"Sunken living room" (joists?)

I am wanting to build a "sunken living room/conversation pit" in my (newly made to be) open floor plan living room, dining room, kitchen. From what I have read. These concepts are primarily built in with new construction or in houses with crawl spaces. I, have a full basement. As for the loss of head space in basement. That is fine. I plan on using that area (walled in) as a seasonal storage cloest. (Holiday decor, seasonal clothing) Just curious as to what would be needed other than a support frame for current and unaltered joists and the new "sunken joists"

Question by TylerPatrick   |  last reply


How can I hang a pot holder with metal ceiling joists?

I moved into an apartment complex where the ceiling joists are made of metal. I have a pot rack that I need to hang, and hanging from just anchors isn't an option as it has to support almost 100 pounds. I feel like the best thing I could do would be to find some way to have a support sit on TOP of two paralell joists, but I don't know how to install something like that without ripping the ceiling apart to get to it? Anyone have any ideas/ know of any kind of anchors that I could install without a big fuss? Thanks a lot!

Question by WPennypacker   |  last reply


constructing an a-frame, lean-to roof on a garage

I started framing a lean-to, a-frame roof like a deck (with an a-frame "header" and three joist hangers). The joists are angled at about a 45-degree angle and are perpendicular to the garage (on which I hung the header). There will be two 4x4 posts at the end of the 10'x10' roof. When I looked for advice about this framing style, I found nothing. Is this going to be stable? I designed the roof this way because I have 6' reclaimed cedar fence panels that will run down the roof like shingles. Thanks for your help.

Topic by meralgia   |  last reply


interior wall help

17x 25 ft room-8 ft interior wall-taking out only 3 feet of it--can I attach support beams from the joist to the rafters in the attic to help supprt the span or do I need to do a header

Question by    |  last reply


Hanging a pulley from the ceiling using electrical Strut for the purpose of overhead lifting.?

Hello out there, I am currently working on organizing my garage. Part of my organization project is to find a way to utilize the most available space possible. I am looking at hanging some items like a wheel barrow and a tow behind de-thatcher on the wall. My ceiling is 10ft high and I want to hang them as high up on the wall as possible. To help get the items up and down every time I need them, I plan on hanging block and tackles from the ceiling for each item. Unfortunenaly one of the items does not line up under a joist. To overcome this my plan is to hang a 20” pieces of shallow electrical strut (lagged in on each end to a joist) and then use a strut nut, 3/8 threaded eye bolt, and a strut washer(see picture for set up). Do you think that will hold? At MOST I would never lift anything heavier than 80lbs(and that would be a rarity). The average weight would be around 40lbs. For the items that do line up under a joist I was going to use a screw eye (I can’t access the top to through bolt it). The screw eyes I bought at the local hardware store have an SWL of 160lbs but say “not for overhead lifting”. Again using 80lbs as my max load, should I be worried about the “not for overhead lifting” label?

Question by Mpc1055   |  last reply


How can I move a 12 foot by 24 foot shed?

I have a 12 foot by 24 foot shed that I need to move away from my house, its just too close. I just want to move it about 7 feet and forward. The floor joist are 2"x 6". I want to move the shed North (literately) and the joist are running East/West, thats good so far, as I intend to use 3 pieces of 2" x 10" running the full 24 feet North and South. Now here's the problem... Its heavy and I dont know what I could use to roll it on. I was thinking about using 4" PVC pipe schedule 40 (or 80). I just want some feed back before I do this. Cost is an issue here... dont forget Im doing a " for the poor man " series BloFish

Question by BluTiger   |  last reply


How do I install a sound proof floor?

I need to intstall some sort of a sound proof floor brtween and upstairs/downstairs duplex. There is currently a 3/4 plywood subfloor with carpet and padding over it with insulation between the floor joists but it still allows a lot of noise to travel between the 2 units. I am wondering if I can use some sort of sound board with a laminate flooring laid on top of that?

Question by    |  last reply


3 Way outdoor joint

Hi I am looking at designing a garden structure which uses large timber sections and etched glass. I have a concept that I quite like but I am unsure about the best way to joint the uprights and joists. I want to try and keep the joints quite traditional and honest and reduce the reliance on glue. I have attached a diagram of the end of one structure. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

Topic by cgalmrott   |  last reply


Ideas To Build A Cheap Tree house???

Ok, I'm building a tree house, so far I have my Frame and Floor Joists up on my 8x8 Tree House. Now I need Walls and Floor and ceiling and do not want to have to pay 30 $ for Plywood or 75 $ for decking. I already know I could use pallets for the floor, but what about the ceiling, and walls? Try to suggest something under 40 $ Thanks

Question by    |  last reply


What can I use as a cheap alternative to cable raceway/conduit?

