Licensing

Any thoughts about the licensing? I think I chose the wrong one for the rubber band gun I posted. I just noticed that the license I picked says that you can't use this Instructable commercially. I would prefer that people be able to make and sell the rubber band gun if they wish. Also, I am not concerned if someone does not attribute the design to me. It would be nice but not necessary. I did not make the design to receive accolades.

Topic by HTMF Metal Pizza   |  last reply


License Question???

Hi, I'm new here and I wanted to post up this instructable but I'm worried about someone re-posting it under their name. What do I do when someone breaks the license?

Topic by DrAcher   |  last reply


Instructable licenses

Hi i recently posted an instructable and put the wrong license. I've tried to change it but the change doesn't register... HELP! Pls refer to the picture for clarification.

Topic by micraman   |  last reply


License question... Answered

I am currently in the finnishing stages of a new aluminium print nozzle for 3D printers. Of course I would like to share my project here soon but I also would like to see if it has any commercial value. I would only be able to make a very small amount of them each month and the hours I have to spend in my workshop for it would not be justified by any price. So if someone would have an interest to mass produce this nozzle what would be the correct type of license to choose from when publishing the Instructable?

Question by Downunder35m   |  last reply


licensing an instructable

Salutations! This is a fantastic site. I'm brand new, so throw underhand for a little bit. I saw a link here somewhere, where it explained the different types of licensing for instructables...and I can't find it. Someone please point me in the right direction. Also, if you can just nutshell if for me right here, that would be awesome. Just...put it in a nutshell. Just bottom-line it for me. Just give me the nuts and bolts. Don't sugarcoat it, just give it to me straight. Just the fax, ma'am. Just... I'm considering putting some moderately cool stuff here, and I'd like to be well-prepared. TANKS! BTW, is there a preview function for posting? or an edit function?

Topic by Scrupulous   |  last reply


Maker's License?

I have a few Instructables I'm working on - none posted yet - but i'm debating on what would be the best licensing...On the simple project, I'm going to go with the Creative Commons (attribution, share-alike) license.The other project is a different creature - I'm looking at creating a general purpose widget - then others can adapt the widget to their specific use. To get others involved in adapting the widget, i would start a contest here and offer a prize to the best adapted (or 'remixed') widget.Here's the dilemma that haunts me a little...1) A man or women that is 17 years old adapts the widget to fulfill a need that many people can use. Everyone is happy. Then, 6 months later, their adapted widget is being sold at the local hardware store. Great! Except that the Maker isn't getting any kind of design fee for the commercial product - and could have used that money to help with their college expenses...2) A man or women that is 67 years old adapts the widget that becomes the 'must have' item for seniors. This time it's being sold on QVC and being promoted in AARP magazine. Great! Except that the Maker isn't getting any kind of design fee for the commercial product - and could have used that money to help with health expenses...As for me - i'm looking at only attribution for the general purpose widget and waive any kind of design fee for commercial use for myself...BUT -If someone designs and makes an adaptive widget that really takes off - then i would like them to get credit and at least reap a little fiscal reward for their blood, sweat, and tears that they put into it if it takes off as a huge commercial success.Again - just attribution for me (it's a general purpose widget!) - the thoughtfulness in making comes from adapting it to a specific use - it's fun - but it takes work too.When i get ready to post - I was thinking of a...Makers License 1) Attribution, share alike, I waive any and all commercial fees for the general purpose widget2) Remix Fee: a) Remix Makers fee: You can build a Remix Design for yourself - however - if you intend to sell the remix to others then a remix fee applies. The remix fee to the author is limited to $1.00 per item you sell. Contact Author for fee arrangement before selling.OR b) Remix Maker waives all fees.I don't know - am i over thinking this?Any help, advice, or suggestions - Please Post!Thank You,-MM

Topic by MasterMonkey   |  last reply


A fee to license Bicycles?

Last week, James Vesely, the editorial page editor at The Seattle times, Proposed the idea to Impose a license fee on bicycles, more here What do YOU think?

