergency flotation for a homemade skin-on-frame kayak? Answered

     I'm working on a Yostwerks-design skin-on-frame kayak, and have seen pictures of inflatable bags that fit in bow and stern for emergency flotation - in case you're swamped, they'll help keep your water-filled boat on the surface.      Part of this project is the joy of spending time making something that I will enjoy.      Part of this project is about not spending a lot of money - I could go out and buy a kayak, but would need several hundred dollars all at once to do so.  I can afford to buy individual components: a sheet of plywood, or a plank, or fabric, so can work little by little on building my own.      The specialized flotation bags, while nice, would be an added expense - I'm assuming on the spendy side.  But I drink cheap diet soda, and believe I could reuse the bottles as cheap (essentially free to me, since this would otherwise be trash) flotation.  It would take lots of these to float a kayak plus any camping gear I might put in it - about 25, I've figured out.      What I can't figure out, though, is how to have 25 empty bottles split between the bow and stern, filling the awkward pointy kayak spaces, and not rolling all around or falling out if I capsize.      So what do you think?  How would you go about this?  Please let me know what you think.  Thanks!

Question by tw0nst3r 9 years ago  |  last reply 9 years ago


Did you miss me?

You may have noticed that I mysteriously stopped posting for a couple of days. I've been camping! I came on as a last-minute substitute when another leader was unexpectedly hospitalised, and whizzed off to Gilwell 24 with a small group of our Explorer Scouts. It's an awesome event for teenage scouts - from 09:00 Saturday, to 09:00 Sunday, 24 hours of non-stop activities without the requirement of sleep.  Four thousand Explorer Scouts took up the challenge, and almost all of them managed a full 24 hours of extreme Scouting. 3G Swing Archery Bushcraft Zone Bouldering Campfire Climbing (Outdoor rock and revolving wall) Craft zone Crate stacking Disco Fairground Flying Trapeze Geocaching Giant games Gilwell gauntlet Global Zone - including Shelterbox High ropes course Laser Clay Pigeon Shooting Mountain boarding Orienteering Outdoor arena Quad Bikes Outdoor Woodland Quaser Raft Racing / Boat Racing Rifle Shooting Competition Scavenger hunt Scuba Diving Slacklining Speed climbing Segways Simulators Technology zone Water rockets Assault Course Car driving Go Karts Power Boking Inflatables Fire Building Fishing Military Activity Team Speed Stacking Caving Zorbing As well crafts and other activities going on all the time (I had my first go at wood-turning at 14:00, and was soldering together an AM band radio at 22:30 (goodness me, the writing on a capacitor gets small later at night!)). Add to that a month's rain in about 20 hours, giving liquid mud on the scale of Glastonbury, it's hardly a surprise that every single Explorer fell asleep on the train home. Because my standing-in was very short notice, none of my electronics were properly charged, but I did get a few snaps of the atmosphere before my iPod completely died. I have never been so wet or so dirty on a camping trip, and I was taking it easy - it's the first time I've been forced to pack my tent away wet and muddy at the end of a camp. If you're a Scout or an Explorer, and will be over 13½ next July, why not take up the challenge yourself? If you fancy taking part, offering an activity, or otherwise getting involved in next year's event, they are already taking comments and ideas.  If you're not in Scouting, and didn't realise it was so awesome (or that girls are allowed at any age), then why not think about joining? (As an aside, I'd never seen Rock-It-Ball being played before.  Looks fun.)

Topic by Kiteman 6 years ago  |  last reply 6 years ago


Japan Day 1

(I am planning on doing a forum post for each day of my trip in Japan. The first few days will just be copy pasted from my blog (but now with pictures, and image notes!), and after that I will type up the entry I kept for each day in my journal)I am writing this all on my eee pc, and, while I am getting the hang of this tiny keyboard, typing mistakes are common. I am also in various states of mental functioning so excuse any grammatical errors.I woke up at around 6:45 on Thursday morning. I had been feeling a bit under the weather, and was slightly congested. I really hoped that I did not catch something right before my trip. I woke up the other interns (Bilal, Josh, and Paul), because I knew they would be very sad and might cry, if I did not give them the last chance to say goodbye to me. We did a 4 way shoulder-tap, the universe imploded, and I was off.As I walked down Clementina I realized that it would be the last time I smelled that poo stench on the street. I had mixed feelings about this.The BART ride to SFO was very uneventful. Check in was amazingly fast. The line was short and moved quickly. I had almost everything I was taking with me in my carry-on. There was nothing in my checked baggage but knives and lint (one knife & one swiss tech mulikey). Anyway the whole process of checking in took about 15 minutes. The security checkpoint was even faster. There was no line, and for the first time in a long time I didn't set off the metal detector. I had shown up three hours before my flight to be safe, and I was now left with two hours and forty minutes to kill.I went to the currency exchange and turned 300$ into 27,000 yen. The Lonely Planet guidebook I have (which was printed just last year), has the exchange rate of one USD to 120 Yen, at the exchange booth they offered about 98 Yen for a dollar, google says the current rates are 107 yen to a dollar. Stupid weak American money. Anyway, I used ten dollars which I did not convert to yen to buy an english muffin breakfast sandwich and a gatorade. I went to my terminal, and accidentally dropped the barely touched sandwich on the floor while removing my backpack. I was hungry :(I read for two hours then boarded the plane at around 11. There were many people coughing on this eleven hour flight, so I did not have high hopes for avoiding sickness. Read some more on the flight, watched iron man in Japanese, watched iron man in english, and watched be kind rewind. They served two decent meals, and a few snacks in between. Ten hours later when we were finally over Japan, I went to the back of the plane, and stared out the window in the emergency exit door to get my first view of Japan.We landed around 2 pm on Friday. It was hot, so very hot (humid too). I filled out my customs form, got fingerprinted, and photographed, and made my way over to the baggage claim to pick up my knives. I made my way out of the airport to the train, and bought a ticket for what I hoped was a kanayama station bound train. Turns out it was. (cue the "ding" sound that is played on the audio tracks for slideshows, when it is time to change the slide). The first few pictures are of Kanayama station. There was a cool little inflatable pool, with little kids in miniature paddle boats. They also had a bunch of those water mist sprayers that people stand in front of to cool off.I relaxed at the train station for a bit before I caught the number 12 bus. I took it to the Ishikawa Bashi stop, and got off. I used a pay phone to call up Changmi who I had found on couchsurfing.com. I actually set up the couchsurf with her husband (who was out of town) who said it would be ok for me to stay, so I think she was a little surprised when I called. She said that she was currently hosting two couples who each had a small child. It was cool if I stayed, but it would be crowded. She picked me up at the nearest intersection with her mother, one of the couples, and their child in the car.We drove to downtown Nagoya and they let us out. Changmi and her mother were going somewhere, so I hung out with Sarah, Seba, and their daughter Maya. They were couchsurfers from France who had been in Japan for a couple of weeks. We walked around central park in downtown Nagoya for a bit. There is the large TV tower at one end of the park, and a bunch of art pieces scattered about randomly (metal taco boat thing). We went and got dinner, which I later found out to be pig intestines, with an egg, over rice. It was pretty good.After eating we took the subway back to Changmi's house and slept.Japan Day 2