I need to run some cables across my bedroom ceiling. I live in the basement, so the walls and floor are concrete. The ceiling is that cheap wood-veneer paneling you see in RVs. I'd poke it under the ceiling panels, but given what I know of the demented arrangement of floor joists in this house, I'd have to pull down the entire ceiling and start drilling holes. I'm after something like electrical raceway, but cheaper. I want it inconspicuous, but not costing me $25 to cover cable across 15' of ceiling. Ideas, O wise Hive Mind?

Question by CameronSS   |  last reply


Gymnastic Rings mounting?

I'm trying to think of a good way to mount my wooden rings I made. I'm thinking of something like the design in the photo. Its made of 1" angle iron and square tubing and would be atached to a 12"x6" joist that is visible in my house. The metal is welded together Through the hole in the bottom  would put an eyebolt and bolt it in. I welded a nut to a large washer for the support under the tubing and I would use a washer and two nuts on top to help prevent it from loostening. I'm thinking of using lock tight on the nuts. Any suggestions? If I should post more views tell me and I'll render more views. I'm not going to be doing anything crazy, like giants or bails, mainly strength, like crosses and planches/?multicies?.

Question by snowluck2345   |  last reply


Can I mount a fridge from the ceiling? Answered

My parents are moving into a home about a fourth of the size they live in now, since the kids are at college. The kitchen is a sad affair and needs to be torn apart. Even with a fair amount of work, the kitchen will be under 120 square feet. A standard fridge cuts the usable space down drastically and stick out into walking ad working areas.  Under cabinet fridges are being considered, but the below counter cabinet space is limited enough as it it, at best around, 200" linear of 32" deep counter and 90" of 24" deep counter.  The idea hit me when I was searching for fridges that fit under counters when I saw commercial display fridges, and mistook them for ceiling units.  So, is there any way to hang a small fridge from the ceiling? What kind of joists/beams would be needed to keep it from crashing down? Or is this a crazy pipe dream?? Are they just too heavy with all the copper coils and insulation?

Question by eggplanthunter   |  last reply


Making coolest self-raising loft bed for kid - please help with hardware!

Hi everybody.  I am going to make a loft bed that will raise automatically when my kid gets out of it.  What I'd like to do (please see attached files) is suspend the bed via pulleys and cables attached to one weight.  The weight would be just a pound or two (trimmable, of course) more than the frame, mattress, bedding, etc. so it will raise itself until the weight hits a stop leaving the bed a few inches from the ceiling.  If necessary some friction could be used to keep the speed reasonable.  At night it should pull down quite easily, and I believe that with this layout, it should come down evenly regardless of where it is being pulled.   I had wanted this to "float", but since it is going to be in a corner anyways, I may run a couple tracks down the wall with hardware to guide the bed and keep it from swinging. The big question I have is how to fasten this to the ceiling.  It is drywall with joists above.  Offhand I'm guessing the bed will be say 110 pounds, so about 225 pounds hanging from the ceiling with the bed empty.  I'd like to have an extra, what, 500 pounds wiggle room?  Worst case scenario, two 150 pound people sitting on the end of the bed...  I mean I can explain that this is a one person only contraption, but I REALLY don't want it coming down regardless of what gets thrown at this thing. Any ideas, criticisms, feedback, will be so greatly appreciated.  I think this could be really awesome, and I know it will make my son flip out!  He's got a very small room, and this will free up so much space. Thanks again.  John

Topic by jtiii   |  last reply


Replacing an old bathroom fan

This is an idea someone may be able to use, but it does not quite rise to what I would want to do as an Instructable. A widow friend has two bathrooms, each with a very dated bathroom fan in need of replacement. I was able to mount the works (fan motor, fan blade, and mounting plate) for the new fan onto the old mounting plate after modifying the old plate. This saved me hours of work in a very hot confined attic when time and tools available to me were quite limited. Had I torn out the carcass for the old fan and tried to put the new fan carcass in its place, I would have needed to fashion a wooden framework for mounting the carcass that would fit just right between the ceiling joists, all so the fan would be properly centered above the existing hole in the ceiling.  The mounting plate for the new works was just a bit smaller than that for the old works. The height and diameter of the new fan cage were very close to the dimensions of the old fan cage. I began by using a cutting wheel on an angle head grinder to cut through the old mounting plate around the circumference of the old fan cage. Then I positioned the old mounting plate over the new works and its mounting plate. The glass dish that would cover the light bulbs fastens to a shaft that screws onto a threaded stud centered between the corners of the new mounting plate. I sighted across the corners of the mounting plates so the threaded stud was centered. I clamped the two mounting plates together and drilled four holes for 10-32 screws 1/2 inch long and secured them with nuts and lockwashers. (I did need to cut out part of the new mounting plate so the fitting for the two electrical outlets [fan and light] were accessible to plug in both the light and fan cords.) Had the glass dish mounted to the works differently, I would have used measurements from at least two sides to the center of the fan's shaft to position the new mounting plate on the old. Once the two mounting plates were held together with four screws it was a simple matter to put the works into the old carcass and plug in both the fan and the light to their respective receptacles. There was no question the works would fit because they were attached to the old mounting plate that had been taken from the old carcass. The round opening in the ceiling drywall bordered on being too large to be covered by the escutcheon for the new cover/light fixture. I added some drywall spackling around the edges to close any imperfections and gaps. For me this was an idea that worked and saved me a lot of time.  