Topic by koolaidslammer   |  last reply


Change License for Instructables

I uploaded a PDF of an Instructable that I made to my blog. This Instructable is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial license. Unfortunately, my application for Google AdSense on my blog was rejected, and I believe that it was due to this file, since they did not try to verify me as the owner of the PDF. I have taken the PDF down now to get approval from Google, but I would like to offer it the PDF in the future. I tried to switch the license to a Creative Commons Attribution license to do this. However, this does not seem to update my Instructable. Here are a few details:  1. I tried to update the license using the sidebar for my Instructable. 2. This did not work in Chrome 26 or IE 10 on a Windows 8 desktop. 3. The Instructable in question is featured and was the winner of the Pi day contest.  4. Is the copyright locked after winning a contest? I think that changing copyright to a looser license should be fine, but maybe I am mistaken.

Topic by Postmodernist Cuisine   |  last reply


Is this a CC Licensing violation?

I came across a blog that shared my DIY rotary tool project which is under CC-BY-NC-SA.  I am new to this licensing thing, but how the project has been shared by the blog doesn't feel right to me.  The blog admin has downloaded the images and stl files from my instructable and uploaded directly to their website and in the 'parts required' list they have put affiliate links. Does it violate the Non-Commercial license?  At the end of the article, they have a small link to my instructable.  Is this legal to do so and within the limits of the Creative Common license? If yes, What can I do in the future so that other people are not using my projects for making easy money? Thanks. 

Topic by Makernaut   |  last reply


IP and licensing on Instructables

There have been some interesting discussions in the Forums about intellectual property, Creative Commons, open-source hardware, and patent law- hopefully you've noticed and chimed in already. I sent a synthesis of the discussion out to friends, bloggers, and journalists earlier this week, and have gotten some good responses. People are excited to see Instructables users actually testing out theories of open source design, and will be following our progress to see what solutions we find.What do you think? The main discussion is on the mirror post in the Forums.Instructables is a leader in user-driven innovation, as discussed last Sunday in the New York Times, and we'd like to share the ideas and trends we're seeing with you so we can get your feedback. Intellectual property (IP) rights are a hot-button issue among all creators, but few understand the legal details. Those who create music, text, and images can copyright their work under the Creative Commons and similar licenses, but no such equivalent exists for patentable ideas. Instructables users may choose to license the copyrightable portions of their Instructables under any of the available licenses, but the problem remains- what of potentially patentable IP? Current patent laws are geared toward large corporations- the law has been written to accommodate and reinforce the needs and goals of corporations and their lawyers. Individuals rarely have the time, money, and legal knowledge to file well-written patents, much less defend them- and a patent is only as good as the legal defense mounted in its support.Given these systemic problems, what should an inventor do with his or her idea? It turns out that one of the best things to do with a new, good idea is to share it. Instructables is a great forum to publicize your idea, whether you're interested in pursuing a patent or not. Under US patent law, one has a year after publication of an idea to file a provisional patent. Publishing an idea on Instructables provides exactly that stake in the sand, and can bring plenty of discussion about prior art and potential modifications to the original project.That year can be a valuable time to test the waters. The Instructables community can help identify potential collaborators or business partners, and investigate the appeal and potential commercial viability of an idea. At the end of that year, you're more likely to know whether it makes more sense to apply for a provisional patent, or to simply let your idea pass into the public domain. This idea is then unpatentable by others, so the idea will be available to other inventors to use, build upon, and remix without restriction.Instructables users are on the forefront of this discussion, testing the viability of these new models. For more information, check out Instructables founder and CEO Eric Wilhelm's Forum posts which cover these issues in more depth, and particularly the user discussions in the comments. Open Source Hardware and the Creative CommonsThe value of sharing patentable ideasThe cost of aggressive licensing of University patentsOpen-source design of a keyboard systemWhat do you think should be happening in these areas? How do you see these developments affecting the individual inventor? We'd love to hear your thoughts via either public or private channels. Feel free to contact me at canida (at) instructables.com for more information.Dan Goldwater wrote about some of these same issues a while back in the old Squid Labs blog: Advice for the budding inventor and Open Source Hardware and Industry.