Topic by Tetranitrate 10 years ago  |  last reply 10 years ago


Producing Hydrogen to Function as a Lift Gas

The short version: I want to make hydrogen to fill model airship envelopes with, because screw helium. Help me make a cheap electrolysis device that can do this in under an hour (ideally), or come up with an even better system for production. My immediate problem is that I need a high-surface electrode that won't fail in a solution of sodium hydroxide.The long version:I've devoted a fair portion of my time to contemplating airships, primarily because they're awesome. Fell out of use with the rise of much faster aircraft, and the technology its fate sealed by the extraordinarily bad rep the Hindenburg gave it. It is still far from useless, however, in that lighter-than-air systems can lay claim to flight times measured in days, and sometimes months, thanks to the fact that they literally float in the air like a boat floats in water.Their day may have come and gone, but I still want to experiment with the technology and create some model airships of my own. Helium works okay as a lifting gas, but it remains expensive and isn't going to get any cheaper in the foreseeable future. It is for this reason that I am pursuing hydrogen, in the hope that I might be able to produce a cheap lifting gas for my projects. Unfortunately for my aspirations, hydrogen is surprisingly hard to get cheaply in decent quantities. Here's what I've figured out so far.For one, it is absurdly hard to find sites that don't veer into fringe science when talking about hydrogen. HHO production, Joe cells, power your car with water...it all keeps cropping up, and not only does none of this do what I want, the concepts are often poorly documented or riddled with problems. However, I have been able to glean some information from my research. First off, one of the easiest methods (and the one I'll be pursuing the most) of hydrogen production is through electrolysis. For those of you unfamiliar with the concept, you can basically take two electrodes, stick them in water, add some electrolyte (like regular table salt), and apply a decent voltage. You'll get hydrogen gas streaming out of the negative electrode and oxygen out of the positive electrode. Fancier systems use large tanks, platinum electrodes, and a strong acid or base as the electrolyte. To increase efficiency (yeah, it's not 100% efficient), there is ongoing experimentation with high-temperature electrolysis and ongoing research into an effective electrocatalyst.Now, when I did my research, I thought "Hey! This sounds easy! I'll just set the system up like explained, and away we go!" Unfortunately, those exclamation marks were unwarranted. My first attempt showed that production is mind-numbingly slow with small electrodes. Using salt had the wonderful side-effect of producing chlorine and sodium hydroxide, a.k.a. caustic soda. It's called that for a reason, and I'm lucky I didn't run it too long or I might have a chemical burn now. Now I know. Choosing a good electrode turns out to be a problem too, as most conductors oxidize quickly or dissolve in the solution (now I know why everybody uses platinum when possible). My aluminum foil electrodes in a sodium hydroxide solution? Yeah, that didn't work AT ALL. I had better luck with steel mesh, but I recently found that it seems to fail over time too. The only thing that isn't disappointing is the container and the collection apparatus: an inverted plastic bottle with some airtight hose running off it, connected to a gas valve. If the bottle is placed such that forming gas causes the internal water level to be lower than the external container water level, the gas will be pushed through the hose (no pumping necessary!). There was one good thing I discovered, however. Apparently there was a bit of soap or something left over in the container, and I ended up forming a bit of explosive foam as well. The hydrogen foam blows up like nothing else, and the oxygen foam makes a loud pop and sends (slightly) caustic foam all over the place. Totally useless but still somewhat cool, so long as you're not fool enough to do it in large quantities.So, as of right now, I've got a good container and collection system, but my electrodes suck and production rates are so low that it'd take me hours and hours to inflate a good-sized balloon anyway. I'll be using sodium hydroxide in the future as the electrolyte, skipping the chlorine production and observing the proper safety procedures. My top priority is finding a good electrode, my next is finding a good way to increase surface area, and my last is getting a higher voltage source than the 12V power supply I had lying around. Any ideas?

Topic by Cognoscan 9 years ago  |  last reply 8 years ago