Topic by Phil B   |  last reply


What would be the VERY BEST way for me to TRANSITION into my newly adopted off-grid, survivalist, subsistence lifestyle? Answered

A 16'x16'x16', 256-square foot, A-frame cabin on an elevated 3' concrete paver floating DekBlock foundation with a 3'x 6'8" front flush door, one rear 48"x 48"horizontal slider window, and another upper 24"x 24" horizontal slider window for the sleeping loft.I'm thinking that one of those standard U.S. Stove designs might provide just a little too much heat for my needs up in the Copper River Basin region of ALASKA's rural backcountry. Who knows? What are your suggestions for the above described "habitat"? Where can I find the best deals for my 256-square foot space? (Heating/ventilation-wise, we're speaking of subzero temperatures and heavy snowfall, so, I don't believe that "opening a window" is a practical solution for me if it gets too hot and smokey inside my A-frame.) Plus, I've done the HEATING ESTIMATE for the A-frame I'm going to build and the numbers come out to about a 620,000 btuh (heat loss) for the new dimensions I'm finally settling on: 16'x16'x16' or 256sq.ft. This calculation is for -50 degrees F with cold floor, ceiling, and glass surfaces taken into account. (Insulation isn't a factor this early in the design.) "Wow!" I thought at first. "A 620,000 btuh HEAT LOSS! I reckon you can never have too much stove even for an A-frame design." (Being that A-frame cabins retain heat so well, and that my sleeping loft may get really HOT in the Winter, this was a preliminary concern.) Foundation:(4) 8"- diameter cardboard cylindrical concrete forms for pin-point piers;(4) 84" reinforcement rods for pin-point concrete forms;(16) Bricks for base of footing;(24) Layout stakes;(8) 5' batter boards;(1) Spool of wire for joining the two 14" reinforcement rods for each footing base;(1) Spool of line for marking building layout lines;(?) Bags of cement;(?) Bags of gravel;(?) Bags of sand...*A few questions about the amount of concrete needed for the four footings and the four concrete piers: "How much concrete will be needed for four 8"-deep concrete footings poured into four 16"-diameter, 44"-deep holes with each containing four bricks and the four reinforcement rod supports? How much concrete will be needed to fill four 8"-diameter pin-point concrete pier forms to an estimated height of about 80"-inches? How many total bags of cement, gravel and sand (aggregate) will my foundation require? Most importantly, how much will it all cost?"A-Frame Structural Triangle (Theoretical Dimensions):Sides = 16'Base = 16'Angles opposite sides = 60 degreesAngle opposite base = 60 degreesArea = 110.85125168441 sq. ft.Perimeter = 48 ft.Framing:(2) 2"x 10"x 16' girders;(12) 2"x 6"x 12' rafters;(6) 2"x 6"x 8' joists;(4) 2"x 4"x 4' collar beams;(10) 4'x 4' plywood sheets for subflooring;(2) 16' framing braces for structural support against wind damage;(?) 3200-square feet of roof/wall sheathing material for exterior surface areas...*A few questions about the amount of roof/wall sheathing material needed to cover the 3200-square foot exterior surface area: "How much exterior sheathing will I need? How much will it cost? I understand that metal sheathing is preferred in the Copper River Basin region for its snow-shedding ability, so, given everything I've just said, what are my options for the A-frame I recently designed?"My total approach to this whole subsistence lifestyle (i.e. living off the land within a small, confined space) is probably all wrong. I understand that I might need to change my complete "mindset" and adopt a sort of NAUTICAL (or MARITIME) theme with my decor, furnishings and appliances.Since I'm really getting into boats anyway (my one chosen option for escaping the bitterly harsh winters of ALASKA's COPPER RIVER BASIN if all else fails), I feel that marine stoves, composting toilets, and an overall nautical aspect in the "finish work" might help me cope since sailboat cabins tend to be tiny, and I may need to transplant a lot of what I have to my seagoing vessel, "Vera Essie".www.geocities.com/wduncanbinns

Question by Herr VOLKMAR   |  last reply