Topic by canida   |  last reply


IP and licensing on Instructables

There have been some interesting discussions here in the Forums about intellectual property, Creative Commons, open-source hardware, and patent law- hopefully you've noticed and chimed in already. I sent a synthesis of the discussion out to friends, bloggers, and journalists earlier this week, and have gotten some good responses. People are excited to see Instructables users actually testing out theories of open source design, and will be following our progress to see what solutions we find.What do you think?Instructables is a leader in user-driven innovation, as discussed last Sunday in the New York Times, and we'd like to share the ideas and trends we're seeing with you so we can get your feedback. Intellectual property (IP) rights are a hot-button issue among all creators, but few understand the legal details. Those who create music, text, and images can copyright their work under the Creative Commons and similar licenses, but no such equivalent exists for patentable ideas. Instructables users may choose to license the copyrightable portions of their Instructables under any of the available licenses, but the problem remains- what of potentially patentable IP? Current patent laws are geared toward large corporations- the law has been written to accommodate and reinforce the needs and goals of corporations and their lawyers. Individuals rarely have the time, money, and legal knowledge to file well-written patents, much less defend them- and a patent is only as good as the legal defense mounted in its support.Given these systemic problems, what should an inventor do with his or her idea? It turns out that one of the best things to do with a new, good idea is to share it. Instructables is a great forum to publicize your idea, whether you're interested in pursuing a patent or not. Under US patent law, one has a year after publication of an idea to file a provisional patent. Publishing an idea on Instructables provides exactly that stake in the sand, and can bring plenty of discussion about prior art and potential modifications to the original project.That year can be a valuable time to test the waters. The Instructables community can help identify potential collaborators or business partners, and investigate the appeal and potential commercial viability of an idea. At the end of that year, you're more likely to know whether it makes more sense to apply for a provisional patent, or to simply let your idea pass into the public domain. This idea is then unpatentable by others, so the idea will be available to other inventors to use, build upon, and remix without restriction.Instructables users are on the forefront of this discussion, testing the viability of these new models. For more information, check out Instructables founder and CEO Eric Wilhelm's Forum posts which cover these issues in more depth, and particularly the user discussions in the comments. Open Source Hardware and the Creative CommonsThe value of sharing patentable ideasThe cost of aggressive licensing of University patentsOpen-source design of a keyboard systemWhat do you think should be happening in these areas? How do you see these developments affecting the individual inventor? We'd love to hear your thoughts via either public or private channels. Feel free to contact me at canida (at) instructables.com for more information.Dan Goldwater wrote about some of these same issues a while back in the old Squid Labs blog: Advice for the budding inventor and Open Source Hardware and Industry.

Topic by canida   |  last reply


What to do with old license plate

Hey guys I ~~ripped a license plate off some dude's car~~ got a new pair of license plates for my car. As such, I have a surplus pair of plates. I'll most likely keep one of them unaltered for sentimental reasons, but was thinking it could be cool to do something with the other one. Anybody got any good ideas? --Purduecer

Topic by purduecer   |  last reply




Can't change Licence

Hi, I was tying to change the type of license for my instructable. When I go into the "edit" screen it shows the one I want, the published one however still displays the old one. What do I do now? https://www.instructables.com/id/Casting-with-molds-made-with-paper/

Topic by krummrey   |  last reply


Which license would you recommend?

I have a new patented item that I would like to publish here. I need to know which license would protect my interests though and since I am new here, I would like to ask you seasoned vets. This is a color coded tool labeling system that will label your wrenches, sockets, drivers and extensions both standard and metric for quicker more precise size identification in all situations. Which license would you recommend?

Topic by toolman58   |  last reply


Can't change license of published instructable

Hi, I have some instructables that was posted under one license by a team member (e.g. CC-BY-SA) and I want to re-licese (to "CC-BY"). I was trying to do the following: * go to the instructable in question * hit Author Options: Edit, * hit publish * change the license value to the desired one * hit save I got a message in the UI that "saved", but if I refresh on the page, or go back to the instructable in question, it still shows the original license, and nothing has actually been saved. Any idea? Tried both Firefox 39.0 and Chromium 44.0.2403.107, on Arch Linux 64-bit, without success (license cannot be changed). Tried for example  this, this, or this instructables.

Topic by taipeihackerspace   |  last reply


How to make sure I've got the right type of license?

Sorry, I searched through the answers and found a couple relating to types of license, but nothing that quite answered my question. I want to publish my first Instructable but am having a hard time finding specific information relating to the different types of license that are listed in the drop down menu. I want to protect my photos and written text, so the Instructible itself, but the actual technique that the -ible is about is one that anyone should be able to do whatever they want with, including making projects to sell. What type of license should I be choosing??

Question by spacepiper   |  last reply


How to weld license plates together without burning the piant off front?

Im trying to learn how to weld license plates together to build a state map out of license plates. I need to know if welding is the best option or if  I an apoxy will work better. I have been screwing the license plates to wood but this is a little heavy. Any help would be great.

Question by steven1714   |  last reply


License changes when updating

Please make the license stick to what it was set at last. Whenever I update an instructable to include a new tag or cover image, it changes back to the default. It took me a while to even notice this was happening and many of my instructables were under a different license than I prefer for a period of time. The license can be changed, but if someone used the content while it was under a different license, I can't do anything about it. 

Topic by Brooklyntonia 


Enforceability of CC "Non-Commercial" license?

Update: I was able to resolve this issue with Jameco and I now earn a commission on the kit sales. Original post below. -------------------- I'm not sure if this is the right forum to post this, and I realize most responses will probably start with "I am not a lawyer, but...", but I figured it's worth asking. I publish all my Instructables under the CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/legalcode What I had in mind was that I didn't want people trying to sell the content - putting my Instructables in a book and selling it, or behind a pay wall on the internet or whatever (I realize the odds of that happening are probably slim). I figured the odds of anyone actually selling a product based on one of my Instructables were vanishingly small. However, it turns out that my most popular Instructable: https://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-controlled-RGB-LED-Infinity-Mirror/ is now the basis for an Infinity Mirror kit sold by Jameco Electronics: http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10001_10001_2215380_-1 It looks like this was a project by one of their summer interns, who did a "step-by-step guide" (which DOES link to my Instructable as the original source) here: http://www.jameco.com/Jameco/workshop/JamecoBuilds/infinity-mirror.html To complicate things a bit, Jameco as a feature called "Club Jameco" where you can design electronics projects (similar to Instructables) with a set bill of materials, and if it's popular enough they will sell it as a kit and give you a comission: http://clubjameco.com/ I contacted Jameco to let them know that technically I'd published the project under a non-commercial license, so they probably shouldn't have done that without consulting with me (in a very cordial manner, not threatening to sue or anything). Their response was that they thought the intern's work was "different" enough and that she put enough of her own work into the project that it constituted a different product, which I strongly disagree with (the only circuit diagram in her written directions is from my Instructable - all she really did was create a BOM using Jameco parts instead of SparkFun). I would have liked to make this my own Club Jameco project so I could earn commission, but they said they wouldn't want to sell duplicate kits like that. Realistically, I doubt I'm missing out on huge amounts of cash here (the kits retail for $80 and commission is 10% or so), so I'm in no hurry to go hire a lawyer. I'm just curious about the enforceability of Creative Commons licenses in general. Do I have the right to just tell them "Hey, you actually can't do that, because the license says so?" In theory, would I actually need to hire a lawyer and send them some sort of scary-looking cease-and-desist letter? So again, I know most Instructables users probably can't give actual legal advice...just curious if anyone else has had a similar experience. I'm sure content gets ripped off without attribution quite a bit, violating the "Attribution" and "Share-Alike" clauses of the CC license.

Topic by Ben Finio   |  last reply


Why do you need to choose a license every time you publish an instructable?

I don't get why do you need a license. I just choose GPL (General Public License).

Question by firtvid20   |  last reply


In the uk can you legally own a vehicle if your under 18? Answered

If you do not intend on driving it Just keeping it Its a small road legal 49 cc Trike for info

Question by stephenniall   |  last reply


Overview of License on Publish page

I often get questions about copyright, licensing, patents, and publishing an Instructable.  In an effort to help clarify, we're going to put an overview of the license on the Instructable publish page.  We'll also link to a forum topic where users can ask questions and discuss edge cases.  I'd love your feedback, suggestions, and question on the proposed text that will appear on the publish page where you choose a license: Here's a brief overview of how the license works: By publishing your Instructable, you give Instructables.com permission to republish your Instructable on our website, or on a partner's website or other media.  We always try to get your Instructable seen by as many people as possible, and usually our goal is the same as yours.  For more information, see our Terms of Service. The license you choose below informs third-parties how they must treat your Instructable.  If you choose our default license, Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike (by-nc-sa), any website may republish your entire Instructable in a non-commercial venue under the same license, provided they attribute it properly -- by citing your name, linking to your website, your userpage on Instructables, or the original Instructable.  If you choose to reserve all rights, no entity other than Instructables.com may republish your exact text or images.  If you choose Public Domain, you are explicitly abandoning all rights. For the purposes of news reporting, pieces of your Instructable may be republished regardless of their copyright under the fair use exemption. More information can be found on the Creative Common website. The ideas or methods described within your Instructables are not protected by copyright.  Copyright only applies to original works of authorship that are fixed in a tangible form of expression; for the purposes of your Instructable, that includes your text, images, and any files.  If you'd like to protect the idea or method of your Instructable, you'll need a patent.  Patent law is more complicated than we have space for here, but the good news is that in the United States, you have a year from first publication to file a patent application.  So, if you think your idea is patentable, you can publish a form of it as an Instructable, get constructive feedback on the idea, and still be able to apply for a patent.

Topic by ewilhelm   |  last reply


External postings and attribution

Did somebody from the Instructables staff post a version of my instructable on Sustain Lane without attribution or credit to the author? It certainly looks like it here where it says "Instructables - Premier Partner" while the content is clearly my instructable with no author attribution or credit to be found. http://www.sustainlane.com/reviews/how-to-create-a-simple-aluminum-air-battery-from-a-soda-can/MD2QLHMIKYY78J73MY3DLABDNAQI

Topic by egbertfitzwilly   |  last reply


Why is MIT license not offered among the available licenses on Instructables?

Hi folks, why is MIT license not listed in the available licenses for instructables? It seems to be a very popular license for open source software development projects, I found a modified version which covers hardware as well.. Any specific reason why it's not available? What's the most popular license around here? Thanks and Regards, Stefan

Question by systdist   |  last reply


Relicense old CC license versions (2.5 to 4.0

Hi guys I have tried to update or relicense some of my projects here from creative commons 2.5 to 4.0 but haven't succeeded yet. The thing is that with the CC 2.5 license there is a possible loophole which can get into trouble with copyright law in some cases if you release your work on another site. Now I wanted to relicense my projects under CC 4.0 license but I don't want ot mess with unpublish and republish. I don't know if this messes up some statistics or some subscriber email distribution lists or in the worst case to rouse the grim database guarding dragon, burning villages and tracts of land making Smaug look like Grisu the little dragon

Topic by ianmcmill   |  last reply


How do I obtain a noise permit or discretionary license in Phoenix?

I can't seem to find how to obtain one of these two documents from the city of phoenix (or maricopa county, as this might be a county issue). 

Question by A_of_s_t   |  last reply


vista to xp upgrade without piracy ?

Mom is going to buy a new thinkpad soon. it comes with vista home basic - probably oem licensed is there way to change the vista to licensed xp without paying for that ? (question is how to make it licensed and not just download and install xp)

Question by 11010010110   |  last reply


Posting Instructables' videos on other sites

To whom it may concern, my name is Tomas Husner and I come from Poland. I've been meaning to ask under what conditions I am allowed to post your videos on my web site or if I am at all allowed to do so at all. Do I for example need to place the logo of Videojug in the video, post a link to your website or give other forms of credit to your web site in order to be able to use some of your video content on my site. If I am allowed to do so (under certain conditions of course) am I also for example allowed to edit the video in any way? Thank you for your answer.

Topic by bananow   |  last reply


What is the easiest way to remove DRM licenses from downloaded iTunes 9 music? Answered

I want to remove the DRM licenses from all my download iTunes music. What is the easiest (free) method of doing so? Thanks! -Shadow Ops

Question by Arbitror   |  last reply


Can I make these projects to sell?

I want to offer an instructable building service (through the instructables forum) for people who want a project but can't build it. I am going to have a list of projects that I am comfortable building and will build for people. These are the instructables I am going to start with: https://www.instructables.com/id/Make-a-Joule-Thief/ https://www.instructables.com/id/ATX--%3E-Lab-Bench-Power-Supply-Conversion/ https://www.instructables.com/id/Music-LED-Light-Box/ Can someone tell me which of these I can use. Also how to tell on any instructable whether or not I can use it. Also if anybody has any other sugestion for this endeavour I would apreciate it. Thanks

Question by nurdee1   |  last reply


New breed/ hybrid sunflower! Market opportunities??

I always have lots of flowers in my allotment garden. Sunflowers, originally from 3 different  seed package varieties 5 years ago, come up spontaneously in spring, the seeds spread by birds. I usually collect the seedlings to put them in some rows, for beauty, wind protection and bird/ bee food. This year a large plant came up with double flowers. I have only ever seen small plants with double flowers. I am collecting all old flower heads and will sow these seeds in a small field next year, weed out all non double sunflower plants, and protect them from being pollinated by other, non double plants.  So next year I might end up with a big bag of seeds for big double sunflowers! So far so good, but then??? I think many people would love to buy a packet of these seeds, but how to go about? Should I change my pseudonym BobS to BobMonsanto?

Question by BobS   |  last reply


How do I publish an Instructable and can make sure my work is not stolen for commercial products? Answered

Background: A nice member noticed an induction heater "kit" on Ebay and commented about it. After a lot of digging I found some pictures and technical details on the web - Google translate might be funny at times but was a real help for my bad chinese skills... Turned out the shematics for this heater are identical to my design. Sure they use a different mosfets and and create a nice looking circuit board for all but it does not change the fact that my design drives it. One chinese wholeseller is selling them in 500pcs bulk. Current problem: I am working on the next generation of my induction heater based on an induction cooktop. Since the power levels are much higher and more option possible I think it will be a great project loved by a lot of people. But I feel reluctant to publish it in a detailed form that can be used by everyone to re-create it as I fear it will end up on Ebay as well. So far I can't even estimate how much profit some chinese guy is making while laughing at me and for obvious reasons I would like to prevent that from happening to 2.0 as well... Is there any way to protect my designs or to get hands on the chinaman to strangle some money back out of him?

Question by Downunder35m   |  last reply


motorized flip up license plate

    I have started to try and create a motorized flip up license plate. It's mainly for my motorcycle.  In the "off" position the license plate is down and readable. Turn the switch to "on" and it flips up, making the plate unreadable. I thought about using a servo or a motor with limit switches. I do not really know how to wire something up to control the servo or motor.  Any help would be great. I know they sell these as kits, but they start off at teh $150 dollar range. Thanks in advance!

Topic by thirdGEARchirp   |  last reply


Automated License Plate Recognition - Good ? Bad ? Indifferent?

Is this a good thing? Does anyone see any possible bad in it (drawbacks, ways to abuse the system)? One place the videos can be found

Topic by Goodhart   |  last reply


What steps should I follow to obtain an FM license from the FCC? Answered

A friend suggested to apply for an FM license to broadcast from a home operated radio station. I could fill a needed niche but I don't know how much money I need and what steps should I follow to make everything legit.

Question by blkhawk   |  last reply


I have a scrolling led license plate frame. What do i need to do in order to be able to hook it up to my pc via usb?

 I'd like to be able to mod the sign so that i can hook it up to my pc and program messages into rather than using the painstakingly slow remote it came with. Thanks.

Question by spacegravity4me   |  last reply


Anyone know if this came off an 1899 automobile?

Found this metal detecting old cellar hole. Think it might be made of copper. It's about the thickness of a dime. I looked up "Charleroi"  and found there is a town in Pa. named that. Any info or anything would be great.

Topic by Inanotherworld   |  last reply


If I attach an engine to my bicycle, will I be allowed to ride it in Massachusetts at 15? Answered

 I'm 15 and I want to attach a 3.5HP engine to my bike. would it be considered a moped and would it be legal for me to ride it without a license?

Question by rab236   |  last reply



License: NONE: All Rights Reserved... why?

I've seen this on numerous recipe Ibles.  What purpose does this serve?

Question by bajablue   |  last reply


Air Instructables pilot's license - Toss It! Prize

We did the design for the Toss It! prize today. Here's how it looks. These are laser-etched anodized aluminum cards. You can only get one by winning the contest.

Topic by fungus amungus   |  last reply


How can I make Plants vs Zombies to have a license for more than an hour?

How and where to download the game Plants vs Zombies  licensed, game found only demo.

Topic by pastore michel   |  last reply


BB OR PELLET GUN(1.77cal) COME!!!!

These guns can be fun to have they are also a big responsibility. If you want to get a license you need to take a course that lasts about 2 days(possibly) and then you will get a test, if you pass the test depending on where you are i think you will get a certificate. After all this you should be able to apply for a license... Now if you are a MINOR in Canada you need to be from the age of "12 to 17" you will need to do all the same things as you would do for the adult license, this license is only for a minor who gets a gun from a licensed adult. The gun can not be purchased by a minor it needs to be registerd under the name of a licensed adult. the price for a minors license rages from about $10 to $30, it depends on how long you will have it for. the minors license in Canada will allow a minor to do the following: - target practice - hunting - instruction in the use of firearms;and - taking part in organized shooting competitions NOTE: a minor does not need a license unless he is under super vision of a licensed adult(arms length away. :( This stuff is all so interesting to me if you have a license or a gun tell me what you think of it and what you do with it.(hunting...) Do you like these guns etc. etc. talk to me about them. PCE!

Topic by rickick   |  last reply


Can anyone teach me how to make a remote control plate flipper for my license/vehicle registration plate for a car show?

I have a car contest coming up in Indonesia and we have a choice to remove our plates to protect our identities on the streets from show visitors. It usually takes a small amount of effort to remove the plate screws and fix on the contest user name but I thought it would be nice to have it automatically change when I enter the show (might help me gain more points :D) I have tried to search for this item online but some only supply the item to Russia and the rest of the sellers are in China. They cost around 290 dollars for a set, which I thought was quite pricy. To be quite honest in that 290 dollars I was going to spend, I doubted that the China factory would use the best quality materials considering the price. So I was wondering if anyone could help me make one of these automatic revolving plate frames with remote control operation for the auto show? It would be really great as it would help me gain more points! These are the links of the Russian company and Chinese company that produces it: 1. http://www.plate-flipper.com/       They have videos (Russia) 2. http://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/AUTOMATIC-Automatic-Flip-license-plate-revolving-license-plate-frame-free-shipping/101548_517916045.html               They don't have videos (China) Thank you all for you help!!!

Question by 1N5TRUCT4BL3S   |  last reply


Question about licensing work posted here for the Etsy contest

I've got the basics of the contest:1. Sign up at both sites.2. Create something, documenting the process.3. Post the item on Etsy for sale following contest guidelines.4. Post the information on Instructables following contest guidelines.5. Win! (okay, maybe)However, the item as I envisioned it would be a licensed item - people could make it for personal use under the CC license subject to the selected provisions* or contact me for commercial licensing.*selected provisions might be, say $5 for making an unlimited number for personal use, a $50 licensing fee for commercial re-sale, along with attribution, et cetera, for a stated amount of timeIs this allowed under instructables rules? I know that standard CC is used here, but I don't know yet if it can be combined with a licensing fee, and if CC does allow it if Instructables does.Thanks!

Topic by whirlygeek   |  last reply


License plate spray to emulate (PhotoBlocker) existing products

I want to learn how to make my own photoblocker spray so I can use the tollway without my plates being photographed. I know PhotoBlocker already works but wondering if you geniuses can come up with an at home, DIY for this purpose. MANY thanks!

Topic by kfarrell   |  last reply



Regulations on a ground effect vehicle (Australia)? Answered

A while ago, I came across the work of guy in New Zealand who had made a hovercraft that could also fly like a ground effect vehicle. (See it here) And it got me wondering..... What kind of regulations are placed on a vehicle like this? Say I (while in Australia) built a similar craft to his, only smaller, lighter, and a single seater. Well, firstly, I'd like to know if it's legal or not. I'm assuming it would be, but with certain conditions, so; What licensing (if any) would be needed for it/me? And what regulations must it/I follow? Here's what I've taken in so far, although I don't know for sure that it's accurate/true: It's legal, as long as it does not exceed a certain weight, number of occupants, noise level, etc  I'm allowed to fly it as long as it is not able to get over a certain height (a couple of metres) It's a wing in ground vehicle, so it falls under the same category as boats, so the same regulations apply. Does that mean I'm not allowed to use it over land....? It'd be helpful if you could just point me in the direction of answers somewhere else, even Thanks 

Question by .Unknown.   |  last reply